Charcoal pencil white: General’s® Charcoal White Pencils

What the heck is “White Charcoal”? – Vitruvian Fine Art Studio

We had an argument at the studio yesterday. It preceded the opening of our exhibition at the International Museum of Surgical Science in Chicago, where we had some class demonstration drawings and lecture diagrams on display. We were printing exhibition labels for the artwork, and the argument was about what to call a white pencil.

I’ve been working on gray paper for most of my drawings lately, which requires the lighter values to be “heightened” with white… But what kind of “white”? My tool of choice to date has been General’s Charcoal White – a dense and chalky substance, available in pencils or sticks, that does the job nicely. But what is it, exactly, and what should it be called on our exhibition labels? “Graphite and what on gray paper”?

When I asked how I should refer to their product on our exhibition labels, the representative replied curtly. “Just call it white charcoal.”

Rage.

I’m afraid this is where we descend into pedantry. Artists typically refer to this product as “white charcoal”. To an extent, this makes sense – it’s powdery like charcoal, and it’s made to be used along with charcoal. There’s just one problem: it’s not charcoal. It’s not even close to being charcoal. In fact, the practice of referring to the stuff as “white charcoal” has been a pet peeve of mine for years, and I cringe every time I hear it. It’s just sloppy language and I refuse to say it – particularly on exhibition labels. Hence the argument.

But if it’s not charcoal, then what is it? General’s offers no help at all. I called the company for clarification and all they said is that the composition of their products is “proprietary” and can’t be shared. When I asked how I should refer to their product on our exhibition labels, the representative replied curtly. “Just call it white charcoal.”

Rage.

What complicates matters here is that “white charcoal” does legitimately exist. It’s a Japanese variety also known as “Binchōtan”, and while it isn’t as dark as conventional charcoal, it isn’t exactly white, either. At best, it’s a light gray – like the color of ashes.

Japanese “Binchōtan” or “White Charcoal”.

In any case, “Binchōtan” is not widely used for drawing, and I’m pretty sure it’s not what General’s Charcoal White is made from – which isn’t the color of ashes at all, but rather gleams like the driven snow.

Some artists refer to this and similar white pencils generically as “pastel pencils” and that might be a better fit – except that I frequently use a soft white pastel on drawings to achieve values lighter than what the General’s Charcoal White pencils can deliver. Referring to the pencil, then, as any kind of pastel would be wordy and confusing: “Graphite and pastel pencil and pastel on gray paper” Huh?

So what do I call it? For sheer lack of a better option, I’ve taken to calling it a “chalk pencil”. It’s unclear if it actually contains any chalk, either, but it’s the best I can come up with. It definitely seems chalky, and it’s better than calling it charcoal, but really I’m at a loss.

If anyone out there has a better idea, I’m all ears. But until then, “chalk pencil” it is – which is what we put on the labels.

3 Drawing Techniques to Try

Why use white charcoal pencils?

Whether you’re looking to challenge your drawing skills or shake things up in the studio, using these pencils could be just the way to do it! On this page I introduce three of my favorite white charcoal drawing techniques, from least to most advanced.

Drawing Supplies I will be Referring To

General’s Charcoal White 558 Pencil

Drawing Pencils: The pencils commonly referred to as ‘white charcoal pencils’ combine beautifully with regular charcoal pencils. I will be using General’s Charcoal Pencils and General’s Charcoal White Pencil 558.

Drawing Paper: A variety of toned paper can be used for the following techniques. Throughout this page I use Strathmore Artagain Black Paper, toned Artagain Paper by Strathmore, and Strathmore 400 Series Drawing Paper that I toned myself.

This is a brief overview of the materials used throughout this page. However, if you click on the tutorial mentioned in each technique description, you can view a detailed list of drawing supplies used to create that specific drawing.


White Charcoal Pencil Technique #1:
Blend white charcoal with regular charcoal

Step by Step Tutorial using this Technique: Ear Cast Drawing Tutorial

Level of Difficulty: Easiest technique of the three.

In this technique, white charcoal pencils and regular charcoal pencils are blended together. Light values are drawn using white charcoal, dark values are drawn using regular charcoal, and middle values are drawn by mixing and layering the two. As you can see in the image below, the toned paper does not show through in the drawn areas.



Benefits of Technique #1:

This is such an enjoyable technique, and is one of my personal favorites for the following reasons:

1) There is no erasing!

This technique is entirely additive and does not require any erasing (well, you certainly can if you want to, but it’s not necessary). To darken an area of your drawing, you add dark value with a regular charcoal pencil, as you normally would. However, to lighten an area, instead of erasing you can add light value with a white charcoal pencil! Darker, drawn areas can be lightened by layering lighter value overtop, as black and white charcoal blend together beautifully.

Lightening a dark value by layering white charcoal overtop

2) It has unique aesthetic qualities

Blending white
charcoal with regular charcoal ‘cools its temperature’, meaning that it
gives the charcoal a bluer hue than it normally has.

The two drawings in the image
below were both drawn on Strathmore 400 Series Drawing Paper. However, in the left drawing, I toned the paper lightly and then used white charcoal throughout. The right drawing was drawn only with regular charcoal pencils (no white charcoal).

Do you see the temperature difference? The left drawing is distinctly bluer than the right one.

White charcoal also gives drawings a
quality that I can only describe as ‘silvery’ or ‘velvety’, though it rarely translates in photos.

White charcoal was used in the left drawing, giving it a bluer hue than the drawing on the right.

3) Black and white charcoal blend together very nicely with an inexpensive paintbrush

This makes it easier to achieve smooth, even values and gradations.

Blending black and white charcoal together with a paintbrush.

This technique can be used on homemade toned paper, like the ear drawing pictured above, or on store-bought toned paper, like the gradation above. One is not better than the other – it’s completely a matter of personal preference.

I often choose to tone my own paper because it allows me to ‘skip a step’: as soon as I begin using white charcoal on my homemade toned paper, it immediately starts to combine and blend with the regular charcoal. This simply cuts back on some blending time.

However, that’s just my personal preference! Experiment with store-bought toned paper vs homemade toned paper to determine what you prefer.

Challenges of this Technique

  • When using white charcoal in this blended way, remember that
    wherever it is applied, it will cool the temperature of the black
    charcoal. If you only use it in some areas, you will have cooler and
    warmer areas of your drawing. You may like this variation and choose to
    use it intentionally, or this may bother you. You can unify the drawing
    by using white charcoal throughout the entire drawing (even very lightly
    in the darkest areas to cool them slightly, giving them the blue hue
    present in the rest of the drawing).
  • If you layer a lot
    of charcoal repeatedly, there can come a point where your drawing paper
    will not be able to hold any more pencil dust. You can minimize the
    chance of this happening by using a good quality drawing paper with a
    little bit of tooth, or texture, to it: slightly ‘toothier’ paper can
    hold more pencil dust. You can also analyze the values in the scene that
    you’re drawing and plan your value structure, so that you have a better idea of what value is needed where, and don’t have to modify your values too many times. Learn how to plan your value structure in lesson 5 of my free Mini-Course.

When to Use this Technique

This technique works beautifully with a variety of subject matters. I have used it for quick-sketch figure drawing, for drawing interior spaces, still life drawings – really anything you can think of.

Check out a full step by step tutorial using Technique #1 here!


White Charcoal Pencil Technique #2:
White charcoal on black paper

Step by Step Tutorial using this Technique: How to Draw Glass Using White Charcoal on Black Paper

Level of Difficulty: Medium.

Technique #2 involves drawing with only white charcoal on black paper, as
opposed to a dark pencil on light paper. Variations in half-tone values are achieved by adjusting the pressure of your marks with the white charcoal pencil. You can use a kneaded eraser to help even out your pencil marks and create a range of middle values.


Benefits of Technique #2

How often do you get to use a single (type of) pencil?! All you need for this is a General’s White Charcoal Pencil!

A benefit of this technique is that it can be quite quick: because it is most often used on high-contrast subjects (that consist mostly of extremely dark and extremely light values), applying only the light values can often take less time than applying the dark values in a regular drawing.

Finally, these drawings are usually very dramatic and striking!

Challenges of this Technique

This technique may require a considerable
shift in your mindset! We would
normally leave the paper blank where lightest values are needed and add
value to
darken shadows, right? Well, here we will leave the paper blank where
shadows are needed and add value to create the light areas. It sounds
simple enough, but it may have you scratching your head every once in a while!

It
may also take some getting used to that a kneaded eraser is used to
darken rather than to lighten values in this scenario.

Finally, since you can’t switch pencil grades in order to make it easier for yourself to draw lightly (for example, in a regular drawing you could switch to an HB or even a 2H charcoal pencil to draw the lightest values), it is a benefit if you have a sensitive hand when using this technique. However, if you don’t, that’s all the more reason to try this method! It will be excellent practice and increase your control of your drawing tools. If gaining control, stability and sensitivity with your drawing pencil is something you are working on, please check out my video on the topic.

Don’t let these potential challenges dissuade you from trying this technique! With a little bit
of practice you could very well come to love it.

When to Use this Technique

It makes the most sense to use this technique when your subject matter consists predominantly of dark values.

Check out a full, step by step tutorial using Technique #2 here!




White Charcoal Pencil Technique #3:
Leave half-tones as the value of the toned paper

Step by Step Tutorial using this Technique: How to Draw an Ear on Toned Paper

Level of Difficulty: Most advanced of the three techniques.

