Traditional singapore recipes: 20 Singapore Hawker Food You Can Make at Home – Spice N’ Pans

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20 Singapore Hawker Food You Can Make at Home – Spice N’ Pans

No mountain is too high to conquer. As long as you have the will, we can show you the way. 🙂 We have rounded up 20 of our Singapore hawker food recipes for you. Which one would you like to conquer first?

#1: Hainanese Chicken Rice 海南鸡饭

Ask any Singaporean for a recommendation on what to eat when you are in Singapore and Hainanese chicken rice will always be on the top of the list. CNN even listed it as one of the 50 most delicious foods in the world — that is how good Hainanese chicken rice is. While chicken rice is commonly available at most food centres in Singapore, you can rarely find a stall that sells chicken rice balls. So other than showing you how to make typical chicken rice, we show you how to make chicken rice balls in our video too. Try this recipe. Your kids will enjoy moulding the rice balls.

Watch how we made it on Youtube: https://youtu. be/oCCikPxlUkA


#2: Teochew Braised Duck 潮州卤鸭

Braised duck is well-loved by Chinese Singaporeans. Different Chinese dialect groups have their own version of braised duck but Teochew braised duck is the most popular in Singapore. Our favourite stall is Yu Kee Duck Rice. They have branches all over Singapore and their duck rice never fails to satisfy our craving. We especially love their herbal soup that comes free with every meal. Yum! Now you can make braised duck at home too. Imagine serving your braised duck with rice drenched in delicious dark gravy. Heaven! Remember to cook some firm beancurd (tau kwa) or tofu puff (tau pok) and hard-boiled eggs in the gravy too. So easy!

Watch how we made it on Youtube: https://youtu.be/TUCkqb9oF4w


#3: Kway Chap 粿汁

Kway chap is another Teochew dish we love. A typical set of kway chap consists of a bowl of flat rice noodles soaked in diluted braising sauce and on the side, you will get a variety of pig innards, different types of tofu, preserved salted vegetables and braised hard-boiled egg. Truth be told, while the cooking process is fairly easy, the process of cleaning pig innards can take a bit of time and effort. If you are game to cook this at home, we have some videos to show you how to clean pig innards. Are you game though? If not, just FoodPanda it and support Singapore hawkers.

Watch how we made it on Youtube: https://youtu.be/-Sn-qHuw4ek


#4: Pig Organ Soup 猪杂汤

Pig organ soup is one of the more popular Chinese soup in Singapore. This Teochew soup is usually served with rice as well as side dishes such as braised pork leg, braised tau pok, braised hard-boiled eggs and salted vegetables. The broth is boiled with different parts of a pig including liver, intestines, stomach, pork and some salted vegetables. Before serving this up, add some crispy garlic bits and garlic oil. Super yummy! If you are not a fan of pig innards or you are too lazy to clean them, just prepare the broth and add pork balls or sliced pork instead. If you want to know how to make the special chilli sauce to go with your pig organ soup, watch our kway chap video above. Our favourite pig organ soup stall is Soon Huat Pig’s Organ Soup located at Serangoon Garden — the other food market next to Chomp Chomp.

Watch how we made it on Youtube: https://youtu.be/hf8mKsy9gh5


#5: Otah-otah 乌达

We are huge fans of otah. We used to buy them in bulk (like 100 pieces — don’t judge us please. LOL!) when Sheng Shiong used to sell them freshly grilled just at the doorstep of their Serangoon North store. Otah-otah (or simply otah or otak) is a Malay snack commonly found in Singapore, Indonesia and Malaysia. This spicy grilled fish cake is made of ground fish meat and a mix of spices. Traditionally, it is cooked in banana leaf or coconut leaf but you can also cook them without. You can easily replicate this recipe if you have a food processor or blender at home. We have a Magimix at home and it is truly life-saving. Once you are done preparing the otah paste, you can either roast them in an oven or steam them. Super easy!

Watch how we made it on Youtube: https://youtu.be/KAPkdHtcgxI


#6: Bak Chor Mee 肉脞面

Our recipe was inspired by our favourite stall Xing Ji Rou Cuo Mian located at Blk 85 Fengshan Market and we are so happy that we managed to achieve 98% similarity to their bak chor mee. Yes yes yes! Although this bowl of noodles seems rather simple, it wowed the palates of the judges at the World Street Food Congress in 2017. Bak chor mee was one of the 14 dishes from Singapore voted to be amongst the top 50 dishes from around the world. You can get both the soup and dry versions in Singapore but we will only show you how to make the soup version because that is what our favourite stall only serve. If you intend to make this at home, remember to buy Lion Dance brand pork balls from NTUC, Sheng Siong, Cold Storage or Giant. They are the exact same pork balls used by Xing Ji.

Watch how we made it on Youtube: https://youtu.be/Af308h4rA0g


#7: Mee Hoon Kway 面粉粿

If you have all-purpose flour at home, you can easily make mee hoon kway from scratch. If the noodles are cut in long strips, they are known as ban mian (板麵). This popular noodle dish in Singapore is made up of handmade noodles served in a simple light ikan bilis broth with some vegetables, minced meat and a half-cooked egg. Simple goodness. Once you are done making the broth with the ikan bilis — do not discard them. You can add some salt to them and then bake them in the oven until crispy. Our favourite mee hoon kway stall is China Whampoa Home Made Noodles located at Whampoa (morning) market. Yum yum yum! Be prepared to wait up to an hour for your mee hoon kway fix there though.

Watch how we made it on Youtube: https://youtu.be/hPb-9In-lQ8


#8: Teochew Bak Kut Teh 潮州肉骨茶

Unlike the herbal-based Klang bak kut teh, Teochew bak kut teh features a clear pork broth with an overwhelming peppery taste. Imagine taking this when you are feeling groggy. Shiok! With our recipe, you will never need to buy another pre-packed Teochew bak kut teh mix again. It is really easy to make. Which style of bak kut teh do you like? We cannot make up our minds — we want them both! Our favourite Teochew bak kut teh is Old Street Bak Kut Teh. Their broth is super powerful. Best of all, they give unlimited free soup refill so you can have it until you drop.

Watch how we made it on Youtube: https://youtu.be/aESOgpgAuM4


#9: Chicken Satay 鸡肉沙爹

Does satay or sate mean three pieces in Hokkien? Hmmm. What we know for sure is this barbecued meat skewer is super duper yummy. Although satay is a national delicacy of Indonesia, we can easily get satay in Singapore too. Indonesian sate is coated with creamy peanut sauce when served but Singapore satay is served with chunky peanut sauce on the side. You can never go wrong when making chicken satay at home as long as you have the right recipe. We hope our recipe is the perfect one for you.

Watch how we made it on Youtube: https://youtu.be/Xe9_ihBpvbI


#10: Singapore Laksa 叻沙

Laksa is a popular Peranakan spicy soup noodle dish, available in different variations depending on the country of origin. Although you can find this dish in Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia and Thailand, the ingredients used in each country are different. In general, laksa consists of rice vermicelli with chicken or seafood, served in spicy coconut-based broth. Call us biased but we think Singapore laksa is the best! Our favourite laksa stall is Katong Laksa but we are also happy with any Singapore laksa that comes our way.

Watch how we made it on Youtube: https://youtu.be/aUFZq15uZj0


#11: Kung Pao Frog Leg Porridge 宫保田鸡粥

If you have never been fed frogs since young, you are very likely to find this dish extremely gross. LOL! Like what they always say about everything else, frogs taste like chicken and we concur. When cooked properly, their flesh is even more tender than that of a chicken. Our favourite frog porridge stall is located at Hong Chang Eating House, the coffeeshop along Braddell Road. If you also like their kung pao frog leg porridge, you will like our recipe. We did not include the white porridge recipe in the video but it is very easy to make. All you need to do is cook 3/4 cup jasmine rice, 1/4 cup glutinous rice, 10 cups water and 1/4 chicken stock cube in a rice cooker or over the stove. This concoction serves four or five. One quick tip: put your uncooked mixed rice (without water and chicken stock) in the freezer first before cooking. This helps to shorten the time needed to make congee-like porridge.

Watch how we made it on Youtube: https://youtu.be/OcehBj5dG1A


#12: Goreng Pisang 香脆炸香蕉

Thinking of making some tea time snacks for your loved ones? Try making these super crispy banana fritters. In Singapore, this is commonly known as goreng pisang, which means fried banana in Malay. We have seen two types of goreng pisang in Singapore. One is coated with this traditional flour batter while the other is coated with a batter that results in a lighter and airier crunch. We prefer goreng pisang coated with traditional batter as it makes the banana fritters crunchier. Which one do you prefer?

Watch how we made it on Youtube: https://youtu.be/eVkj_POEL-o


#13: Singapore See Hum Char Kway Teow 新加坡鲜蛤炒粿条

See hum means fresh cockles and char kway teow means stir-fried flat rice noodles in Hokkien or Teochew. Although char kway teow is also available in Malaysia, Brunei and Indonesia, every country has their rendition of char kway teow. Singapore char kway teow is sweet and stir-fried with fresh cockles. This is the style that we have shared in our video. Fret not if you cannot get hold of fresh cockles. Just omit them. No problemo.

Watch how we made it on Youtube: https://youtu.be/1HtUfN4psf0


#14: Nasi Lemak 椰浆饭

We know most people only add coconut milk, salt and pandan leaves to make coconut rice but we have added a secret ingredient to make our rice even more fragrant. Watch our video to find out what our secret ingredient is. Other than the fragrant coconut rice, a good nasi lemak is defined by the sambal chilli that is served alongside. You might be pleased to know that we managed to create sambal chilli that resembles the one served by Punggol Nasi Lemak, our favourite stall. Super yummy!

Watch how we made it on Youtube: https://youtu.be/DnhCfLuJgGg


#15: Carrot Cake 菜头粿

Carrot cake is one of our favourite Singapore hawker food. Contrary to its name, Singapore carrot cake does not contain any carrots. It is made of radish instead. Before serving, the steamed carrot cake is fried with eggs and preserved radish (chai po). You can choose to have your carrot cake in black or white. White is the savoury version and black is a mix of sweet and savoury. We usually go for black carrot cake as a side to go with other dishes whenever we eat at hawker centres. Give this recipe a try and let us know what you think. Happy cooking!

Watch how we made it on Youtube: https://youtu.be/9lafRsGXio0


#16: Prawn Noodles 虾面

We love love love prawn noodles! Need us say more? Good news is — you can easily make prawn noodles at home as long as you have a good inventory of uncooked prawn shells and prawn heads. If you do not have an inventory yet, you can easily build it up. The next time you intend to cook prawns for other dishes without their shells, instead of discarding them, put them in a bag and freeze them. Our prawn noodle recipe is very different from what you normally get in Singapore because we have added five spice to the broth. We like our broth better this way. Try it and let us know what you think.

Watch how we made it on Youtube: https://youtu.be/WK-JRh4aoas


#17: Teochew Fish Porridge 潮州鱼粥

Teochew fish soup is another dish that is widely available in Singapore. You can get it at most foodcourts and coffeeshops. If you can find a fish soup stall, fish porridge very likely to be included on their menu. Teochew fish porridge is simply cooked rice soaked in a bowl of clear fish broth. If you are not a fan of rice, you can just replace it with vermicelli or any other types of noodles that you like. We have two favourite stalls in Singapore – one is First Street Teochew Fish Soup along Upper Serangoon and the other is Lu Jia Fish Soup located at A’Posh Bizhub in Yishun.

Watch how we made it on Youtube: https://youtu.be/vIQEKLymCPs


#18: Sambal Stingray 叁巴魔鬼鱼

From mala hotpots to sambal-loaded dishes, we can safely proclaim that Singaporeans love spicy food. We think you will love our sambal stingray recipe. The sambal chilli is to die for. Best still, it is very easy to make. You can also prepare this in advance for your BBQ parties (after the COVID-19 lockdown of course). We are very sure that your guests will love this. Remember to squeeze some calamansi juice over the fish for the extra punch. Our favourite kung pao frog leg porridge stall in Hong Chang Eating House also serves super delicious sambal stingray and sambal sotong. Do give them a try.

Watch how we made it on Youtube: https://youtu.be/iG2GigbraTg


#19: Teochew Homemade Fishball Noodles 潮州鱼圆面

Fishball noodles come in soup and dry variants. There are a few key components to making a good bowl of fishball noodles. When served dry, the sambal chilli has to be good and the noodles have to be springy. If you like the dry version, our chilli recipe used in our sambal stingray video is perfect for your fishball noodles. Our favourite stall for dry fishball noodles is Finest Song Kee Fishball Noodles located along Upper Serangoon Road. For the soup variant, the broth needs to be really good. We used to have a favourite stall (亚水鱼丸面) located around Kitchener Road but sadly it has already closed down. So whenever we feel like having fishball noodle soup, we will cook them ourselves. If you find making fishballs from scratch too troublesome, just buy them. Dodo fishball noodles are pretty good.

Watch how we made it on Youtube: https://youtu.be/qsWsa_ngWsU


#20: Hokkien Mee 福建炒面

Hokkien mee or fried Hokkien noodles is our ultimate favourite Singapore hawker food. If you were to ask us for a recommended list of food to try in Singapore, Hokkien mee is definitely going to be amongst the top three. The dish is made up of yellow cooked noodles and vermicelli fried in super flavourful prawn broth and most importantly — lard. This is another compelling reason why you need to start building up your inventory of prawn heads and prawn shells. Our favourite stall is Singapore Fried Hokkien Mee located at Whampoa (night) market. Which is yours? For the record, our top three recommended food to try in Singapore is Hokkien Mee, Hainanese Chicken Rice and Black Pepper Crabs.

Watch how we made it on Youtube: https://youtu.be/fk0uCh6XMfQ


Hope you are feeling inspired already. Head over to Spice N’ Pans channel on Youtube for more recipes. We have more than 400 recipes to let you try. Let’s start cooking!

Related

8 National Dishes To Celebrate All Things Singapore

Mention national dish, and it’s easy to pinpoint Thailand’s pad Thai, Taiwan’s beef noodles or Indonesia’s nasi campur as the defining food of those countries. But in Singapore, more is more, especially when there’s a melting pot of cultures that have contributed to the development of our palates over the decades.

A national dish is defined as the culinary creation that best represents that country. It can be an unofficial favourite dish or an officially declared one, but whichever the case, it is strongly tied to the cultural identity of its people.  

Visitors to Singapore have a checklist that often include chicken rice and chilli crab, but why stop there? We expand the list to eight must-eat items, each one significant for its contribution to our culinary pride, and include recommendations on where to eat different renditions of the same dish.

From light meals and main courses to dessert, here’s where to start.

168 CMY Satay (Pic: MICHELIN Guide Digital)

Light meals 

Satay
The pleasure of satay lies in the trifecta of charcoal grilled meat, Malay-influenced spice marinade, and the cool contrast of peanut dipping sauce. Although its origins are likely from the Arabic skewered meat tradition, this dish has been thoroughly adapted to Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore, where it hails in chicken, lamb, beef and pork variations. A unique local touch is seen in the addition of tangy and sweet pineapple puree to the peanut dip, which you will find at both MICHELIN Plate stalls 168 CMY Satay and Chomp Chomp Satay.

Conveniently located in central Chinatown, 168 CMY Satay is so named for its stall number (168) as well as its supplier Chun Man Yuan Food Supplies, a well-known 3rd generation satay manufacturer. Its satay is available in chicken, mutton and pork, and cooked-to-order to tender, grilled succulence.

Tucked away in the famous Chomp Chomp Food Centre in the heartlands estate of Serangoon, Chomp Chomp Satay opens only at night serving up chargrilled sticks of pork, chicken and mutton satay. The care taken in achieving that grilled exterior while keeping its meat juicy has earned it a MICHELIN Plate distinction since 2018.

Roti prata (file photo)

Prata
From breakfast to supper, prata is a national culinary icon well-loved by people of all ages. This Indian flaky flatbread is crisp from being fried, and fluffy on the inside, ideal for dipping into curry or eaten with a sprinkle of sugar. MICHELIN Plate Springleaf Prata Place offers many more modern variations with one thing in common: the prata itself is always reliable and handmade at the live station. Try it with egg, cheese, mushrooms, red bean, banana or simply plain. The full-service restaurant also dishes up Northern and Southern Indian cuisine for a bigger meal.

Tian Tian Hainaese Chicken Rice

Chicken rice
Don’t underestimate the humble plate of chicken rice – Singapore’s unofficial national dish inspires daily devotion and can be found everywhere, from humble hawker stall to the top hotels. Comprising slices of chicken, aromatic rice and fresh tangy chilli, chicken rice can trace its origins to Hainan island, where a version called Wenchang chicken first hailed. Its adaptation in Singapore includes the use of younger, more succulent chicken, while the chilli must have the right blend of spicy and sour.

Boon Tong Kee is a brand synonymous with chicken rice with multiple outlets, but its MICHELIN Plate is awarded to the original restaurant, established in 1983, at Balestier Road. Its poached white chicken is silky smooth and the rice is perfectly suffused with chicken stock and aromatics. 

With a Bib Gourmand rating, Tian Tian Hainanese Chicken Rice is one of the most famous stops for chicken rice in the bustling financial district. Each element is in harmony, from the tender chicken and secret housemade dressing for the chicken, to the aromatic rice.

Pepper is the hero ingredient in Song Fa’s pork rib soup, made with fall-off-the-bone tender pork ribs and Sarawak peppers roasted in-house. Photo: Nicholas Ee

Bak kut teh
Its name translates to ‘meat bone tea’, alluding to the main ingredient in this pork rib stew. Bak kut teh is thought to have been introduced to Malaysia and Singapore through Fujian’s Hokkien immigrants. There are three main traditional styles of the soup, from dark and herbal to clear and peppery.

At Bib Gourmand eatery Song Fa Bak Kut Teh, the queues are long for its famous peppery pork rib soup. It first started out in 1969 as a pushcart stall, but expanded under the second generation before opening overseas outlets in Indonesia, China and Thailand.

For the dark, herbal version, MICHELIN Plate Hokkien Street Bak Kut Teh ticks all the right boxes with its Hokkien style broths as well as braised offerings.

BEHIND THE BIB: Song Fa Bak Kut Teh

Hawker-Owner Daniel Soo is the face you’ll see dishing out laksa and mee siam at the stall

Laksa
With Chinese and Malay origins, laksa can be found in many regional variations across Malaysia and Singapore. It is a one-bowl meal, comprising a rich spicy coconut-laced soup, rice noodles and ingredients such as fishcake and prawns.

