Bonded leather description: All You Need to Know About Bonded Leather

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All You Need to Know About Bonded Leather

WHAT IS BONDED LEATHER?

Bonded leather is called ‘leather’ because it incorporates scraps of leather remnants, which comprise between 10-20% of its content. The scraps of leather are made into a pulp and stuck to a fibre or paper backer which is then coated with polyurethane and embossed to give it the appearance of genuine leather.

HOW TO TELL IF ITS BONDED LEATHER

The price of an article is an immediate indication as to whether you are buying genuine leather. At a glance, bonded leather may look like the real thing but it will feel thin to the touch and will lack the softness of real leather, it may also exude a chemical smell.

WHAT IS BONDED LEATHER MATCH?

This term refers to the ability of bonded leather manufacturers to replicate the appearance of real leather, although it is likely that the product may be dyed in a striking range of unnatural colours.

HOW IS BONDED LEATHER MADE?

Composition of this material varies considerably and is often a trade secret but in principle its manufacture is similar to the production of paper. Shredded leather scraps and fibre are mixed with bonding materials and extruded onto a fibre or paper backing cloth. The material can then be dyed and embossed with a leather like texture, although the colour and patterning are only a surface treatment. A polyurethane treatment gives the surface a glossy finish.

WHY BUY BONDED LEATHER?

For most people this will be a choice dictated by the comparative low cost of the product; some may choose bonded leather because it can be regarded as environmentally friendly, in so much as it uses left overs and does not involve additional farming and, potentially, reduces landfill. The product is also easy to clean and is likely to come in a wide range of design options.

HOW TO CLEAN BONDED LEATHER

Bonded leather should be wiped with a clean damp cloth and wiped dry with a different cloth. Spilt liquids should be cleaned immediately but no detergents or abrasive cleaners should be used. Non-alkaline cleaners and non-detergent soaps can be used but the material should always be tested for colour fastness on a small unobtrusive area first.

HOW DURABLE IS BONDED LEATHER?

Bonded leather is not a durable product. Generally, furniture made from bonded leather is likely to peel and crack within two to five years.

WHAT CAUSES BONDED LEATHER TO PEEL AND CRACK? 

Bonded leather is a non-elastic material; therefore, it has a tendency to crack with use, strips of polyurethane and leather will then start to peel away from the backing.

WHY IS BONDED LEATHER BAD?

Compared with leather, bonded leather has a very short lifespan. It is prone to cracking and peeling and once it has deteriorated beyond a certain point it is impossible to repair. Although a bonded leather may be cheaper than real leather, it’s short life span means that in the long run the cost of replacing a bonded leather item can be more expensive. There is also the argument that this also makes it less environmentally friendly.

HOW TO REPAIR BONDED LEATHER  

There are repair kits on the market which enable you to make small repairs to bonded leather. The affected area must be sanded to remove any protruding bits of leather, a patch can then be dyed to match or the fabric under the peel can be dyed and sealed to stop further peeling. The resulting repair will be noticeable but will be an improvement.

HOW TO FIX BONDED LEATHER SCRATCHES  

First clean the area with a white cloth to ensure that no dye is transferred. Then mix a leather repair solution together with an appropriate tint. Add a small quantity of the mixture to the affected area and around the affected area. Then place leather grained paper, supplied with the kit, over the area and gently iron with a warm iron, this will transfer the pattern to the repair. Be careful to ensure that the iron is not too hot because it may discolour or damage the bonded leather. For minor scratches, it may be possible to affect a repair with the use of shoe polish. You should also check any new products on a small inconspicuous area of the leather item first.

BONDED LEATHER VERSUS FULL GRAIN LEATHER 

Full Grain leather is the top layer of the hide with all the grain, hence its name. It’s considered the highest quality leather, which is why MAHI chooses to use full grain leather for all its products. It has a natural beauty which is enhanced with age and its vertical fibres make it extraordinarily strong and durable. Unlike bonded leather, it’s extremely durable and it will not crack, peel, tear or puncture.

BONDED LEATHER VERSUS TOP GRAIN LEATHER 

Top Grain leather is the second highest grade quality of leather and is the lower part of the top layer of the hide. One removed it is sanded and refinished. It comes in two grades, aniline, which is natural soft leather which is vulnerable to stains and semi-aniline which has a protective coating. Top Grain leather is comprised of twelve to fourteen percent water and consequently it adjusts to body temperature: it is cool in summer and warm in winter. With bonded leather the reverse is the case.

BONDED LEATHER VERSUS REAL LEATHER 

Real Leather, also referred to as Genuine Leather is the third grade of leather, taken from the lower, thinner layer of the hide. The surface is then reworked to resemble a higher-grade leather. It is not as tough as Full grain leather or Top Grain leather but is considerably more durable than bonded leather.

BONDED LEATHER VERSUS FAUX LEATHER 

Faux leather, sometimes referred to as Pleather, contains no animal products and is made from polyurethane. It can be embossed with any texture and looks and feels like genuine leather. It is water resistant and easy to clean. Unlike bonded leather it does not crack or fade in sunlight, it is however, easy to tear or puncture. It is also considered less environmentally friendly due to the chemicals and toxins used in its production – although this varies depending on the exact process and materials used to produce it.

BONDED LEATHER VERSUS DURABLEND

Durablend is a low-cost leather alternative, similar to bonded leather and comprising of 57% polyurethane, 26% poly/cotton and 17% leather shavings. It is the trademark product of Ashley Furniture. Customer reviews suggest that it shares similar weaknesses with bonded leather in so much as it scratches easily and is prone to cracking.


BONDED LEATHER VERSUS VINYL
 

Polyvinyl chloride, popularly known as Vinyl or PVC is a faux leather which has been produced since the 1940’s by chemical companies like DuPont. It is used for shoes, car interiors and upholstery. Not as breathable as bonded leather, skin tends to stick to its surface, which makes it unpleasant seating in hot weather, it is easy to clean and maintain. Like bonded leather it cracks with use and is easy to puncture.

BONDED LEATHER VERSUS MICROFIBER 

A much more sophisticated form of faux leather: polyurethane resin and ultra- fine microfiber bundles are combined to replicate the microscopic structure of leather. The complexity of its construction mean that it is more expensive than other faux products but it does have a number of advantages over bonded leather. It doesn’t scratch or tear and is non-fading. It breathes like real leather but it also has ant -bacteria and anti-mildew properties. Unlike bonded leather it is completely odourless.

BONDED LEATHER VERSUS REXINE 

Rexine is the registered trademark of a British artificial leather which has been produced since the 1920’s. Essentially a cloth backing is coated with cellulose nitrate and embossed to produce the illusion of leather. Primarily used for car interiors this is now regarded as retro faux leather and as such is sort out by collectors.

BONDED LEATHER VERSUS BICAST

Bicast is constructed using a split leather backing to which a layer of polyurethane is applied. The surface is then embossed to give the appearance of leather. It shares many of the qualities of bonded leather: it has a consistent texture and is easy to clean and maintain but it doesn’t breathe like leather and it lacks strength and durability.

BONDED LEATHER VERSUS LEATHERETTE 

Leatherette is a plastic based synthetic leather. Unlike bonded leather it does not scratch and it does not fade in sunlight. Like most faux leather, it does not breathe and is unpleasant next to the skin. Although it might be the preferred choice of those who don’t like to use animal products, it is made from non- biodegradable, non-renewable materials and is therefore considered less environmentally friendly.

Bonded Leather – The Truth on Quality, Cost, & Durability

There are many different types of leather available. Bonded leather is one option to have the look of leather at lower cost.

Bonded leather is a near-synthetic leather. It is made primarily of ground leather fibers, bonded together with a polyurethane (plastic) mixture, and attached to a paper or fiber backing. This type of leather is most often used in furniture upholstery, bookbinding, bags, and personal accessories.

There are some benefits to this material, which is what has made it so popular and commonplace. Let’s take a look at why.

 

Bonded Leather Samples

Bonded leather is a type of leather constructed from ground-up leather scraps. It allows smaller pieces and lower grades of leather to be utilized in finished goods. This can be a positive, as it reduces the amount of leather waste that is generated. It also can be an outlet through which older, worn leathers can be recycled into newer materials. This type of leather is sometimes referred to as reconstituted leather. Another term used is blended leather.

In a way, bonded leather is like the scrapple or hot dogs of leather; it is made up of leather scraps that are finely shredded and bonded together using polyurethane or latex onto a fiber/paper mesh or sheet. The amount of leather in the actual mix can vary greatly (from 10%-90%), and thus affect the functional and aesthetic properties of the finished product.

The surface is often stamped with a grain pattern to give it the appearance of a natural leather. An array of different, sometimes vivid, colors are applied to the surface providing many options for the color of the finished product. This makes it a material that is available in many styles, colors, and textures.

The durability of this leather is generally less than that of natural leather. The plastic used in its production ends up making the product not very flexible. Thus, it can wear and crack from just a few years of use.