In this technique, light values are drawn using white charcoal pencils, dark values are drawn using regular charcoal pencils, and half-tone values are left as the value of the paper. As you can see in the images above and below, the toned paper shows through only where there are middle values.

As opposed to Technique 1 where the charcoal is applied opaquely, here both white charcoal and black charcoal are applied more ‘transparently’, gradually gradating into the tone of the paper to create a range of middle values.


Benefits of Technique #3

This technique gives drawings a distinct look, almost as though they are growing out of the paper. It can also be a great way to add some color to your drawing, as toned paper comes in various shades and hues.

Finally, this technique will challenge you. Wait – the benefit is that it’s a challenge? Sure! At some point during your drawing education you’ll get comfortable with the technique you’ve been working with and desire to stretch your drawing skills. This could be just the method for you to do that!

Challenges of this Technique

This technique requires more planning of the
value structure of your image: you need to be very mindful of where the
light values, middle values and dark values are on your subject, so as not to cover up the middle values with pencil marks, and to keep the white and black charcoal separate. Learn how to plan the value structure of your drawing effectively in Lesson 5 of my free Mini-Course!

When to Use this Technique

This technique works especially well when your subject matter consists predominantly of middle values. However, it can be used effectively in other scenarios as well. For example, notice that the earring in the drawing above is high in contrast: it is made up of mostly very light and very dark values, so the paper shows through very minimally.

Check out a full, step by step tutorial using Technique #3 here!


Three White Charcoal Pencil Drawing Techniques:
A Summary

Technique #1: White charcoal and regular charcoal are blended together

Technique #2: White charcoal is used on black paper (with no addition of regular charcoal)

Technique #3: Both white charcoal pencils and regular charcoal pencils are used but remain separate, allowing the toned paper to show through as the middle value of the drawing



Is this an exhaustive list of techniques to try with white charcoal pencils? Definitely not!

Could you combine a few of the above techniques in a single drawing? Absolutely! Once you’ve got the hang of these techniques separately, why not experiment with blending white and black charcoal opaquely in some areas, and transparently in others.

I hope you enjoy experimenting with white charcoal pencils!

Happy drawing,


Enjoyed this page? Please share it!
Share buttons and pinnable image below:





If you enjoyed this page on drawing with white charcoal pencils, you may also enjoy …


Related Pages

How to Blend White and Black Charcoal in a Drawing

How to Draw Glass using White Charcoal on Black Paper

How to Make Toned Paper

How to Hold and Control a Drawing Pencil (Video)

3 Ways to Use a Kneaded Eraser (Video)


Return to Drawing Supplies from 3 Ways to Use White Charcoal Pencils

Return to Drawing Tutorials from 3 Ways to Use White Charcoal Pencils


report this ad

General Pencil General’s Charcoal Pencil – White

General Pencil General’s Charcoal Pencil – White | JetPens
JetPens is accepting and shipping orders. See COVID-19 for more details.

$1.50

In stock and usually ships within 1 to 3 business days.

Description Specifications Questions & Answers

This versatile white charcoal pencil is perfect for art. Use it with darker colors to add highlights and achieve tonal variation, or by itself to sketch on dark paper. This pencil can be used with a variety of media, including charcoal, graphite, pastels, and watercolors. When dry, it draws erasable white lines. When used with a wet tip, the pencil lines become brighter, more opaque, and resistant to erasing.

Model Number GENERAL PENCIL 558
Manufacturer General Pencil
Body Color Light Brown
Diameter – Max 7.5 mm
Eraser Attached No
Gift Set No
Lead Characteristics Charcoal
Lead Color White
Length – Body 17.3 cm / 6.8 inches
Quantity in Pack 1
Shape Round
Weight – Item Without Packaging i

For a product that contains more than one of the same item, this is the weight of one single item.

0.21 oz / 6 grams

There are currently no questions.


Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought



This white charcoal is…

This white charcoal is awesome. Quite smooth for a charcoal, and the best
feature is that it writes over black charcoal (something that most other white
charcoals don’t do), making it perfect for highlights.

1 person found this helpful

Sharpens well with Uni…

September 1, 2020

Verified Purchase

Sharpens well with Uni colored pencil sharpener. Lead works well so far in my
shop on beaver board and wood. Recommended.

July 23, 2020

Verified Purchase

I use this pencil for woodworking and it is by far the best charcoal pencil I
have used! It doesn’t break easily or leave a powdery residue, it just leaves
clean visible lines that I can easily wipe off when I’m done. Works especially
well on darker woods like walnut.

Exactly what I needed….

May 20, 2020

Verified Purchase

Exactly what I needed. I need to order more

July 11, 2019

Verified Purchase

Pretty great standard pencil for adding soft highlights

|ct_1319|ct_620|ct_5185|

Black & White Charcoal Pencils

Constructed out of carbon and organic blacks or whites, the Charcoal Pencil is a General classic for good reason. Easy to fade, shade, and, if you need to, correct, a charcoal pencil is unique both for its textural abilities and forgiving nature. The pencils are pre-sharpened and encased in handsome cedar. Click “read more” to get the lowdown on all of the General Pencil Charcoal options that are available for you. 

Charcoal Pencil 2B Medium –
The Charcoal Pencil 2B Medium is the “medium” degree on the material hardness scale and will give you a smoother, more even marking.

Charcoal Pencil 4B Soft –
Charcoal Pencil 4B Soft is the “soft” degree on the material hardness scale and will give you a darker marking that has more depth, capturing the texture of your surface.

Charcoal Pencil 6B Extra Soft –
Charcoal Pencil 6B Extra Soft is the “extra soft” degree on the material hardness scale and will give you a deep, dark marking that has a material-rich tangibility, capturing the texture of your surface.

Charcoal Pencil HB Hard –
Charcoal Pencil HB Hard is a “hard” on the material hardness scale and will give you a light, even marking.

White Charcoal Pencil –
White Charcoal Pencil is an attractive white that can be used over black.

Sets:

The 4 pencils + erasers are:
3 Charcoal Pencils – 2B, 4B, 6B
1 Charcoal White Pencil
1 Kneaded Eraser
This great set from General combines four classic pencils and a kneaded eraser. There are three charcoal pencils in the 2B, 4B, and 6B hardness degrees along with one charcoal white pencil. If you’re interested in what charcoal pencils can do for you, this is the place to start.

The 7 Pencils + Sharpener are:
2 – 6B
1 – 4B, 2B, HB
1– White
1 – Bonus Carbon Sketch Pencil
1- Sharpener

An expanded set for the pencil connoisseur. General has put together quite the winning squad, teaming up seven pencils with a durable sharpener. You’ll get four charcoal pencils – two 6Bs and one each of the 4B, 2B, and HB hardness degrees. Then, if that wasn’t enough, General also adds a white charcoal pencil and a bonus carbon sketch pencil. The sharp-point-maintaining sharpener is the icing on the cake.

Compressed Charcoal Sticks
When you need a smoother version of charcoal’s qualities, try General’s Compressed Charcoal Sticks. Since the charcoal is compressed, it has a consistency that’s closer to graphite. However, the versatility of charcoal is still present in every stroke. These sticks come in both square and rectangular shapes. You also can get three degrees of “hardness:” 2B, 4B, and 6B.

White Compressed Charcoal Sticks
When you need a smoother version of charcoal’s qualities, try General’s Compressed Charcoal Sticks. Since the charcoal is compressed, it has a consistency that’s closer to graphite. However, the versatility of charcoal is still present in every stroke. These sticks come in both square and rectangular shapes. You also can get three degrees of “hardness:” 2B, 4B, and 6B. This is the white version, able to be used over black.

Primo Charcoal Pencil Kit
The Primo Charcoal Pencil Kit is a great way to try out charcoal or restock your current collection. In this set, three Primo Euro Blend charcoal pencils in HB, B, and 3B are joined by one Primo Bianco pencil (white), one eraser, and one pencil sharpener.

Made from high quality cedar, these pencils sharpen well while laying down consistent marks on the page thanks to a “unique, creamy rich formula.” Whether used alone or when paired with other media, Primo is primed to make an impact.

Primo Charcoal Drawing Set
The Primo Charcoal Drawing Set is a fine point of entry for a beginner or a fantastic way for a seasoned artist to expand their collection. Boasting three Primo Euro Blend pencils, one Primo Bianco pencil (white), one Primo ELITE Grande pencil, four Primo compressed sticks, one Factis Magic Black Eraser, one General’s kneaded rubber eraser, and a Little Red All-Art sharpener, this set provides everything you’d need to get the ball rolling or complete your masterpiece.

Made from high quality cedar, these pencils sharpen well while laying down consistent marks on the page thanks to a “unique, creamy rich formula.” Whether used alone or when paired with other media, Primo is primed to make an impact.

Click here for more info on General’s products.

Charcoal Pencil – Pkg of 2

One great General Pencil Charcoal pencil plus a spare. Available in 2B Medium, 4B Soft, 6B Extra Soft, or HB Hard.

Charcoal Pencil – Pkg of 12

12 General Pencil Charcoal pencils to fill out your collection. Available in 2B Medium, 4B Soft, 6B Extra Soft, or HB Hard.