For a taste that relies less on coconut milk, head to Bib Gourmand hawker stall Famous Sungei Road Trishaw Laksa in Chinatown. Owner Daniel Soo instead adds more flavour through the use of dried scallops and dried oysters to boost the seafood umami.

RELATED: Hawker Guide To Hong Lim Market and Food Centre

Over at another Bib Gourmand venue, Depot Road Zhen Shan Mei Claypot Laksa, a more traditional creamy gravy can be found. The slow cooked broth features fresh squeezed coconut milk, blue ginger, turmeric, belachan, shrimp paste and chilli, which is served bubbling and piping hot in a claypot.

Main Meals

Chilli crab

Proudly originated in Singapore, chilli crab gets its delectable flavours from a combination of chilli sauce, tomato paste, sambal and egg, along with tweaks and variations across the many seafood restaurants that serve it.

(Left image: Roland Seafood)

Go straight to MICHELIN Plate-recognised Roland Seafood, a second-generation restaurant in the eastern part of Singapore, where founder Madam Cher Yam Tian is said to be the creator of the dish in the 1950s, and her son Roland currently holds the secret recipe that envelops Sri Lankan crab cooked to red-hued perfection.

Steaming platters of chilli crab adorn most tables at Sin Hoi Sai, a MICHELIN Plate-rated live seafood restaurant specialising in crab. Prior to COVID-19, the restaurant had regular shipments of specialty crab such as king crab, snow crab, Dungeness crab and meaty Sri Lanka ones. Celebrities, local and overseas, can be spotted tucking into the dish, which is always made up of your choice of crab ladled over with a more viscous version of the chilli gravy.

Curry fish head
Another dish created in Singapore, curry fish head brings together two cultures: curry from south India, and the fondness for fish head from the Chinese. Served in both Indian and Chinese eateries, the unique curry can be more piquant with use of tamarind or richer in spices with a spicier paste base.

At a regular-looking coffeeshop in Jurong, Bib Gourmand eatery Zai Shun Curry Fish Head has been operating for close to 40 years. They have a fierce following for the stall’s star dish – curry fish head using wild caught red snapper in a lighter style tamarind-tinged gravy (right image). The stall also specialises in seafood, as well as other popular cze char dishes.

Muthu’s Curry, which has a Bib Gourmand rating, serves its fish head curry in a posh restaurant, but still holds true to the cooking that was established in 1969 by the founder, Ayyakkanu. His sons now oversee the secret recipe of their spicy, robust curry paste, with added pineapple chunks and typical vegetables of okra, tomato and brinjal.

One MICHELIN star Candlenut’s kueh salat

Dessert 

Kueh salat
What’s old is new again. Kueh salat, also known as kueh seri muka, is a Malay and Peranakan steamed two-layer cake comprised of glutinous rice and pandan custard. Of all the tempting kuehs in the Malay and Peranakan lexicon, it is kueh salat that has trended in Singapore and which can be found at hip bakeries and restaurants alike.

You’ll find a traditional version that’s hard to beat at Bib Gourmand-rated Hjh Maimunah, located in the Arab quarter of Singapore. This coconut kueh is made daily from fresh-squeezed coconut milk for its unbeatable fragrance and richer flavour. 

For a modern rendition of the cake, one-MICHELIN-star restaurant Candlenut has a remake that’s heavy on the pandan custard and light on the glutinous rice, accompanied by glutinous rice sorbet. There’re only 20 freshly made portions a day. Tempted as you may be to scarf the aromatic sweet treat quickly, take a minute to read about chef Malcolm Lee’s thoughtful inspiration for the dish here. 

READ MORE: Bib Gourmand Stalls With Island-Wide Delivery

Written by
June Lee

June Lee is a freelance contributor on the MICHELIN Guide Asia team. Since 2001, she’s been writing about food and wine, consulting in hospitality and communications, and unabashedly tasting and cooking her way through the world.

Top 10 foods to try in Singapore

From classic Malaysian laksa and Indonesian satays, to southern Indian curries and spicy Chinese stir-fries, there are more dishes to try in Singapore than you can shake a set of chopsticks at. A thriving blend of cultures and cuisines drives the bustling street markets and exciting restaurant scene which demand to be explored. Go there armed with our expert recommendations.

Top 10 foods to try

Bak chor mee



Translated as minced meat noodles, this dish of flat egg noodles (known locally as mee pok) is prepared with a base sauce of vinegar, lard, soy sauce and chilli, and garnished with condiments such as pork liver slices, fishcake and minced pork.

Nasi padang



Common fare in most hawker centres and food courts, nasi padang is a delicious, fuss-free and versatile steamed rice dish also found in numerous restaurants, served with a wide range of meat and vegetables, cooked in a variety of sauces and curries.

Laksa



A spicy noodle dish made with a chilli paste and coconut milk and blended with fish stock, served with seafood, such as cockles, fishcake and prawns, this is popular for breakfast.

Try our prawn laksa curry bowl, ready in just 15 minutes.

Roti prata

A south Indian fried flatbread, roti prata is often paired with curries. The breads are individually moulded into their characteristic disk shape and fried on a griddle. It’s flaky and crisp, and you can add toppings like egg and onion. Children (and some adults) also like to eat it with sugar.

If this has got your mouth watering, try our roti jala or Malaysian net pancakes.

Kaya toast and eggs



Toast is smothered in kaya, a thick egg custard jam cooked with aromatic pandan (screwpine leaves) with a slice of butter. It is often paired with runny soft-boiled eggs on the side and your choice of either local coffee or tea.

Chicken rice

Regularly referred to as Singapore’s national dish. The rice is cooked in chicken stock, ensuring a burst of flavour with every bite. Go for the steamed chicken option, served with thick sweet soy sauce, chilli and ginger.

Nasi lemak

Cooked with coconut milk and screwpine leaves, this fragrant rice dish is often served with a spicy sambal (sauce), a chicken wing marinated and fried with cumin, as well as ikan bilis – that’s small fish, fried and eaten whole.

Chilli crab



Whole crabs (usually mud crabs) are cooked in a thick, savoury sauce with tomato and chilli. Get to work cracking the shells and pincers to get at the sweet meat. Don’t be afraid to get your hands dirty!

Sugarcane juice



Singapore can get pretty hot, especially in the afternoons, so cool down with sugarcane juice. It’s served with ice and you can ask for some lemon to give it a sour kick. It’s found in most hawker centres and costs about £1.

Hokkien mee

Two types of noodles – egg and rice – are stir-fried with beansprouts, prawns, squid, egg and small slices of pork. Squeeze a calamansi (local citrus, similar to lime) over the dish before you tuck in, and don’t be afraid of adding a little sambal on the side.

5 foodie travel tips

Eat local



Even if you’re not on a budget, don’t miss out on the experience of going to a hawker centre. There are many of these buzzing food halls with stalls each specialising in a limited range of dishes (sometimes just one). This is where you’ll find truly authentic, local specialities such as chicken rice, satay, laksa and chilli crab. Note that stalls are usually cash-only.

Super satay



Smack in the middle of the central business district, Lau Pa Sat, is a huge and historic hawker centre that’s worth checking out at any time of day. A night visit, though, brings an added bonus: the small road is closed off from 7pm nightly (weather permitting), and satay stalls are set up. Enjoy the evening atmosphere of the tropics while feasting on fine little skewers of meat.

Read food blogs

If you’re overwhelmed by choice and at a loss about what to prioritise, there are plenty of food bloggers in Singapore who have got your back. A simple Google search will reveal bloggers such as Ieatishootipost or Bibik Gourmand, who visit a huge range of food spots across the island to bring you the lowdown of what’s to die for (and what to weed out of that long to-eat list).

Booze ban



Sure, Singapore is known for its Sling (the cocktail invented at the city’s colonial landmark, Raffles Hotel), but there’s a high ‘sin tax’ on alcohol, making it expensive to drink here compared to neighbouring countries. Be warned: there are also laws against drinking in public after 10.30pm.

Ask a local

Singaporeans are a food-obsessed lot and very opinionated about their cuisine. If you’re unsure about what to eat, simply ask a local. You’ll be sure to be guided off the beaten track for real food finds. And look out for queues. If people are making time to line up for something in this fast-paced and frenetic city, there’s bound to be something good at the end of it.

Like these recommendations? Read other foodie travel guides…

Top 10 foods to try in Macau
Top 10 foods to try in Lancashire
Top 10 foods to try in the Algarve

Is there anything we’ve missed? Let us know in the comments section below…

All recommendations have been reviewed and approved as of the 25 November 2017 and will be checked and updated annually. If you think there is any incorrect or out-of-date information in this guide please email us at [email protected]

Travellers are advised to read the FCO travel advice for the country they are travelling to.

Classic Singapore Sling Recipe

Nutrition Facts (per serving)
397 Calories
12g Fat
29g Carbs
3g Protein

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Nutrition Facts
Servings: 1
Amount per serving
Calories 397
% Daily Value*
12g 16%
Saturated Fat 8g 38%
45mg 15%
74mg 3%
29g 10%
Dietary Fiber 1g 3%
Total Sugars 24g
3g
Vitamin C 15mg 73%
Calcium 33mg 3%
Iron 0mg 2%
Potassium 122mg 3%
*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.

(Nutrition information is calculated using an ingredient database and should be considered an estimate.)

The Singapore sling is a classic gin cocktail that has enchanted drinkers for over a century. The popular story is that it was developed around 1915 by Ngiam Tong Boon at the Long Bar in Singapore’s Raffles Hotel. Though its origin is debatable, it is a semisweet, sparkling fruity punch with a delightfully complex flavor.

Nearly every Singapore sling recipe is different, and few agree on the formula or ingredients for this famous cocktail. While many claim to be the “original” Raffles version, that recipe was apparently lost in the 1930s. To some extent, each version follows the gin sling formula of gin, citrus, sweetener, and soda. Many bartenders agree that Bénédictine is this sling’s key ingredient and that liqueur’s herbaceous flavor is essential to any good Singapore sling.

This recipe is one of the newer variations. Others include anything from pineapple juice to grenadine to orange liqueurs. Cocktail historians have also found older recipes that are equally intriguing. No matter how you mix up the Singapore sling, it is a fascinating drink that is well worth your time to explore.

Click Play to See This Singapore Sling Recipe Come Together

“The Singapore sling is one of a few classic cocktails many have heard of, but few know exactly what it should taste like. In fact, no one really knows because there are multiple versions. I personally prefer the pineapple version with grenadine and Cointreau. When balanced properly, it tastes like a delicious grown-up Hawaiian punch.” —Tom Macy

  • 1 1/2 ounces gin

  • 1 ounce Bénédictine Liqueur

  • 1/2 ounce cherry liqueur

  • 1 ounce lime juice

  • 1/4 ounce simple syrup

  • 2 ounces club soda

  • Lemon slice, for garnish

  • Maraschino cherry, for garnish

  1. Gather the ingredients.

    The Spruce

  2. In a cocktail shaker filled with ice cubes, pour the gin, Bénédictine, cherry liqueur, lime juice, and simple syrup.

    The Spruce

  3. Shake well.

    The Spruce

  4. Strain into a highball glass over fresh ice.

    The Spruce

  5. Top with club soda.

    The Spruce

  6. Garnish with a lemon slice and cherry. Serve and enjoy.

    The Spruce 

Tips

  • For the cherry liqueur, cherry brandy, kirsch, and Cherry Heering are popular options.
  • If you like, float the cherry liqueur on top by pouring it over the back of a bar spoon after adding the soda.
  • Simple syrup can range in sweetness. The recipe’s 1/4-ounce pour should be good with a rich (2:1) simple syrup. When using a syrup made with equal parts of sugar and water, you may want to add a little more.

What Is in the Raffles Singapore Sling?

In 2015, the Raffles Hotel Singapore celebrated the 100th anniversary of the Singapore sling, which some call Singapore’s national drink. According to Raffles, Ngiam Tom Boon’s intent was clear: to produce a cocktail that looked like juice and had a rosy color that would appeal to women. It was, as the hotel notes, “a socially acceptable punch for the ladies.” Beyond gin, pineapple juice is the primary ingredient in the Raffles version. It also includes grenadine, lime juice, Bénédictine, Cointreau, and—for the “pretty pink hue”—cherry brandy. (They failed to mention grenadine’s contribution to the color.)

An Earlier Singapore Sling

Raffles has the most famous claim to the Singapore sling. However, cocktail historian David Wondrich tells an entirely different story in his book, “Imbibe!” An adaptation of the gin sling, it may have been around since 1897 or so and was a popular hangover cure and a general cure-all for anything that might ail you.

Wondrich dug up a recipe from the Singapore Cricket Club. This version pours 1 ounce each of cherry brandy, gin, Bénédictine, and lime juice. Wondrich recommends stirring it with ice, then finishing it off with 1 to 2 ounces of sparkling water and a dash of Angostura Bitters. For the gin, a traditional London dry or Old Tom is a nice choice, and the suggested garnish is a lime twist.

That recipe is missing the pineapple juice. It’s possible that it was the key ingredient Ngiam used to “improve” a popular drink found throughout Singapore at the time.

Popular Singapore Sling Variations

  • Wondrich notes that a few recipes from the 1930s used either claret or sloe gin to give the sling its signature color. With either, he recommends cutting back on the lime and Bénédictine, then adding more gin.
  • Harry Craddock’s “The Savoy Cocktail Book” (1930) includes the simplest Singapore sling: Dry gin, cherry brandy, lemon juice, and soda.
  • Two popular versions are found in Gary “Gaz” Regan’s “The Joy of Mixology.” The Singapore Sling No. 2 recipe uses 2 ounces each of pineapple juice and Beefeater Gin, 1/2 ounce each of Cherry Heering and triple sec, 1/4 ounce Bénédictine, and 3/4 ounce of lime juice. It’s topped with Angostura Bitters and club soda. This recipe was apparently found on a coaster from Raffles and lacked measurements, so bartenders had to wing it to come up with these recommendations.
  • Regan’s Singapore Sling No. 1 recipe is completely different and skips the pineapple. Instead, it uses 2 ounces of gin, 1/2 ounce each of Bénédictine and kirsch, 3/4 ounce of lemon juice, and both orange and aromatic bitters. As with most slings, it is topped with club soda.

Which Sling Recipe Is for You?

These versions do not even begin to reflect the many Singapore slings you can find. There are too many to count.

Many drinkers make matters worse by trying to replicate the look of the sling they were served at Raffles and inundate it with too much red (typically grenadine). This can make the drink too sweet. Any cocktail’s appearance is not as important as the taste, and the color may be off for any number of reasons. For instance, you may be using the colorless kirsch while the bar uses Cherry Heering or a cherry brandy with a similar deep red color. 

The goal is to find a Singapore sling that you enjoy. Chasing the original recipe or going for the “right color” is not a productive approach. Some recipes have a drier profile, while others are sweeter, and you can always make your own adjustments. Why not? Everyone else did.

The good news is that, for the most part, Singapore sling recipes agree on similar ingredients. That means you can save a little money and stock your bar with the essentials while playing around with these recipes until you find your ideal formula. Write it down so you can duplicate it later, then sit back and enjoy this iconic cocktail.

How Strong Is a Singapore Sling?

The Singapore sling is a lovely fruit punch that’s relatively easy on the alcohol. Despite all the variables, it typically mixes up to about 15 percent ABV (30 proof), which is average for highball drinks.

How to fry the best Singapore noodles (rice vermicelli recipe)

Looking for the authentic Singapore noodles recipe?

You probably won’t find one.

It is the term given by people in foreign countries the way the locals prepare the rice vermicelli in Singapore. It is futile looking for Singapore noodles in Singapore.

So Singaporeans will be pretty bewildered to see that there is one stir-fried bearing their country’s moniker when they visit places like US, Hong Kong, Australia Canada, and the UK.

Rice vermicelli is called bee hoon, mee hoon or mai fun by the locals, which is the pronunciation of the two Chinese words of the same meaning, 米粉, in different dialects. It is a street food that you can find in every nooks and cranny of the city.

Singapore is famous for food. According to the MICHELIN Guide Singapore, there are a total of 38 starred restaurants in a small island city-state which is only 739.1 km square.

But rice vermicelli is a street food, right at the opposite end of the spectrum. Isn’t it worth for us to try?

If you are squeamish about street food, you may be surprised that Liao Fan Chicken Rice Noodle shop by hawker Chan, has received one star according to the MICHELIN Guide 2017.

So let’s dive in and take a look at the famous Singapore noodles that is world famous.

How is the vermicelli prepared in Singapore and other countries

Singapore noodles 星洲炒米 is the name given to any stir-fried noodles prepared by following the method used by the hawkers in Singapore. Nevertheless, different hawkers use seasonings and ingredients that appeal to them, and therefore there is no one standard method to cook it.

The Singaporean staying abroad integrate the local ingredients into their cooking style. Eventually, the stir-fried noodles evolved into a new form and termed Singapore noodles since it is prepared by the Singaporean.

List of ingredients to cook the Singapore noodles. From top left to right bottom: eggs, chicken, shrimps, cabbage, bean sprouts, carrots, dry shrimps, scallions, garlic, onions.

Note: This post may contain affiliate links. Please read my disclosure for more info. I may receive commissions for purchases made through links in this post.

Street food style vs. curry powder version Singapore noodles

Before I move on to the recipe section, here is the comparison between the Singapore noodles in overseas compared to the local street food style ‘economy’ fried noodle at the hawker stores in Singapore.

The Singapore version

The vermicelli is presoaked in water, drained and set aside. The hawker will saute some chopped garlic and onion with vegetable oil or lard, then stir-fried with a few shrimps, squid, and meat. Some hawkers also add an egg. The common seasonings are soy sauce, oyster sauce, tomato ketchup and sesame oil. Choy sum, cabbage, carrot and bean sprouts are the common vegetables for the stir-fried noodles.

Some stores are selling the fried noodles that cooked with a minimal amount of ingredients, usually selling cheap and serve as the daily breakfast. This barebone version is available in each corner of Singapore which the local call it as economic fried bee hoon 經濟米粉.

The local likes to eat the noodles with sambal and pickled green chilies as condiments to heat things up. Some people also like to add fried shallot to the noodles.

Singapore noodles in other countries

The fried noodles named as Singapore noodles in non-Asia countries are different from what you can find in Singapore.