A benefit, however, is cost. Since bonded leather utilizes leather scraps, and plastics, it can be produced at much less expense than fully natural leathers. Thus, it has found a market across a range of consumer goods. Generally, this leather has the look and smell of real leather, so while it lasts, it can be quite appealing and budget friendly.

 

Leather Sofa

Bonded leather is most commonly used in the manufacture of furniture upholstery. This can include sofas, sectionals, chairs, stools, couches, headboards, ottomans, lounge chairs, and others. Since the cost is much lower than natural leather, many furniture stores offer bonded leather goods as relatively low prices as a way to own “real leather”.

While this might be somewhat technically true, based on the varying amount of leather present, it can be misleading as the performance of this type of leather does not match that of natural leather. It is often an easy way to draw attention to leather goods, without always being transparent in what the final product really is.

Bonded leather is also used on books as covers. Since the material protects well and can be shaped with any texture, it offers a near-endless amount of options for bookbinding. It also can be available is most any color, so the applications here are both varied and cost effective.

Clothing also takes advantage of the this type of leather material. Some shoe and boot pieces might use it. So can the linings and even externally facing surfaces of clothes, jackets, pants, skirts, and hats.

For travel use, this leather is often found in briefcases, bags, some handbags, backpacks, protective cases, makeup bags, electronic device protectors, and portfolios. At home it might be found in media (CD and DVD) storage cases, diploma covers, folders, and other protective cases or bags.

In personal accessories, bonded leather is used for belts, straps, wallets, keychains, eyeglass cases, sunglass cases, jewelry boxes, key cases, credit card cases, and generally any small, useful applications. It can be used for most any product that would otherwise utilize natural leather.

 

 

1. Shredding

Leather scraps and fibers are ground up. These can come as the trimmings remaining from the production of natural leather goods. They can also come from lower grade hides that might not pass evaluation standards for finished goods, though can absolutely be utilized in a bonded leather application.

 

2. Mixing

The shredded leather fibers are them mixed with a polyurethane plastic or latex plastic mixture. This binds them all together as the fibers are held together by the plastic mixture once it dries and solidifies. Often, this is referred to as bonded leather “pulp”, taking its name from the similar process used in paper production.

The exact elements in the mixture can vary widely based on the final intended use of the material. Some might be more dense, firm, strong, soft, or hard. Some of these mixtures are kept as trade secrets. They each contribute to the overall feel and performance of the the final leather good.

 

3. Extrusion

The bonded mixture, not yet dried, is then extruded onto a flat backing. The extrusion might be via gravity and pouring, or via machines that push the material out evenly onto the backing.

A backing is necessary as the bonded material needs a secure place to dry and adhere to to take the final shape. The backing is usually made of a paper or fiber (cotton, polyester, etc.). It can also be made of a fine mesh (fiber, plastic, metal). This mesh provided more gripping areas for the pulp to more easily adhere to the backing. Once the pulp is extruded onto the backing in an even layer, it is set to dry.

The backing selection is often based on the intended use of the finished product. For example, bookbinders might utilize bonded leather with a paper backing. Upholstery workers might use bonded leather on a fabric backing.

 

4. Dyeing/Coloring

After the pulp has dried onto the backer, the leather can be colored. This is usually a surface treatment that does not penetrate deeply into the material. While natural leather usually has dye penetrate fully, bonded leather color only goes on the surface (and does not penetrate through the synthetic plastic). Virtually any color can be added via dyeing or painting to treat the surface.

 

5. Stamping/Embossing

Once colored, the bonded leather can have a surface texture applied. This can be utilized to make it look like the natural grain of a natural leather. It can also be used to imprint a preferred design that is visually appealing.

While stamping natural leather is sometimes used to cover surface imperfections, stamping bonded leather is purely cosmetic for finishing reasons. The bonded leather surface is generally even due to the bonding and extrusion processes.

Various textures might be preferred in a final product, depending on what type of goods it will be used for. Since this is a mostly synthetic material, bonded leather offers an opportunity to easily introduce stylish and functional textures.

 

6. Finishing

Once stamped/embossed, bonded leather can be finished. This is usually done with a synthetic surface protectant. It can provide a shiny appearance to the leather. The surface finish can also provide a layer that protects the material underneath. Generally, these finishes are a transparent polymer that resists water and scratches/abrasions. Finishes can also include scents that help make the bonded leather smell just like more natural leather.

 

 

Pros

Cons

• Less expensive than most other types of leather • Isn’t very flexible
• Available in many colors • Cracks in just a few years
• Available in many surface textures • More difficult than natural leather to fix tears and scratches
• Can be used in many types of leather goods • Doesn’t last as long as more natural leathers
• Can be made in very large sheets for large applications (such as furniture) • Has a different feel than more natural leathers
• Looks and smells like natural leather • Usually gets worse with age (whereas some natural leathers look/feel better with age and care)

 

 

Since bonded leather is a composite of leather and plastic, it can be made utilizing various formulas and amounts, depending on the goal of the final product. This can be a benefit, as leather can be reused in bonded applications for future life. It can also be confusing to customer, as it isn’t always clear exactly how much leather is used in the making of each bonded leather piece.

In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) provides a Leather Guide which provides guidance around how bonded leather should be marketed. Generally, the % of leather and non leather materials should be made clear to the consumer The guide states, under section 16 CFR Part §24.2(f). Click here to view the full guide and text.

 

“(f) Ground, pulverized, shredded, reconstituted, or bonded leather. A material in an industry product that contains ground, pulverized, shredded, reconstituted, or bonded leather and thus is not wholly the hide of an animal should not be represented, directly or by implication, as being leather. This provision does not preclude an accurate representation as to the ground, pulverized, shredded, reconstituted, or bonded leather content of the material. However, if the material appears to be leather, it should be accompanied by either:

(1) An adequate disclosure as described by paragraph (a) of this section; or

(2) If the terms “ground leather,” “pulverized leather,” “shredded leather,” “reconstituted leather,” or “bonded leather” are used, a disclosure of the percentage of leather fibers and the percentage of non-leather substances contained in the material. For example: An industry product made of a composition material consisting of 60% shredded leather fibers may be described as: Bonded Leather Containing 60% Leather Fibers and 40% Non-leather Substances.”

-FTC Leather Guide

 

The European Committee for Standardization (CEN) has also developed a standard when referring to bonded leather material. Under CEN/TC 289 > EN 15987:2015, Click here to view on their website.

The 2011 version of the standard mentioned:

 

“The minimum amount of 50% in weight of dry leather is needed to use the term ‘bonded leather’.

-European Committee for Standardization

 

Standards continue to evolve over time. It is valuable to have a mutually agreeable understanding, at least across different commercial regions, what the term “bonded leather” should mean.

 

Leather Sofas

Bonded leather is generally not as durable as natural leather. Due to it being mixed with plastic, the fibers are generally inaccessible for conditioning and treatment. Over time, the surface begins to wear, the plastic deteriorates, and the material begins to crack.

Usually, this happens over just a few years. Natural leather, when well-cared for, can last hundreds of years. However, since it is plastic-based, bonded leather can easily withstand moisture and spills along with general abrasions and use. Though once it starts to break down, it breaks down pretty quickly and is tough to repair, usually about 2-3 years.

 

Since bonded leather is plastic-based, it isn’t as flexible as natural leather. Also, since the natural fibers are not exposed, this type of leather cannot be treated and conditioned like natural leather.

When the material is exposed to frequent flexing, as from sitting and moving around furniture, the bonded leather begins to separate from it’s backing. Over time, it begins to flake and peel away. This creates a visually unappealing piece, as literal pieces of the upholstery fall off. The color of the surface is no longer uniform, and the underlying layers of the material become exposed.

 

Bonded leathers a generally lower-quality leather. This is mostly since it is not a natural leather material, instead it is a synthetic leather material with some natural leather grains and fibers mixed in.

Over a relatively short period of time (about 2-4 years), bonded leather begins to crack, flake, and break down. When considering furniture or personal accessories, this is a relatively short time to have a piece or leather good.

As a balance, bonded leather goods are generally lower cost than natural leather goods. It mainly comes down to preference and budget. A less expensive bonded leather item can be repurchased every few years, or a more expensive natural leather item can be purchased once and last for decades.

 

Bonded Leather

When making a decision about what type of leather item to buy, let’s take a look at how others compare.

 

 

Bonded Leather vs Genuine Leather

Genuine leather can come from any layer of the hide, and undergoes treatment to the surface to provide a more uniform, “corrected”, appearance. It can be sanded or buffed to remove surface imperfections, then dyed (or spray painted) or stamped/embossed to give it a final surface appearance.

The process alters some of the preferred qualities of leather, so while not a top quality, it is often used for belts and similar goods. Since genuine leather is still a solid layer of natural hide, it will perform better and last longer than bonded leather.