White Charcoal Pencil – Pkg of 2 + Sharpener

Two General Pencil Charcoal pencils to fill out your collection, plus a nifty sharpener. Available in white.

White Charcoal Pencil – Pkg of 12

12 General Pencil Charcoal pencils to fill out your collection. Available in white.

 

Ways To Use White Charcoal

 

You Will Need:

  • early start Imagination Paper, A3 Pad
  • Micador For Artists Compressed Charcoal – White
  • Micador For Artists Compressed Charcoal – Black
  • Micador For Artists Charcoal Pencils, White
  • Micador For Artists Artist Soft Pastels, Pack 12

 

1. Highlights


White charcoal can be used to highlight areas on black charcoal drawings. Start by drawing a shape with black compressed charcoal. Shade in the dark areas. Using your white compressed charcoal, draw over areas with the lightest highlights, then begin to blend your white in with the black creating mid tones.

2. Draw On Coloured Paper


A good way to experiment with white charcoal is to draw on coloured or toned paper. For this technique you can invert the colours in your reference image by drawing the darkest parts of the image in with your white charcoal pencil and shading the lighter parts with a softer hand.

3. Blending To Create Colour


Shade a light layer of a coloured soft pastel. Then shade a layer over the top with your white compressed charcoal. Blend with your finger and see how the colour becomes less intense. Repeat until you achieve your desired shade.

4. Contrast Drawing


This technique creates high contrast. You will use your coloured paper as the darkest shadows and only use your white charcoal to draw in the lighter parts of the image. Make the lightest parts white and more opaque and once you reach shadows slowly reduce the opacity of your charcoal to create mid tones.






Download this info as a takeaway PDF

white charcoal pencil – Buy white charcoal pencil with free shipping on AliExpress

Great news!!!You’re in the right place for white charcoal pencil. By now you already know that, whatever you are looking for, you’re sure to find it on AliExpress. We literally have thousands of great products in all product categories. Whether you’re looking for high-end labels or cheap, economy bulk purchases, we guarantee that it’s here on AliExpress.

You’ll find official stores for brand names alongside small independent discount sellers, all of whom offer quick shipping and reliable, as well as convenient and safe, payment methods, no matter how much you choose to spend.

AliExpress will never be beaten on choice, quality and price. Every day you’ll find new, online-only offers, store discounts and the opportunity to save even more by collecting coupons. But you may have to act fast as this top white charcoal pencil is set to become one of the most sought-after best-sellers in no time. Think how jealous you’re friends will be when you tell them you got your white charcoal pencil on AliExpress. With the lowest prices online, cheap shipping rates and local collection options, you can make an even bigger saving.

If you’re still in two minds about white charcoal pencil and are thinking about choosing a similar product, AliExpress is a great place to compare prices and sellers. We’ll help you to work out whether it’s worth paying extra for a high-end version or whether you’re getting just as good a deal by getting the cheaper item. And, if you just want to treat yourself and splash out on the most expensive version, AliExpress will always make sure you can get the best price for your money, even letting you know when you’ll be better off waiting for a promotion to start, and the savings you can expect to make.AliExpress takes pride in making sure that you always have an informed choice when you buy from one of hundreds of stores and sellers on our platform. Every store and seller is rated for customer service, price and quality by real customers. Plus you can find out the store or individual seller ratings, as well as compare prices, shipping and discount offers on the same product by reading comments and reviews left by users. Every purchase is star-rated and often has comments left by previous customers describing their transaction experience so you can buy with confidence every time. In short, you don’t have to take our word for it – just listen to our millions of happy customers.

And, if you’re new to AliExpress, we’ll let you in on a secret. Just before you click ‘buy now’ in the transaction process, take a moment to check for coupons – and you’ll save even more. You can find store coupons, AliExpress coupons or you can collect coupons every day by playing games on the AliExpress app. And, as most of our sellers offer free shipping – we think you’ll agree that you’re getting this white charcoal pencil at one of the best prices online.

We’ve always got the latest tech, the newest trends, and the most talked about labels. On AliExpress, great quality, price and service comes as standard – every time. Start the best shopping experience you’ll ever have, right here.

How to Draw with White Charcoal on Black Paper

Reverse Drawing

Using strong contrast in drawings is a great way to create a dynamic image. One effective way of creating strong contrast is by using white material or media on dark or black surfaces. Any white media will work. Ink, charcoal, oil pastels, chalk pastels, and colored pencils are all types of white media that could be used. Combine this white media with a stark, black background and you’ve got instant contrast. 

In this lesson, we’ll take a look at applying white charcoal to black drawing paper to create a portrait. Precise and direct lighting plays a role in this image since only a few portions of the face are lit. 

Drawing with white material on black paper may require a bit of practice. Most of us are accustomed to drawing with dark material on white or lightly colored paper.  This thinking has ingrained in us the impulse to add dark values and leave the lighter values.  When we reverse this thinking by drawing with white material on black paper, the process is the opposite. 

We now must train our minds to deal with the lighter values and leave the darker values to the tone of the surface.  This reversal can be challenging, but important in our development as artists.  It forces us to recognize the importance of tints (lighter values) and their relationships with shades (darker values).  With practice, our understanding of value improves.

Suggested White Media to Use on Black Surfaces

While you are nearly unlimited when choosing a medium to work with, if you are doing this exercise for the first time, I would recommend starting with a drawing medium.  Drawing mediums that work best for a “reverse drawing” include compressed white charcoal, conté, oil pastel, and colored pencils.  Work with a medium that you are already comfortable with so you can concentrate on the thought process involved in working with the lighter values.

Step By Step Breakdown

The process begins with a light sketch, mapping out the shapes of lighter value. This process is largely dependent on recognizing the relationships between the light and dark shapes, so this is where we should start. Even with light pressure, the white charcoal makes strong marks, so some control and precision is required even at this early stage.

Once the the shapes of lighter value are established on the drawing surface, we can begin the process of adding white charcoal to fill in the shapes. We’ll begin in the locations where the light is strongest, adjusting pressure placed on the pencil according to the intensity of the light. Small circular strokes are made with the charcoal pencil in order to produce even gradations of tone and value.

A blending stump is used to blend the material, producing a smoother texture that is similar to that of skin. Adjustments to the shapes of value can be made with an eraser. A kneaded eraser works well to lift the charcoal from the surface in larger areas, while an eraser pencil is better suited for areas that require more precision.

The blending stump mutes the intensity of the lighter tones and slightly darkens the value. This gives us the opportunity to add bits of stronger intensity within the areas of lighter value with the white charcoal pencil. Most of these locations are closest to the light source, but also exist on the areas of the face that protrude – the cheek, the nose, the forehead, the bottom lip and the chin.

As we add stronger highlights with the charcoal pencil, we can further develop the texture of skin. The texture of skin is not entirely smooth. Instead, small variations in the texture exist. We can create this illusion by adding small circular marks of stronger intensity over the blended applications.

Lastly, the hair is addressed. Strokes are pulled outward from the top of the head with the charcoal pencil, mimicking the direction that the hair grows. Care is taken to leave areas of shadow in between. If too much of the charcoal is applied, shadows can be erased out with a kneaded eraser or an eraser pencil.

A blending stump is used to mute the initial applications of white charcoal so that a broader range of value can be developed. Stronger highlights are added over the blended applications in areas to develop a bit more variety.

The completed drawing is dynamic and high in contrast. This drawing process is much quicker than other approaches that may produce a similar result, but presents a different set of challenges. We must focus on adding lighter values instead of adding darker ones. Although this approach may be challenging for some, it is well worth the exercise.

90,000 About white pastel pencils | artlab.club

In the course of the inventory of my cabinet with art supplies, I found n-number of all kinds of white pencils from different companies and fields of application. I’ll tell you more about pastels suitable for work, suddenly someone will come in handy.
I’ll start with a little preface: why exactly white?
Because, for the most part, I am an animal painter, 90% of my orders are portraits of animals, for the soul I draw them myself. And animals are whiskers! 🙂 Whiskers are most often white and are drawn in the very final, according to a large number of already applied pastel layers.In general, white pencils bear a much greater responsibility than others. Indeed, at the very end we draw the lightest places, highlights, the same mustache, individual hairs or hairs permeated with lighting, which means that the white pencil should be sharp enough to draw a thin line with it, but gentle so as not to tear off the layers of fragile pastels, and should be bright, dense and opaque, so that it does not “fall through” into these very layers. That is why the correct and intelligent choice of a tool such as a white pencil is so important.

Participants in my test drive:

  1. Derwent Pastel Titanium White P720
  2. Chalk Koh-I-Noor Hardtmuth “Gioconda” White Chalk 8801
  3. Lyra Rembrandt White Pastel soft
  4. General’s White Pastel
  5. General’s White Pastel Chalk 44
  6. Charcoal General’s Charcoal White 558

And also:

  • Black smooth paper from a sketchbook Clairefontaine “Goldline”
  • Rembrandt Pastels # 235.3 and # 620.3

more “oily” and thicker it, in my opinion, is more difficult to cover than the same light and delicate Schmincke.
In the end, separately, so to speak, as a bonus, I will tell and show Caran D’Ache Verdigris 712. It is not white, but a very cold, very pale green shade, but a bright enough representative of the light line of these pencils and by its properties it is quite possible to imagine how it will lead myself white.