Most of these Singapore fried vermicelli recipes include curry powder as one of the ingredients, which is never used by the local hawkers. In Malaysia (where I live), tomato ketchup is a common ingredient. One of the cookbook by Chef Alan Koh even include Worcestershire sauce.

Capsicum (bell peppers) is the favorite vegetable for the stir-fried, perhaps choy sum is not available at some places. Sometime you may see boy choy 白菜 in it, which is the more commonly available Asian green vegetables in the west.

The overseas version gives the barebone street food a luxury spin, with more ingredients ranging from shrimps, chicken to roast pork.

Singapore noodles: Final stage of stir-frying.

The secret of making the rice vermicelli springy and not clumping together

In this article, I will attempt to improvise the classic Singapore street food style fried noodle with a twist, not so much of the ingredient, but the METHOD OF COOKING.

Why?

I have seen many hawkers stores offering rice vermicelli that clumps together, and with a soggy and sticky texture. I guess either they are missing out something or just to take the easy way out.

This mistake happens to me too before I started to dig deeper to find a better way to prepare the noodles.

After a series of tests, I finally decipher the mystery code that bothers me all these while.  Hopefully, this is one small contribution to find out how to prepare the best Singapore fried vermicelli recipe.

Here is what I have tested while verifying this recipe:

The purpose: to solve two problem as below: 

1. The rice vermicellis stick to each other, and to the wok while stir-frying.
2. The rice vermicellis become soggy and clump up.

What I want to achieve:

1. To obtain a springy texture.
2. To shorten the stir-frying time. (The longer I fry it, the stickier it becomes).

The cooking method being tested:: Blanch the vermicelli in hot water and cool it immediately in cold water.

The result:

This method works and creates springy texture vermicelli that is not clumpy. Since it has been blanched and partially cooked, I only stir-fry it briefly over high heat and never have any sticky problem.

Why is this cooking method work?

I am not entirely sure why it works, but the closest explanation is that most of the starch has been washed away by blanching it, and hence they become less sticky (and more springy). For the same reason, it is unlikely to stick together. Furthermore, the immersion in cold water after blanching will stop further cooking immediately, preventing the vermicelli from overcooking and turns soggy.

A closer look at the Singapore noodles.

8 Tips and useful notes to cook the best Singapore noodles

Choice of ingredients
  • The meat. The most common ingredient is Chinese barbeque pork (Char Siu / 叉烧). Cut the Char siu into fine julienne. Alternatively, substitute for thin slices of chicken breast meat. The meat is best to marinate with some light soy sauce, cornstarch and a pinch of salt.
  • The vegetables. The most common greens for the Singapore street food version is bean sprouts, Choy Sum, cabbage, and carrots. You should divide it into two portions. Add one to the vermicelli during frying, and throw in the remaining to the wok just before turning off the fie so that they will still be crispy.
  • Dry shrimps. Since non-Asian may not familiar to dry shrimps, so it is is an acquired taste to some people. It has a high umami flavor and is considered an essential item in the recipe. You need to wash the dry shrimps with water and soak it for twenty minutes before cooking it. Alternatively, soak it in hot water for five minutes and drained.
  • Dried Chinese mushrooms. Soak the dried Chinese mushrooms until they become soft and hydrated. The soaking will take from one hour to overnight depends on how large and hard rare the mushrooms. Since mushrooms are more expensive than other ingredients, the hawkers usually do not use it. However, most of the restaurants use it due to its aroma.
Cooking techniques
  • Blanch the vermicelli in boiling water, drained and quickly cool in cold water before stir-frying. The cold water treatment is the standard procedure to cook wonton noodles. I find that it works best for the rice vermicelli too, and it produces a springy texture and less sticky.
  • Soak the vermicelli for two hours or until thoroughly hydrated and soft before stir-frying. This method is simple to execute, but the texture of the vermicelli will not become springy. The vermicelli will tend to clump together during stir-frying. It is quite common among the hawkers because this method is simple to take much less time, especially when they need to prepare in large quantity.
  • Pan-fried the softened vermicelli (by using either one of the methods above) until slightly brown and crispy before proceeding to stir-fry with other ingredients. Chef Pang Fah suggest this technique in his cookbook, but I do not like the texture that is lumpy and not springy. the pan-fried steps do create an additional aroma that resembles stir-frying over high heat (镬气)
  • The amount of rice vermicelli in the recipe refers to the dry weight before blanching. After the blanching, the weight for 200g of dry vermicelli becomes 488g.

The Singapore Noodles Recipe

Prep Time
20 minutes

Cook Time
10 minutes

Total Time
30 minutes

Ingredients

Ingredients A

Ingredients B

  • 1 tbsp chopped garlic
  • 1 medium size onion

Ingredients C

Ingredients D (seasoning)

Instructions

Preparation

  1. Bring a pot of water to boil. Blanch the rice vermicelli until soft, which will take about one minute.
  2. Remove the vermicelli, place it in a pot of cold water. Let it cools down to room temperature. Drain away the water with a wire mesh strainer or colander. Set aside.
  3. Deveined the shrimps, marinate with a half teaspoon of salt for five minutes, wash in running water until the water runs clear.
  4. Soak the dry shrimps in hot water for 30 minutes. Drained.
  5. Cut cabbage and carrot into julienne
  6. Cut the chicken breast meat into thin slices. Mix with a half teaspoon of cornflour, 1 teaspoon of light soy sauce and one teaspoon of vegetable oil. Marinate for ten minutes.

Stir-fry

  1. Heat up 2 tablespoons of vegetable oil in the wok. Saute the chopped onions and garlic.
  2. Add the breast meat, dry shrimps, shrimps and stir-fry until they are cooked.
  3. Add the cabbage and carrot and stir-fry for another minute. Push all the ingredients to the side of the wok.
  4. Add 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil and scramble two beaten eggs until nearly cooked. Push back the ingredients to the bottom of the wok and mix with the eggs.
  5. Add the vermicelli, 2/3 of the bean sprouts and the seasonings (ingredients D). Mix well with the vermicelli.  Turn to high heat and stir-fry until aromatic.
  6. Turn off the heat. Add the remaining bean sprouts and mix well.
  7. Top with chopped scallion and serve.

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Nutrition Information:

Yield:

1

Serving Size:

1

Amount Per Serving:

Calories: 1130Total Fat: 58gSaturated Fat: 7gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 47gCholesterol: 565mgSodium: 5048mgCarbohydrates: 92gFiber: 7gSugar: 22gProtein: 62g

This data was provided and calculated by Nutritionix on 1/28/2019

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Makan cookbook: Three traditional Singaporean recipes

The trains that rattle directly above chef Elizabeth Haigh’s Singapore coffee shop clack-clack-clack down the phone line, while her neighbours appear to be drilling with total abandon. She shouts over the clamour nonplussed – all that noise means action, life returning, businesses reopening.

Not that her restaurant, Mei Mei, in Borough Market, central London, has been dormant. Opening just a few months before the pandemic completely shuttered bars and restaurants, Haigh quickly pivoted to takeaways, meal kits and feeding the vulnerable and local key workers.

Speaking a few days before outdoor dining resumed in England, she’s buzzed. “I cannot wait to share things on plates again; I’m sick to death of putting everything in packaging.”

Singapore-born Haigh, 33, trained as an architect before turning to food via a stint on MasterChef in 2011. She went on to win a Michelin star while at Pidgin in Hackney, east London. Now she’s written her first cook book, Makan, whose title means “dinnertime”, or “let’s eat”. Haigh calls the book “a love letter to my family and our Singaporean heritage”. It’s packed with the Singaporean dishes she grew up eating (“I would be baffled at beans on toast”), using seasonal ingredients found in Britain (her dad’s British; Sunday roasts were a weekly staple).

In the book, she writes: “When people move and mix together, food just gets better,” and she is adamant that’s true, “because food represents community. And without community, there’s no food, there’s no recipes, there’s no knowledge of culture and dishes”.

Elizabeth Haigh won a Michelin star

(PA)

She says people’s interpretation of Singaporean food is often confined to Singapore noodles, which is nonsense. “One type of noodles in Singapore? It doesn’t exist,” Haigh scoffs. “[That is] a fusion of someone’s idea of Singapore.”

While high streets tend to be brilliantly spiked with restaurants celebrating Indian, Chinese, Thai, Indonesian and Vietnamese food, Singaporean restaurants often just aren’t in the mix. “There are many great ones but just not enough,” says Haigh and it’s that representation that’s been missing.

Partly it’s down to the exceptional culinary secret-keeping of Singaporean home cooks. “Makan represents the culture of my mum,” explains Haigh. “She cooks a lot, like a lot of her generation but they don’t really pass on that knowledge because it’s just their way of showing love, that they do all the cooking.”

Haigh had to doggedly prise the knowledge out of her mum but you’ll be glad she did. The recipes in the “Nonya Secrets” chapter, featuring her spiced chicken noodle soup, Gado Gado peanut salad, Malay hot and sour noodles, in particular, are ones, “she would go probably to her grave with if she could; I had to beg her to share them with me”.

Telling her mum these very personal recipes were to be published in a book “took some convincing”, but Haigh had a strategy. “I promised a lot of cooking – and a dedication.” It was also important to her to be able to make these dishes for her three-year-old son, Riley, so he could share them with his friends. “That’s the way to get your mother, bribe her by using the grandson as leverage,” she says wryly. “I just wanted it to be normalised, so it’s a cuisine everyone recognises more and that he can be proud of.”

Makan – the title means ‘let’s eat’

(Bloomsbury Absolute)

Representation is crucial in a climate in which Asian hate crimes are surfacing during the pandemic and attacks on individuals and businesses are escalating. Haigh says: “I’ve had [racism] all my life, right?

“I’m glad that everyone’s got more of a voice to stand up against it now, because it’s just not tolerable. If you normalise this style of cuisine and this food and people know more about Singaporean culture it [becomes] normal. It’s just representation; it really does matter.”

Unravelling and then recreating her mother’s recipes was a challenge in itself though; Haigh had to translate her mum’s ingredient “guestimation” and dismantle some of the internal scaffolding of her own classical French training, “building it back up again, as per how my mum wanted it to be”.

She hadn’t previously needed those recipes sequestered in her brain. “In my generation, not lots of Singaporeans cook,” Haigh explains. “In Singapore, we’re absolutely spoilt for choice by hawker food. It’s more common to go eat somewhere because it’s so cheap.”

The homesickness involved in not being able to travel or access that delicious, clamorous street food world, was another motivation for Makan, “to recreate those dishes and recreate those memories”.

Read more:

The moment dictates the meal: “For Singaporeans, that’s how we choose what we eat and when.” So if you need something hearty, it’d be her Hainanese chicken rice (“the recipe I’ve built my business on”) or a rendang. If under the weather, she’d turn to noodle soups and for celebrations, it’d have to be Singapore chilli crab.

Whatever the mood though, eating is paramount. Instead of saying “Hello,” as a greeting, Singaporeans are likely to say, “Are you hungry?” or, “Shall we get some food?”

Haigh says with a laugh that if whoever you’re with isn’t planning on eating, then, “it’s basically, ‘Oh, are you gonna watch me eat?’.”

It’s that delight – in eating, cooking and trying food – that Haigh hopes to bestow. “I’m a feeder, just like my mum,” she says. “I wanted to write Makan so much because I wanted to share that joy.” And you can’t not feel it in every recipe.

Wonton soup

Simple, yet delicious, wonton noodle soup

(PA)

This is a simple yet delicious soup. You can add a bit more Chinese choi sum and make it a side dish, or add noodles and serve it as a meal on its own.

Makes: 4 as a main, or 6 as a side

Ingredients

½ pack wonton skins/wrappers (in Chinese supermarkets)

2L salted water

2L chicken stock

Soy sauce

Choi sum or lettuce, shredded

Spring onions, chopped

Toasted sesame oil

Salt and white pepper

For the filling:

200g minced pork (with 10 per cent fat)

¾ teaspoons salt

½ teaspoons caster sugar

½ teaspoons toasted sesame oil

A good pinch of white pepper

1 tablespoons rice wine (shaoxing or sake)

2 teaspoons corn or groundnut oil

1 tablespoons water

½ teaspoons cornflour, plus extra for dusting

170g peeled raw prawns, chopped

Method

1. Start by making the wonton filling. Put all the ingredients, except the prawns, in a bowl and mix together by hand for five minutes. You want to make sure that the pork and seasonings are thoroughly combined. Mix in the chopped prawns until evenly incorporated.

2. To make each wonton, take a wonton skin and put about one teaspoon of filling in the middle. Wet the edges of the skin with water, then bring the two opposite corners together to form a triangle, trying to remove as much air from the wonton as possible (to prevent it from bursting open later on). Press the edges together to seal. Dust the bottom of the wonton with a tiny bit of cornflour to prevent them from sticking together.

3. Continue making wontons like this – you should be able to make about three dozen, depending on how generous you are with the filling.

4. Bring the salted water to the boil in a saucepan, then turn the heat down to medium. Add the wontons one at a time to the water. Don’t rush and don’t crowd the pan, cook in batches if you need to. Once a wonton is cooked in four to five minutes, it will float to the surface. Scoop out the cooked wonton and place in cold water for 10 seconds. Lift out and set aside. Continue until all your wontons are cooked.

5. To complete the soup, bring the chicken stock to the boil in a large pot, then turn the heat down to medium. Season with salt, pepper and soy sauce to taste. Add the choi sum or lettuce, then add the cooked wontons, dropping them gently into the soup. Take care not to stir hard as you don’t want to break the delicate wontons. Ladle into bowls. Alternatively, it’s easier to put the wontons into bowls and ladle the stock into the bowls. Garnish each with chopped spring onions and a drop of sesame oil.

Spicy green beans with chilli and garlic

French greens beans work better in spicy green beans with chilli and garlic

(PA)

The traditional Nonya recipe for this dish calls for kangkong or water spinach. Without good-quality fresh Asian vegetables, substitute French green beans.

Although I am fond of kangkong, I think this dish is actually better made with the beans because of their crunchy texture. It is also more affordable. If you want to make this vegetarian/vegan just omit the dried shrimps, belachan and pork floss.

Makes: 2 as a side dish

Ingredients

1 tablespoons dried shrimps

6 dried red chillies

3 garlic cloves, peeled

2 banana shallots, peeled

2 tablespoons cooking oil

2 teaspoons belachan (fermented shrimp paste)

250g green beans, trimmed and cut into 1.5cm pieces

2 tablespoons water

2 tablespoons pork floss (rousong), optional

Salt

Method

1. Soak the dried shrimps and chillies in warm water for at least 10 minutes or up to one hour, then drain. If you don’t want the dish to be too spicy, remove the seeds from the chillies, then place them in a blender with the soaked shrimps, garlic and shallots. Blend together to make a rough paste.

2. Heat the oil in a wok over a medium heat. Add the chilli-shrimp paste and stir-fry until aromatic, then add the belachan and stir for a couple more minutes to cook the paste out.

3. Turn up the heat slightly, add the green beans and give it all a good stir. Stir-fry for a couple of minutes. Add the water to help ‘steam-cook’ the beans and season with salt, then turn the heat down and continue cooking for four to five minutes or until the beans are tender (no more than seven minutes in total).

4. Serve immediately with pork floss sprinkled on top, if using.

Stir-fried beef

Prepare your ingredients ahead, as this is a quick dish

(PA)

This quick and delicious beef stir-fry is a staple dish for us at dinnertime at home. You can omit the chilli and dried chilli flakes if you’re cooking for little ones, which is what I do for my son, Riley. As with all stir-fries, have your ingredients measured and prepared because the cooking time is very short.

Makes: 4 servings

Ingredients

250g boneless beef rump, sliced into bite-sized pieces

4 tablespoons cooking oil

1½ teaspoons finely chopped root ginger

2 teaspoons finely chopped garlic

1 red pepper, cut into bite-sized pieces similar to the beef

1 fresh, medium-hot, red Dutch chilli, deseeded and finely chopped (optional)

2–4 teaspoons dried chilli flakes, or to taste

2 spring onions (green part), finely sliced

1 teaspoons toasted sesame oil

For the marinade:

1 teaspoons rice wine (Shaoxing or sake)

¼ teaspoons salt

½ teaspoons light soy sauce

¾ teaspoons dark soy sauce

1½ teaspoons potato flour

1½ teaspoons water

Method

1. Stir the marinade ingredients together in a bowl. Add the beef and mix in well with the marinade.

2. Add three tablespoons of the oil to a wok set over a high heat and swirl the oil around to coat the wok. When it is starting to smoke, add the beef and stir-fry briskly, separating the pieces using a Chinese spatula. When the pieces are separated and still a little pink, remove them from the wok and set aside.

3. Add the remaining oil to the wok, then add the ginger and garlic. Allow them to sizzle for a few seconds to release their fragrance. Tip in the red pepper and fresh chilli, if using, and stir-fry until hot.

4. Return the beef to the wok and give everything a good stir, then add the chilli flakes. When all is hot and fragrant, add the spring onions and remove from the heat. Stir in the sesame oil, check the seasoning and serve.

Variation: Stir-fried venison: Venison is a very healthy alternative to beef, as it is rich in iron, potassium and zinc and is very lean. Just replace the beef in the recipe above with 250g venison fillet, cut into strips, and add a splash of stock at the end to prevent the stir-fry from being too dry.

Recipes from Makan: Recipes From The Heart Of Singapore by Elizabeth Haigh (Bloomsbury Absolute, £26; photography by Kris Kirkham).

Malaysian and Singaporean Recipes | Malaysian recipes

Want to try cooking some of the Malaysian and Singaporean dishes at home? Here we have recipes for everyone.The complete collection of all our precious heritage recipes, consisting of traditional multi-ethnic dishes to revised versions of old goodies.

This popular rice noodle dish has moved up the Malay peninsula to China and became an important part of Chinese cuisine. Make sure all the ingredients are prepped before you start to cook. This recipe is very authentic!

Pink and sweet this gin-based cocktail is a party must!

Authentic Chinese recipe, in a Jain-compatible form! Tasty and easy to make, it combines the best of both worlds.

Alcoholic lemonade with a dark twist!

Rice stir fried with ketchup, meats and vegetables.

Fragrant and tasty Nasi Biryani flavored with spices and rose or kewra water. This aromatic rice is the base for all your meat biryanis.

Laksa – Spicy street food noodle dish popular in Malaysia and Singapore. This homemade curry laksa recipe is so easy and delicious.