 

Bonded Leather vs Full Grain Leather

This cut of leather contains the outer layout of the hide, referred to as the “grain”; it hasn’t been sanded or buffed to remove any imperfections. Generally, only the hair is removed on full grain leathers. The grain generally has densely packed fibers that are finer; this results in a surface that is very strong, durable, and can withstand tough use.

Because it undergoes no sanding, the surface can have minor imperfections. These might be from where a cow rubbed up against a fence, a small cut they might have received, or scrapes from everyday life. Full grain hides without many blemishes are the most prized, as they are least common and are the most visually appealing.

Those surface fibers are also what give it the most strength of any leather type. This makes it good for saddlery, footwear, and furniture. Since the outer layer isn’t removed, it develops a patina (a surface color change from use) over time that can be pleasing to the eye. The outer layer also provides some water-resistance qualities as well. Full Grain is looked upon as the highest quality leather available.

Bonded leather will not perform as well, or last as long as full grain leather.

 

Bonded Leather vs Top Grain Leather

This cut is very similar to full-grain, except that it has had the very top layer sanded and/or buffed to remove imperfections and irregularities in the finish. This makes the leather softer and more pliable, with various dyes and finished applied to it.

While this sanding makes it more visually appealing, it also removes a lot of the strength and some water-repellent qualities of full grain leather. This we begin to see a tradeoff between leather strength, and leather look and softness.

Given its softness and flexibility, top grain leather is often used in high end leather goods, including handbags, wallets, and shoes.

Bonded leather will begin to crack and flake within a few years, and not perform as well as top grain leather.

 

Bonded Leather vs Faux Leather

Faux leather is a type of synthetic leather made generally of polyurethane or vinyl. Faux leather is intended to look like real leather yet cost significantly less. It is used often in the furniture industry and has the benefits of being inexpensive (compared to real leather), durable, and easy to clean.

It does however not reflect real leather qualities such as wearing better over time, having natural stretchability, breathability, and resistance to cuts and other abrasions, and a unique natural look/feel.

Since faux leather is generally has a consistent makeup of its material, it will not flake and crack over time like bonded leather will. Bonded leather will have slightly more of a leather look and smell early on. Click here to learn more in my detailed article about faux leather.

 

Bonded Leather vs Imitation Leather

Imitation leather is another term used to describe faux leather. As described above, faux leather will generally not flake and crack over time like bonded leather will. Bonded leather will have slightly more of a leather look and smell early on, though wear out much faster.

 

Bonded Leather vs Vinyl

Vinyl leather is another term used to describe faux leather. As described above, faux leather will generally not flake and crack over time like bonded leather will. Bonded leather will have slightly more of a leather look and smell early on, though wear out much faster.

 

Bonded Leather vs PU Leather

PU leather is another term used to describe faux leather. As described above, faux leather will generally not flake and crack over time like bonded leather will. Bonded leather will have slightly more of a leather look and smell early on, though wear out much faster.

 

Bonded Leather vs Leather Bound

When considering book bindings, one might choose between these two leather types. Generally, natural leather will be more durable, last longer, and feel better when used. Bonded leather will be less expensive, provide less protection to the book, and wear out more quickly.

 

Bonded Leather vs Leather Gel

Leather Gel is a material sold by King Textiles, is a synthetic leather with a “breathable” backing. This makes it useful for applications such as upholstery and clothing where air flow can aid in comfort of the user experience.

Since it is a synthetic leather, with high abrasion tolerance, it will generally perform better than bonded leather. The bonded leather will wear crack, and peel more quickly.

 

Bonded Leather vs Polyurethane

Polyurethane (PU) leather is another term used to describe faux leather. As described above, faux leather will generally not flake and crack over time like bonded leather will. Bonded leather will have slightly more of a leather look and smell early on, though wear out much faster.

 

 

If handled well, maintained properly, cleaned often, and story properly, bonded leather can look nice and smell great for a few years.

 

How to Clean Bonded Leather

Microfiber Towels

Due to it’s finished surface, bonded leather can be cleaned gently with a wet cloth. Ensure the cloth doesn’t have loose fibers and lint that could transfer to the surface. A microfiber cloth could work well. Also, test in a small area first to make sure the cloth will not transfer any color to the items surface (couch, sofa, bag, purse, etc.)

If the item needs additional cleaning, a very soft brush can be used to help loosen dirt and grime. Wet it slightly and work it over the leather, being careful not to press to hard. The bristles of the brush should be doing most of the work. After this step, going over it with a damp cloth can help clean off any remaining dirt/dust. Let the item dry off before using or storing.

If what you are trying to clean goes beyond dust/grime, and is a stain from something, additional care might be needed. First, consider what type of stain it is. Knowing the substance can help determine what the best method to clean it is. If it is something common, and gentle cleaner might work.

If it’s something more significant, look into cleaners made specifically for bonded leather. They will be made to treat the stain while helping to maintain the surface finish. As with most cleaners, always test in a small, non-noticeable spot first to ensure it will not discolor the bag. Definitely don’t want to make a second stain while trying to clean the first 🙂

 

How to Condition Bonded Leather

Since bonded leather has a protective surface finish, it doesn’t need to be conditioned. And functionally, it really can’t. The surface finish protects the leather underneath. It also serves as a barrier that conditioner can not penetrate.

Thankfully though, the protective surface makes it’s very easy to clean with a damp cloth. This is an easy way to always keep bonded leather products looking great. If the surface layer begins to wear away, additional protectant can be applied to help restore it.

Some of these products will be applied with a cloth or applicator, and others sprayed on and wiped off. Make sure to read the instructions on any finish you plan to apply, and test on a small area first (to make sure it will not discolor the surface) before applying to the entire item.

 

How to Fix a Scratch on Bonded Leather

Fixing a scratch on a bonded leather piece is usually as easy as applying a leather repeat kit. Since bonded leather is a leather/plastic mix, it will require replacement of the material that was scratched away.

Typically, leather repair kits have color-matched liquid that is poured into the crack. It might need to be evened, heat pressed, a grain pattern applied, and/or allowed to dry, and then the scratch should be filled.

 

How to Fix Tears in Bonded Leather

Tears in bonded leather are harder to fix than scratches. Since bonded leather is a leather/plastic blend, fixing tears might require a repair kit that includes a filler. The space created by the tear will need to be filled.

Depending on the size of the tear, this can be done with fabric, flexible glue, or the color-matched liquid that comes in the repair kit. Since the item will likely be sat or or used and need to flex, the material used as a filler will need to be flexible once dry too.

Once the tear is filled, just fix the remaining scratch that is visible above it. Pour the color-matched liquid that is poured into the crack. It might need to be evened, heat pressed, a grain pattern applied, and/or allowed to dry, and then the scratch should be filled.

 

How to Store Bonded Leather

Closet Leather Storage

Bonded leather should be stored in a cool, dry place. Keeping it out of direct sunlight is key, as the sun can discolor the protective finish. Most furniture is kept indoors, and thus a great place for them.

If you have bonded leather clothing or accessories, storing them in a closet or drawer works great. Keeping them away from extreme moisture, and sunlight, are key.

 

 

Bonded leather offers some benefits in price, and closeness to the look/smell of real leather. If considering a purchase or material for a new project, this type of leather is an option that can be explored.

 

 

Is bonded leather as good as real leather?

No, bonded leather is not as good as real leather. It is made primarily of ground leather fibers, bonded together with a polyurethane (plastic) mixture, and lasts only a few years. Real leather will look better, perform better, and last much longer.

Is bonded leather durable?

No, bonded leather is not very durable. It is a blend of leather and plastic and flexibility is limited. Over time it will begin to crack, peel, and flake. While new, the surface resists moisture and abrasions, though wears out in roughly 2-3 years.

The Difference Between Bonded Leather vs Genuine Leather –

So you found a leather product that you really like and can not believe the price! You don’t understand how leather be so cheap! Don’t be fooled, not all leather is equal!

One of the many terms that cause confusion in leather products is the use of terms such as “bonded leather”. What exactly does it mean? In this article we will examine the differences between bonded leather and real genuine leather.

Bonded leather can at times legally be called genuine leather, real leather, vero cuoio, etc. This is because, scientifically speaking, it is real leather; however, the quality of the material is not even close to the real thing as we understand it.

Bonded leather is partially leather; however, by law it only has to be around twenty percent leather.

How Is Bonded Leather Made?

Leather does not come in long industrial sheets like man-made materials do. Factories that work with leather have to work with the natural shapes and sizes of animal hides. As you can imagine, this causes a lot of waste with cutoffs and small unusable pieces of hides.

An Example of Bonded Leather. © Athinais | Dreamstime.com

These scraps are collected together and sent to a specialized factory to be made into bonded leather. The pieces are all ground together in a special machine in order to make a kind of mulch. These small pieces of leather are then glued together with polyurethane and “bonded leather” is born.

The look and sometimes the smell can be very convincing. A bonded leather product that is put together well can be hard for the average person to tell apart from real cut pieces of leather. Unfortunately, as previously mentioned, these products can legally be labeled as genuine or real leather.