How was the test drive:

  1. All pencil samples without pressure.
  2. The top rectangle is a stretch with layering from 3 layers to one.
  3. Bottom rectangle one layer with a slight finger shading.
  4. Lines on a pastel layer. The middle of the color spot is 5 bold layers of pastel, towards the edges they are reduced to one. 1st and 3rd lines – pencil in one layer. 2nd line – in 3 layers.

Looking ahead, I will say that this test revealed some features that were not at all noticeable when working directly on the drawings. In some places I was even surprised … But everything is in order.

So let’s get started.

The first to enter the ring is English Derwent

I love this brand in general and I love the white pastel pencil in particular.It feels like the manufacturers put something in this pencil (or don’t put it), which makes white more opaque than its colored comrades (no matter how racist it sounds right now). Derwent is dry, not too soft, but not hard either, sharpens sharply and keeps sharpness for a long time (by the standards of pastel pencils, naturally).
Pros:

  • Fits on top of several layers of pastel
  • Availability. It can be found in Russia in any thin.market
  • Sold by the piece
  • Value / price quality. It is relatively inexpensive, while the quality is superior to some slightly more expensive competitors.

Cons:

  • Hiding power is not always enough. With a large number of pastels, it can not cope, give a dirty tint instead of pure white.
  • Not suitable for all types of paper. It is bad friends with velor, practically not giving pigment to this paper. The delicate surface of Pastelfix can be damaged … very rarely, but an excessively hard grain comes across, which is critical for this paper.

Czech chalk Koh-I-Noor is nothing more than chalk in pencil.

I have him as a workhorse, I make sketches for him and preliminary drawing / construction on dark grades of paper. Dry, crumbly, does not hold sharpness very well.
Pros:

  • Price and availability. It is inexpensive, sold by the piece, and can be found even in small regional art stores, not to mention large metropolitan ones.
  • Good body wood.Sharpening normally with a knife and sharpener.
  • Basically fits on any paper

Cons:

  • Not very white. The shade is a little dull and warm.
  • Poor spreading rate. Even on a thin layer of pastel, you can hardly get a good result.

German Lyra Rembrandt White Pastel

A little more expensive than derwent and faber, but absolutely worth the money! From what you can buy in Russian stores without any problems, this pencil is perhaps the best.
Pros:

  • Bright, rich white pigment
  • Soft, with a dense velvet texture
  • Excellent hiding power
  • Sold by the piece
  • Sharpens well and keeps sharpness
  • Writes on any paper

I do not know what to write in cons … perhaps, perhaps, they are probably not everywhere you can buy and quickly disassemble … So I thought about this pencil in the process. No complaints. And during testing, he behaved frankly indecently, scratching the pastel layer to the paper! I still don’t understand how, it’s probably the smooth paper that didn’t hold the pastel itself well … But the fact remains:

  • a possible minus – it can tear off the pastel layer.

Well, now the overseas stars are American General’s .
My latest novelties, surpassing everyone that came before.
General’s Pastel Chalk

To be honest, I don’t quite understand this pastel pencil or chalk … or is it some kind of tricky mixture of them. Sold in a blister with a set of two identical pencils. They seem very long due to the fact that they have small erasers on their tails (for some reason they terribly touch me), this is a “trick” of the entire pastel line of this company, colored people have the same story.The wooden case is pleasant, varnished. Writes this pencil very softly, densely and incredibly opaque. Sharpening is good, keeps sharpness.
General’s Charcoal is something!

A white charcoal pencil that turned my idea of ​​coal as such and tucked all of the above into the belt. I am used to the fact that charcoal pencils are something so light and glazed, they do not give bright shades, rather pleasant undertones … and as one bearded guy from a lot of budget films said: “I was never so wrong!” A dazzling white color with a fantastic hiding power. is perhaps the clearest characteristic of this American! The wood of the body is without varnish and does not look very “glamorous”, but it does not matter at all! Feels like working – almost exactly the same as pastel with an eraser, only a little more “bold” and a little brighter.And the funny thing is, this treasure costs $ 0.99! Less than a dollar, Karl !!! Pastels in a blister, slightly more expensive, about $ 2.5 for two pencils. If we compare with the prices in our art markets, then this is not money at all.
But of course, these fabulous pencils also have disadvantages, more precisely one, but the most critical:
– They are not in Russia. You can order only from America … but this is a very expensive delivery, a hassle with an intermediary and 2 months of waiting for the parcel. So if you are planning a trip to the USA, I advise you to buy these pencils there.;)

And now about not white, but light, suitable for a mustache and other little things.

Swiss Caran D’Ache Verdigris 712

As I wrote above, it is not white, but very light, and I also draw the details with it in the final. And he’s adorable! Those who have drawn with pencils from this company at least once will understand me – they are the best! Simply the best pastel pencils on the world market. Point. Incredibly high quality, beautiful, soft, juicy and stand like a cast iron bridge.That is why I did not buy a pure white pencil from this company, I am sure that it is just stunningly white, but the same General’s is not worse, while it costs 4 times cheaper, and for $ 3.5 I would rather take some interesting color, and Caran D’Ache has almost all of them! 🙂 But more on that another time, in the review about pastel pencils in general. 🙂
And so pluses:

  • Very soft and “fatty”
  • Incredibly opaque, overlaps with 6-7 layers of pastel (I have not tried it again)
  • The slate, with its softness, sharpens very sharply and keeps sharpness for a very long time.
  • Good wood, very convenient to sharpen and keep in chickens.
  • Sold by the piece.

Cons:

  • The price is sky-high.
  • Difficult to find and easy to lose . In Russia, as far as I know, there is only one store, where they are quickly disassembled. We have to order from behind the hillock.

Austrian Cretacolor FINE ART Ivory color (ivory).

Very light yellowish-cream, I use it as a warm shade of white, in fact it is on black paper, the fact that it is not white is noticeable only on white paper.In general, I really like these pencils. They are ideal in a combination of price / quality, soft, pleasant to work with and are cheaper than competitors from the shelves of our stores. Unlike the same Faber-Castell “Pitt”, which I find too hard for pastels. That is why the white faber is not included in this review, although it can often be found in art markets.
But Cretacolor also failed on the test by scratching the pastel layer. I have a lot of pencils from this company, with a robot such a sin is not found behind them, but the test is spoiled.

Total:
They passed the test with excellent marks:

  • General’s Pastel Chalk 4414 White
  • Charcoal General’s Charcoal White 558
  • Caran D’Ache Verdigris

They were united by the fact that the pigment does not smudge, reliably adheres to the paper. This does not interfere with the shading, although you need to put more effort on the drop.
Something like that.

Thank you, dear reader, who mastered this huge post to the end! I hope it was at least a little interesting and useful!

Charcoal pencil 8812/2 GIOCONDA Koh-I-Noor – “The whitest of the whites.Photos of pictures, links to works. ”

Hello reading this review!

I got acquainted with the material from this review because of my love for pastel pencils. They became my passion, the material that I tried 7 years ago and fell madly in love with.

In our city, pastel pencils are sold only in sets, and strictly of the same brand. Once upon a time, I bought a Derwent set and fell in love with them from the very first stroke. My work is certainly not a masterpiece, but the process of drawing itself is a lot of pleasure.The first in my set began to run out of black and white pencils, respectively, I began to look for a replacement for them among those pencils that are available by the piece. I have tried many different alternatives, but today we will talk about the pencil that is ideal for me, which I have been waiting and looking for for a long time.

To my surprise, this pencil is called CHARCOAL, although I always thought the charcoal was black.

So, to the point.

Koh-I-Noor GIOCONDA 8812/2. It has a nice sleek white body, on which all the necessary information is indicated: the name, barcode and article number (!) In my case played an important role, i.e.Because it is by these numbers that I rock it, because Koh-I-Noor, to my surprise, turned out to have several types of such pencils (or maybe not such, but very similar).

Perfectly fits into a standard pencil holder, but unfortunately this pencil does not survive to the state of a small stub, since the lead in it is up to a gold strip on the body.

The body is made of the softest pleasant wood, which is perfectly sharpened.

Why I liked EXACTLY THIS pencil?

It is the whitest of all whites, as well as the softest and most opaque.

I use this pencil as a standard white among pastels, and also sometimes trace around other graphic works made with pencils or gel pens.

I am attaching a few pictures below, they used this white pencil.

These donuts are made with Derwent and Cretacolor pencils on craft paper.

Also, white pencils and chalk leads can be used as a separate tool. A little more on this here.

I hope my review was useful and interesting, all the best, and thanks for reading to the end!

P.S. In fact, this review should have been much more, and it had a lot of information about other manufacturers, as well as a great comparison of white pencils from pastel sets hoh-i-noor, derwent, cretacolor, faber castell, but unfortunately how many I Neither the rules of the information the site constantly gave me publication, so in order to pass the moderation I had to remove all the photo comparisons, and information about other white pencils.Who is interested directly in the theme of pastel pencils can be found on my page. And write all questions about comparing whites in the comments!

More information about art materials on my page.

Coal and Conte (sanguine, sepia, white chalk, etc.)

Charcoal began to be used for artistic purposes with the emergence of drawing as a form of fine art. Usually they took a charred vine or willow. Willow charcoal is lighter and more fragile.Carbon rods are available in various sizes. They are fragile – such is the nature of the material. While charcoal smudges your hands more than a pencil, it is great for quick tonal sketches and for applying solid stains.
Charcoal is also available in the form of charcoal pencils. They resemble ordinary graphite pencils, but their core is made of pressed charcoal, which is housed in a wooden case, which gives the pencil its strength. It is much more convenient to use such a pencil than a charcoal stick.One of the benefits is that your hands remain relatively clean.