This simple dish is a great way to cook crab; black pepper adds an extra kick.

Char kway teow, which means “fried flat noodles,” is a popular and cheap dish found in Malaysia and Singapore. Hearty and filling, it started out as a poor laborer’s meal.

This chicken curry recipe is extra creamy and smooth.

Simple appetizers or a main dish! Thai-style chicken satay (or chicken on a stick) served with my homemade peanut dipping sauce.

Chicken rice is one of Singapore’s most iconic dishes and everyone has an opinion about their favourite place for the meal.

Kaya is a very popular spread among Malaysian and Singaporean. It is made with coconut milk and eggs, usually served with bread or cream cracker.

This is a simple, mouth-watering South Indian style green chicken curry made with a blend of spices and fresh coriander leaves. It goes well with rice and chapathi.

The Char Yoke is a popular Malaysian dish that invokes fond childhood memories for many – after all, it is a must serve dish during festivities in Hakka homes.

Seri muka is a Malaysian steamed layer cake (kuih) which consist of a glutinous rice (thai sweet rice – sticky rice) layer steamed with coconut milk and a sweet pandan custard layer to finish off. It’s green layer comes from the
pandan leaf, but some do add green colouring.

Butter cereal chicken is really tasty with its crispy cereal and flavourful curry leaves all crunched-up in the richness of butter. Make this dish at home for dinner or lunch and serve it with hot steamed rice.

Authentic Penang Lam Mee consists of yellow noodles in meat stock topped with prawns, pork, omelette strips and bean sprouts.

Flavorful, easy to make Cashew Chicken that’s perfect for busy weeknights! Skip the take out and make this at home instead! It’s so satisfyingly delicious!

Kerabu Bok Kua is a refreshing salad that has a mix of sour, sweet and spiciness. It blends beautifully with the crunchy peanuts, crispy vegetables and juicy tomatoes. Ensure that your papaya is not ripe and is hard and firm.

The key to delicious wonton noodles is the springy egg noodle tossed in dark caramel sauce and savoury wontons in soup. This version of wonton noodles is typically found in the Kuala Lumpur region and Penang, while other parts of
Malaysia have a slightly different take on the dish.

Rojak is a traditional messy mix of fruit and vegetable salad, found commonly in Malaysia, Singapore and Indonesia. There’s a couple versions including a red Indian rojak, but the typical style you’ll find in Singapore is sweet.

Curry dishes are well-loved by many Asians. Made with flavourful spices, the rich and fragrant curry sauce is a versatile convenient sauce to whip up that spicy meal.

Beef Rendang is a very aromatic caramelized beef curry. In Malaysia, it is traditionally prepared for festive and ceremonial occasions!

Mee Rebus – Popular noodle dish in Malaysia. This mee rebus recipe womes with yellow noodles in a spicy potato-based gravy and prawn fritters.

Putu Mayam is a popular Malaysian breakfast that is of South Indian origin. These string hoppers garnished with grated coconut, make for a delicious and filling meal!

Pineapple jam is a sweet, juicy spread that is slightly more tart than the average berry jam. It’s also quite easy to make at home, even if you’ve never made jam or jelly before.

Curry puff is consisting of curry with chicken and potatoes in a deep-fried or baked pastry shell. The curry is quite thick to prevent it from oozing out of the snack.

Sambal Udang (Prawn Sambal) is a fiery and piquant side dish often served as an accompaniment to perk up any rice meal. A must-try for the spicy food fan.

Steamed fish cakes flavoured with a laksa paste – the Laksa Otah is perfect and makes for a healthy and warming dish on a cold day! Try this South East Asian recipe!

Chicken Rendang is a version of dry chicken curry dish & is so rich in flavours and spices. It is one of the specialties in Malaysian cooking.

Chiffon cakes have been an all-time favorite for cake lovers. If you are one among them, then you may try this chiffon cake recipe with ‘pandan’ flavor.

Give korma a twist by using lamb leg instead of chicken. Using fragrant Malaysian spices brings the dish alive.

The shucked cockles on half shell are sold frozen, but they are no less fresh-tasting once you are done defrosting and cooking them. Dousing them in Shaoxing wine followed by a spicy garlic dressing makes this humble shellfish a touch fancier and tastier.

Beef fried rice is definitely one of our favorite items on your average Chinese takeout menu. Find out how to make an easy & better beef fried rice at home!

 

90,000 Singapore is about food – Unique Singapore

Since it is not customary to discuss the weather in Singapore due to its unchanging nature, do not be surprised if they start asking you how you like Singaporean food and advise you to visit certain cafes and restaurants. The cuisine on the island is really worth discussing as it includes Chinese, Malaysian, Indian, Peranakan, Thai and Indonesian! Moreover, gradually the dishes borrow from each other the recipe, which is the reason for the birth of new ones with an unusual accent.

Most popular dishes in Singapore

Due to the variety, it is difficult to settle for one thing, so here is a list of Singapore’s key dishes and treats.

Chilli Crab

King of Singaporean National Cuisine! It is a crime to visit the island and not try it. The crab is served in a deep bowl filled with a sauce based on ginger, onion, garlic, sugar, pepper, tomato paste, rice vinegar and flour.Don’t worry, it is only “chili” in words, it is not a very spicy dish! Order buns or mantou with your meal to dip in the sauce – it’s incredibly delicious. On average, a kilo of crab costs S $ 40-50 depending on the season. It is best prepared at Jumbo Seafood and Long Beach Seafood Restaurant.


Chicken Rice

Hainanese Chicken Rice is another national dish in Singapore that is sold on every corner: food courts, five-star hotels and even a zoo.Pieces of boiled or baked chicken are served with aromatic crumbly rice, chopped cucumbers and sauces, and a cup of rich broth.


Mee Goreng

Originally from the island of Bali, this dish is a spicy noodles with seafood, eggs, chicken or tofu topped with oyster, soy and royal shiratcha sauce. Typically in Asia, it is quite spicy, but you can ask for a less spicy version for you. Mee Goreng should be sprinkled with lime juice.By the way, a great option for brunch after a hectic party.


Roti Prata

Indian thin dough cakes baked in front of your eyes! It is customary to eat them dipped in a hot curry sauce. You can also order prata with all kinds of fillings: cheese, herbs, meat, mushrooms, berries, fruits, nutella and ice cream. Visit Singapore’s favorite Prata House at 246 Upper Thomson Road. In appearance, the institution is far from the Louvre, but the main thing is that it is delicious that you will lick your fingers.


Murtabak

Meat pie with various fillings: beef, lamb, chicken, sardine. Usually served with curry sauce. The most delicate murtabak is in a restaurant with a 100-year history – Singapore Zam Zam (Arab quarter).


Biryani

This is an Indian dish. Delicious, spicy and aromatic basmati rice with cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves and bay leaves.You can add chicken, beef or fish there. Served with curry sauce.


Hokkien Prawn Mee

Fried noodles with pieces of fish, shrimps, seafood, garlic, eggs, bean sprouts. This simple yet flavorful dish is sprinkled with soy sauce – we recommend it!


Dumpling Noodles / Wanton Mee

These are fried noodles with pork slices and Chinese dumplings with shrimp, pork and even lamb.Served as a separate dish, but can be ordered as a soup. Various sauces are attached to the dish. Interestingly, the Chinese themselves prefer not to eat thick in soup in the form of herbs, mushrooms, but there is nothing wrong with eating them.


Fish head soup bee hoon

Despite its unusual name, it is one of the most interesting and authentic Singaporean food. It is made from freshwater fish called toman (“snakehead fish”), which is boiled in milk sauce with a handful of fresh vegetables.Fans of this dish will gnaw a fish’s head with passion, sucking on every bone. However, if the dish seems a little shocking to you, then you can always order the option with fish fillets or fried pieces of fish – such versions of the soup are no less popular.


Satay

This is a tender grilled meat marinated in turmeric, traditionally served on bamboo sticks. The recipe came from Indonesia; chicken, beef, lamb and rarely pork are used.It is customary to serve rice cake and vegetables with peanut sauce.


Baby Kai Lan in oyster sauce

This Chinese dish is usually served as a side dish to main courses, although it is quite filling and very tasty. Spices, oyster sauce and garlic add an unforgettable aroma to the dish. In addition, kailan is extremely beneficial due to its high iron content.


Laksa

Laksa’s recipes are apparently invisible, because they really like to cook it in Asia.Traditionally, this is rice noodles with shrimps in a fragrant sauce made from coconut milk and various spices. The taste is fantastic, but you better ask for a less spicy version of the dish, unless you are a fan of spicy.


Bak Kut Teh

A dish with history! Tradition says that once a beggar, hungry man walked across Singapore. In the hope that he would be fed, he went to a butcher’s shop. The owner himself was not rich, but he had a kind heart and cooked the poor fellow a few pork bones with the addition of the cheapest spices – anise and pepper.So the recipe for a soup more like tea was born. Of course, Singaporean chefs add variety to it by adding new herbs and spices, and you can choose the ribs for the soup yourself.


Dim Sum

Dim Sum means BBQ pork, Xiao Long Bao and Siew Mai dumplings, vegetables, rice with yolks, mushrooms and meat in lotus leaf, pies and much more. This set came to Singapore from Shanghai and Hong Kong, all this yummy is served in the morning and always with pu-erh tea!


Fried carrot cake

This is a pie you can’t get at Starbucks! It consists of eggs, canned iris, and white Chinese radish flour.There are two types of this pie – crispy with a fried egg crust or black carrot with a sweet sauce. The taste is quite unusual, but it is very popular with the locals.


Kaya toasts

While Singaporeans can eat rice with chicken at any time of the day or night, they like to eat kaya toast for breakfast along with a cup of coffee and scrambled eggs. Kaya is a fragrant, sweet, thick greenish coconut paste that is aromatic and nutritious.Such toasts can be found on almost any food court at any time, but there is a greater demand for them in the morning, during breakfast.


Mooncakes

Traditional Chinese pastries, made only during the Mid-Autumn Festival, consumed with Chinese tea. Munkeiki are usually round or square patties stuffed with sweet bean or lotus paste. As a symbol of the Moon, an egg yolk is added inside the muncake, and hieroglyphs with the symbol of the Moon or harmony, as well as information about the pastry shop and the type of filling, are stamped on top.


Ice Kachang

This dessert is ideal for those who want to cool off. A slide of crushed, multi-colored ice sarsi syrup with red beans, berries, fruits, corn and even durian. The choice of ingredients is up to you, you can also ask to pour it with syrup, condensed milk or chocolate. In Malaysia, a song is even dedicated to ice-kachang, although let’s not be cunning – the dish is not for everybody.


Yes, Singaporeans have a sweet tooth! Street ice cream in bread gathers whole lines of people who want to eat it.You can choose any ice cream: from classic ice cream to exotic lychee and durian. It is wrapped in multi-colored sweet bread or in a waffle – that’s how the buyer decides.

Singapore is a tropical country, therefore it is rich in fruits grown in neighboring countries. Therefore, freshly squeezed juices can be bought almost everywhere!

Did you know that if you mix avocado juice with milk, you get real ice cream? Extremely popular ABC beetroot, apple and carrot juice .You can also ask to add soursoup to any juice, aka sour cream apple. Surprisingly sweet in taste, a bit like a pear, this fruit is also extremely useful – its use is considered to prevent cancer.

Almost at any food court you will find Milo and Milo Dinosaur drinks . They are served both cold and hot. The taste is reminiscent of the familiar “Nesquik”, perfectly combined with spicy dishes. The difference is that Milo Dinosaur is served with ice cream on top.

Pearl Barley Limonade drink is very popular (barley lemonade with pearl barley decoction). The pearl barley is poured with water, sugar and sometimes lime or lemon are added. It tastes like sweet lemonade. They say it is good for the kidneys and for frequent edema.

From alcoholic beverages, people prefer beer Tiger Beer , which Singaporeans consider their own, national, but invented on the island Singapore Sling tourists usually order themselves. The nightlife is in full swing and you will find many different bars with first-class cocktails.

And this is how you will be served local coffee if you order it “to go”

If you wandered into a local, and not an international chain coffee shop, then here is a short memo, without which it is immediately impossible to figure it out.

Main types of Singapore coffee:
  • Kopi – coffee with condensed milk.
  • Kopi-C – coffee with condensed milk and sugar.
  • Kopi-O – black coffee with sugar.
  • Kopi-O-kosong – black coffee without milk and sugar.
  • Kopi-O-kosong-gau – very strong coffee without sugar and milk.
And tea:
  • Teh – tea with milk.
  • Teh-C – tea with milk and sugar.
  • Teh-O is a simple tea with sugar.
  • Teh-O-kosong is a plain tea without additives.

When choosing a café, restaurant or food court, make sure that it has an A or B cleanliness and quality standard.The Singapore government is anxious to ensure that island residents and tourists eat only high-quality, fresh food. By the way, there are dizzyingly many food courts in the city, so we decided to help you a little with your choice and outline the most popular of them.

Lau Pa Sat (18 Raffles Quay)
Perhaps the most beautiful food court in Singapore, housed in an 1894 building. It is located in the heart of the business district, so on weekdays at lunchtime there is nowhere for an apple to fall!

Tekka Center Little India (665 Buffalo Road)
Located right next to a large food market – always the freshest food guaranteed.It opens early at 6:30 am, so you can even have an early breakfast here.

Chinatown Food Street (Smith Street)
One of the cheapest and most picturesque in the city in one of the most picturesque districts – Chinatown.

Newton Circus (500 Clemenceau Avenue)
Located just off the famous shopping street Orchard. They serve delicious seafood there, but be mentally prepared for intrusive barkers.

Old Airport Road Food Center (51 Old Airport Road)
Welcome to Singapore’s oldest food court! Moreover, it is also one of the largest. Here you will find dishes from any of the local cuisines.

East Coast Lagoon Food Village
Located in the heart of the East Coast Park, the food court offers great sea views, pleasant breezes and a variety of the freshest seafood and other national dishes.

90,000 Singapore cuisine.Dishes and recipes of Singaporean cuisine.

Traditional Singapore cuisine originated from Malay, Chinese, Indian culinary traditions. The food here is varied and delicious. The abundance of fish, seafood and exotic fruits explains the variety of dishes that can be seen on the tables of Singaporeans.

The development of the country’s culinary traditions has been influenced by a variety of countries.The leading role belongs to Chinese cuisine, from where the famous shark fin soup came to Singapore. In accordance with Chinese recipes, local chefs prepare piglets in a special way and often offer guests to try noodles with fried meat or soup with aromatic herbs.

Singapore Food Recipes. Dishes for the holidays. National New Year’s recipes.

First courses:
  • Noodle Soup
  • Hainan chicken with rice
  • Bak Kut Tekh (pork ribs soup)
  • Laksa soup
  • Fish soup Bi hun
Main courses:
  • Rice noodles with seafood
  • Chicken with mushrooms and rice
  • Roti Prata
  • Rojak
  • Nasi Lemak
  • Kaya Toast
  • Hokkien Prawn Mee fried noodles
  • Wanton Mee
  • Dim sum
  • Kaya Toast and Soft-boiled Eggs
  • Crabs (Chilli or Pepper)
  • Curry Fish Head
  • Oyster Omelet (Orh Lua)
  • Shrimp Noodles (Hokkien Prawn Mee)
  • BBQ Sambal Sting Ray
  • Rice Nasi Lemak (rice with coconut milk)
  • Devil Curry
  • Pineapple stuffed with shrimps
  • Tofu cutlets with mushrooms and vegetables
  • Satay bi hung, Singapore-style rice noodles
  • Vantons (dumplings) with shrimps
  • Mi goreng (vegetables fried with duck)
  • Tiger prawns in Chinese vodka
  • Satay (Malay skewers)
  • Singapore noodles
Dough dishes and desserts:
  • Ice Kachang
  • Fried sesame balls
  • Tau huai
  • Chandall
  • Popiah
  • Curry dough
  • Roti Prata
  • Durian
  • Parboiled Rice Cake (Chwee Kway)
  • Ice Kachang / frozen beans (Ice Kacang)
  • Tau Huay
  • Fried carrot cake
National drinks: 90,015
  • Ginger tea (te haliya)
  • Kopi tarik – coffee with milk and sugar
  • Sugarcane juice with lemon wedge
  • Local beer “Tiger”

Malay dishes are not rare in Singapore.You can recognize them by tofu and coconut milk – the main ingredients for preparing such delicacies. Pieces of grilled meat with peanut sauce, vegetable salad with tofu and peanuts, steamed rice with meat, fish and curry, chicken skewers with spices – these and many other culinary delights can be tried in Malay restaurants, which are more than enough in Singapore.

To prepare signature dishes, many Singaporean chefs actively use Indian recipes and prepare spicy vindalo sauce, tender tandori, saffron rice with spices and chicken, pizza with onions and minced meat.

Separately, it should be said about seafood and fish. Almost everywhere you can buy squid, mussels, oysters, crabs, stingray kats, lobsters and cook a wide variety of dishes on their basis.

Chinese New Year is widely celebrated in Singapore. On the festive table of local residents, you can see Bak Kua sweet fried pork, Yu Sheng salad of raw fish and vegetables, steamed Nan Gao sweet cakes, and pineapple crumb cakes.On holidays in Singapore, fish with vegetables and spices are also often cooked – there are many recipes that include these ingredients.

A few words about local snacks. Pay attention to pieces of marinated meat in a spicy nut sauce, seafood, fresh vegetables, fried tofu cheese. By the way, bean curd is often used in the preparation of vegetable salads, which makes the dish more satisfying and nutritious. For example, salad with tofu, peanuts and potatoes is widely known.Fruit salads are also popular and are cooked everywhere.

Thanks to Malay culinary traditions, Singapore’s cuisine has been enriched with a couple of delicious soup recipes. Known chicken broth with young juicy bamboo and bean shoots, laksa noodles with spices. Vegetable soups are common.

Uncomplicated, yet incredibly delicious Singaporean desserts can be found both in the food court of the mall and in a small local restaurant.Be sure to try the coconut milk and mango puddings, almond jelly, melon and watermelon cubes chilled in sago and coconut milk, jam tarts, fruit cakes and pastries, coconut milk drinks with ice and palm sugar.

In Singapore, it is customary to end a meal with tea. It is prepared with ginger, soy or condensed milk. Freshly squeezed juices, alcoholic cocktails and a variety of local beers (often prepared with ice) are common.