You may be asking, however, what difference does it really make if something is made from or covered with bonded leather vs. a true cut piece of leather. As long as it looks real and costs a lot less what is the harm in it?

The answer depends on the product that you are buying. This article will continue by examining the pros and cons of four of the most common products that are made using bonded leather.

Leather Book Covers – Bonded Leather vs Genuine Leather

Nowadays, one of the most common uses of bonded leather is in leather book covers especially Bible Leather Covers, Journals and expensive books. Before the modern day invention of bonded leather, all book covers were made from single pieces of real leather and they are expected to last for decades with proper care.

Two decades ago, I inherited several antique Bibles from my late father that are nearly 200 years old! Unfortunately, I didn’t have the expertise and knowledge at that time to take proper care of them and they have further deteriorated somewhat as can be seen from the photo here.

However, if they had been made using Bonded leather, they would have turned into dust during the early part of the 19th century!

Leather Belts – Bonded vs Genuine Leather

One of the most common use of bonded leather is in belts. In the store, a belt made from bonded leather is very difficult to tell apart from one that is made out of solid pieces of genuine leather.

The difference, however, will quickly be seen when you use the belt. A true genuine leather belt may last twenty years or more. A true leather belt will never split in half from normal use.

A bonded leather belt, however, may split completely in half within months if it is worn tightly. The best case scenario is that it will last a few months before starting to split where you wear your buckle. Even if it does not completely split in half, it will get cracked and look ugly in no time.

Leather Jackets –  Genuine Leathers vs Bonded

If you are looking for a riding jacket, beware of bonded leather! While the price is tempting and the jackets are usually very nice looking, the strength just isn’t there.

It is important that your riding jacket be strong enough to provide protection in case of an accident. Real leather riding jackets are far more resistant to damage than bonded leather could ever be.

Additionally, bonded leather jackets’ breathability are substantially inferior to jackets made with genuine leather and you can feel the difference in a hot or humid environment. If comfort is among your top priorities, then the choice is pretty obvious.

If you are looking for quick fashion items, a bonded leather jacket is great. However, if you are looking for comfort, protection and long lasting durability, real genuine leather is the only way to go.

Genuine Vs Bonded Leather In Furniture

Genuine leather sofas are really incredible pieces of furniture. If you have ever owned one you probably really appreciated its qualities.

Real leather sofas acclimate to your body’s temperature whether it is hot or cold out; bonded leather does not. In fact, it is colder in the winter and hotter in the summer, just the opposite of real leather.

Real leather ages very nicely and lasts a long time; bonded leather does not. It wears very quickly and does not get better looking with time.

Final Thoughts

In conclusion, if you want something quick and fashionable and if you can afford to keep replacing it, you may prefer bonded leather. However, if you want a good quality product that will look and feel great for a long time, real genuine leather is the only way to go.

Bonded leather – www.leather-dictionary.com – The Leather Dictionary

Leather fibres

When leather is shaved in the tannery it produces a large amount of leather fibres.

Bonded leather – Blended leather – Leather board

Bonded leather (also called “reconstituted leather” or “blended leather”) is a material consisting of leather fibres and binders. It’s produced in rolls and should have a leather fibre content of at least 50%.

The leather-like properties of the material, its homogeneous structure, the favourable price and the ability to process it into sheets and/or rolls make the use of leather fibres attractive. Another plus point is that it is produced from waste during leather production.

Bonded leather and leather boards are produced in thicknesses of 0.25 to 6 millimetres.

Thick and firm bonded leather. – Bonded leather flooring with embossing.

 

Bonded leather is mainly used as a material for heels, soles and other non-visible components of shoes. Other processors are the furniture industry and bookbinding companies. Bonded leather is used for book covers, floor panels and wall panels. In the furniture sector, leather fibres only appear at the cheap end of the market.

However, such materials cannot be sold as “genuine leather”, even if genuine leather fibres are a component.

A film on an easily tearing fibre composite.

 

The surface consists of a film impressed with hair pores and the material below is made up of leather fibres, which are connected with a binder. The material can be torn easily with two fingers as the fibres do not have as strong a bond as real leather. The fibres “stick” only to each other and are not naturally fused together and do not have the stability of leather.

Recycled leather

Relatively inexpensive leather items are offered for sale with the description “recycled leather”. This sounds as if used leather objects are being processed into new products. This may be true for some accessories, but they are not sold as “recycled leather”.

The products sold under the name “recycled leather” or “recycling leather” are divided into two: those made from bonded leather and also artificial leather with leather fibres on the reverse.

In both cases, if the term is used without further description, it does not comply with the labelling requirements for leather.

Regenerated leather

In the online trade, the term “regenerated leather” often appears. It applies to leather fibre materials used for cheap upholstery, newspaper stands, bookcases and other accessories. But, without further description, this term contravenes the labelling requirements for leather.

In the furniture sector, imitation leather is also offered, where leather fibres are glued to the back in order to suggest a similarity to leather in the advertising. However, it is artificial leather without leather properties.

Artificial leather with leather fibres glued to the reverse.

 

Additional information

WE UNDERSTAND LEATHER – WWW.COLOURLOCK.COM

Bonded leather vs. Faux leather – What is the difference?

Faux leathers are synthetic materials that mimic the look and feel of genuine leather at far lower prices.

The most common faux leathers currently are polyurethane and polyvinyl chloride (better known as vinyl.) There are also some polyester microfibers available which mimic the look and feel of leather.

All three of these types of faux leathers are extremely durable and stain-resistant.

  • 100% polyurethanes are generally softer and closer to the actual look and feel of real leather than the vinyls. As a result polyurethane faux leathers are growing in popularity for residential furniture buyers.
  • Vinyl fabrics have become far less popular for residential furniture. Higher cost vinyls are still widely used for commercial and institutional use where durability is the most important factor.
  • Microfiber faux leathers are far back in popularity, primarily because they do not mimic the look and feel of real leather as closely as the other two.
  • Recently, a new classification of faux leather, combining polyurethane, vinyl and polyester has become available.
    • This new type of faux leather is less costly, but it is still to early to tell whether its durability will hold up over the long term.

“Bonded leather” is generally classified as a type of faux leather. It is an inferior flimsy product.

Bonded leather’s primary purpose is to fool uneducated consumers into believing they are buying genuine leather furniture (or something similar) at a cheap price.

  • Bonded leather has no advantages for consumers.
  • Bonded leather is not even significantly less expensive than the alternative (more durable) faux leathers.

The term “bonded leather” is still widely used for office furniture.

  • Residential furniture companies often try to hide its existence by substituting brand names such as Nuvo Leather, Renew Leather, LeatherSoft etc. to disguise its use.
  • Sellers of small personal items such as purses, belts, wallets etc. are even more deceptive.
  • The term “genuine leather” is almost universally used as a substitute for “bonded leather” for accessory items. (This is why the “leather” on lower cost accessories now peels after a few months. )
    • So far, the furniture industry still uses the term “genuine leather” to describe “real” leather made from hides. This may change in the future.

My company sells both genuine top grain leather and 100% polyurethane faux leathers.

Our experience is that 50% of the customers who contact us looking for leather furniture do not know the difference between genuine leather made from hides and “bonded leather.”

Nobody should buy “leather” furniture unless they understand the difference.

  • “Bonded leathers” are typically made of thin layers of vinyls or polyurethanes that are “bonded” (glued) to a backing consisting of anywhere from 10% to 20% “genuine” recycled leather hide scraps. These scraps have been chopped into tiny pieces, mixed with adhesives and rolled flat.
  • The face of the bonded leather fabric is 100% vinyl or polyurethane. You do not see or feel any of the “genuine” leather part of a bonded leather fabric.
  • The biggest problem is that chopped up leather particles make a very poor backing material. The surface material frequently begins to “peel” away from the backing after only a few years or even a few months.

If you purchase bonded leather furniture which begins to peel, retailers will usually do absolutely nothing for you.

  • This type of problem is specifically excluded from both retailer and manufacturer warranties, unless you are fortunate enough to have your furniture begin to peel in less than one year.
  • Extended warranties never cover damage from peeling bonded leather (or almost any other fabric related problems.) Click on this article for more information about extended warranties.

At that point all you can do is sue the retailer. There have been many lawsuits regarding bonded leathers that began to peel after a short period of time. Consumers rarely win these cases.

For example take a look at this NBC video and article. This is an interview with the CEO of a major (and highly reputable) furniture retail chain who is asked about bonded leather in response to multiple customer complaints .

At one point, when the CEO is asked about whether the peeling may be caused by customer abuse of the furniture he replies, “I’m not saying they [the customers] did something wrong, what I’m saying is that it’s delicate.”

Most consumers purchase leather furniture because they believe it will be extremely durable.

I can virtually guarantee that none of these consumers were ever warned by their salespeople that “bonded” leather was a “delicate” material.