Charcoal pencils can be up to 15cm long and usually vary in diameter; according to their composition, they are divided into soft, medium soft and hard. The so-called decorator charcoal is also on sale – in the form of large rectangular blocks and thick rods.
Charcoal pencils smear when used, but if dirty hands do not bother, this is a very convenient tool. Charcoal is ideal for handling and can be easily removed before fixing – most of the traces of such a pencil can simply be brushed off with a rag.

Pressed charcoal and charcoal pencils.
Compressed charcoal is made from coal powder with the addition of binders. It comes in short rods and is harder than regular coal. Some manufacturers classify pressed charcoal from 3H (3T) to HB (TM) in hardness and from the darkest 4B (4M) to the lightest 2B (2M) in black saturation. Pressed carbon rods can also be gray, in which case the coal powder is mixed with a binder and chalk.In cross-section, the rods are round and square. Wood sheathed charcoal pencils have thin pressed charcoal rods and are available in soft, medium soft and hard varieties.

Willow Charcoal is made from sanded and burnt willow branches. It is sold in boxes and comes in different thicknesses and compositions: thin and thick, hard and soft.

There are three types of charcoal pencils: light, medium and dark.Using all types, you will have a good grasp of the shading technique.

The charcoal is smeared – wrap the shaft over the shaft to avoid getting your hands dirty.

Use a cloth or brush to remove charcoal from softer products. But you won’t be able to use them after pinning the picture.

Oil charcoal.
To obtain this charcoal, simply place the rods in linseed oil for a few hours, or better overnight. Remove the rods and remove any unabsorbed oil.Work as you would with a regular charcoal rod and you will notice that the traces of charcoal are no longer smeared and do not need to be fixed.

Shank sharpening
Thick carbon rods can be sharpened with a fine knife, a sander or fine sandpaper. Use a knife or sandpaper for compressed charcoal, and a sharp knife for charcoal wood pencils.

ARTIST TIP
To erase a line drawn by charcoal, use a hard eraser, a nag: the soft eraser will only smudge the strokes.With an eraser, you can lighten some areas and even blend them. Note that the lines drawn by the charcoal branches can be completely erased. Other types of coal leave traces.
Try drawing with charcoal on colored paper to emphasize light and dark areas.

Texture and tone
Charcoal can be used to draw precise lines and apply tone; both come in handy when creating texture effects. Thick black lines are ideal for showing trunks and bare branches, the tip of the charcoal rod can be used for multiple strokes in foliage, and the side of the rod can be used for no shadows.

Rough paper is best for charcoal drawing, while smooth paper is best for pencil sketches.

Use chalk or a white pastel pencil to create a light background.

Using Fixer
Fixer is a mixture of glue and an alcohol solution that is applied to a drawing made with soft materials such as charcoal and soft pencils. It leaves a layer of glue on the paper that holds all loose pigment particles in place.
Sealer can be purchased as a spray. Make sure that during operation it does not come into contact with your face or clothing, do not inhale it and ventilate the area well. Fixers are widely available, but they are quite expensive, which is why some artists use hairspray to fix designs.

Light and Shadow
Charcoal and chalk are a wonderful combination that works well for creating grays. Sketch with white chalk first, then work with black pressed charcoal.Apply charcoal strokes incrementally so as not to “darken” the image. Charcoal is ideal for exploring and drawing perspective, as its strokes are easy to remove or recycle.

KONTE – tetrahedral crayons, slightly waxed, made of clay pigment. They can be applied to the paper with rich and clear lines, similar to the lines of charcoal pencils. Conte are also available in pencil form, which makes it easier to draw thinner lines. These pencils come in black, white, dark brown, terracotta, and Payne’s gray.The limited choice of colors makes Conte the perfect tool for the transition from monochrome to color.
Conte is quite soft, so the finished drawing should be covered with a fixer (see “Using Fixer” above). Cover the design with tracing paper when storing it in a stack. When drawing in the album, start from the end, moving to the beginning – in this case, the pages rub against each other less and the drawing is not smeared.

ARTIST’S TIP
Work right away without making a pencil sketch.Graphite and Conte have a certain fat content and therefore mix.

Contents are produced in the form of rods and pencils and can be sharpened with a penknife and a pencil sharpener.

Pencils and Contents
Traditional Conte colors are white (made of chalk), sanguine (made of iron oxides), bistre (dark brown; cooked from birch soot), sepia (made from cuttlefish ink) and black (made from graphite ).

Pencil Black chalk , “CRETACOLOR” Austria
Pencil Black chalk is recommended for sketching and sketching.Combines well with sanguine, sepia and other crayons, in addition, it can be washed out with water. The pencil is available in medium softness Art. No. 460 12.
Shaft available in medium softness Art. No. 260 12.

Water-soluble graphite pencil, “CRETACOLOR” Austria
Water-soluble artistic graphite pencil. Great for the watercolor graphite technique, and is also recommended for sketching watercolor sketches. Available in 3 softness options.
Art. No. 180 00 = HB, 180 04 = 4B, 180 08 = 8B, cylindrical, Ø 3.8 mm rod, 7.5 mm body, 12 pcs. in a cardboard box

Oil sanguine, “CRETACOLOR” Austria
Oil sanguine has a brilliant touch. Since it contains fat, it is waterproof and will not blend.
The pencil is available in medium soft. Art no. 462 02
Shaft available in medium softness. Art no. 262 02

Sepia assorted, CRETACOLOR Austria
Light and dark sepia is recommended for combining with crayons, charcoal and sanguine.The pencils are offered in medium softness. Art no. 463 22 = dry, light, 463 32 = dry, dark, 463 42 = oily, light, 463 52 = oily, dark
The rods are offered in medium softness. Art no. 263 22 = dry light, 263 32 = dry dark.

Charcoal pencil, “CRETACOLOR” Austria
The charcoal pencil has a uniform, thin and rich black stroke.
The pencil is available in three softnesses: Art. No. 460 01 = soft, art. No. 460 02 = medium, art. No.460 03 = hard.
The rod is available in two softnesses: Art. No. 260 01 = soft, art. No. 260 02 = medium.

Pencil White chalk , “CRETACOLOR” Austria
Pencil White chalk combines perfectly with charcoal, sanguine, sepia. By shading it, shades of color are brought out.
The pencil is available in two softnesses: Art. No. 461 51 = non-greasy soft, art. No. 461 52 = medium low fat, art. No. 461 61 = buttery soft.
Shaft available in medium soft Art. No.261 52 (dry).

Pencil Nero, CRETACOLOR Austria
Pencil Nero stands out with a shiny black stroke. Since it contains fat, the waterproof is not shaded. The pencil is available in five softness options: Art. No. 461 01 = very soft, art. No. 461 02 = soft, art. No. 461 03 = medium, art. No. 461 04 = hard, art. No. 461 05 = very hard.
The rod is available in two softnesses: Art. No. 261 01 = soft, art. No. 261 02 = medium.

Sanguine low-fat (dry), “CRETACOLOR” Austria
Sanguine low-fat or dry can be perfectly combined with crayons and charcoal.
The pencil is available in medium soft. Art no. 46212
Shaft available in medium softness. Art no. 26212

Pastel pencils

Today we publish the long-awaited post about pastel pencils from Ira Kukrusova.
Why are they even needed if there is pastel? The fact is that only with a pencil you can work out the details with high quality, draw thin, neat lines. And here’s the super bonus of pastel pencils – they don’t get your hands dirty. Let’s go through the main brands.

Stabilo
This is a real workhorse and a backbone. In a set of 60 pencils, many bright juicy colors, which (due to the theme of my work, apparently) I do not even know where to apply. Soft, perfectly shaded, draw the thinnest lines.

Faber Castell. Dry
The best choice for creating effects – scratch through a thick layer of pastel. The delightful palette has intricate grays, greens, and umber colors.

Derwent
Dry charcoal pencils, sometimes break when sharpened.Complex colors, beautiful dark shades, very rich, juicy. They draw well on pastels, mix well. White is rather weak, but good for mixing. This brand is highly praised for the Rexel series for its wide palette of unique complex colors and a soft, thick lead.

Conte a Paris
Thick lead, soft, well pigmented. They blend and shade perfectly, a wonderful clear line, one of the best pencils for animalism. You can quickly select the pencil you want – they are coated on the outside with the same color as the lead, which is very convenient.

Caran d’ache
Expensive stylish pencils, pleasant to hold in the hand, a little greasy. A rich palette, rich complex colors, ideally fit on paper. A significant disadvantage (especially considering the price) – the rod sometimes literally falls apart when sharpening.

Bruynzeel
Juicy colors, the rod draws softly, as if fibrous, beautiful velvety lines are obtained, but they are quickly written out.

Cretacolor
Strong, soft pencils, colors mix well, but I didn’t get it.

And now a little about black and white pastel pencils. American Generals is the blackest and whitest of all the pastel pencils I’ve used. My absolute leader and must have.
Lyra Rembrandt – dry charcoal pencil, deep bottomless black color, thick lead (at least 4 mm). Fits flat, not free-flowing, almost silent.
Try different pencils, you can start with 2-3 pieces of each brand, choose “yours” and enjoy. Bringing a picture, drawing strokes and details is a special pleasure.