90,000 Singaporean coffee. Singapore cuisine, dishes, recipes, history

Since it is not customary to discuss the weather in Singapore due to its immutability, do not be surprised if you are asked how you like Singaporean food and advise you to visit certain cafes and restaurants. The cuisine on the island is really worth discussing as it includes Chinese, Malaysian, Indian, Peranakan, Thai and Indonesian! Moreover, gradually the dishes borrow from each other the recipe, which is the reason for the birth of new ones with an unusual accent.

Most Popular Singapore Foods

Due to the variety, it is difficult to settle for one thing, so here is a list of Singapore’s key dishes and goodies.

Chilli Crab
(Chili crab)

King of Singaporean National Cuisine! It is a crime to visit the island and not try it. The crab is served in a deep bowl filled with a sauce based on ginger, onion, garlic, sugar, pepper, tomato paste, rice vinegar and flour. Don’t worry, it is only “chili” in words, it is not a very spicy dish! Order buns or mantou with your meal to dip in the sauce – it’s incredibly delicious.On average, a kilo of crab costs S $ 40-50 depending on the season. It is best prepared at Jumbo Seafood and Long Beach Seafood Restaurant.

Chicken Rice
(Chicken Rice)

Hainanese Chicken Rice is another national dish in Singapore that is sold on every corner: food courts, five-star hotels and even a zoo. Pieces of boiled or baked chicken are served with aromatic crumbly rice, chopped cucumbers and sauces, and a cup of rich broth.

Mee Goreng
(Mi goreng)

Originally from the island of Bali, this dish is a spicy noodles with seafood, eggs, chicken or tofu topped with oyster, soy and royal shiratcha sauce. Typically in Asia, it is quite spicy, but you can ask for a less spicy version for you. Mee Goreng should be sprinkled with lime juice. By the way, a great option for brunch after a hectic party.

Roti Prata
(Roti prata)

Indian thin dough cakes baked in front of your eyes! It is customary to eat them dipped in a hot curry sauce.You can also order prata with all kinds of fillings: cheese, herbs, meat, mushrooms, berries, fruits, nutella and ice cream. Visit Singapore’s favorite Prata House at 246 Upper Thomson Road. In appearance, the institution is far from the Louvre, but the main thing is that it is delicious that you will lick your fingers.

Murtabak
(Murtabak)

Meat pie with various fillings: beef, lamb, chicken, sardine. Usually served with curry sauce. The most delicate murtabak is in a restaurant with a 100-year history – Singapore Zam Zam (Arab quarter).

Dumpling Noodles / Wanton Mee
(Dumpling Noodles / Vanton Mee)

These are fried noodles with pork slices and Chinese dumplings with shrimp, pork and even lamb. Served as a separate dish, but can be ordered as a soup. Various sauces are attached to the dish. Interestingly, the Chinese themselves prefer not to eat thick in soup in the form of herbs, mushrooms, but there is nothing wrong with eating them.

Fish Head Soup
(Fish head soup bee hoon)

Despite its unusual name, it is one of the most interesting and authentic Singaporean food.It is made from freshwater fish called toman (“snakehead fish”), which is boiled in milk sauce with a handful of fresh vegetables. Fans of this dish will gnaw a fish’s head with passion, sucking on every bone. However, if the dish seems a little shocking to you, then you can always order the option with fish fillets or fried pieces of fish – such versions of the soup are no less popular.

Satay
(Sat)

This is a tender grilled meat marinated in turmeric, traditionally served on bamboo sticks.The recipe came from Indonesia; chicken, beef, lamb and rarely pork are used. It is customary to serve rice cake and vegetables with peanut sauce.

Baby Kai Lan in oyster sauce
(Baby kailan in oyster sauce)

This Chinese dish is usually served as a side dish to main courses, although it is quite filling and very tasty. Spices, oyster sauce and garlic add an unforgettable aroma to the dish. In addition, kailan is extremely beneficial due to its high iron content.

Laksa
(Laxa)

Laksa’s recipes are apparently invisible, because they really like to cook it in Asia. Traditionally, this is rice noodles with shrimps in a fragrant sauce made from coconut milk and various spices. The taste is fantastic, but you better ask for a less spicy version of the dish, unless you are a fan of spicy.

Bak Kut Teh
(Buck Coot Tech)

A dish with history! Tradition says that once a beggar, hungry man walked across Singapore.In the hope that he would be fed, he went to a butcher’s shop. The owner himself was not rich, but he had a kind heart and cooked a few pork bones for the poor fellow with the addition of the cheapest spices – anise and pepper. So the recipe for a soup more like tea was born. Of course, Singaporean chefs add variety to it by adding new herbs and spices, and you can choose the ribs for the soup yourself.

Dim Sum
(Dim-Sam)

Dim Sum means BBQ pork, Xiao Long Bao and Siew Mai dumplings, vegetables, rice with yolks, mushrooms and meat in lotus leaf, pies and much more.This set came to Singapore from Shanghai and Hong Kong, all this yummy is served in the morning and always with pu-erh tea!

Fried carrot cake
(Fried Carrot Pie)

This is a pie you can’t get at Starbucks! It consists of eggs, canned iris, and white Chinese radish flour. There are two types of this pie – crispy with a fried egg crust or black carrot with a sweet sauce. The taste is quite unusual, but it is very popular with the locals.

Kaya toasts
(Kaya pasta sandwiches)

While Singaporeans can eat rice with chicken at any time of the day or night, they like to eat kaya toast for breakfast along with a cup of coffee and scrambled eggs. Kaya is an aromatic sweet thick greenish coconut paste that is aromatic and nutritious. Such toasts can be found on almost any food court at any time, but there is a greater demand for them in the morning, during breakfast.

Munkeiki
(Mooncakes)

Traditional Chinese pastries, made only during the Mid-Autumn Festival, eaten with Chinese tea.Munkeiki are usually round or square patties stuffed with sweet bean or lotus paste. As a symbol of the Moon, an egg yolk is added inside the muncake, and hieroglyphs with the symbol of the Moon or harmony, as well as information about the pastry shop and the type of filling, are stamped on top.

Ice Kachang
(Ice Kachang)

This dessert is ideal for those who want to cool off. A slide of crushed, multi-colored ice sarsi syrup with red beans, berries, fruits, corn and even durian.The choice of ingredients is up to you, you can also ask to pour it with syrup, condensed milk or chocolate. In Malaysia, a song is even dedicated to ice-kachang, although let’s not be cunning – the dish is not for everybody.

Yes, Singaporeans have a sweet tooth! Street ice cream in bread

collects whole queues of people who want to eat it. You can choose any ice cream: from classic ice cream to exotic lychee and durian. It is wrapped in multi-colored sweet bread or in a waffle – that’s how the buyer decides.

Singapore is a tropical country, so it is rich in fruits grown in neighboring countries. Therefore, freshly squeezed juices can be bought almost everywhere!

Did you know that if you mix avocado juice with milk, you get real ice cream? Super popular ABC beet, apple and carrot juice

… You can also ask to add soursoup to any juice, aka sour cream apple. Surprisingly sweet in taste, a bit like a pear, this fruit is also extremely useful – its use is considered to prevent cancer.

Almost at any food court you will find Milo and Milo Dinosaur drinks

… They are served both cold and hot. The taste is reminiscent of the familiar “Nesquik”, perfectly combined with spicy dishes. The difference is that Milo Dinosaur is served with ice cream on top.

Very popular Pearl Barley Limonade

(barley lemonade with barley broth). The pearl barley is poured with water, sugar and sometimes lime or lemon are added. It tastes like sweet lemonade.They say it is good for the kidneys and for frequent edema.

From alcoholic beverages, people prefer beer Tiger Beer

, which Singaporeans consider their own, national, but invented on the island Singapore Sling

tourists usually order for themselves. The nightlife is in full swing and you will find many different bars with first-class cocktails.

And this is how you will be served local coffee if you order it “with you”

If you wandered into a local, and not an international chain coffee shop, then here is a short memo, without which it is immediately impossible to figure it out.

The main types of Singaporean coffee:
  • Kopi

    – coffee with condensed milk.
  • Kopi-C

    – coffee with condensed milk and sugar.
  • Kopi-O

    – black coffee with sugar.
  • Kopi-O-kosong

    – black coffee without milk and sugar.
  • Kopi-O-kosong-gau

    – very strong coffee without sugar and milk.
And tea:
  • Teh

    – tea with milk.
  • Teh-C

    – tea with milk and sugar.
  • Teh-O

    – simple tea with sugar.
  • Teh-O-kosong

    – plain tea without additives.

When choosing a café, restaurant or food court, make sure it has an A or B cleanliness and quality standard. The Singapore government is committed to ensuring that the island’s residents and tourists eat only quality, fresh food. By the way, there are dizzyingly many food courts in the city, so we decided to help you a little with your choice and outline the most popular of them.

Lau Pa Sat

(18 Raffles Quay)
Perhaps the most beautiful food court in Singapore, housed in an 1894 building. It is located in the heart of the business district, so on weekdays at lunchtime there is nowhere for an apple to fall!

Tekka Center Little India

(665 Buffalo Road)
Located right next to a large food market – always the freshest food guaranteed. It opens early at 6:30 am, so you can even have an early breakfast here.

Chinatown Food Street

(Smith Street)
One of the cheapest and most picturesque in the city in one of the most picturesque districts – Chinatown.

Newton Circus

(500 Clemenceau Avenue)
Located just off the famous shopping street Orchard. They serve delicious seafood there, but be mentally prepared for intrusive barkers.

Old Airport Road Food Center

(51 Old Airport Road)
Welcome to Singapore’s oldest food court! Moreover, it is also one of the largest.Here you will find dishes from any of the local cuisines.

East Coast Lagoon Food Village

Located in the center of the East Coast Park, the food court offers beautiful sea views, pleasant breezes and a variety of the freshest seafood and other national dishes.

Under the term Singapore cuisine
today understand a wide variety of dishes that are popular in Singapore and brought into the country by descendants of immigrants from many parts of the world. Singaporean cuisine has evolved under the influence of different peoples – it includes Chinese, Malay, Indonesian, Indian, Peranakan and European, especially English and Portuguese cuisines.At the same time, the national dishes of different ethnic groups for centuries of communication have been enriched with ingredients from neighboring culinary traditions.

It is food in multinational Singapore that is considered the most important element of national identity, and Singaporeans themselves consider food their “national obsession” ( national obsession
), by what unites them in preferences and communication, regardless of their views and religious affiliation. This love of food is clearly evidenced by the abundance of street stalls and stalls, food courts, restaurants, bars and cafes, generously scattered over a small area of ​​the country.You don’t have to go far to sample the hundreds of dishes available, everything is within walking distance, wherever you are – from cheap eateries to gourmet restaurants.

That is why Singapore is considered the gastronomic capital of Asia, and the country’s authorities are doing everything possible to ensure that Singaporean cuisine serves as a full-fledged tourist attraction and a lure for travelers, promoting food with gastronomic festivals and supporting the opening of various catering outlets.But what is most interesting, being a “food paradise”, tiny Singapore independently produces only a very small amount of food, importing the bulk from other countries of the world, both nearby and very distant.

Diverse and delicious Singaporean cuisine is a true gourmet feast

The quality of Singaporean national cuisine is evidenced by the fact that for all the country’s obsession with food, the average life expectancy in Singapore is 82 years, and the number of obese people does not exceed 2% of the population.

Chinese food

Chinese cuisine, brought with them by Chinese immigrants, has been creatively reworked in Singapore using local ingredients, so its dishes differ from classic Chinese examples. Much of Singaporean Chinese cuisine comes from the southern regions of mainland China – from the Hokkien, Teochu, Hainan, Cantonese and Hakka ethnic groups.

Malay food

Although the Malays are the indigenous people of Singapore, the local Malay cuisine differs from the regional variations in the Malay Peninsula itself and has been greatly influenced by Indonesia.And in some cases, Malay dishes include Chinese ingredients or have Muslim adaptations.

Indian food

Singapore Indian cuisine has been influenced by different ethnic groups of India, so here you can find both the culinary traditions of the northern and southern parts of the Indian subcontinent.

Peranakan food

Peranakan dishes are a mixture of Chinese, Malay and Indonesian dishes combined with a lot of aromatic spices and herbs.

Intercultural food

In addition to dishes that have retained their original national identity, there are many hybrid dishes in Singapore that have emerged as a result of intercultural gastronomic exchange.

Seafood

Not surprisingly, as an island nation, Singapore offers a wide variety of seafood dishes – fish, squid, stingrays, crabs, lobsters, mussels and oysters.

Singaporean desserts

Desserts in Singapore are plentiful and have a rich history of origin.They can be found in large numbers both on the streets and in the food courts of the city.

Everyone knows that Singapore is an expensive city, in this article I will tell you about the prices in Singapore for transport, hotels, entertainment, sightseeing, food and other little things. I hope this information will help you more accurately calculate your budget and plan your vacation in Singapore.

Almost all prices in the article are indicated in Singapore dollars – SGD

, sometimes referred to as S $

, and in Singapore they don’t bother and just write a dollar sign – $.So if you see on the price tag in Singapore that the price is in $, it still means that the price is indicated in Singapore dollars
, not American 🙂 And the prices for air tickets and hotels are indicated in US dollars (USD). The current exchange rate, you can also convert all prices into a currency convenient for you.

Prices in Singapore for transport

This category includes prices for air tickets to Singapore and transport around the city. I want to note that if you buy air tickets to Singapore in advance, then you can fly very cheaply from neighboring countries, for example from (Kuala Lumpur) or Thailand ().

  • Taxi from Singapore airport to the city center (let’s take the bay near the city center) ~ 20 SGD
    … Book a transfer from / to the airport >>
  • Taxi from the zoo to the Botanical Garden ~ 23 SGD
  • Travel by metro from the airport to the center ~ 1.75 SG
    D
    – 2.4 SGD
    depending on whether to use the EZ-link card or buy individual tickets. It is more profitable to use an EZ-link card
  • in the city – 0.77 SGD
    – 2.4 SGD
  • Cost – 12 SGD
    of which 5 SGD
    irrevocable balance, and 7 SGD
    goes to the account
  • Monorail to Sentosa Island – 4 SGD
    , from the island – free of charge
  • Escalator to Sentosa island – 1 SGD
    , until 31 December 2017 – free of charge
  • Bus around Sentosa Island – free of charge
  • Shuttle service in Gardens by the Bay to Flower Dome and Cloud Forest – 3 SGD
  • Zoo shuttle service (bus with audio guide) – 5 SGD

Escalator on the bridge to Sentosa Island.Now the reconstruction is underway and not all parts of the escalator are working, so you can use it free of charge until December 31

Chatel Gardens by the Bay Service (3 SGD)

This bus with audio guide can be used to travel around the zoo. Cost 5 SGD

Prices for hotels in Singapore

Prices for hotels and other housing in Singapore are high, the country is generally very expensive real estate. By the way, the popular rental site AirBnb is NOT legal
, but still some tourists manage to book apartments / rooms in the city through it.

Be careful when booking a hotel in Singapore: most often you need to add additional taxes to the total cost + 17%
. I have already encountered such a situation when I booked hotels in. So, the average prices in Singapore for hotels:

  • A bed in a dormitory room in a hostel – from 20 USD
  • Medium Nasty Double Room in Chinatown or Indian Quarter Hotel ~ 60 USD
  • Small room (most often without a window) in a normal hotel with a good location near the metro – 90 USD
    – 130 USD
  • Room with a window in a good hotel – 130 USD
    – 200 USD
  • Famous hotel room – from 350 USD
    (I really wanted to stay at this hotel for one night, but for our dates (and we were in Singapore on the weekend), the price was even higher …)
  • Room rates in our Champion Hotel City (I liked everything, I recommend it!) – 91 USD
    per day (there was a good discount through booking)

Our small but cozy and comfortable room at the Champion Hotel City

Against the backdrop of the famous hotel room rates in which from $ 350

Prices in Singapore for entertainment and attractions

Prices in Singapore for visiting attractions are high.Sometimes you can save money by buying tickets in advance on the official sites of attractions (there can be a discount of 10 to 15%) or on the site klook.com (I bought all the tickets on this site). There are also discounts when purchasing packages for visiting attractions (for example, the zoo + bird park package), etc.

There are a lot of paid attractions and entertainment in Singapore, I will give the prices for the main ones.

  • Prices in Singapore for visiting two in Gardens by the Bay – 28 SGD
    , children 3-12 years old – 15 SGD.I bought from the above site for 22 SGD
  • Visit OCBC Skyway (bridge between futuristic trees) – 8 SGD
    , children – 6 SGD
    … You can buy tickets only on site
  • A visit to the bar at the top of one of the “tree” – 20 SGD
    including one drink (glass of wine, beer or soft drink)
  • Evening show near the trees – free of charge
  • Observation deck at the “stern of the ship” of the famous hotel – 23 SGD
    adults and 17 SGD
    children up to 12 years old
  • Visit to the sky bar CE LA VI (bar on the 57th floor above the observation deck in the Marina hotel) – 20 SGD
    to spend on a drink at the bar
  • Visit to the famous bar on the 63rd floor 1-Altitude: during the day (the bar is closed, but you can just go up to the observation deck) – 25 SGD
    , in the evening – 30 SGD
    including one cocktail
  • – 33 SGD
    adults and 21 SGD
    children under 12
  • Visit to the observation deck for – 6 SGD
  • Free Entry to Buddha Tooth Relic Temple in Chinatown
  • Ride a boat on the river – 25 SGD
    for adults and 15 SGD
    for children
  • – 33 SGD
    and 22 SGD
    children under 12 years old.I bought tickets to the zoo on this site for 27 SGD
  • River Safari – 30 SGD
    adults and 20 SGD
    children under 12
  • Night Safari – 45 SGD
    adults and 30 SGD
    children under 12
  • Bird park – 29 SGD
    adults and 19 SGD
    children under 12 years old
  • Botanical Garden – free
  • – 5 SGD
  • to Sentosa Island – 29 SGD
    adults and 18 SGD
    children
  • Prices for visiting the aquarium on Sentosa Island – 34 SGD
    adults and 24 SGD
    children
  • Visit to Sentosa Island – 76 SGD
    adults and 56 SGD
    children.I bought tickets in advance on this site for 68 SGD
  • Prices for visiting the water park on Sentosa Island – 38 SGD
    and 30 SGD
  • Observation Deck Tiger Sky Tower at – 18 SGD
    and 10 SGD

One of the greenhouses in Gardens by the Bay – Cloud Forest

Second Greenhouse – Flower Dome

Bridge between futuristic trees

We did not have time to visit the famous Ferris wheel in Singapore, I left it for the last day, but it turned out to be very busy with us and there was absolutely no time left

Spare some money for a zoo in Singapore! Despite the fact that it is smaller than the zoo in Chiang Mai and on the day of our visit it rained almost continuously, I really liked the zoo!