Another important note was also brought up in this interview — Extended warranties that customers think are protecting them for “everything” do not.

A recent editorial in Furniture Today, the leading trade publication for the furniture industry, discussed the many problems associated with bonded leather.

The author of the article proposed that maybe it was time for bonded leather to be voluntarily banned by retailers and manufacturers throughout the furniture industry.

The use of the term “leather” to describe bonded leather products is already banned by law in some other nations.

What is Bonded Leather? The Humble Counterpart of Real Leather

Many a time, you come across a piece of furniture that looks like leather and feels just as luxurious. However, it’s not as prohibitively priced as real leather. Chances are you are looking at a product made of bonded leather. What is bonded leather, you ask? Read on to find out all there is to know about bonded leather.

What is bonded leather?

Bonded Leather is also called reconstituted leather or blended leather. It comes from animal hide but it differs from real leather in that it is not made of 100% animal hide. Bonded leather is made by shredding leather scraps and leather fiber to form a pulp. This is meshed between a fiber cloth and a polyurethane coating, which is then embossed with a leather-like grain or texture.

How is bonded leather made?

The manufacturing process of bonded leather is similar to making paper. Shredded leather scraps and fibers are mixed with bonding materials and released onto a fiber or paper backing cloth. The material is then dyed and embossed with a leather-like texture on the surface. A polyurethane treatment gives the surface a glossy finish. 

Why purchase bond leather?

There are various reasons to opt for bonded leather. For most people, it’s due to the comparatively low cost of the product. However, some may choose bonded leather because it can be regarded as environmentally friendly, in so much as it uses leftovers and does not involve additional farming, thereby reducing landfill. The product is also easy to clean and likely to come in a wide range of design options.

What is bonded leather used for?

Bonded leather can be used for making furniture, bookbinding and fashion accessories such as shoe components, handbags, belts, and textile lining. A more fragile paper-backed bonded leather is used to cover books such as planners, Bibles, and various types of desk accessories.

What is the difference between bonded leather and real leather?

Top grain leather, or “real leather”, is the most common type of real leather that has the “split” in the hide removed, or the layer showing any natural imperfections or hide marks. The resulting hide is sanded to create an even, smooth texture. Dyes are added, and a finish coat is applied to help resist stains. Essentially, real leather makes use of the entire hide’s different layers, as opposed to bonded leather, which only uses scraps.

How to clean bonded leather?

Bonded leather should be cleaned with a damp cloth and wiped dry with a separate cloth. Spilled liquids should be cleaned immediately but no detergents or abrasive cleaners should be used. Non-alkaline cleaners and non-detergent soaps can be used but the material should always be tested for colorfastness on a small area first.

Advantages of bonded leather
  • Cost-effective
  • Environmentally friendly: uses leftover hide
  • Minimal variations between batches
  • Soft and pliable
Disadvantages of bonded leather
  • Not as durable as real leather
  • Prone to cracking and peeling
  • Difficult to repair if damaged
  • Expensive if product gets damaged

Printing on Leather

At Contrado, we offer a selection of leathers, and they are just as easy to print as any of our other fabrics. From pictures to paintings, you can upload your masterpiece onto our simple design interface and see all updates in real-time. Even taking a picture of your favorite surface to use as a pattern is as simple as clicking a button. Why not try it for yourself? You can order a small test print to get a taste of the full effect.

Now that you know all about bonded leather, get your hands on our swatch pack for your next DIY project.

The Difference Between Bonded Vs. Top Grain Leather

From the amazing customer experience to the unbeatable prices, there are plenty of reasons Leather Expressions is the best place to buy leather furniture in the Philadelphia area.

One of those reasons is the high quality of the leather we sell. We pride ourselves on selling only top grain leather that lasts for decades. We mean it: A piece of furniture that you buy from Leather Expressions should look good as new ten or twenty years down the road. This should be true even for couches and chairs planted in a whirlwind of pets and kids.

So, how does our leather stay pristine despite the passage of years?

Keep reading to learn more about how top grain leather is different from bonded leather, the variety typically sold in lesser furniture outlets.

Bonded Leather vs.

Top Grain Leather

  • Bonded leather is made differently than top grain leather. Bonded leather is made by taking scraps of leather and gluing them onto a material using a chemical adhesive. As you sit on the furniture, your clothing causes friction, which slowly leads the leather to flake. Within five years, that piece of furniture is likely to reveal its cheap manufacture, with many flecks of leather missing from its surface. In contrast, top grain leather is the top layer of the animal’s hide, meaning the natural grain from the surface has been sanded away. This removes imperfections and blemishes, but retains the strong and durable nature of the leather. We urge you to see the difference for yourself in our video below!

  • Bonded leather is a bad investment. People are lured into purchasing bonded leather because it’s cheaper than top grain leather. What they don’t realize is that the lower cost is due to a much lower-quality product. (In fact, bonded leather contains very little actual leather.) For a product that will look and feel the same as it did on the day you bought it, top-grain leather is the only way to go.
  • Bonded leather is difficult to repair. Since bonded leather isn’t real leather, it requires many layers of polish to make it appear real. This polish wears away over time and cannot be replaced. That means if a hole appears in a bonded leather couch, it’s almost impossible to repair. On the other hand, top grain leather couches and chairs not only maintain their sheen over time; they develop a lovely patina. And if a hole happens to appear, it’s relatively easy to repair.  

 

There is so much to know about the wonders of leather furniture! Go to our website to sign up for our free leather furniture buying guide, which you can find on the right-hand side of the page!  Or call 215-631-1500 for more information about buying leather furniture that’s truly top-of-the-line.

 

Bonded leather

Many samples of glued leather in various colors and patterns.

Tied leather , also called reconstituted leather or mixed leather , is the term used to make upholstery material that contains animal hides. It is a layered structure of fiber or paper base covered with a layer of shredded leather fibers mixed with natural rubber or polyurethane binder, embossed with a leather-like texture.

It differs from dual-cast leather, which is made from pieces of whole leather, usually split leather, to which an artificial turf is applied.

Description

Salamander Industrieprodukte in Türkheim, Bavaria, is the oldest and largest manufacturer of bonded leather materials in the world.

Bonded leather is made by chopping leather scraps and leather fibers and then mixing them with binders.The mixture is then extruded onto a fabric or paper backing and the surface is usually embossed with a texture or texture that resembles leather. Color and pattern, if any, is a surface treatment that does not penetrate like painting. The fiber content of natural leather in bonded leather varies. The manufacturing process is somewhat similar to the production of paper.

Lower quality materials can flake off in just a few years, while the best grades are considered very durable and retain their pattern and color even during commercial use.Since the composition of glued leather and related products varies widely and is sometimes a trade secret, it can be difficult to predict how a given product will perform over time. There is a wide range of durability for bonded leather and related products; it is argued that some better quality bonded leather outperforms lower quality natural leather.

Applications

Bonded leather can be found in furniture, binders and various fashion accessories.Products that are commonly made from various types of glued leather include book covers, cases and covers for personal electronics, shoe components, textile linings and accessories, briefcases and briefcases, bags, belts, chairs and sofas. The more fragile, glued paper-backed leather is commonly used to cover books such as diaries and Bibles, as well as various types of desk supplies. These glued leathers may contain a smaller proportion of leather than those used in the furniture industry, and there may be some leather on the surface of the product, which creates a characteristic leather-related odor.

In the same applications, you can alternatively use artificial leather that looks like glued together.

Advantages and disadvantages

Possible advantages of glued leather:

  • Sustainable – Reuse leftover leather without the need for additional farming and resource use
  • Product Stability – Free from Natural Defects and Minimum Lot-to-Lot Variation
  • High Cutting Performance – Profitable and Reduced Waste

Possible disadvantages:

  • Difficult or impossible to repair or rebuild after wear or damage
  • Gassing and sweating of plasticizers and other chemicals from poorly formulated products
  • Usually not as durable as genuine leather

Marking

The actual composition of the bonded leather varies by manufacturer and quality level.

There is some controversy and disagreement about the ethics of using the term glued leather to describe an upholstery product that is in fact reclaimed leather, especially in the home furnishing industry. The Skin Research Lab noted that calling the product “glued skin” “is misleading because it does not reflect its true nature. It’s vinyl or polyurethane laminate or composite, but it’s not leather. ”

In 2011, the European Committee for Standardization published EN 15987: 2011 “Leather – Terminology – Key Definitions for the Leather Trade” to avoid confusion regarding bonded leather, which requires a minimum amount of dry skin of 50% to use dry skin …the term “glued skin”.

In the US, the FTC recommends giving the percentage of skin included. The Federal Trade Commission stated that “the Guidelines caution against misrepresentation of the skin content of products containing shredded, reconstituted or adhered leather, and state that such products, if they appear to be made from leather, must be accompanied by disclosure: to percentage other fiber. The guidelines also state that such information should be included in any product advertisements that might otherwise mislead consumers about the composition of the product. ”

References

external references

90,000 what kind of material. Application methods. Ural Galant

How leather differs from hide

Bovine or cow leather is considered the best leather. Among its undoubted advantages are strength, aesthetic appearance and almost complete absence of smell, with the exception of fragrance – quite pleasant and even included in the composition of some perfumes.