90,000 Introduction to traditional materials: pencil, charcoal, eraser and more

In this lesson, I will introduce you to drawing materials that you can use to sketch and sketch.

Why drawing?

Because you can paint anywhere and anytime using the simplest materials. Drawing is one of the most relaxing and enjoyable pastimes. You will improve your skills and the graphics will develop your coordination.In the future, whatever tools you choose, it will be easier for you to work with them.

So take a lead pencil or Conte’s pencil or a piece of charcoal and draw. Draw on the train on your way to work. Draw what you saw on TV. Draw your husband / wife, your local park – whatever, anywhere.

1. Pencils

Basics

Lead pencils usually consist of a wooden shell with a lead inside, but you can buy a mechanical pencil and adjust the length of the lead yourself.Leads were originally toxic, while modern leads are made of graphite and clay.

Pencils are graded in hardness from 9H (hardest) to 9B (softest), while F and HB are medium hard pencils. I prefer to use soft B-pencils for drawing.

Pencils HB to 9V

B-pencils have the following characteristics: from hardest B to softest 9B:

  • The softer the pencil, the darker the lines and tone.
  • For deep shadows, use a soft pencil; it is easier to blend.
  • It is difficult to maintain the sharpness of the pencil tip when drawing thick lines, and it is much more difficult to erase them so as not to create dirt. But such lines are more resistant to water-based paints. The B-pencil is easier to paint over, while the 9B is much more difficult (almost impossible), especially if you have overlaid the strokes in a dense layer.

When I first started sketching, I used a B-pencil. This allowed me to draw light lines that were then almost invisible as I worked on the drawing.Or I could cover them with softer, darker pencils (take a look at the little boy sketch above). If the subject is moving (panda in the picture below), the B-pencil allows me to make many quick adjustments without losing the overall shape of what I am drawing.

Pencils must be sharp

It’s up to everyone to work with a sharp or blunt lead, but I want to add something about sharpening pencils.

A pencil sharpener is a good thing.But when you’re sketching outside the home, you don’t always have a place to dump the shavings. So take care of buying a sharpener with a container: the shavings will accumulate there until you find a place to throw them away.

Using a knife instead of a sharpener is a great idea, but carrying a knife with you is impractical and sometimes illegal. It does allow you to get an unusual angular tip though. Sharpening pencils with a knife eats them up incredibly quickly.

What should you buy?

First you need to buy separately the following pencils: B, 2B, 4B, 6B and 8B.You have to get a feel for how they paint and decide for yourself which one is too dark and which one is too light. Once you get used to them, you can buy harder or softer pencils.

There are many different brands of pencils, but I have a couple of favorites: Derwent and Faber-Castell. This is because they are less likely to break if you drop them (I do this sometimes), and the lead is softer than others.

You can buy a set of pencils, but make sure they contain a set of soft and hard pencils and not many of the same.Many kits contain large amounts of H and B pencils, so inspect the contents carefully before purchasing.

2. Coal

Coal is mud. It will be everywhere, especially on your hands, face, on the surface of your work, on your clothes and on the floor. But it’s fun to use and the effect it creates is very different from all the other materials presented here.

Basics

There are three types of coal:

  • Charcoal sticks – usually as thick as a regular pencil and made by burning twigs (grapes, beech, willow).
  • Pressed charcoal, which consists of sticks of various lengths and thicknesses.
  • Charcoal pencil (rashkul), in which charcoal is inside the wood shell.

As you can see in the picture above, you can draw a lot of details with a charcoal stick and a rashkule: they are used like regular pencils. Pressed charcoal is best suited for toning and working on large formats.

In this drawing, I have used pressed charcoal to fill the entire surface, smearing it with my finger and hiding the charcoal lines.Then I took a plastic eraser (see part 4) to paint over the charcoal. I erased black dust to create a cube. You can also scratch out the charcoal with your nails and add more detail with charcoal sticks, pencils, and even a small knife. And if you’re worried about smearing your drawing, hairspray can help.

What do you need to buy?

If you want to experiment with coal, I would start with two types:

  1. Willow charcoal sticks of various thicknesses allow you to achieve beautiful lines.It is easy to draw with them – just like with a regular pencil.
  2. Compressed charcoal allows you to quickly cover large areas. The lines will be darker than the touches of willow charcoal.

3. Conte Pencils

I have included them in this lesson as a separate paragraph, although they are considered to be simple pencils containing a coloring element. In addition to graphite, Conte’s pencil contains dye and is available in black, brown, red terracotta (sanguine), gray and white. It is a great drawing material and can also be used with charcoal or pencils to enhance your drawing, especially if you are working on colored paper.

I have to admit I love using them and recently spent some wonderful hours in the museum painting with them. They don’t have to be sharpened constantly and when I make a mistake I can gently wipe it off with my finger.

What should you buy?

It’s simple. Conte pencils are common, you just have to decide which colors you prefer. To get started, you can buy a pack of six different colors. I would look for the one in which there is white, i.e.It will help give your drawings more life.

4. Erasers

You can buy an eraser anywhere, but not all of them can be used for drawing. In the picture below, there are four erasers and I would get rid of the top two. Blue can stain the paper you are working on, and black (which can add color as well) is so harsh that it can damage the surface of your drawing.

What you need is a smooth white eraser on the bottom left.

The one on the bottom right is a plastic eraser (nag) and although not very good for large areas, it has no equal for creating small clean areas or white dots in a drawing.It can be given any shape, for example, pointed. But the more you use it, the dirtier it will get: look at the photo below (the sphere is drawn with a 9B pencil and a plastic eraser). I usually use this eraser as a drawing tool, not as an eraser.

I try to avoid using the eraser because it improves my skills. If I make a mistake, then I don’t erase anything – I just keep drawing on and try not to make it again.

What should you buy?

You need to buy two erasers: rubber and plastic. The best rubber eraser I have found is Staedtler Mars Plastic because it washes great and doesn’t fall apart. The plastic eraser can be of any brand, but always white. I have never been fond of colored erasers, tk. you never know what this color can do.

5. Paper

There are infinitely many types of paper. It comes in smooth, textured, white, cream, and any color you can imagine.Your choice influences many aspects of the drawing. You can buy paper sheets separately or as a whole album.

Paper weight

When people talk about the weight of paper, they really mean its density. I prefer to work on paper 120 g / cm2 and thicker. It has a luxurious look and will forgive you much more mistakes than 80g / sq.cm. This type of paper is harder to wrinkle, and you can use an eraser without damaging the surface. Plus, I can add water-based materials to thicker paper without the fear of wrinkling the paper.

Surface and Texture

The choice of texture is a personal matter. When painting, I like to work on lightly textured paper. On a smooth surface, the drawing may smear, and sometimes it is simply difficult to draw the necessary lines with the selected materials. The rough texture also affects the result of the work: take a look at the sketch of the cat below.

Color

I prefer to work on white, cream, pale brown, gray and black paper.Any other colors are too bright and distract attention from the picture. Darker shades of paper allow you to create light and highlights – and Conte pencils are perfect for this.

Dimensions

Paper is sold in separate sheets and comes in a variety of sizes. A4 is the paper size for the printer. A3 – twice as much, A2 – four times as much, etc. The following are the formats most commonly used by artists. But the sheets can be much larger:

  • A1: 59.4 x 84.1 cm, 23.4 x 33.1 inches
  • A2: 42 x 59.4 cm, 16.5 x 23.4 inches
  • A3: 29.7 x 42 cm, 11.7 x 16.5 inches
  • A4: 21 x 29.7 cm, 8.3 x 11.7 inches
  • A5: 14.8 x 21 cm, 5.8 x 8.3 inches
  • A6: 10.5 x 14.8 cm, 4.1 x 5.8 inches

I have to point out that paper sizes in the US are different.

What should you buy?

For pencil drawing, it’s best to start with something off-white and slightly textured.It’s tempting to use printer paper, but it’s too smooth and won’t give you room for error. When working with charcoal and Conte, use a more textured paper and start with something colored to see how it affects the drawing. Try to avoid bright colors, as they distract attention from the main thing.

To save money, I also used lining paper (material that is glued under the wallpaper) that is available from hardware stores. It’s a little textured, will forgive you a lot of mistakes, works great on most materials with the exception of some paints, and you can cut any size.

The choice of sheet size is at your discretion. If you paint outside the home, select A4 on a clipboard. It will be easy for you to keep it in your lap.

6. Sketchbooks

A sketchbook is an artist’s diary, notebook and inspiration. They come in different shapes and sizes: some will fit in a bag, while others are larger, you need to carry it in your hands.

Some have fully stapled pages, while others have perforations for tearing out the sheets.

What should you buy?

I usually avoid buying spiral sketchbooks because I like to work in a spread, which allows me to convert A4 to A3.The spiral can interfere with work.

If you are drawing outside the home or you have little space, then take a closer look at the A6 or A5 sketchbooks. They are easy to carry in a bag and place on one hand when drawing. Large sketchbooks are more suitable for work at home, while outside you may need a portable easel.

Write down your contact information on the first page of your sketchbook in case you lose it. Be sure to include a date. Then you can see how your skills have improved over time.