Despite the fact that a visit to the Universal Studios amusement park is quite an expensive pleasure, I did not regret that we spent a day in this park

About the prices in Singapore for entertainment, it seems like everything, if you forgot something, ask, pliz, in the comments to the article 🙂

Food prices in Singapore

Food prices in Singapore vary considerably from area to area.For example, at a food court in a Chinese or Indian district, you can dine on a fairly budgetary one. We did not look for budget places, but ate where hunger would catch us 🙂 We did not visit expensive restaurants. I want to note that at food courts, prices are indicated with all taxes, and in restaurants and cafes where there is a menu and waiters, you need to add 17% to the cost on the menu .
See also prices on photo menu (prices quoted in S $
despite the $ icon).

Prices in the store

  • Water 1.5 liters in 7 eleven – 2.5 SGD
    – 3 SGD
  • Water 1.5 liters in a large supermarket – 1 SGD
  • Yoghurt – 1.6 SGD
  • Milk – 2.5 SGD
  • Cookies – 2 SGD

Food court and fast food prices in Singapore

  • Fresh juices – 2.7 SGD
    – 5 SGD
  • Rice – 1 SGD
  • Rice + boiled chicken at a cheap food court in Chinatown – from 3.5 SGD
  • Indian meat dish at the food court ~ 7 SGD
  • Popular Singapore Pork Rib Soup ~ 7 SGD
  • Spaghetti ~ 10 SGD
  • Frying pan with steak, potatoes and salad (very tasty!) ~ 12.9 SGD
  • Hot dog + cola in Universal studio park – 14 SGD
  • Ice Cream – 5 SGD
  • Breakfast menu at KFC (sandwich, potatoes, coffee) – 9 SGD
  • Average cost of a meal at a food court for two ~ 30 SGD

Two dishes in the photo + juice – 30 Singapore dollars.It’s on the food court at MBS

This is my snack at Universal Park. Hod Dog with Potatoes and Cola – S $ 14

This is the popular pork ribs soup. Pretty tasty

Food court prices in Singapore

Prices in Singapore cafes

Prices for a business lunch in the city center

Prices for chilli crabs. For some reason we haven’t tried it 🙂

Din Tai Fung Menu. It’s delicious there! Prices are in Singapore dollars and don’t forget + 17%

Din Tai Fung Menu

Prices in Singapore.Miscellaneous

  • Magnets near attractions – from 10 SGD
    per piece
  • Chinatown magnets – 10 SGD
    for 3-4 pieces!
  • Bot Garden Orchid Flower Earrings – 30 SGD
  • iPhone 7, 128 GB at the airport in Duty free – 1138 SGD
    (by the way, there is red! And yes, if you buy in Kuala Lumpur and return the tax free, it will be cheaper than buying at the airport in Singapore)
  • Prices for clothes-shoes-bags of standard brands are identical with prices in Thailand, Malaysia and Ukraine 🙂

Prices for iPhone 7 at Singapore airport.Prices are in Singapore dollars. The price that is less, this price when buying on departure from the country

That’s all, I hope that this article about prices in Singapore will help you prepare in more detail for your vacation in Singapore and plan your budget.

I must say right away that I in no way claim to be the proud title of “expert”, but just want to tell how we personally ate in Singapore, perhaps someone will be curious, and someone will be useful.
Posts on the same topic in my magazine

As you probably remember, we booked ourselves an apartment with a kitchen with an eye on what we will cook if the local food does not work.Even though we already had the experience of eating in Hong Kong, we still had doubts, and the first-aid kit weighed about a kilogram on the road 🙂 True, in real life only a refrigerator was used in the kitchen (fruit and juice were stored there) and a kettle (we drank tea in the evening because we were fed breakfast.

On the day of arrival, we flew in at 17 o’clock local time, until we got to the place, it was already 18 o’clock. I didn’t really want to run in search of food, so we, without thinking twice, sat down in the nearest place in the mall , which is built above the Novena metro station, turned out to be a Japanese cafe.The mechanism of all these establishments in shopping centers in Singapore is quite simple: come up, look at the menu with prices and pictures, if the price suits you, nod to the waiter, who will take you to the place and give you the menu. In addition to the menu, a leaflet with a list of dishes and a pen are given, it is supposed to put down a checkmark that you will eat. Choose, eat, then go to the checkout at the exit with these pieces of paper, which the waiter gives you and pay. In addition to the actual cost of food, you will be charged VAT and service fees, only about 20% of the cost of food.In such places, we spent about 30 Singapore dollars on 2x (1 SD was approximately equal to 26-27 rubles).

Here is food from Japanese noodles (filmed by phone). The noodles on the plate are Sichuan, deliciously unusual, take it and don’t even think you’ll like it.

The next day we ran (I even fell asleep in the park) and also did not go to look for different nutritious places, but stupidly went to an Indian institution in our own mall (the cost of dinner is the same). Here, however, for the same money a little more food, and in both places water is free.By the way, it was in the Indian restaurant that the system turned out to be reminiscent of our favorite restaurant in Hong Kong – in fact, a “set” of food is sold, which includes salad, soup, rice, an appetizer (marinated squid), but you choose the second one yourself, to taste … We came across meat in batter and fish (they are visible in the photo).

Talking about local food, I can’t help but show the abundance of food market in Chinatown
: we came here early in the morning, and we still had to walk the whole day, so – alas – we didn’t buy anything, because it is wrong to carry fish and seafood with us all day in relation to others 🙂 But we looked with pleasure, yes.I was especially struck by the excellent quality vegetables are sold and that you can take the fish with your own hands. By the way, the fish row is wet and slippery, put on something like crocs, like me, otherwise wet your ballet flats (like a couple of tourists in front of my eyes). Conclusion: if you want to cook local products – build the route in such a way that you can then return to the rooms with food and store them in the refrigerator.

In addition to Chinatown, there is another national enclave in Singapore – Little India
. On our third evening, we just came there for a walk, well, and decided to dine there.I must say right away that I like Chinese food (and East Asian in general) much more than Indian food, although I have a positive attitude towards curry. The food in the restaurant we came across (and there are quite a few of them in the enclave) turned out to be tasty, but I did not like the service – I got the impression that they did you a great favor, although I fully admit the thought that the waiter simply did not like that we did not order liters of beer, like the Americans next door. Those who have not tried Indian food before should pay attention to the menu: usually there are three icons in the form of peppers that indicate spicy and very spicy dishes.Denis ordered from the section very spicy, to which the waiter drew our attention three times to these pictures, they say, it is very spicy! “This is not a problem,” Denis told him confidentially. The waiter brought everything ordered, but until the end of the dinner he watched us – if we could run to pour a fire in our mouth to the bar 🙂 (1 dollar each). You pay money, you are given a coconut, the top of which is cut off with a special device and a drinking tube is inserted there.Coconut milk is very refreshing, and there is a lot of juice, we barely drank together. Then you return to the same counter, and the empty coconut is cut in two on the same device resembling a guillotine, giving out a plastic spoon – you can crack a tender center of the coconut.

Directly at Sentosa
(at Universal Park) we had lunch somehow. The establishment opposite Jurassic Park was not crowded and quite accessible, and besides, there was no service fee. The food there was Chinese and Hong Kong, how they differ there, I did not really delve into it, but simply poked on the poster in the image I liked.Tasty!

Please note that here, too, not a dish is sold, but a whole complex. Noodles with some kind of sprout – yum-yum!
In a small jar with something white – something like yogurt, slightly sour, to improve digestion.

On the third day in Singapore, we finally got to the coveted food courts
! All I had to do was to go to Sentosa Island 🙂 Near the Harbor Front metro station, there is a huge VivoCity mall (it is considered the largest in Singapore, and, believe me, for Singapore, in which there are a lot of these shopping centers, this is a lot), from where they leave cable car and monorail to Sentosa, and from here you can start a walking tour (about 800 m) to the island.There is a whole food field on the top floor of the mall – see for yourself.

At the entrance they take fruits, freshly squeezed fruit juices, desserts. Further – a whole field of tables and chairs, where you come with a tray and sit down. In some food courts, a cleaning lady walks around and takes away dirty dishes, wipes the tables, in some places there are counters-counters where they ask to take the dishes away. Along the entire perimeter of the “field” there are numerous shops selling various food, usually it is indicated which cuisine is Chinese, Cantonese, Hong Kong, Singaporean, Malay, Japanese, Korean, etc.p. Only cash is accepted. You come up, choose, show what you need, you get 🙂

Food courts usually don’t give napkins, so ideally you need to have your own, I wore a pack of wet and dry ones, plus a liquid sanitizer.

At prices: prices are different, on average, we spent from 14 to 22 local dollars for 2x. Sometimes it was 2 dishes, sometimes it was a whole tray of rice, soup, spices and salad, plus a second.

They eat in bulk with chopsticks, for soup and noodles they also give short “ladles”, so it’s easier to eat.If you don’t want sticks, spoons, forks and knives are always available. There were locals who also ate with European appliances. By the way, in any food court there is at least one, but a shop with “European” food: burgers, french fries, salad, and every time I saw local residents who proudly ate it, for them it is probably the same exotic as for us Sichuan noodles 🙂

Approximately the same field of food is available in the shopping center near the Ang Mo Kio subway, from where buses go to the zoo.

In general, the concept of “developed infrastructure” for Singapore is a ubiquitous phenomenon: in any, even a distant sleeping area, there is at least one large shopping center, usually combined with a metro station, in which there are all the same shops on several levels, drogeries, pharmacies, cafes and restaurants, so residents of one area do not really need to go to the same center for shopping, everything can be easily purchased near their home.This is especially convenient for travelers, who thus get the opportunity to settle where it is convenient for them from the point of view of the objects planned for inspection, and not the location of shops.

As soon as we discovered food courts, we ate in them. But on the last day, mindlessly walking around the city, we decided to look for something even more “local” and went to eat in Chinatown. The bulk of the catering establishments are located there along the street, the main contingent is Chinese, and it is very crowded, cramped and noisy (cars are in a stream, plus the Chinese themselves are noisy).Therefore, I refused to go there, and we went into a nearby shopping center – and immediately came across a sign of a local food court.

It turned out to be much simpler than food courts in huge shopping centers, but more authentic: only locals, no tourists. The food sellers looked at us with the same interest as we did at the food they were selling 🙂

fantastically delicious.

Oh !!! In fact, the topic “Singapore and food” deserves not just a note on the forum, but a separate scientific study. I agree with the opinion of many bloggers and members of the forum that there is simply a cult of food in Singapore. Certainly many families choose to eat at inexpensive food courts instead of cooking at home.

By the way, there are a lot of food courts here both in shopping centers and in popular recreation areas ( for example, Sentosa
), and just in the city. In Singapore, food courts are better known as Hawker Center or Food Center.I don’t see any point in making a separate map for them, you will almost certainly come across at least a couple yourself while walking around the city. They are a covered area with dozens of independent food stalls inside.

Chinatown food court

Unfortunately, it is hard to see how it is inside

A food court from the popular Food Respublic chain in one of the shopping centers. The chain of these excellent food courts is very well developed in Singapore, there are really a lot of them, so I didn’t even bother adding to the map …

Here you can choose food from almost any national cuisine of Asia – Indian, Malay, Chinese, Indonesian, Japanese.Pay attention to the small signs with letters that hang on the stalls. It is best to buy food from those who have the letter “A” or at least “B” on their plates
, this is a guarantee of quality. Avoid “non-letter” stalls.

Look closely, there is a red plate with the letter A hanging on the stall on the right side of the photo

If you are not a fan of Asian cuisine, then you can easily find European cuisine in the city. In addition, there are many traditional fast food establishments – McDonald’s, KFC and others.

Most popular place to eat with tourists

– Embankments of the Singapore River ( Robertson Key, Clarke Key and Boat Key
), which are essentially one giant “dining room”. Numerous cafes and restaurants open closer to lunchtime and work until late at night. BUT!!! I haven’t seen any locals eating here! There are more than enough tourists, just crowds. It is clear that since the locals do not like these establishments, it is better not to eat there. Not even because the prices are clearly too high ( must pay off the popularity of the place
), but because the quality of service and food here leaves much to be desired.For clarity, I will say that during our morning walk along the Clarke Quay on the day of arrival, we saw several dead fish in the aquariums of popular cafes. It is very likely that the dead fish stayed in the aquariums together with the live one until the evening, and it is also likely that they were eaten with pleasure by some of the tourists.

One of the fish decided not to wait for food to be made of it …

Not very good, but still visible numerous cafes on Clarke Quay

This is in the same place, in the evening

Chile crab. A whole large crab costs about 100 SGD ( on the waterfront, of course more expensive
). Well, so-so taste, chili sauce interrupts everything. This is near the Esplanade Theater and the floating soccer field at Gluttons Bay Food Court.

Black pepper crab
, that is, crab in black pepper sauce. For some reason, few people write about it and recommend it, this dish is not as popular as chili crab, but in vain. Very tasty! Small crab costs 35 SGD. It would be better if we ordered a large crab in black sauce, and a small one in chili sauce … but who knew …

Pickled, smoked and dried ( all in one
) meat, in my opinion it is called “bakkwa”
.Try it! The easiest place to buy is in Chinatown, but you can also find it in the city center on Orchard Road.

All kinds of skewers on bamboo skewers. Of course, these are not kebabs, but all sorts of different things ( mostly meat
) fried in boiling oil. Malaysian food dish called satay
. Not healthy, of course, but tasty.

At the food court by the Ferris wheel, we sampled a variety of Satais; some are very tasty, some are not for everybody

Very popular with Singaporeans Din Tai Fung restaurant chain

( there are many of these restaurants in the city, for example on Sentosa
).True, the queues come here corresponding to the popularity. You have to wait until you are invited to a table. Then you are given a menu and a “receipt” for ordering. You mark the selected dishes with a tick in the “receipt”, and pay at the exit at the checkout. I liked very much that the work of the chefs can be observed through the large window.

A, I almost forgot to mention coconut jam “kaya”
. Try kaya toast for breakfast. This can be done at the Toast Box eateries, which are found in almost all popular places ( we ate at the zoo
).Well, or take a couple of jars home with you and then at breakfast you will remember wonderful Singapore.

Toast with kaya jam at Toast Box

Very pleased in Singapore variety of good cafes with delicious desserts
. I’m not talking about network Starbucks and the like, but about small establishments that are scattered around the city and offer sweet tooth to arrange a real “feast of the belly.”

For a sweet tooth like us, flying to Singapore is simply dangerous … So many temptations! We arranged such gatherings with a “couple” of cakes, probably every other day, and the desserts were not repeated.

Kaya Toast | Rest in Singapore

Kaya Toast is a Chinese Singaporean dish, two toasts made from bread fried on both sides, between which a layer of sweet kaya jam (made from coconuts and eggs) and a piece of butter are placed. A cup of freshly brewed coffee or tea along with toast kaya and soft-boiled egg is a traditional breakfast in Singapore. And for tourists, such a start to the day is another way to tastefully and simply join the culture of this country.

Fried toast with kaya jam is a favorite food for many Singaporeans

The main part of the dish is kaya jam made with coconut milk, sugar, pandanus leaves and eggs. In most cases, it is spread over charcoal toast, but sometimes the bread is replaced with crackers. Ready-made kaya toast during the meal is often dipped in soft-boiled eggs seasoned with soy and white pepper. As a result, an exquisite taste is born from a mixture of sweetness and pungency.

Possible options Kaya Toast : Single-Slice Kaya Toast – Super thin toast, Double-Slice Kaya Toast – traditional thickness toast, Cracker Kaya Toast – crunchy cracker instead of bread, Steamed Kaya Toast – soft steamed bread, French Kaya Toast – fried in eggs, croutons with butter and jam separately, Space Bun Kaya Toast – fluffy buns instead of toasts.

The history of this breakfast has its roots in the Hainan community. Many Chinese from the province have worked as cooks on British ships in the past.When they settled in the British colonies, including Singapore, they began selling the products they used to prepare for the British – coffee and toast – to the local population, only replacing Western jams with the more familiar coconut jam.

The most popular places in Singapore with the best toast with a kaya are the Ya Kun Kaya Toast and Killiney Kopitiam coffee chains. It is in these establishments that you must definitely try this appetizer. In addition, in this cafe you can buy a jar of kai jam as a souvenir, so that when you return home you can prepare a classic Singaporean breakfast on the occasion.

Tours in Singapore:

Search Flights to Singapore:

In addition to airline tickets for self-travel in Singapore, you will also need to choose a hotel or private accommodation, make insurance, arrange a transfer and maybe rent a car. If you book all of these services in advance, you can get a good discount and save on your vacation costs.

How to make a cocktail Singapore sling at home

Singapore Sling is an alcoholic cocktail that is a national treasure, a historical relic and, perhaps, one of the most important attractions of the city-state of Singapore, located on the islands of Southeast Asia.

This drink is a delicious long drink and takes its well-deserved place in the list of IBA’s official cocktails in the “Contemporary Classics” cell. So let’s put together the traditional recipe for such a popular cocktail called the Singapore Sling.

The history of the origin of the Singapore sling

Cocktail The Singapore sling was invented by the ordinary bartender Ngiam Tong Boon, who came up with the name. Translated into Russian, this phrase sounds like “Singaporean commander”.According to legend, a certain officer wandered into the bar and, seeing a beautiful young lady at the table, decided to make an indelible impression on her by treating her with a delicious cocktail.

A bartender who wants to win over the officer and get hold of another regular at his place, got creative and created an amazing mix that eventually became the pride of Singapore. How the story ended, the legend is silent, but when you try this intoxicating drink, you will immediately understand that it could not have ended badly.

Classic cocktail recipe Singapore sling

Thanks to the balance of the components used, the cocktail acquires an exquisite, unique taste and an incomparable, rich aroma. It perfectly coexists with the tartness of the cherry pits, the bitterness of the juniper, the freshness of the juice and the herbaceous base of the liqueur. At first glance, the taste of this drink seems unusually soft and delicate, but this is a deceiving impression, because after the second portion you will feel too cheerful and talkative.