After the animal has been skinned and blown away, it is a rather thick layer of several millimeters.It is clear that it is impossible to sew or make a belt from it.

Ancient Mongolian horsemen made armor and shields from this material, strong (they were not pierced by arrows) and light. But we live in a different time, we do not need such means of protection. Therefore, let’s move on to more relevant things.

Facial leather and split leather: what is it and what is the difference To obtain marketable leather, its layer-by-layer separation is required.
The upper part is the front. It has its advantages, but it is not without its disadvantages.
All vices, including folds, scratches, received by the animal during life, are presented here, as they say, there.

Experienced manufacturers struggle with them by grinding and embossing. The first method consists in pressing a layer of leather with a heated steel plate, after which the material becomes ideally smooth, “ironed”. The second method is applicable to youth and denim haberdashery: a logo is embossed on the surface.

Spilock – a layer of genuine leather obtained in the process of leather production as a result of lamination (sandering), after removing the front layer.When grinding, the skin is divided into layers (from 3 to 6, depending on the thickness of the skin), differing in properties and then used for different purposes. Distinguish between the layers of the front, middle and mezdrovy (or bakhtarmya). A variety of high quality leathers are produced from the face layer, which has a natural grain.

From the layers of the split part, after applying an adhesive coating (artificial grain), leather is also produced, but of a lower quality. Split-velor for the production of footwear, mittens, overalls is also produced from the split part.Mezdra and split trim are used to prepare technical gelatin, glue and other collagen dissolution products. In ancient Jewish sources, the split is called dukhsustus, mezuzahs were written on it.
(wikipedia)

Split properties

But back to the process. Remains the same area of ​​the skin, devoid of the surface layer. This is a split. What is it and how can it be used in a useful way? Do not throw it away? Of course not. In essence, this is also leather, and very good.

If you polish it, it will look very similar to the front, except for the natural porous structure that conducts air. It suffers from the effects of a hot press, and strength is somewhat reduced. Since it is impossible to regulate the thickness of the layer (the skin of the animal is uneven), sometimes two layers of the split have to be glued in order to withstand the standard parameters of the raw material, which is especially important in the production of belts.

Where it is used

It is impossible to say about the split material that it is a kind of substitute for natural leather, because it is made from the same hide as the best raw materials for the haberdashery industry.Another question is why it is more appropriate to use it.

The front layer has better water resistance, therefore it is not recommended to sew a raincoat, jacket or shoes from split leather.

Whatever one may say, but the surface structure is broken by the sharp cutting edge of special equipment, and therefore, such a product will get wet more. But belts made from this material can be almost as good as from full grain leather, and cost significantly less. A welder’s suit with a split in the places most vulnerable to sparks and drops will serve excellently, because, unlike substitutes, genuine leather does not melt and practically does not burn.

However, the products of Turkish leatherworkers, skilled in fashionable styles, may sometimes not withstand the effects of precipitation, so their choice should be treated with vigilance. We can say about split leather, that it is the same excellent raw material for the production of suede, as well as front leather, it is not difficult to “fluff” it up, and it looks great.

How to distinguish split leather from full grain leather

The main difference between split leather and full grain leather lies in the wrong side. If it has a uniform fleecy structure, rather smooth, this indicates that a sharp knife of the dividing machine has passed over it.

Looking at the untreated skin, one can understand that its reverse side is speckled with various veins, therefore, when folded, this side will be the seamy side of the split.

If possible, you should pay attention to whether the skin is single-layer, whether it is not glued together from two thin plates. In the case of a belt, you just need to bend it, the same method is used to determine the naturalness of the raw material. Real skin is smoothed out, and the effects of deformation remain on it.

Wrinkling the product in your hands is also useful for determining the quality of the color, because if peeling or bubbling occurs, then it’s bad.

Bonded leather

Many samples of bonded leather in various colors and patterns.

Tied leather , also called reconstituted leather or mixed leather , is a term used for an industrial upholstery material that contains animal hides. It is made in the form of a layered structure of a fiber or paper base, covered with a layer of shredded natural leather fibers, mixed with natural rubber or polyurethane binding with embossed leather.

It differs from double-layer leather, which is made from pieces of hard leather, usually from split, which has been applied with artificial turf.

Description

Salamander Industrieprodukte in Türkheim, Bavaria is the world’s oldest and largest manufacturer of fiberglass materials.

Bonded leather is made by chopping leather scraps and leather fibers and then mixing them with binders. The mixture is then extruded onto a fabric or paper backing and the surface is usually embossed with a texture or texture that resembles leather.Color and pattern, if any, are surface treatments that do not penetrate as when painted. The fiber content of natural leather in bonded leather varies. The manufacturing process is somewhat similar to the production of paper. [1]

Lower quality materials can flake off on the surface in just a few years, while the best grades are considered very durable and retain their pattern and color even during commercial use. [1] Because the composition of glued leather and related products varies widely, and sometimes Trade secrets, it can be difficult to predict how a given product will perform over time.There is a wide range of durability for bonded leather and related products; Some better quality bonded leathers are said to outperform lower quality natural leathers. [2]

Applications

Bonded leather can be found in furniture, bookbinding, and various fashion accessories. Products that are commonly made from various types of glued leather include book covers, cases and covers for personal electronics, shoe components, textile and auxiliary linings, briefcases and briefcases, bags, belts, chairs and sofas. [3] The more fragile, glued paper-backed leather is commonly used to cover books such as diaries and Bibles, as well as various types of desk supplies. These glued leathers may contain a smaller proportion of leather than those used in the furniture industry, and there may be some leather on the surface of the product, resulting in a characteristic leather smell.

These same applications can alternately use artificial leather in appearance similar to glued leather.

Advantages and disadvantages

Potential benefits of glued leather:

  • Sustainable – reuses leftover leather without the need for additional farming and resource use. [4]
  • Product stability – no natural defects and minimal lot-to-lot deviations
  • High cutting performance – profitable and less waste

Possible disadvantages: [1] [5]

  • Difficult or cannot be repaired or rebuilt after wear or damage [6]
  • Degassing and sweating plasticizers and other chemicals from poorly formulated products
  • Usually not as durable as genuine leather [7] [8] [9]

Marking

The actual content of glued leather varies depending on the manufacturer and the quality level.

There is some debate and disagreement over the ethics of using the term glued leather to describe an upholstery product that is in fact reclaimed leather, especially in the home furnishing industry. The Skin Research Lab noted that calling the product “glued skin” “is misleading because it does not reflect its true nature. vinyl, or polyurethane laminate, or composite, but it’s not leather. ” [10]

In 2011, the European Committee for Standardization published EN 15987: 2011 “Leather – Terminology – Key definitions for the leather trade” to avoid confusion about bonded leather, which requires a minimum amount of dry skin in the amount of 50%. the term “glued skin”.

United States The FTC recommends reporting the percentage of skin included. [11] The FTC stated that “The Guidelines caution against misrepresentation of skin content in products containing shredded, reconstituted, or adhered leather, and state that such products, if they appear to be made from leather, must be accompanied by disclosure, as the percentage of leather or other fiber. Thomas, Larry (12 July 2013). “The FTC says it is necessary to disclose the composition of the material.” “ Furniture Today . Progressive Business Media. Retrieved March 27, 2014.

external link

90,000 of what is composite leather made from?

This type is known as “ glued leather ” and is obtained in different ways. Let’s get acquainted with the basic concepts that make up the material, learn how it is used in the production of footwear.What is composite leather, we will consider its pros and cons in detail.

Composite Leather – Definition

Help! Composite leather is a material that is produced by pressing and then combining the remains of the tanning industry.

Pressed leather

The process and stages of its production may be different, but the principle remains the same.

What is composite leather obtained from?

A continuous web occurs after gluing small pieces of leather that have become redundant after the production of the main product.The elements are combined into a single composition by pressing. Adhesives are not used.

Brief description of the process – small pieces are heated in hot water and rolled into one base. As a result of heat treatment of leather trimmings, a composite variety appears. The naturalness of the material is confirmed by the procedure for its creation.

Unlike many fabrics, the pieces can be dyed, polished or varnished. The canvas is not capricious, it is easy to work with it, it can be given a suede surface, embossed, and metallized.

To identify the value and to know the distinctive features of the leather, it is worth familiarizing yourself with its composition. Composite material is made from different scraps :

  1. Old leather clothing that has become unusable and cannot be restored and repaired.
  2. Small waste, stripes left after sewing products.
  3. Leather dust, flour. These materials are used to create artificial suede.

Important! To create composite leather, trims of unprocessed animal skins, worn-out footwear are not used.

The use of composite leather in the shoe industry

The main area of ​​use is shoe production.

If the boots are completely made of this leather, then they will not last long, they will turn out to be impractical, they will last a maximum of 2 seasons.

Advantages of leather from waste

The advantages of the material include:

  • leather is durable compared to artificial materials;
  • natural fibers;
  • beautiful appearance, it is difficult to distinguish it from real leather;
  • The material can be painted in any color, due to this, a variety of shades.

Other types of materials are produced from the composite type – artificial suede.

Disadvantages

Many inexpensive bags and boots, the sellers of which convince in their naturalness, are made of this material. disadvantages include:

  • lower level of strength due to the fact that it is subjected to pressing;
  • Over time, shoes and boots begin to get wet;
  • due to the lack of integrity of the fabric, the products will not warm in frost, the acceptable temperature is less than -15 °;
  • Boots cannot be used for wearing in the rain, walking on rough terrain.

The upper of the boots made of pressed leather

Differences between the leather and the composite version

In the shoes made of composite leather, the legs will not breathe. The surface does not stretch because it is glued or compressed. It also has a short service life – a maximum of 2 seasons.

Differences between genuine leather and pressed leather

Important! Leftovers are too small and therefore not suitable for sewing whole garments. But due to the natural composition, this type of leather is more expensive than leatherette.

Application in the shoe industry

Composite material is used for sewing insoles, soles. It is also used for the heel of boots, boots.

If a person wants to buy natural leather shoes, but his budget is limited, then you can buy a product made of composite material. If you take care of them, wear them only in dry weather and do not wear them at temperatures below -15 °, then it will last more than 1 season.

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What does leather on Zenden shoes mean?

What is composite leather in shoes?

This type is known as “ adhered leather ” and is obtained in various ways. Let’s get acquainted with the basic concepts that make up the material, find out how it is used in the production of footwear. What is composite leather, we will consider its pros and cons in detail.

Composite Leather – Definition

Help! Composite leather is a material that is produced by pressing and then combining the remains of the leather industry .

The process and stages of its manufacture may be different, but the principle remains the same.

What is composite leather obtained from?

A continuous web occurs after gluing small pieces of leather that have become redundant after the production of the main product. The elements are combined into a single composition by pressing. Adhesives are not used.

Brief description of the process – small pieces are heated in hot water and rolled into one base.As a result of heat treatment of leather trimmings, a composite variety appears. The naturalness of the material is confirmed by the procedure for its creation.

Unlike many fabrics, the pieces can be dyed, polished or varnished. The canvas is not capricious, it is easy to work with it, it can be given a suede surface, embossed, metallized.

In order to reveal the value and to know the distinctive features of leather, it is worth familiarizing yourself with its composition. Composite material is made from different scraps :

  1. Old leather clothing that has become unusable and cannot be restored and repaired.
  2. Small waste, stripes left after sewing products.
  3. Leather dust, flour. These materials are used to create artificial suede.

Important! To create composite leather, trims of unprocessed animal skins, worn-out footwear are not used.

The use of composite leather in the shoe industry

The main area of ​​use is shoe production.

If boots are completely made of this leather, then they will not last long, they will be impractical, they will last a maximum of 2 seasons.

Advantages of leather from waste

The advantages of the material include:

  • Compared with artificial materials, leather is distinguished by its strength ;
  • natural fibers ;
  • beautiful appearance, it is difficult to distinguish it from real leather ;
  • Material can be painted in any color , due to this a variety of shades.

Other types of materials are produced from the composite type – artificial suede.

Disadvantages

Many inexpensive bags and boots, the sellers of which convince them of their naturalness, are made of this material. disadvantages include:

  • lower level of strength due to the fact that it is subjected to pressing;
  • Over time, shoes and boots begin to get wet;
  • due to the lack of integrity of the fabric, the products will not warm in frost, the acceptable temperature is less than -15 °;
  • Boots cannot be used for wearing in the rain, walking on rough terrain .

The upper of the boots made of pressed leather

Differences between the leather and the composite version

In the shoes made of composite leather, the legs will not breathe. The surface does not stretch because it is glued or compressed. Also, it has a short service life – a maximum of 2 seasons .

Differences between genuine and pressed leather

Important! Leftovers are too small and therefore not suitable for sewing whole garments.But due to the natural composition, this type of leather is more expensive than leatherette.

Application in the footwear industry

Composite material is used for sewing insoles, soles . It is also used for the heel of boots, boots.

If a person wants to buy natural leather shoes, but his budget is limited, then you can buy a product made of composite material. If you take care of them, wear them only in dry weather and do not wear them at temperatures below -15 °, then it will last more than 1 season.


What does leather on Zenden shoes mean?

Application sector (read more …)

  1. Old leather products that have become unusable and cannot be restored. At the same time, leather fibers are not used for the production of a new product.
  2. Small scraps and strips that remained after the main product was finished.
  3. Leather dust, or flour, suitable for the manufacture of artificial suede.

Composite leather – what kind of material is it? Scope of application
The used residues are so small that they are not suitable for the production of a full-fledged leather product.However, the naturalness of the material makes the cost higher than that of leatherette.

Differences between leather and composite version

Composite leather has undoubted advantages. That this material is quite durable and natural, you can understand by reading its composition. Only scraps of natural leather or flour obtained by processing it are used.

Composite leather is the result of processing leftovers from the tanning industry. That this material is natural is confirmed by the algorithm for its production.In this case, the canvas can be painted, polished and even varnished. The material is malleable, so you can give it a suede look, emboss or metallize it. What does it mean to leather on Zenden shoes?

Shoes (read more …)

Some manufacturers use pressed fabric for sewing entire bags. The material looks beautiful on the outside, it has a huge range of shades, the material is smooth on the outside and looks like natural leather. If you use the bag with care, do not take it with you in bad weather or frost, it can last longer than usual.

What is composite leather, its use for shoes and bags
The main field of application of the product in question is shoe production. But shoes are not made of 100% composite material, because they will not last long due to fragility. What does K leather on shoes mean? This means that the sole, insoles and heels are made of this material. For the manufacture of these parts, composite matter is actively used. What does it mean to leather on Zenden shoes

Disadvantages (read more…)

  • lower level of strength due to the fact that it is pressed;
  • Over time, shoes and boots begin to get wet;
  • due to the lack of integrity of the fabric, the products will not warm in frost, the acceptable temperature is less than -15 °;
  • Boots cannot be used for wearing in the rain, walking on rough terrain .

What is composite leather in shoes
If boots are made entirely of this leather, then they will not last long, turn out to be impractical, they will last a maximum of 2 seasons.

Liquid leather LIQUID LEATHER: instructions.

The second life of leather products – restoration with liquid skin!

A new repair tool that will give your accessories, clothes and shoes a second life – liquid leather. This is a special tool with which you can quickly repair any item of leather goods or other leather products. Its main advantage is that liquid skin is very easy to use at home! The high demand for these products is due to the fact that liquid skin repairs even very deep cuts, as well as cracks on the surface.

LIQUID LEATHER liquid leather: features of

The material retains its regenerating properties in an incredibly wide temperature range: from -35 to +70 degrees. At both minimum and maximum temperatures, liquid skin does not lose its plasticity properties and does not become fragile, so it can be used both in winter and in summer!

Liquid leather has many advantages. It is very flexible and does not damage the item being repaired.It also has high strength, so it is very difficult to scratch the repaired place after it dries completely. Liquid repair leather allows an accessory, shoe or garment to regain its shape after being compressed or wrinkled. The material is durable (natural aging age is 35+ years). It is resistant to abrasion and stretching, which is why it is possible to use such, in many cases irreplaceable, material even in those places where the thing will have the maximum load.

Liquid leather is so similar in structure to natural leather that it penetrates very deeply into the surface, and when completely dried, it becomes one with the surface that was restored.Another significant plus of liquid skin is that if you do something wrong during recovery, the situation can be easily remedied. Keep in mind, however, that liquid skin is very difficult to remove once it is completely dry.

Beware of Counterfeits! Unscrupulous sellers can offer you liquid leather at a lower cost and you will receive a low-quality product. To buy liquid leather LIQUID LEATHER at You Buy means to protect yourself from counterfeits, because we offer our customers exclusively original products.The material is completely safe for health. There are no harmful components in it, it is made on a water basis, to which alcohol is added. It is very easy to repair with liquid leather, because it does not need to be dried or heated. Even a child can cope with such a task! If we compare liquid skin with correctors and other “putties” of the last century, then there are a lot of advantages. The most important of them: liquid leather completely eliminates scuffs or scratches, and does not just cover it up; the material treats the restored product with care, significantly extending its service life.

How to use LIQUID LEATHER liquid leather: step by step instructions

So, you have already bought liquid skin and now decided to use a newfangled remedy. The repair procedure itself is simple and does not require much effort from you.

    1. First clean the surface of any dirt. Do not use aggressive agents such as gasoline or acetone for these purposes; it is better to use gentle cleaners.
    2. Next, you need to choose the appropriate color.If you haven’t found one, you can do it yourself by mixing liquid skin of various colors to the desired shade concentration, which will help you with our table:

    3. Do not forget to check the resulting color on an inconspicuous area of ​​the product!

    4. Apply liquid skin to the damaged surface with a thin layer with an artistic brush, leveling the layer with a dry sponge.If the sponge is pressed lightly against the surface, the result will be a natural skin relief. If necessary, after the layer has dried, you can apply a second one.
    5. It is important to remember that liquid skin begins to set only after 30 minutes, and completely hardens within 24 hours!

Another application for liquid leather is product renewal. This material not only restores leather goods well, but also renews their appearance.LIQUID LEATHER liquid skin will very quickly and completely remove scuffs from prolonged use! You need to update the surface of the accessories in the same way as described above, only you need to apply the material in a thinner layer.

Separately, we need to talk about deep cuts, because this is not a simple scratch. More effort is needed to fix the cut. The product must be turned out, then the edges of the leather are glued together with a hot iron, an adhesive cloth or a piece of leather, and only then the front side is treated with liquid leather.We can safely say that liquid leather is a universal remedy for all problems with leather accessories. Feedback from experienced specialists confirms this fact.

Liquid leather for repair, although a versatile material, however, it is not recommended to use it for lacquered, rough leather, reptile leather or textile surfaces. It is also important to remember that only local areas should be treated with liquid skin, and not the entire surface of the product as a whole.

Types of damage to leather accessories and effective remedies

To repair various injuries, liquid leather must be used taking into account some effective rules.

      1. In case of cuts, the hole must first be glued from the inside. For this, almost any of the universal adhesives existing today (waterproof rubber-based, toluene with carbon) is suitable. Important: in no case should you use the Moment glue for these purposes, because the heat released by it during instant gluing decomposes the skin, and after repair the glued area becomes rough, a white coating appears on it, which spoils the appearance of the accessory.

Repair of cuts with liquid skin.

      1. In case of scratches or punctures of a leather product, liquid leather must be applied after preliminary degreasing of the surface, for which abrasive or aggressive cleaning agents (solvent, acetone, etc.) must not be used. Clean the area with any detergent and let it dry.

      1. Large gaps on the product cannot be repaired with liquid leather alone, they must first be glued.
      1. Do not forget that the color of liquid skin must be selected individually. Use the Liquid Skin Tone Selection Chart above to understand what colors and in what proportions you need to mix in a particular situation.
      2. Damage over several centimeters in length should be repaired in several stages.
      3. Do not flood minor lesions with large amounts of liquid leather.It is better to make a thin layer at each stage. At least two hours should elapse between the application of the first and second layers. Only after the repair site has dried out within 12 hours can the procedure be considered complete, and the accessory ready for use.
      4. If the accessory has a special relief, it is better to first create its template using a regular napkin. To do this, apply liquid skin to a napkin, apply it to any intact place on the product with a clearly visible relief, then dry the template for 12 hours.Now the blank can be used at the final stage of the accessory restoration by attaching the template to the place of application of the second layer of liquid leather. If the skin is rough, you can use an ordinary foam sponge to create a relief.

It may seem to some customers that the packing of 17 ml of liquid leather is very small, but each restorative layer is 0.2 mm thick, which means that one jar will be enough for you for 100 centimeters of the square surface that needs to be repaired.To buy liquid leather in the You Buy online store means guaranteed to receive the original products of the Russian manufacturer, which has established itself as a high-quality material for the repair of leather products.

Storage conditions and shelf life of liquid leather LIQUID LEATHER

  • Expiry date: 2 years
  • Store in a closed bottle away from sunlight and heat

How to choose the right soccer ball – tips for choosing a ball for football

How to choose the right soccer ball – tips for choosing a ball for soccer – Sportmaster online store

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The soccer ball is the most important piece of football equipment for both children and adults, without which football is impossible. A good ball must be properly inflated, fly at the speed and in such a trajectory that the player wants.

When choosing a ball, consider the following:

First you need to decide on the age of the player – the size and weight of the ball depends on it.And also pay attention to such parameters as the material of the outer and inner layers, the material of the chamber and the type of cut.

Then with its purpose – the ball is bought for friendly matches, training, or professional matches, or just as a souvenir.

And most importantly, you should understand on what type of surface most of the games will be.

Weight and size

Grams and centimeters are physical characteristics that determine the weight and size of a ball. Modern soccer balls can be from size 1 to
size 5.

Depending on the age of the player, one or another size of the ball is chosen. For children and women, some manufacturers offer lightweight balls of the 4th and 5th sizes with the same circumference, but with a lower weight of 40-50 g.

Ball size
Circumference
cm
Weight, g Designation
1 43 200 – 220 Souvenir / kids
2 56 283.5 Souvenir / kids
3 61 340 For juniors / kids
4 62 – 64 400 – 440 Junior / Futsal
5 68 – 70 450 For adults

In addition to size, there are other characteristics that affect the “flying” qualities of the ball and its price.

Construction of soccer balls

The soccer ball consists of a tire

a

, a tube

b

and a lining

c

between it.

Tire material

Unlike in past years, when balls were made mostly of leather, modern ball covers are made of polyurethane (PU) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC).

Genuine leather

It gets wet quickly (the weight of the ball increases, the rebound worsens, it becomes more difficult to perform technical elements).

Polyurethane (a type of synthetic leather)

Strong elastic material (the thicker the layer, the better the rebound and control, the longer the ball will last).

The surface of the polyurethane ball can be matte
“imitation leather”

a

or glossy

b

.

Gloss repels water better and improves aerodynamic properties.

Polyvinyl chloride

Balls intended for training and indoor games are more often sewn from it.

The material is hard, but not elastic.

Not suitable for winter, as it hardens in the cold.

Number of tire panels

The number of panels from which the ball is made can be different – from 6 to 32. The panels can be sewn or glued together.

Stitching is more reliable than gluing, and manual stitching is better than machine stitching. The ball will last the longest when the tire is hand-sewn from 32 panels with polyester thread

a

.

Camera

Most modern soccer ball chambers are made from butyl

a

and latex

b

.

Butyl

Holds air better.

Latex

The ball with a camera made of natural latex is better felt and controlled by the player.

It holds the air worse, so you have to pump up the ball more often than a ball with a butyl chamber.

Expensive professional balls have a latex camera.

Lining

A lining is installed between the tube and the tire, which gives the ball elasticity and the correct spherical shape.It can be made of foam, fabric or non-woven material – a high-tech product.

Cloth and foam

Quickly absorb water in wet fields, which increases the weight of the ball and decreases the “flight” qualities.

Non-woven backing

It usually consists of spiral-shaped cotton fibers treated with synthetic resin.

This lining is good at repelling water.

The ball almost immediately regains its shape after being hit or bounced.

Assignment

Football balls differ depending on the purpose of use.

Professional. These are premium balls for high-level official matches.

High quality (have special marks of the International Football Federation FIFA: FIFAQualityPro, FIFAQuality and IMS (InternationalMatchStandard).

“Flight” characteristics are almost ideal (the most modern technologies and the best materials are used in the manufacture).

Training. Designed for regular training in any weather on open fields and indoor areas.

Strong and durable enough.

Universal balls suitable for players of all skill levels.

They have a laminated coating that repels dirt and water well and withstands a lot of impacts.

Amateur. Never used in official matches, but great for regular play and training by amateur athletes.

Good value for money.

They serve less (unlike practice balls, amateur balls are made of cheaper materials)

Souvenir. These are the smallest balls, usually in sizes 1 and 2. They are usually bought as a souvenir or gift. Children can play with this ball. Also, a small ball is suitable for soccer exercises to develop the agility and feel of the ball in training.

Professional
Zional
Training
Amateur –
Souvenirs –
Wear resistance – +++ +++ ++
All-weather +++ +++ ++
Ball Control +++ ++ ++ +
Aerodynamics +++ ++ ++ +

Coating type

When choosing a soccer ball, you need to take into account on what surface the majority of games and trainings will take place.Depending on this, the model of the ball is selected.

Universal

These are practice balls suitable for playing on any field. They are distinguished by their strength and durability, suitable for both amateurs and professionals.

For playing on the lawn

Almost any ball will do – amateur, professional, practice. Even a souvenir ball of a “child’s” size can be “driven” while playing with a child.

Indoor play (futsal)

Usually smaller balls are used – sizes 3 and 4.Thanks to a butyl tube and a special padding of the lining, they have a small rebound – 50–65 cm, which ensures good ball control.

Beach

Beach soccer practice and recreational balls are made of lightweight, soft materials to make it easier to play barefoot. As a rule, these balls are waterproof.

For hard surfaces

Asphalt, concrete, trampled soil – these are hard surfaces typical for open street areas.Amateur balls for playing in these conditions are usually made of durable rubber filled with 80-125 cm rebound filling.

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