Conclusion

There are no hard and fast rules for drawing and sketching other than practice with materials. Use the tools you like best. Mix lead pencils with charcoal and Conte pencils and see what you get. Draw at home and on the go and have fun!

All the materials that I presented are available in art stores and on the Internet.

90,000 What is a charcoal pencil for. Charcoal and Conte (sanguine, sepia, white chalk, etc.)

We’ve all seen the marks on the end of each pencil, but what do HB and 2B stand for, and how are they different? When should we use a lead pencil, charcoal, or charcoal pencil? And why do pencils come in different shapes?

Let’s start simple: forms.

Pencils generally come in four shapes: hexagonal, semi-hexagonal, round and triangular. Some specialty pencils are also elliptical, octagonal, or rectangular; there are also new pencils that come in many different shapes. They are formed by forming a wooden body around the lead, which prevents lubrication during operation.

The four most common pencil shapes

Hexagonal pencils are commonly used for writing.They have very clear edges for easy grip and prevent scrolling. The solid body, however, is not ideal for shading, and the sharp edges often cause calluses.

Hexagonal pencils with smooth edges are often used for drawing. They have more rounded edges than just hexagonal pencils, so they are less stiff, but that also means less grip for writers.

Round edged pencils are more often produced for marketing reasons, as smooth edges look more attractive.But these pencils are less practical because roll off the table and do not adhere well to the hand.

Triangle pencils are best for children who are just starting out with drawing. Their shape helps children learn how to hold a pencil correctly. It is easier for children to hold large objects.

Graduation

At school, on test exams, we were always intimidated by the need to fill in the circles with HB or 2B pencils, but what does that really mean?

H stands for hardness and B stands for black, according to the European pencil classification system.Or, respectively, T and M, according to Russian. They are used to define the different shades of gray and black that can be obtained with a given pencil.

Pencil center, graphite, made from a mixture of clay and graphite. The relative proportions of each determine the graduation of the pencil – more clay means a harder pencil, while the amount of graphite affects blackness.

Graduation from 9B to 9H

The American pencil grading system uses numbers and is primarily used for writing pencils.There are only five varieties: # 1 (softest), # 2, # 3 and # 4 (hardest), which corresponds to European 2H, H, F (halfway up the scale), HB and B.

Writing Materials

Most pencils are made of graphite, the materials of which are made from a mixture of clay and graphite. These pencils make the smoothest strokes. Hard graphite pencils simply do not have a wooden body and are primarily used by artists to cover large spaces.

Charcoal pencils are deeper in black but smudge-free and more abrasive than graphite.

Charcoal pencils are composed of clay and carbon black or mixed with charcoal or graphite. On the scale of smoothness and blackness, they are located between graphite and charcoal, respectively.

Watch this video on how to choose a pencil for your artistic endeavors:

Which pencil to choose for drawing – video for beginners

As you move forward, you will also come across things like specialty pencils that are designed for drawing.Try experimenting with them at least once to understand how they work, and decide for yourself if they are right for you.

Charcoal began to be used for artistic purposes with the emergence of drawing as a form of fine art. Usually they took a charred vine or willow. Willow charcoal is lighter and more fragile. Carbon rods are available in various sizes. They are fragile – such is the nature of the material. While charcoal smudges your hands more than a pencil, it is great for quick tonal sketches and for applying solid stains.
Charcoal is also available in the form of charcoal pencils. They resemble ordinary graphite pencils, but their core is made of pressed charcoal, which is housed in a wooden case, which gives the pencil its strength. It is much more convenient to use such a pencil than a charcoal stick. One of the benefits is that your hands remain relatively clean.

Charcoal pencils can be up to 15cm in length and usually vary in diameter; according to their composition, they are divided into soft, medium soft and hard.The so-called decorator charcoal is also on sale – in the form of large rectangular blocks and thick rods.
When used, charcoal pencils are smeared, but if dirty hands do not bother, this is a very convenient tool. Charcoal is ideal for handling and can be easily removed before fixing – most of the traces of such a pencil can simply be brushed off with a rag.

Pressed charcoal and charcoal pencils.


Pressed coal is made from coal powder with the addition of binders.It comes in short rods and is harder than regular coal. Some manufacturers classify pressed charcoal from 3H (3T) to HB (TM) according to hardness and from the darkest 4B (4M) to the lightest 2B (2M) according to the richness of black color. Pressed carbon rods can also be gray, in which case the coal powder is mixed with a binder and chalk. In cross-section, the rods are round and square. Wood sheathed charcoal pencils have thin pressed charcoal rods and are available in soft, medium soft and hard varieties.

Willow charcoal

made from peeled and burnt willow branches. It is sold in boxes and comes in different thicknesses and compositions: thin and thick, hard and soft.

Charcoal pencils are of three types:

light, medium and dark. Using all types, you will have a good grasp of the shading technique.

The charcoal is smeared – wrap the shaft over the shaft to avoid getting your hands dirty.

Use a cloth or brush to remove charcoal from softer products.But you won’t be able to use them after pinning the picture.

Oil charcoal.


To obtain such charcoal, simply place the rods in linseed oil for a few hours, or better overnight. Remove the rods and remove any unabsorbed oil. Work as you would with a regular charcoal rod and you will notice that the traces of charcoal are no longer smeared and do not need to be fixed.

Shank sharpening


Thick carbon rods can be sharpened with a fine knife, sander or fine sandpaper.Use a knife or sandpaper for compressed charcoal, and a sharp knife for charcoal wood pencils.

ARTIST’S TIP
To erase a line drawn by charcoal, use a hard eraser, a nag: the soft eraser will only smudge the strokes. With an eraser, you can lighten some areas and even blend them. Note that the lines drawn by the charcoal branches can be completely erased. Other types of coal leave traces.
Try drawing with charcoal on colored paper to add emphasis to light and dark areas.

Texture and tone

Charcoal can be used to draw precise lines and apply tone; both come in handy when creating texture effects. Thick black lines are ideal for showing trunks and bare branches, the tip of the charcoal rod can be used for multiple strokes in foliage, and the side of the rod can be used for no shadows.

Rough paper is best for charcoal drawing, while smooth paper is best for pencil sketches.

Use chalk or a white pastel pencil to create a light background.

Using fixer

A fixer is a mixture of glue and an alcohol solution that is applied to a drawing made with soft materials such as charcoal and soft pencils. It leaves a layer of glue on the paper that holds all loose pigment particles in place.
Sealer can be purchased as a spray. Make sure that during operation it does not come into contact with your face or clothing, do not inhale it and ventilate the area well.Fixers are widely available, but they are quite expensive, which is why some artists use hairspray to fix designs.

Light and shadow

Charcoal pencil and chalk are a wonderful combination that works well for creating grays. Sketch with white chalk first, then work with black pressed charcoal. Apply charcoal strokes incrementally so as not to “darken” the image. Charcoal is ideal for exploring and drawing perspective, as its strokes are easy to remove or recycle.

KONTE
– Tetrahedral crayons, slightly waxed, made of clay pigment. They can be applied to the paper with rich and clear lines, similar to the lines of charcoal pencils. Conte are also available in pencil form, which makes it easier to draw thinner lines. These pencils come in black, white, dark brown, terracotta, and Payne’s gray. The limited choice of colors makes Conte the perfect tool for the transition from monochrome to color.
Conte is quite soft, so the finished drawing should be covered with a fixative (see.above ”
Using the fixer “). When storing the drawing in a stack, cover it with tracing paper. When drawing in the album, start work from its end, moving to the beginning, – in this case, the pages rub against each other less and the drawing does not smudge.

ARTIST’S TIP
Work Conte immediately, without making a sketch in pencil. Graphite and Conte differ in a certain fatness and therefore mix.

Contents are produced in the form of rods and pencils.You can sharpen the rods with a penknife and a pencil sharpener.

Pencils and Conte rods


The traditional colors of Conte are white (from chalk), sanguine (from iron oxides), bistre (dark brown; cooked from birch soot), sepia (from cuttlefish ink) and black (from graphite).

Pencil Black chalk
, “CRETACOLOR” Austria

Pencil Black chalk recommended for sketching and sketching. Combines well with sanguine, sepia and other crayons, in addition, it can be washed out with water.The pencil is available in medium softness Art. No. 460 12.
Shaft available in medium softness Art. No. 260 12.

Water-soluble graphite pencil,
“CRETACOLOR” Austria

Water-soluble art graphite pencil. Great for the watercolor graphite technique, and is also recommended for sketching watercolor sketches. Available in 3 softness options.
Art. No. 180 00 = HB, 180 04 = 4B, 180 08 = 8B, cylindrical, Ø 3.8 mm rod, 7.5 mm body, 12 pcs.in a cardboard box

Oil sanguine,
“CRETACOLOR” Austria

The oil sanguine has a brilliant touch. Since it contains fat, it is waterproof and will not blend.
The pencil is available in medium softness. Art no. 462 02
Shaft available in medium softness. Art no. 262 02

Sepia
assorted, “CRETACOLOR” Austria

Sepia light and dark is recommended for combining with crayons, charcoal and sanguine.The pencils are offered in medium softness. Art no. 463 22 = dry, light, 463 32 = dry, dark, 463 42 = oily, light, 463 52 = oily, dark
The rods are offered in medium softness. Art no. 263 22 = dry light, 263 32 = dry dark.