Required components

components proportions
gin 40 ml
pineapple juice
125 ml
25 ml
lime juice 25 ml
Cointreau or Triple Sec liqueur 15 ml
– Benedectin liqueur – 15 ml
pomegranate syrup grenadine 15 ml
Angostura bitter 3-5 drops
ice cubes 10-15 pcs.
soda or tonic (optional) 50-80 ml
pineapple (for decoration) 1 slice
cherry (for decoration) 1-2 berries
fresh mint (for decoration) 1 sprig

Cooking technology

  1. Fill a tall harricane glass halfway with ice cubes and leave it that way while preparing the cocktail.
  2. Wash the lime thoroughly, then wipe it dry with paper towels and squeeze the juice using a citrus press.
  3. We pass the squeezed juice through a special strainer or a gauze cloth folded in several layers.
  4. Put 4-5 ice cubes into a shaker and pour filtered citrus juice.
  5. Pour pineapple juice, grenadine pomegranate drink, Cointreau and Benedictine liqueurs in turn.
  6. Close the shaker and shake it slightly.
  7. Drop in a couple more ice cubes and then add cherry liqueur, gin and a few drops of Angostura herbal bitter.
  8. Shake the contents vigorously for 30-40 seconds.
  9. Pour the prepared mix through a strainer directly into a glass on top of slightly melted ice.
  10. In order to soften the bitter taste of gin, pour in soda or tonic in a thin stream, and then gently stir the cocktail using a bar spoon.
  11. We use a fresh sprig of mint, a slice of fresh pineapple and a few cocktail cherries as a decoration for alcohol.
  12. Serve the drink with two straws.

A simplified version of the cocktail Singapore sling

The Singapore sling, prepared according to the presented simplified technology, has an unusual, delicious taste and an incomparable, rich aroma. Due to the short list of ingredients used, the finished mix is ​​slightly bitter due to the presence of gin, and in order to correct this annoying nuisance, experienced bartenders recommend using exclusively natural freshly squeezed juices.

Required Components

Components Ratios
Gin 40 ml
Cherry Liqueur 55ml
55ml
35 ml
Cointreau liqueur 20 ml
pomegranate syrup grenadine 15 ml
Angostura bitter 3-5 drops
orange juice 55 ml
pineapple juice 55 ml
pineapple (for decoration) 1 slice
fresh mint (for decoration) 1 sprig
cherry (for decoration) 2-3 berries

Cooking technology

  1. Citrus fruits well m oem, and then squeeze juice from them in any convenient and usual way.
  2. Mix orange and lime juice with each other and filter through a special strainer or a gauze cloth folded in several layers.
  3. Cut the pineapple pulp into small pieces and send it to the bowl of the food processor, where we grind it until puree.
  4. Pass the pineapple gruel through a fine sieve or gauze filter to get the right amount of natural juice.
  5. Fill the shaker more than half with ice cubes, and then fill in the filtered citrus and pineapple juices.
  6. Add gin, cherry liqueur, Cointreau and grenadine to this.
  7. Add a few drops of Angostura herbal bitter last.
  8. Shake the contents of the shaker for at least one minute.
  9. Pour the prepared mix into a tall glass half-filled with ice.
  10. Serve the drink with a straw, garnish with a small piece of pineapple, a cocktail cherry or a sprig of fresh mint.

Video of a cocktail recipe Singapore sling

To pre-evaluate the chic look of a Singaporean cocktail, as well as to understand the technology of its preparation in a matter of minutes, I advise you to watch the video materials presented.

  • Video # 1. The Experienced Bartender presents his own simplified version of creating a delicious and flavorful mix called the Singapore Sling. In addition, the bartender will introduce you to a rather original and non-standard method of serving this intoxicating drink.
  • Video # 2. In this video, the most famous and experienced Jamie Oliver will teach you how to cook a Singapore sling according to his signature recipe, which any layman can handle. You will find a beautiful professional work of a bartender and step-by-step creation of his creation.

Useful Information

  • Check out other interesting gin cocktail variations. The excellent taste and clear aroma of strong alcohol make it possible to create chic mixes that can satisfy the tastes of absolutely any consumer, regardless of age, gender and taste preferences.
  • For novice bartenders, I recommend starting with the most popular Gin and Tonic mix. At any friendly get-together or business buffet, there is hardly a person who denied himself the pleasure of tasting this treat.
  • The Gin Fat cocktail will undoubtedly win the hearts of women. The mix is ​​renowned for its effervescence and pronounced citrus notes that perfectly mask the bitter taste and pungent aroma of gin.
  • I also recommend expanding your knowledge of the art of bar and get acquainted with reliable and simple recipes for Cointreau cocktails, the presence of which will not go unnoticed even at a business buffet table.

As you can see, there is nothing overwhelming, complicated or mysterious in making the Singapore Sling cocktail.Anyone can easily create an excellent treat in a fairly short time, which will delight not only loved ones, but also an accidentally fermented guest with high taste requirements. Enjoy your cooking and keep on conquering the heights of challenging bar art!

Singaporean cuisine – Ethnicities – MirTesen media platform

Singapore is not just a city in Southeast Asia. The Republic of Singapore is a unique city-state located on the Malaysian islands.In fact, Singapore is part of Malaysia.

The area of ​​Singapore is not large, only 714 sq. Km. However, since the 60s of the XX century, the Singapore authorities have annually added kilometer by kilometer to their territories using labor-intensive and costly technologies of reclamation of the island territory.

The history of Singapore begins in the 3rd century AD. Then the island had another name Temasek and was an important trade center. Later the city fell into decay and was captured by the Portuguese. At the beginning of the 19th century, Singapore became part of the East India Company and soon became a British colony.

During World War II, the Japanese managed to trick Singapore back from the British. British subjects awaited an attack by the Japanese naval forces from the sea, and the Japanese decided to attack Singapore from the land side and came from Malaysia.

Until the end of the war, Singapore was under Japanese rule. In the middle of the 20th century, Singapore became part of the Federation of Malaysia. From this moment, the golden time for Singapore begins. From the poorest Asian third world country, the city-state has become the largest investment, cultural and business center in Southeast Asia.

The indigenous population of Singapore consists of three main groups – Chinese, Malays and descendants of immigrants from India. Therefore, Singaporean cuisine is a synthesis of three independent culinary traditions. In the 70s of the XX century, it was from the dishes of Singaporean cuisine that a popular trend in cooking, fusion, began to emerge.

Chinese, Malay and Indian recipes have a lot in common, which is why they are all organically intertwined in Singaporean cuisine. A characteristic feature of Singaporean cuisine is considered to be the sweet and sour taste of almost every dish, an abundance of fish and seafood, as well as seasonings, spices, noodles and rice.

We think that it is worth considering Singaporean cuisine according to its main subtypes. Let’s start with the Singaporean dishes, which were brought in by Chinese chefs. Singaporeans eat chicken meat and prepare a delicious and tender Chinese dish “Hainanese Chicken Fillet with Rice” from chicken breast. For a more savory taste, ask the chef to cook you Hainanese duck.

In Asia, they like to cook dishes based on noodles, and Singaporean cuisine is no exception.Fried noodles with slices of pork, beef, chicken or seafood are served in a broth with mushrooms, vegetables, herbs and herbs, as well as Chinese dumplings. A seafood delicacy in Singaporean cuisine is crab in a hot chili sauce.

These are dishes for strong-minded gourmets or for lovers of very spicy food. The best side dish for such a fiery meal would be plain unleavened rice. Satay can be attributed to the original Malay recipes of Singaporean cuisine. These are mini kebabs made from pre-marinated meat and fried over an open fire.

Incredibly delicious and satisfying Singaporean fried rice Nasi Lemak. A box is made from a banana leaf and hot rice is put there with the addition of spices, spices, eggs and nuts. Among the Indian dishes of Singaporean cuisine are the famous Roti flatbread, as well as a variety of curries and Tandoori.

Tandoor is an ancient Indian stove in which meat, fish or chicken were baked, pre-marinated in a mixture of hot spices and herbs. In Singapore, it is customary to drink green tea, which perfectly quenches thirst and invigorates.Local green tea Teh Tarik is usually mixed with milk in the English manner or with ginger. Green tea with ice is also popular in hot Singapore.

If you are a true lover of spicy food, you should definitely try the fish head curry and the chili crab dish, which will cheer you up with the spice of their spicy sauce.

Also worth trying is Hainanese chicken rice and nazi lemak – favorite dishes of the locals.

Teh tarik, a creamy tea with milk foam, and ice kacang or cendol for dessert are a good choice to complete your meal.

Bon appetit!

Ayam Buah Keluak

This is one of the main dishes of Peranakan cuisine with a truly unforgettable aroma and taste. The traditional recipe for Ayam Buah Keluak has been carefully passed down from generation to generation, and today it is called the golden dish of the Peranakans.

It is prepared from chicken (sometimes from pork) and keluak walnut (an atypical nut with a hard outer shell, but liquid pulp), so the taste of the dish is unique and unlike anything else.Definitely worth a try!

It should be noted that this is a very difficult dish to prepare; you will have to spend the whole day just preparing the main seasoning – remfah, which is a mixture of many spices, chopped and thoroughly ground.

Then you need to peel the nuts, soak them in water for two days, and, chopping off the tip of each nut, extract the black pulp, which is subsequently mixed with the seasoning. You need to open the nuts carefully – so that then you can put the seasoned pulp and meat inside.Yes, hard work!

After that, the nuts “stuffed” with a mixture of their own pulp and chicken are simmered on the fire for half a day, until the sauce thickens. There is a lot of hassle with this dish, so you hardly want to cook it yourself. It is best to try it in Peranakan restaurants.

However, it should be noted that the dish is not served in every cafe due to the complexity of its preparation.

Visit The Blue Ginger, Baba Inn & Lounge or Spice Peranakan (if you have time to go to the suburbs of Buona Vista) – these are the three best places where Ayam Buah Keluak cooks right.

For Ayam Buah Keluak, boiled rice with spinach and an omelet with shrimp (chincalok) are perfect – an unforgettable combination for true gourmets.

Bak Kut Teh

The dish is made from juicy pork ribs stewed in a unique decoction of herbs and spices – cloves, cinnamon, star anise, fennel seeds and coriander. This variety of condiments reflects the influences of different cultures in Singaporean cuisine. Bak Kut Teh’s recipe has undergone some changes over time – in the past, the dish was rather scarce and non-nutritious, today it has become popular with locals, tourists, and even celebrities and dignitaries.

There are two options for making bak kut teh soup: a rich thick dark broth flavored with a bouquet of spices or a soup with a softer taste and only slightly peppery, without abundance in seasonings. The first option is more likely for those who prefer spicy and spicy dishes.

The differences in cooking styles of this popular dish are a reflection of how descendants of immigrants from different parts of China have adapted one dish to suit different tastes.

Cantonese are very fond of soups and, as a rule, add a lot of spices and even medicinal herbs to them.The Hokkien Chinese prefer less spicy food, but more salty – they add a lot of soy sauce to bak kut teh, so their version of the soup has a darker and richer color.

The most delicious bak kut teh can be tasted at any time of the day in one of the famous restaurants in Singapore – Founder Bak Kut Teh (347, Balestier Road), Ng Ah Sio Pork Ribs Eating House (8, Rangoon Road) or Sin Heng Bak Koot Teh (439, Joo Chiat Road). The dish can be ordered with rice, noodles, or deep-fried wheat pancakes.

The bak kut teh dish itself contains pork ribs, canned vegetables and tofu stew, so it is quite a healthy and healthy dish, and also inexpensive.

Bak kut teh soup is so popular in Singapore that it is even sold as instant noodles or complete with a soup base for making a meal at home. So you can bring an edible culinary souvenir from Singapore!

Cendol

The main ingredients of cendol dessert are coconut milk, green starch noodles, pandanus and palm sugar.The Singaporeans, known for their penchant for adding new flavor to familiar dishes, have come up with several flavors for this dessert as well. Cendol can be served with crushed ice, red beans, rice balls, fruit jelly or corn purée.

Delicious and sweet Cendol is the perfect dessert on a hot Singaporean day.

And if you are not afraid of bold options, try Cendol with Dope, this is a very specific fruit with a strong aroma.

Char Kway Teow

This is a very popular rice noodle dish with an interesting history.When char kway teow first appeared, it was a dish made from little by little and hastily. Many fishermen and farmers made extra money as night peddlers of char kway teow, prepared on the eve of the house from a mixture of ingredients at hand.

Char Kway Teow translates roughly as “fried rice cakes in strips”, and it is prepared like this: flat rice noodles, similar to Italian tagliatelle, are fried, light and thick dark soy sauces, Belachan shrimp paste, Indian date juice, bean sprouts, Chinese onions, Chinese lap cheong sausages and heart-shaped clams.In the original version of the recipe, the noodles are fried in pork fat, which gives the dish a special rich taste.

In recent years, Char Kway Teow, still commonly sold in stalls and kiosks, has become a healthier and fresher dish with more herbs and less oil. In addition, young crispy soy sprouts were added to Char Kway Teow. With such innovations, the favorite dish for a long time has acquired new shades of taste and aroma: before you try Char Kway Teow, you will remember the hot wok and the heady aromas of spices.

Char Kway Teow can be easily found in almost any café in Singapore, such as the Maxwell Road Hawker Center or Princess Terrace Café, where it is a signature dish. At your choice, it can be served with clams or shrimps, with this addition, Char Kway Teow will become a delicious hearty lunch. And if you are going to a party at the Zouk club, then you can dine at the famous Char Kway Teow at the nearby famous Zion Road Hawker Center (you will immediately recognize this place by the long lines of thirsty customers).

Chilli Crab

Some of the best restaurants for this delicious dish are: No Signboard Seafood Restaurant, Jumbo Seafood and Long Beach Seafood located in the East Coast Lagoon Food Village, near East Coast Park located on the shore.

There are other seafood restaurants such as Long Beach Seafood at Dempsey Hotel, Palm Beach Seafood at One Fullerton Hotel and Singapore Seafood Republic at Resorts World Sentosa.

Chilli Crab is a special dish, in a sweet and salty sauce, cooked with chilli and tomato sauce. This unique combination will bring you real pleasure.

Red hot crab sauce made with garlic and rice vinegar. And the dish itself is known for its airy consistency, which is achieved by adding a beaten egg with flour at the very end of the cooking process.

Fried buns can be ordered with the crab, they can be dipped in a delicious sauce, which is a pity to leave on the plate.

Different types of crab can be used in the preparation of the dish – both with hard and soft shells.

All seafood lovers should definitely try this dish in Singapore.

Here you can taste the black pepper crab dish very similar to Chilli Crab, for example, in the Eng Seng Restaurant coffee shop in the Joo Chiat quarter. Coffee shops in Singapore are small kiosks that sell food – a kind of simplified version of a cafe. Rows of coffee shops can be found in every area of ​​the island.

Wanton Mee Noodles with Dumplings

Served in two versions: with broth – Hong Kong version, or without broth – Malay and Singapore versions.

Hong Kong-style Wanton Mee, usually served in broth, dumplings stuffed with shrimp or pork. The noodles in the dish in Hong Kong are cooked al dente – they are not boiled, but only scalded. In Cantonese restaurants, the dish is often served with crispy noodles and dumplings made from thin text and stuffed with shrimp, pork, or tree mushrooms.Wanton Mee in Hong Kong is deliciously prepared at two family restaurants – Crystal Jade Kitchen and Imperial Treasure Cantonese Cuisine.

The Singaporean and Malay versions of the dish are very similar, they are served with small dumplings, barbecued pork slices and lettuce, no broth. Sometimes the dumplings are deep-fried. The composition of the sauce for Wanton Mee without broth varies – Malays are usually limited to soy sauce, while Singaporeans make a sauce with tomato, chili and sesame oil.

Often Cantonese-style meat, Char Siew, is added to the Wanton Mee dish, and the most delicious is meat cooked so that it is slightly charred, but at the same time remains juicy.This is achieved due to the fact that meat pieces with fat are used in cooking. Char Siew noodles are mostly egg noodles and are yellow in color, firm in consistency and flat in shape. With this version, Wanton Mee can serve rice as a side dish and sweet BBQ sauce. However, despite the fact that the Cantonese way of preparing the dish is quite widespread, the lean version of the dish has become more and more popular lately.

In recent years, new variations of Wanton Mee have emerged, such as the Kolo Mee from Sarawak.All flavors of such a different dish can be tasted in inexpensive coffee shops. Some of the places where Wanton Mee is best served are Foong Kee Coffee Shop on Keong Siak Road, Kok Kee Wanton Mee at Lavender Food Center, and Happy Wanton Noodle at Bukit Timah Food Center. All noodle lovers should definitely try Wanton Mee in Singapore.

Fish head in curry sauce

This dish, invented by Singaporean Malayale (an Indian ethnic group in the southern state of India – Kerala), consists of red snapper heads and vegetables stewed in curry sauce.The “visiting card” of the dish is its sour taste of tamarind – an Indian date.

Fish head curry can be eaten with rice or with a bun dipped in the sauce of the dish, as the Chinese do. The sweetness of the dough softens the spice flavors – a good option for those who don’t consider themselves a big fan of spices.

In addition, the Chinese often eat a dish with vegetables and meat. For a taste like this, head to the famous Ocean Fish Head Curry on McCullum Street in downtown.

Indians also eat fish head curry with rice, but they add pickled vegetables. An Indian twist can be enjoyed at Banana Leaf Apolo in Little India, or nearby at the famous Muthu’s Curry on Race Course Road.

The Indian Kingfisher beer or cold lemonade is a great addition to this delicious dish. Fish head curry is another must-try dish in Singapore, because you can hardly find something similar in other parts of the world.

Carrot Pie

The recipe for this long-loved local dish is as old as the world. The fried carrot cake is known here as chai tow kueh, and is actually cubes of boiled rice flour and white radish. It is baked in an egg like an omelet with the addition of green onions – a very common method of cooking among the TeoChu people. In Singapore, the dish can be served “white” or “dark” (with the addition of sweet soy sauce), in either case, it is ideal for a quick and tasty lunch.

Great food at Makansutra Gluttons Bay, near Esplanade Theater or Newton Food Center. Some restaurants, such as Hai Tien Lo, serve the Cantonese version of the dish – with fresh radishes, loop chong (Chinese sausages) and shrimp, and the pie is made in a square shape and first steamed and then fried.

By the way, the cooking process is very entertaining, it is interesting to watch it – the chefs loudly chop a large cooked pie into square pieces with knives.This is somewhat similar to a small theatrical performance with rhythmic sounds, we advise you not only to taste the dish, but also to admire the cooking process.

Fried Sesame Ball

There are many Chinese bakeries and steamed restaurants (Dim Sum) in Singapore, so you can easily find sesame balls on almost any menu. Fully coated with sesame seeds, these balls are fried until crispy. This is not to say that serving the dish will delight the eye, but you just have to try it …

Sesame balls are a delicious snack with a sweetish taste, viscous dough consistency and an empty core.They can be served simply as a light side dish, or as an independent dish, adding red beans or lotus seeds inside.

The Malay version of this Kuih Bom snack is prepared in the same way. The only difference is that Kuih Bom often includes sweet coconut flakes and green or red bean paste. In Singapore, you can try two more famous versions of the dessert made from rice flour – Nian Gao and Tangyuan.

Nian Gao Sweet Pudding is a traditional Chinese New Year dish.It is served steamed or fried (sometimes with an egg), and everyone is supposed to eat one serving at random. It is often prepared for dessert at any time of the year.

Tangyuan dessert is traditionally prepared during the Autumn Festival, however it is sold year round in numerous food centers and supermarkets in Singapore. Tangyuan is served with a selection of sweet gravy and toppings – sesame seeds, peanuts and red bean paste.

A golden dessert Jian Dui, shaped like a coin, is a symbol of good luck and prosperity.The Chinese have a belief that if the balls swell a lot during frying, then expect good luck. Therefore, when you visit one of the Dim Sum restaurants or any Chinese bakery, be sure to eat this dessert at random.

Hainanese Chicken Rice

Hainanese Chicken Rice is a culinary gem of early Chinese immigrants originally from the Hainan province of southern China.

The dish seems quite simple: steamed chicken fillet, aromatic rice pre-fried in chicken fat or cooked in chicken broth, light or dark soy sauce, a little chili powder and ginger paste.

However, in order to achieve the “correct” taste of the dish, seasonings must be added in strictly defined proportions – it is worth a little deviation from the traditional recipe and the dish can turn into a mediocre mixture of rice and chicken. In this sense, ground chili is a very insidious seasoning – if you overdo it, the dish will turn out to be too spicy and it will be impossible to eat it, and if you do not sleep enough pepper, Hainanese rice will turn out to be a lean dish without a special taste and aroma inherent in it.

In addition, cooking chicken is not an easy process: first it is steamed until fully cooked, then immediately placed in cold water.Thus, meat that is served not hot, but at room temperature, remains tender and juicy.

Hainanese chicken rice is usually served with a cup of chicken stock, thinly sliced ​​cucumber, and soy sauce mixed with ground chili and ginger paste as a condiment. This is a favorite dish of many locals and is well prepared in many Singapore shopping malls, food centers, and restaurants. For example, at Maxwell Road Hawker Center, Boon Tong Kee or Big Bird Chicken Rice Restaurant at Balmoral Plaza Hotel, and Wee Nam Kee, Novena Ville, or Chatterbox at Mandarin Orchard Hotel.

Uncomplicated but very tasty Hainanese chicken rice is one of the favorite daily dishes of Singaporeans, which is definitely worth trying for all guests of the island.

Yong Tau Foo

This dish is very common in Malaysia and Singapore. It appeared in the 60s of the last century, and was tofu bean curd stuffed with fish or pork pate. Its name is translated as “stuffed tofu”. Today, other products are used in the preparation of the dish – fish pate, chili peppers, antillis, bean curd, pumpkin, mushrooms, dry tofu noodles and eggplant.All of these products can be purchased semi-finished in many supermarkets and markets in Singapore.

Fish pâté is traditionally made from herring fillets or Spanish mackerel, grinding fillet pieces in a mortar to the consistency of a homogeneous sticky paste. The key to delicious Yong Tau Foo is properly cooked fish paste. Deep-fried pancakes, dumplings or Ngo Hiang meat rolls are often served in addition.

At your choice, the dish can be served with broth, and as a side dish – with egg noodles or vermicelli.The flavorful and light broth used to boil other ingredients in the dish is usually made with soybeans and dried anchovies. Due to the different preferences of the local population, the dish is served with Laksa Spicy Peranakan soup or curry sauce. Sesame seeds, chili peppers, or sweet soy sauce are often used in addition to the meal.

The Malaysian version of the dish – Ampang Yong Tau Foo – without broth, steamed or stewed over low heat with the addition of piquant spices is also popular in Singapore.Famous places serving Yong Tau Foo are Goldhill Hakka Restaurant on Changi Road, Rong Xin Cooked Food at Tanjong Pagar Food Center. We recommend all lovers of healthy food to try Hakka Yong Tau Foo.

Hokkien Prawn Mee

The Hokkien Prawn Mee dish was invented by sailors from South Korea. In the post-war years, those who worked in factories gathered at the end of the day on Rochor Road and fried noodles from those same factories in charcoal ovens.

Today, the dish is made by frying noodles and adding garlic, egg, soy sauce, yellow noodles, soy sprouts, shrimp and squid rings. The key to success in the preparation of the dish is the right seasoning made from stewed shrimp heads, clams and dried fish. First, the noodles are dipped in the sauce, stewed for a minute, then fried with seafood until the excess liquid evaporates. Pork fat was once an important ingredient in the Hokkien Prawn Mee dish; nowadays it is less and less added to the dish, considering that it does not belong to a healthy diet.

Hokkien Prawn Mee is often served with chili or lime to spice it up. And many food centers use palm leaves or bark instead of plates to enhance the flavor of the dish.

You can try this mouth-watering dish in famous cafes in Singapore: Nam Sing Fried Hokkien Mee or Geylang Lor 29 Fried Hokkien Mee.

Ice Kachang

Ice Kachang is the very first cold dessert to appear in Singapore. Initially, the dish consisted of dense balls of grated ice, poured over with colored sugar syrup.They usually ate such a dessert without cutlery – just with their fingers. In the 50s and 60s of the last century, Ice Kachang could be bought at any street or roadside shop, it was sold by beverage manufacturers in order to generate additional accompanying income.

Modern Ice Kachang is a more complex dish – balls of ice or ice cream with jelly, red beans (hence the name of the dish – Kachang is translated from Malay as “beans”), sweet corn and palm tree seeds. From above everything is sprinkled with grated ice, poured over with bright colored sugar syrup and condensed milk, served in a bowl or a tall glass.If the dish is served in a bowl, then all the fillings are usually hidden inside the ice ball, so you have to cunningly arrange it with a spoon to get to the most delicious one. And to satisfy the different tastes of Singaporeans and visitors, in recent years, this dessert has been served with fruit cocktails, aloe vera jelly, and even chocolate or dope. Ice Kachang can be enjoyed at any food center on the island, such as the particularly popular Maxwell Road Hawker Center in Chinatown.

Ice Kachang is best eaten slowly.It is worth remembering that in a well-prepared dessert, the ice is crumbled with very small crumbs, so it instantly melts in your mouth. There should be no feeling of ice chunks floating in the sugar syrup. As for the fillers, the more there are and the more varied they are, the tastier the dessert will be. Then with each spoon of Ice Kachang you can taste new flavors of each filling in the dessert.

Kaya Toast

Ya Kun Kaya Toast is one of the best places to serve the most delicious Kaya toast on their menu since 1940.a wide range of different versions of this dish is presented. In addition, delicious gifts and souvenirs and ground coffee can be bought at Ya Kun Kaya Toast Outlets.

If you did not have a chance to visit the Ya Kun Kaya Toast diner, you can go to any cafe or food center – delicious Kaya Toast is sold almost everywhere. Another popular Singaporean cafe chain that cooks this dish well is Killiney Kopitiam. Their cafe is on the eponymous Killiney Road, right behind the futuristic Orchard Central shopping center.

In some places, Kaya Toast is served with boiled soft-boiled egg to dip the toast into it like a sauce – it turns out very tasty. And the most suitable drink for the dish is bitter black coffee known as Kopi-O.

Laksa

Peranakans are ethnic Chinese who settled along the British Strait, and Laksa is their popular national dish, which is also known in Sinagpur and Malaysia. However, as with many other national dishes, there are several options for preparing Laksa in different areas.

The unique Singaporean version of Laksa lemak, also known as Nyonya Laksa, is made with a thick, creamy coconut milk sauce. Laksa Lemak can be found in almost every food center on the island.

And the restaurants that best serve Laksa Lemak are in Katong, an area on the east side of the island. Here the dish is served with chopped noodles, so you can eat it with a spoon familiar to Europeans, you won’t need sticks.

A lighter version of the dish – Assam laksa – served with spicy fish broth.Recently, even laksa pasta has appeared, a new interpretation of the Singaporean dish with an Italian twist.

The Katong War for the Lax Platter

Katong is an area of ​​the island inhabited by the Peranakans. It is here that you will find the most popular cafes and restaurants where the Laksa dish is best prepared. They are all located on East Coast Road. Each owner of a local cafe or restaurant here claims that he is the one who knows the original recipe for the dish. Such urban disputes among chefs continue to this day, and the origin of the dish and its original recipe remain unknown.

If you want to try this popular local dish, we advise you to visit one of three constantly competing restaurants – 49 Katong Laksa at 49 East Coast Road, 328 Katong Laksa at 51 East Coast Road or Marine Parade Laksa located at address 50 East Coast Road. Doubting which place to choose? Perhaps the opinion of Lonely Planet Travelers magazine will help you, which awarded 328 Katong Laksa the first place in the rating of such establishments.

A The New Paper (November 2011 issue.) presented his version of the 8 Best Places Serving the Tastiest Laksa in Singapore:

  1. 48 Roxy Laksa at East Coast Lagoon Food Village
  2. Terry Katong Laksa at Bukit Timah Market and Food Center
  3. Depot Road Zhen Shan Mei Claypot Laksa in Alexandra Villag
  4. Lucy’s Penang Delights at Block 117 on Aljunied Avenue 2
  5. Sungei Road Laksa at Block 27 Jalan Berseh, Jin Shui Kopitiam
  6. 328 Katong Laksa at 51 East Coast Road
  7. Katong Laksa at 1 90 Telok Kura185 Road 49 Katong Laksa at 49 East Coast Road, Hock Tong Hin Eating House

Lo Hei is a whole tradition.The dish, symbolizing prosperity, a healthy and long life, is usually served as a snack, and at festive dinners, when all family and friends get together, one person mixes the ingredients of the salad and says aloud something like a toast – wishes for good luck and well-being. This tradition is also popular among businessmen during the New Year celebrations – the word Hei translates as “success, prosperity, going up”.

The main ingredients of Lo Hei are white or green radish, carrots, bell peppers, turnips and red pickled ginger.

Homeland of this Hokkien dish

Lor Mee – Xiamen city in China; it was brought to Singapore in 1950. Lor Mee is traditionally made with thin, flat egg noodles with a special thick, dark starchy sauce, but many food centers make it with plain wheat noodles.

How a special sauce is prepared largely determines whether a dish turns out to be mediocre or delicious. The sauce is made by stewing pork bones, eggs and spices.Sometimes potato or corn starch is added to the sauce as thickeners. The set of ingredients that make up the dish itself is different. These are usually braised pork, fish casseroles, boiled eggs, and fried meat rolls.

In some cafes, the dish is also prepared with fried fish, in particular with shark fillets, stewed duck and deep-fried dumplings. And of course, Lor Mee is not complete without a traditional set of spices and seasonings such as garlic, ginger, red chili and balsamic vinegar.All this gives the dish a captivating aroma.

Some of the best places to cook Lor Mee are Tiong Bahru Lor Mee and 178 Lor Mee at Tiong Bahru Market, Bukit Purmei Lor Mee at Bukit Purmei Avenue and Yuan Chuan Lor Mee at Amoy Street Food Center. …

Singaporean cuisine is a fusion of many Asian cuisines. But this fusion was not deep enough to significantly transform the dishes – and they remained authentic.But this pineapple is another matter. Rather, it is the epitome of the Western, tourist vision of what Asian food should be.

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 very ripe large pineapple
  • 300-350 g large shrimps
  • 150 g dinosaur rice (jasmine or basmati)
  • 1 medium, not too hot chili
  • 3 cm fresh root
  • 3 cm fresh root –3 cloves of garlic
  • 5–7 green onion feathers
  • juice of 1 lime
  • 20 g roasted peanuts
  • vegetable oil
  • 1 tbsp.l. sauce ketchup manis
  • 1 tbsp. l. fish sauce
  • 2 tsp curry powder
  • ground hot red pepper, salt

COOKING METHOD

Step 1

Fill the rice with cold drinking water and leave for 1 hour. Then drain the water. Heat 1 tbsp in a heavy-bottomed saucepan. l. butter, add half the curry powder, stir and stir in the rice. Pour 250 ml of boiling water, salt, bring to a boil, cook over low heat for 20 minutes. Turn off the heat and leave the rice to cool, 1 tsp.

Step 2

Peel the ginger, garlic and chili. Finely chop the ginger and chili. Cut the garlic into thin slices. Chop the green onion.

Step 3

Peel the shrimp from the shell, remove the heads, if any. Slice the back of the shrimp along the center, remove the dark intestinal vein.

Step 4

Without peeling, cut the pineapple lengthwise along with the leaves – this should be done with a large, very sharp chef’s knife. If the core is hard, cut it out and do not use it.Cut the flesh into squares without cutting through to the very end. Take out the pulp and cut into small pieces.

Step 5

Brush the insides of both pineapple halves with oil and place, cut side up, on a baking sheet. Bake in an oven preheated to 180 ° C until the surface is slightly caramelized, about 15 minutes.

Step 6

Meanwhile, heat some oil in a wok or a large deep-bottomed saucepan, add garlic, chili, peanuts and 2/3 of the onion, quickly sauté, stirring occasionally.Add remaining curry powder, cook 30 sec.

Step 7

Put pineapple pieces, cook over high heat, stirring occasionally, for 3-4 minutes. Add shrimp, manis ketchup and fish sauce. Fry, stirring occasionally, until the shrimp turn red. Remove from heat, add lime juice, pepper and stir.

Step 8

Add rice to the wok, mix thoroughly. Salt if necessary.

Step 9

Place pineapple halves on a platter, gently fill with pineapple rice and shrimp, sprinkle with remaining green onions and serve immediately

Singapore Food Courts | BusinessIntourService

One of the ways to get acquainted with Singaporean cuisine is to visit the food court, of which there are a huge number in the city.A food court is a complex under the roof of which small eateries of a wide variety of cuisines have united, be they Chinese, Thai, Indian, Malay or Vietnamese. Food courts operate on the principle of self-service: you choose a dish, pay for it, wait for it to be prepared for you, pick it up, find a free table and start tasting.

Popular food courts in the city:

  • Lau Pa Sat (Raffles Place MRT) is a food court located in the business center on the site of the former market.Probably the largest in the center of Singapore. The place is interesting for its unusual architecture – the building resembles a Gothic building and is almost entirely made of metal.
  • Newton Food Center (near Orchard Road) is Singapore’s premier food court and is advertised by the Tourist Office of Singapore as one of the places to sample local cuisine.
  • Makansutra Gluttons Bay is not the largest, but one of the most popular food courts due to its location.It is located in the heart of tourist activity – next to the famous Singapore theater Esplanade.
  • Tekka Center Little India – located right next to a large food market – always the freshest food guaranteed. It opens early at 6:30 am, so you can even have an early breakfast here.
  • Chinatown Food Street – The “food street” on Smith Street in Chinatown, is one of the cheapest and most colorful food courts in the city. Another popular food court is located across the street – Maxwell Road Hawker Center
  • East Coast Lagoon Food Village – Located in the center of the East Coast Park, the food court offers great sea views, pleasant breezes and a variety of the freshest seafood and national dishes.

Don’t Miss: Look out for the one-Michelin-star street eateries. The owner of Hong Kong Soya Sauce Chicken Rice and Noodle , which serves rice and noodles with chicken, Cheng Hong Meng earned a one-star for a street vendor for the first time in the history of a Michelin guide.
Tang Chai Sen is another chef and owner of a small street food stand that has received one Michelin star, Hill Street Tai Hwa Pork Noodle is famous for its noodles.

National Singaporean dishes

They are eaten every day, sold at food courts and served in countless cafes where Singaporeans mostly eat: cooking at home is not very common here. And why, if the city is replete with hockers – small stalls with a wide variety of take-away food, behind the stove of which there are often real virtuosos, whose families pass on the secrets of their craft from generation to generation. Also, all these dishes can, of course, be tried in decent restaurants.

Our Top 5 Singapore Foods

Chilli Crab
Chilli Crab – in an impossibly tasty sauce. Knowledgeable people order special small buns for this crab, so that not a single drop of the sauce will be eaten.

Laksa
This Peranakan dish consists of fine rice noodles with a rich and tangy coconut gravy, which is the essence of this dish. There are several types of laksa with different meat (broth), seafood, and spices.

Hainan rice with chicken (Chicken rice)
Hainanese rice with chicken is a real national dish that is sold on every corner. Steamed or boiled chicken is served on aromatic fatty rice, with sliced ​​cucumbers. There may be options with fried chicken or chicken with soy sauce.

Bak Kut Teh soup
This is a cross between rich meat broth and herbal tea. According to legend, once a beggar wandered into a butcher’s shop in the hope that he would be fed.The owner, himself a poor man, cooked a few pork ribs for the poor fellow and added the cheapest spices – anise and pepper. Modern chefs add variety to it by adding new herbs and spices, and you can choose the ribs for the soup yourself.

Dim Sum
Dim Sum is somewhat reminiscent of dumplings, but not as heavy and high in calories as the Russian dish. Their dough is thin, rice, fillings vary from pork to seafood, there are also versions with vegetables.

Singaporean Sweets and Joy

Have you already tasted traditional Singaporean desserts? We bring to your attention the TOP 5 sweet dishes that you should definitely try!

Pandane Cake
The pandan herb gives the cake a greenish tint. It is often eaten for breakfast, dipped in coffee with milk.

Sago Gula Melaka
Sago is a cereal or starch made from the sago palm.It makes beads, pleasant on the tongue, which are collected in jelly and poured on top with coconut cream and brown palm sugar, which tastes like caramel.

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