Charcoal pencil,
“CRETACOLOR” Austria

The charcoal pencil has an even, thin and rich black stroke.
The pencil is available in three softness options: Art. No. 460 01 = soft, art. No. 460 02 = medium, art. No.460 03 = hard.
The rod is available in two softnesses: Art. No. 260 01 = soft, art. No. 260 02 = medium.

Pencil White chalk
, “CRETACOLOR” Austria

Pencil White chalk combines perfectly with charcoal, sanguine, sepia. By shading it, shades of color are brought out.
The pencil is available in two softness options: Art. No. 461 51 = non-greasy soft, art. No. 461 52 = medium low fat, art. No. 461 61 = buttery soft.
Shaft available in medium soft Art. No.261 52 (dry).

Pencil “Nero”,
“CRETACOLOR” Austria

The Nero pencil stands out with a shiny black stroke. Since it contains fat, the waterproof is not shaded. The pencil is available in five softness options: Art. No. 461 01 = very soft, art. No. 461 02 = soft, art. No. 461 03 = medium, art. No. 461 04 = hard, art. No. 461 05 = very hard.
The rod is available in two softnesses: Art. No. 261 01 = soft, art. No. 261 02 = medium.

Sanguine low-fat (dry),
“CRETACOLOR” Austria

Sanguine low-fat or dry can be combined perfectly with crayons and charcoal.
The pencil is available in medium softness. Art no. 46212
Shaft available in medium softness. Art no. 26212

No one can say for sure when exactly the technique of drawing with charcoal was born, namely when the idea first came to someone to take coal from a dying fire and start drawing with it. Perhaps we can safely say that this incident occurred at the time of the birth of mankind. The uniqueness of the artistic material lies in the fact that even over the centuries-old history of its existence, it has not lost its relevance, and today it is even more in demand than before.

First of all, the ease of preparation attracted artists in charcoal pencils. It was enough just to take a bunch of willow branches, smear them with clay and drip burning coal on them. Today, you do not need to make coal yourself, since manufacturers offer a wide selection of such products. Moreover, over time, modern charcoal pencils appeared, which combined all the best from charcoal and ordinary pencils. A rich assortment of charcoal pencils is presented here.

Charcoal Pencil Drawing Techniques

Before starting to describe the drawing techniques, it is worth noting that for an effective creative process, you must use quality paper that is specifically designed for charcoal. You can choose a suitable art paper on the website https://mpmart.ru. A sheet of paper is fixed on a tablet, but first it must be moistened with water. This is done so that the sheet is evenly stretched.

There are only two ways to draw with charcoal pencils.

The first method is to draw with strokes and lines. It is very similar to the technique of drawing with an ordinary pencil, but only due to the specifics of coal, you have the opportunity to get lines of various thicknesses.

The second method focuses more on applying tones and laying out wide backgrounds and shadows. To do this, the pencil is turned as horizontally as possible to the surface of the sheet, which allows you to cover large surfaces. You can also, after the drawing has already been drawn, simply rub the charcoal with the edge of your palm.After that, the drawing of the lightest details occurs again. To achieve the desired effect, it is extremely important to use special shading, which is made from suede, leather or paper. This tool is a stiff, pointed roller designed to brighten small details.

Any aspiring artist who wants to try working with charcoal pencils can be advised to learn from small sketches and sketches first. As a model, it is worth choosing simple and large objects without any small details and not giving a lot of shadows.The optimal paper size is A3. To make it easier to use charcoal, the initial drawing can be created with a regular pencil.

Keywords:
charcoal pencils, art paper, how to draw, technique, what kind of paper you need, make charcoals yourself, tips for artists

To create graphic works in which the main emphasis is on the contrast of light and dark tones, the official distributor of the MPM group of companies offers to buy charcoal pencils for drawing at a bargain price.The convenient format in the form of traditional pencils allows you to create subtle shading and draw details with the same convenience, as well as to do toning.

Among the distinctive features of this tool, it is also worth noting:

  • Possibility of fine sharpening and maintaining the sharpness of the rod for a relatively long time.
  • Balanced softness of the lead that leaves a velvety mark without scratching the paper.
  • High adhesion to paper (does not peel off).
  • Easily diluted with water.
  • Good compatibility with other materials.
  • Eliminate the problem of dirt formation during operation.

Using charcoal pencils to draw

This tool has all the properties of traditional charcoal and allows you to achieve various graphic effects when creating sketches, sketches, landscapes or portraits. Works made on matte textured paper look the most advantageous.To create toning, charcoal spreads easily over the paper by shading with a finger or a torchon. To correct mistakes or change the saturation of the tone, the nag will allow.

The assortment includes a large selection of charcoal pencils for drawing of various hardness and saturation. The palette also contains tint materials with the addition of pigments, for example, sand, burnt orange, with a green or blue tint. Black, white or colored pencils can be purchased individually or in sets of 4 or more (in a blister or box).

Coal has been used as a material for many centuries. Its analogue was painted in Ancient Greece. Craftsmen created “charcoal” by mixing charred willow branches, nuts and grapes. The history of the lead pencil dates back to 16th century England.

Pencil and charcoal are different materials. The first is a hard instrument, the second is soft. The drawing technique with these materials differs, primarily due to these properties. Charcoal, unlike pencil, is not used for detailed objects.The soft material is intended for sketches, sketches, modeling of light and shade.

Charcoal should be used on paper with a rough surface. Otherwise, the material will not adhere well to the base and will quickly crumble. With a pencil, you can draw on the most ordinary paper.

Beginning artists are recommended to use graphite pencils to master the drawing. You will be able to easily control the line, erase the failed details, drawing them again. These manipulations will not work with coal.It lends itself well to correction, but it can leave unpleasant dark spots. To master both tools, you should be familiar with the basic techniques for using them.

Pencil: Basic Drawing Techniques

The main pencil drawing technique is the line. Depending on the texture of the paper and the type of instrument, it can be clear, pronounced or slightly noticeable. The pencil allows you to feel and master in a quality manner. The clarity of the line also depends on the pressure on the tool.With one pencil, you can change the intensity of the outline, highlighting the most important points.

Other technique – shading with a shift in key. When creating it with a pencil, you need to smoothly change the pressure on the entire area selected for toning. It is very difficult to create beautiful hatches the first time, but constant practice and ease of adjustments will help you quickly master frequently used graphic techniques.

Drawing with charcoal

The main technique for drawing with charcoal is working with the tonality of the image.It will take much less time to master it than when working with a pencil. However, there are some tricks here.

When creating a shadow or working with depth, you should not draw in the same way as with a graphite tool – vary the degree of pressure. Start in the darkest place and gradually loosen up, paint in only 1/3 of the intended space. Then, using a napkin or your finger, blend the material in the desired direction.

Having decided to work with charcoal like a pencil, you will get a sad result: the tinting will quickly lose its properties and turn into a dark, monochromatic spot.

Please note: charcoal is practically not used for drawing smooth, smooth lines. With its help, mainly toning is created, and also depth to the picture is given. In this case, the initial sketch is often done with a pencil (thin dashed lines).

Coal operations require careful handling and storage. To preserve the image without deformation, it should be placed under glass. You can also use a special fixer or simple hairspray.

Illustration and Charcoal Pencils – Lessons in Illustration with Elina Ellis

Recently on the Internet I saw some interesting works made with charcoal pencils. I myself really love black and white illustrations and am constantly looking for new materials. I decided to ask the creator of these wonderful drawings, illustrator Inna Ruda , to tell in more detail what she works and how and why she chose these materials. Here is her story and drawings –

“In January of this year, my friend and I decided to make an analogue of “ Drawing breakfasts ” in Kiev – “ Baby on Snidanok ”, in order to regularly sketch and communicate with other people (which is especially relevant for those who work from home).My goal was to do quick, complete stylized artwork – illustrations. Before that, I didn’t like sketching at all, but in the warmth, with food and new friends, things went very well.
At first I tried to draw with everything I have: a ton of colored pencils and the entire palette of acrylics in jars, but it quickly became clear that this was neither convenient nor fast, but since the task was to loosen my hand and do as much as possible drawings in 2 hours, it is completely unnecessary. Therefore, I tried sketches in 2-3 colors of a colored pencil, and then completely switched to 1 black pencil.

This wonderful pencil – oil-based charcoal , it gives all the advantages of coal, just does not creak on the paper, Plus it is not very shaded, although the “bold” version is very smeared. I found such pencils from Cretacolor NERO and Koh-i-noor Gioconda Negro . Cretacolor even has a whole line of black pencils that are the same in color saturation, but differ in softness. Number 1 (extrasoft) is so soft that it seems like it could be eyed down.Gioconda Negro is much harder, but hardly smears.

I love these pencils because they are just as rich in color as markers, but they give you more options for using materials, and it is more pleasant to work with, there is no drying out like markers or terrible squeak like charcoal pencils. Plus, the marker / liner still has the same line width, and the pencil is grinded all the time, and it turns out that the line width itself varies all the time. There is plenty of room for different touches and textures.

In order not to be too variegated and loose, I add a little halftone, “uniform fill” with watercolor.

I liked what it turned out, and I decided to explore to the end the possibilities of this material, drawing a whole bunch of animal characters in b / w, where only a mechanical pencil for sketches and a liner for drawing eyes were added from the materials.

Related Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *