Stainless steel back water resistant: Delicious Fruit stainless steel back water resistant watch Popular Picks

Buy Apple Watch – Stainless Steel Case

Buy an Apple Watch with GPS + Cellular directly from Apple and get $100 back after activation.**View details

Largest Display

The new Retina display on Apple Watch Series 7 has nearly 20 percent more screen area than Series 6.

Improved Durability

Most crack-resistant front crystal. Dust resistant. And swimproof.footnote1

Fast Charging

Same all-day battery lifefootnote2 with up to 33 percent faster charging than Series 6.footnote3

Health and Wellness

The most advanced Apple Watch health and wellness features yet, including the Blood Oxygen app and sensorfootnote4 and the ECG app. footnote5

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Apple Watch Series 7

Starting at

$399

  • 45mm or 41mm
  • Swimprooffootnote1
  • Most crack-resistant front crystal
  • Certified IP6X dust resistantfootnote1
  • Always-On Retina display
    Nearly 20% larger than SE
    More than 50% larger than Series 3
  • Blood Oxygen appfootnote4
  • ECG appfootnote5
  • High and low heart rate notifications
  • Irregular heart rhythm notificationfootnote6
  • Emergency SOSfootnote7
  • International emergency callingfootnote8
  • Fall detection
  • Cellular availablefootnote9
  • Family Setup — pair multiple watches with one iPhonefootnote10

Shop Apple Watch Series 7

Learn more Apple Watch Series 7

Apple Watch SE

Starting at

$279

  • 44mm or 40mm
  • Swimprooffootnote1
  • Retina display
    Over 30% larger than Series 3

  • High and low heart rate notifications
  • Irregular heart rhythm notificationfootnote6
  • Emergency SOSfootnote7
  • International emergency callingfootnote8
  • Fall detection
  • Cellular availablefootnote9
  • Family Setup — pair multiple watches with one iPhonefootnote10

Shop Apple Watch SE

Learn more Apple Watch SE

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ShopHQ | Boutique Shopping
45mm Quartz
Stainless Steel
Bracelet Watch – ShopHQ

Watch Glossary:

ATM: Measures water resistance; Stands for “atmospheres” or the amount of pressure a watch can withstand before leaking; One atmosphere is equal to 10 meters of water pressure.

Bezel: Retaining ring topping the case and securing the crystal; Sometimes incorporates unidirectional or ratcheting movements, engraved or printed chapter markers, or complications such as a tachymeter.

Chronograph: Functioning similarly to a stopwatch, a chronograph is a unique and valued complication due to its ability to measure increments of elapsed time while the watch still maintains traditional timekeeping abilities. The crown controls the analog watch while function pushers allow you to start, stop and reset the chronograph subdials.

Chronometer: High-precision timepiece that has been tested and is certified to meet precision standards; Chronometer watches often come with certificates indicating their certified status.

Complication: Any feature added to the timepiece that does not indicate hours, minutes or seconds.

COSC Certified Chronometer: Refers to timepieces that have been christened with the title of chronometer. To become a chronometer, timepieces have to pass a test conducted by the Controle Officiel Suisse des Chronometers (COSC), roughly translating to Official Swiss Chronometer Testing Institute. COSC is a prestigious Swiss government agency that certifies the accuracy and precision of timepieces in Switzerland.

Crown: Part that allows you to manipulate the watch movement for a variety of purposes such as setting the hands, changing the date, winding the mainspring, etc.

Crystal: Transparent cover on a watch face that gives view of the dial.

Deployant: Type of clasp that keeps the closing mechanism hidden, creating an uninterrupted look for your bracelet or strap.

Exhibition Case Back: Unique complication wherein a crystal window is implemented into the back of a watch case, allowing view of the timepiece’s movement.

Function Pushers: Manual controls on a case for when a movement features complications that require increased manipulation.

Greenwich Mean Time (GMT): Also referred to as Greenwich Meridian Time, the Greenwich Meridian Line is located at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich, England. It is the place from where all time zones are measured. Greenwich Mean Time is the average time that Earth takes to rotate from noon to noon. In this regard, GMT is thought of as “the world’s time” and was once the basis with which every other zone set time.

Guilloche: Style of engraving that features wavy or straight lines, giving a unique effect when the timepiece is moved or shifted.

Ionic Plating: Process that produces a hardened surface that is durable and scratch-resistant; Has a black flat “stealth” finish.

Jewels: Within a movement, metal on metal contact creates wear and tear. Watchmakers use jewel bearings to reduce friction and help the delicate parts of the movement work smoothly and with great precision. Jewels help extend the movement’s life. Diamonds, sapphires, rubies and garnets are the preferred materials. As a general rule, a higher number of jewels suggests a more prestigious movement.

Lugs: North and south ends of the case that attach to the strap or bracelet and often extend out from the dominant lines of the case.

Moon Phase: The lunar cycle has been a cornerstone of horology, the study of measuring time, since ancient days. Moon Phase is a complication on a timepiece that displays the various stages of the moon cycles from waxing to waning. It appears as a dial visible through an aperture which reveals the current moon phase.

Movement: Assembly making up the principal elements and mechanisms of a watch or clock; Includes the winding and setting mechanism, the mainspring, the train, the escapement and the regulating elements.

Power Reserve: Time a watch will continue running based on the movement’s residual winding of its mainspring; In quartz and digital watches, this can also refer to the amount of energy left in the battery.

Push Button Dual Deployant: Similar to deployant and considered one of the most desirable and easy-to-use clasps, the push button dual deployant employs two small hidden push buttons that release the bracelet. This clasp keeps the closing mechanism hidden for an uninterrupted, seamless finish.

Retrograde: Hour, minute, second or calendar hand that moves across a scale and resets to zero at the end of its cycle.

Skeletonization: Reveals the intricate symphony of moving rotors, gears and springs which power a timepiece; The open design offers an insider’s view, as unnecessary metal is cut away to allow the wearer to actually see the movement’s skeleton.

Swiss Made: Since the 16th century, Switzerland has been the epicenter of watch making, producing some of the industry’s greatest technological advances. The Swiss put a law into effect for all timepieces baring the words “Swiss Made”: First, the movement must be assembled in Switzerland. Secondly, the movement must be cased up in Switzerland. Finally, the manufacturer must carry out the timepiece’s final inspection in Switzerland.

Tachymeter: Scale on a watch used to determine units per hour, such as average speed over a fixed distance, or distance based on speed; Typically located along the outer rim of a dial.

Tritium: Self-powered illumination! Miniature tubes containing gaseous Tritium and layered with phosphor to power the luminous accents which can be seen for several meters in darkness.

Tritnite: Illumination requires no electrical power but must be “charged” by holding your watch close to any light source. The longer you hold it there, the longer and brighter you’ll see the Tritnite.

Unidirectional Rotating Bezel: Used for tracking elapsed time. A ratchet mechanism prevents the bezel from rotating backwards. This feature is popular with divers, who rely on the elapsed time feature to prevent the diver from running out of air. The fact that the bezel cannot rotate backwards prevents the wearer from underestimating the elapsed time.Watch Glossary:

ATM: Measures water resistance; Stands for “atmospheres” or the amount of pressure a watch can withstand before leaking; One atmosphere is equal to 10 meters of water pressure.

Bezel: Retaining ring topping the case and securing the crystal; Sometimes incorporates unidirectional or ratcheting movements, engraved or printed chapter markers, or complications such as a tachymeter.

Chronograph: Functioning similarly to a stopwatch, a chronograph is a unique and valued complication due to its ability to measure increments of elapsed time while the watch still maintains traditional timekeeping abilities. The crown controls the analog watch while function pushers allow you to start, stop and reset the chronograph subdials.

Chronometer: High-precision timepiece that has been tested and is certified to meet precision standards; Chronometer watches often come with certificates indicating their certified status.

Complication: Any feature added to the timepiece that does not indicate hours, minutes or seconds.

COSC Certified Chronometer: Refers to timepieces that have been christened with the title of chronometer. To become a chronometer, timepieces have to pass a test conducted by the Controle Officiel Suisse des Chronometers (COSC), roughly translating to Official Swiss Chronometer Testing Institute. COSC is a prestigious Swiss government agency that certifies the accuracy and precision of timepieces in Switzerland.

Crown: Part that allows you to manipulate the watch movement for a variety of purposes such as setting the hands, changing the date, winding the mainspring, etc.

Crystal: Transparent cover on a watch face that gives view of the dial.

Deployant: Type of clasp that keeps the closing mechanism hidden, creating an uninterrupted look for your bracelet or strap.

Exhibition Case Back: Unique complication wherein a crystal window is implemented into the back of a watch case, allowing view of the timepiece’s movement.

Function Pushers: Manual controls on a case for when a movement features complications that require increased manipulation.

Greenwich Mean Time (GMT): Also referred to as Greenwich Meridian Time, the Greenwich Meridian Line is located at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich, England. It is the place from where all time zones are measured. Greenwich Mean Time is the average time that Earth takes to rotate from noon to noon. In this regard, GMT is thought of as “the world’s time” and was once the basis with which every other zone set time.

Guilloche: Style of engraving that features wavy or straight lines, giving a unique effect when the timepiece is moved or shifted.

Ionic Plating: Process that produces a hardened surface that is durable and scratch-resistant; Has a black flat “stealth” finish.

Jewels: Within a movement, metal on metal contact creates wear and tear. Watchmakers use jewel bearings to reduce friction and help the delicate parts of the movement work smoothly and with great precision. Jewels help extend the movement’s life. Diamonds, sapphires, rubies and garnets are the preferred materials. As a general rule, a higher number of jewels suggests a more prestigious movement.

Lugs: North and south ends of the case that attach to the strap or bracelet and often extend out from the dominant lines of the case.

Moon Phase: The lunar cycle has been a cornerstone of horology, the study of measuring time, since ancient days. Moon Phase is a complication on a timepiece that displays the various stages of the moon cycles from waxing to waning. It appears as a dial visible through an aperture which reveals the current moon phase.

Movement: Assembly making up the principal elements and mechanisms of a watch or clock; Includes the winding and setting mechanism, the mainspring, the train, the escapement and the regulating elements.

Power Reserve: Time a watch will continue running based on the movement’s residual winding of its mainspring; In quartz and digital watches, this can also refer to the amount of energy left in the battery.

Push Button Dual Deployant: Similar to deployant and considered one of the most desirable and easy-to-use clasps, the push button dual deployant employs two small hidden push buttons that release the bracelet. This clasp keeps the closing mechanism hidden for an uninterrupted, seamless finish.

Retrograde: Hour, minute, second or calendar hand that moves across a scale and resets to zero at the end of its cycle.

Skeletonization: Reveals the intricate symphony of moving rotors, gears and springs which power a timepiece; The open design offers an insider’s view, as unnecessary metal is cut away to allow the wearer to actually see the movement’s skeleton.

Swiss Made: Since the 16th century, Switzerland has been the epicenter of watch making, producing some of the industry’s greatest technological advances. The Swiss put a law into effect for all timepieces baring the words “Swiss Made”: First, the movement must be assembled in Switzerland. Secondly, the movement must be cased up in Switzerland. Finally, the manufacturer must carry out the timepiece’s final inspection in Switzerland.

Tachymeter: Scale on a watch used to determine units per hour, such as average speed over a fixed distance, or distance based on speed; Typically located along the outer rim of a dial.

Tritium: Self-powered illumination! Miniature tubes containing gaseous Tritium and layered with phosphor to power the luminous accents which can be seen for several meters in darkness.

Tritnite: Illumination requires no electrical power but must be “charged” by holding your watch close to any light source. The longer you hold it there, the longer and brighter you’ll see the Tritnite.

Unidirectional Rotating Bezel: Used for tracking elapsed time. A ratchet mechanism prevents the bezel from rotating backwards. This feature is popular with divers, who rely on the elapsed time feature to prevent the diver from running out of air. The fact that the bezel cannot rotate backwards prevents the wearer from underestimating the elapsed time.About Stainless Steel:

Also called corrosion resistant steel, stainless steel is a steel alloy with added iron and chromium. The metal is rust-resistant, durable and highly lustrous. It has a similar appearance to platinum and polishes to a glistening sheen. Any scratches that may occur from day to day wear can be easily buffed away without endangering the piece. Please note, however, if the stainless steel is plated with another metal, the plating can wear off if rubbed excessively against hard surfaces.

Stainless steel was first recognized in France in 1821 by metallurgist Pierre Berthier. After several corrosion-resistance related discoveries and patents in Europe and the United States, Harry Brearley in England discovered a modern blend of stainless steel alloy. When it was announced by The New York Times in January of 1915, he was officially credited with the invention of this impressive modern metal.

Quartz: Although not as mechanically complex as other engines, the quartz movement provides the most accurate and reliable time-keeping. This type of movement typically draws power from a battery and centers around a small vibrating chip of quartz crystal. When an electrical current, supplied from a battery, is applied to a quartz crystal, the current is distorted and creates a precise resonating frequency. Watchmakers employ the subsequent frequency to measure time. Some adaptations to the traditional quartz movement include introducing rotors and power cells in an effort to maintain the accuracy of quartz while eliminating the need for a battery. Quartz movements have been used in timepieces since the 1970s and are highly accurate, dependable and affordable.

The case provides the foundation for all other major watch components. It houses the movement, maintains the lugs for attachment to the bracelet or strap, plays host to various crowns and function pushers, and seats the crystal and bezel.

Cases exist in a variety of shapes and sizes and utilize a library of materials for construction such as stainless steel, gold, ceramic, titanium, plastic, and more. The dominance of stainless steel in case construction remains, however, hypo-allergenic metals and materials, like titanium, continue to gain in popularity. Metal cases often have particular finishes – such as a smooth reflective polish or circular matte brush – that enhance the presentation of the timepiece and give it unique depth.

Some designs allow for the case and lugs to be curved in order for the watch to have a more comfortable fit around the wrist. The back of a case will typically be removable and most likely be screw down or pop-off. It is important to note, however, it should only be opened by a trained professional. An exhibition feature (found within a case’s back) refers to an added window that allows you to view the movement and is often found on automatic and mechanical timepieces.

Case Size:

Case measurements do not include crown or lugs.

  • Round – One measurement, 8:00 to 2:00
  • Square – One measurement, 3:00 to 9:00 or 6:00 to 12:00 (should be the same)
  • Rectangle, Tonneau, Oval, Octagon, etc. – Two measurements, 3:00 to 9:00 and 6:00 to 12:00
  • Watch Case Dimension Comparisons:

    It can be difficult to determine how a watch will fit on your wrist without trying it on first. Get a better feel for the size of a watch case by comparing the case diameter to the following diameters of common objects:

  • Nickel: 21.21mm
  • Quarter: 24.26mm
  • Half Dollar: 30.61mm
  • Poker Chip (standard): 39mm
  • Ping Pong Ball: 40mm
  • Golf Ball: 42.67mm
  • Tow Ball Hitch (ISO standard): 50mm
  • Racquetball: 57mm
  • Soda Can (standard): 65mm
  • Tennis Ball: 67mm
  • Advanced Health Smartwatch | Fitbit Sense

     

     

    *The Fitbit ECG app is only available in select countries, not intended for use by people under 22 years old. See here for additional details.

    **Varies with use and other factors; up to 12 hours with continuous GPS. Get 24 hours of charge with 12 minutes of charging.

    ***Skin temperature variation and SpO2 are not available in all markets. Skin temperature is only available in the Fitbit app and only displays variation. Significant changes in ambient temperature may negatively impact skin temperature tracking. The SpO2 feature is not intended to diagnose or treat any medical condition or for any other medical purpose. It is intended to help you manage your well-being and keep track of your information. The SpO2 feature requires more frequent charging.

    †New and returning Premium users only. Valid payment method required. Free trial must be activated within 60 days of device activation. Cancel before free trial ends to avoid subscription fees. See full terms & conditions here.

    ††Requires a Premium subscription. Only available in English, Spanish, Portuguese, French, German, Japanese and Korean.

    ◆COMING SOON. Daily Readiness Score requires a Fitbit Premium membership. Premium content recommendations are not available in all locales and may be in English only.

    ◆◆Calls, texts and notifications available when phone is nearby. Voice assistant availability and features may vary, see here. Applicable subscriptions required for offline music; Pandora is US only. Spotify and Deezer not available in all countries. Always-on display mode and on-wrist calls require more frequent charging. Fitbit Pay™ accepted everywhere that accepts tap-to-pay purchase. See bank and transit availability here.

    ◆◆◆This feature is not intended to be used for contraceptive or other medical purposes. Fitbit does not guarantee or warrant that this feature can be used to achieve particular results. This feature may not accurately predict your menstrual cycles or related information. This feature is intended only to help users monitor and keep track of certain information.

    ‡The Health Metrics dashboard and the metrics displayed in the dashboard are not available in all countries. This feature should not be relied on for any medical purposes. It is intended to provide information that can help you manage your well-being. The SpO2 feature requires more frequent charging.

    §Statistics as of Q4 2020. Relevant study: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33149712/

    §§Only available for Fitbit Premium members. This feature is not intended to diagnose or treat any medical condition and should not be relied on for any medical purposes. It is intended to provide information that can help you manage your well-being. We only use the microphone to register noise levels and snores; we do not store any of your audio data.

     

    All the Details! Reviews, Features, More

    Introduced on September 14, the iPhone 13 Pro and iPhone 13 Pro Max are Apple’s newest high-end pro-level flagship iPhones and are being sold alongside the more affordable iPhone 13 and iPhone 13 mini. The iPhone 13 Pro and iPhone 13 Pro Max are ideal for those who want iPhones with the most features and the best cameras.

    The 6.1-inch iPhone 13 Pro is the successor to the iPhone 12 Pro, while the 6.7-inch iPhone 13 Pro Max is the replacement for the iPhone 12 Pro Max. Both of the new iPhone 13 Pro models are nearly identical in design to the iPhone 12 Pro models, featuring flat edges, a stainless steel frame, a textured matte glass back, and a slight increase in thickness (7.65mm). The iPhone 13 Pro models are available in Silver, Gold, Sierra Blue, and Graphite.

    Both of the new models feature OLED Super Retina XDR Displays that support ProMotion technology with adaptive refresh rates ranging from 10Hz up to 120Hz, much like the iPad Pro models. The displays are up to 25 percent brighter outdoors.

    The iPhone 13 Pro has a 2532×1170 resolution with 460 pixels per inch, while the iPhone 13 Pro Max has a 2778×1284 resolution with 458 pixels per inch. Both iPhones feature 1200 nits max brightness for HDR, along with True Tone to match the color temperature of the display to the ambient light, Wide Color for rich, vivid hues, and Haptic Touch for feedback.

    The front-facing TrueDepth camera system has been updated and the Face ID notch is now smaller, taking up less overall space. Like last year’s models, the iPhone 13 Pro and 13 Pro Max feature a Ceramic Shield cover glass that is infused with nano-ceramic crystals for better protection from drops. IP68 water and dust resistance is included, and the new iPhones can hold up to submersion in 6 meters of water for up to 30 minutes.

    An upgraded A15 Bionic Chip powers the new iPhones. It features a 6-core CPU with 2 performance cores and 4 efficiency cores and a 5-core GPU, which is one more GPU core than is available in the iPhone 13 models. There’s also a 16-core Neural Engine. The 5-core GPU offers 50% faster graphics performance than any other smartphone chip.

    There’s an upgraded triple-lens rear camera with an f/2.8 Telephoto lens, an f/1.5 Wide lens, and an f/1.8 Ultra Wide lens. The Wide lens features an aperture that lets in 2.2x more light and the largest sensor in an iPhone yet, while the Ultra Wide lens lets in 92 percent more light for better low-light performance.

    The 77mm Telephoto lens features 3x optical zoom in, up from 2.5x in the 12 Pro Max, and with the addition of the Ultra Wide lens, there is a 6x optical zoom range and support for 15x digital zoom. There’s also a LiDAR Scanner, which is not available on the iPhone 13 and 13 mini. Both Pro models have the same camera setups this year, with no differences between the Pro and Pro Max.

    Along with the standard Portrait Mode, Night Mode, Time-Lapse and other photographic capabilities, the iPhone 13 Pro models gain Cinematic Mode, a feature that uses rack focus to seamlessly shift focus from one subject to another, artfully blurring the background and creating movie-quality depth effects. Cinematic mode shoots in Dolby HDR and the depth of field and blur can be adjusted using the iPhone’s camera app. 4K video recording at up to 60 fps is also supported.

    Smart HDR 4 recognizes up to four people in a photo and optimizes contrast, lighting, and skin tones for each one, and Deep Fusion, a carry over from iPhone 12, activates in mid to low-light scenes to bring out texture and detail.

    Photographic Styles are an upgraded kind of filter that applies selectively to an image, muting colors or boosting vividness without impacting skin tones. There are Vibrant, Rich Contrast, Warm, and Cool options, along with settings for Tone and Warmth for customization and refining.

    There are several Pro-only photographic capabilities that are limited to the triple-lens camera system including macro photography and videography for close-up macro shots with focus at 2cm, Night Mode support for the Telephoto lens, Night Mode portraits that require the LiDAR Scanner, and ProRes video recording that lets users record ProRes video in 4K at up to 30 frames per second. ProRes video is launching later this year.

    Apple’s iPhone 13 Pro and 13 Pro Max can be unlocked with the Face ID facial recognition system, which works with the 12-megapixel front-facing camera that supports Smart HDR 4, Deep Fusion, Night Mode, Cinematic Mode, Night Mode Selfies, and more.

    5G connectivity is included for better quality video streaming, higher-definition FaceTime calls, and improved gaming, but the super fast mmWave speeds are again limited to major cities in the United States. Slower sub-6GHz 5G speeds are available in more rural areas in the U.S. and in other countries, and there’s support for more 5G bands for 5G connectivity in more places.

    Gigabit LTE is supported when 5G isn’t available, and to preserve battery life when using 5G, a Smart Data Mode reverts to an LTE connection when 5G speeds aren’t necessary. The new iPhone 13 models offer dual eSIM support and don’t come with a physical SIM by default, but there’s still a nano-SIM slot.

    The iPhone 13 Pro and 13 Pro Max support WiFi 6 and Bluetooth 5.0, plus they include a U1 Ultra Wideband chip for spatial awareness.

    Battery life has improved significantly thanks to larger batteries and the more efficient A15 chip. The iPhone 13 Pro offers up to 1.5 hours more battery life than the iPhone 12 Pro, and the iPhone 13 Pro Max offers up to 2.5 hours more battery life than the iPhone 12 Pro Max.

    Storage space starts at 128GB and goes up to 1TB at the high end. There’s a built-in three-axis gyro, an accelerometer, proximity sensor, ambient light sensor, and barometer.

    Like last year’s iPhones, the iPhone 13 Pro and iPhone 13 Pro Max have built-in magnets and are compatible with MagSafe accessories, charging at up to 15W with Apple’s MagSafe Charger. The iPhones also support fast charging, which provides 50 percent charge in 30 minutes with a 20W power adapter.

    There is no power adapter or EarPods included with the iPhone 13 Pro and 13 Pro Max, and these accessories must be purchased separately. They do ship with a USB-C to Lightning cable for charging purposes.

    Note: See an error in this roundup or want to offer feedback? Send us an email here.

    10 Important Military Watches from World War II

    Though the move from pocket watch to wristwatch was accelerated by First World War, it was really during the Second World War that the idea of a dedicated watch for military use came into its own. Developments in Italy just prior to the breakout of hostilities led to the military dive watch, while the Germans advanced the design of the aviator’s watch and the Americans mass-produced infantrymen’s timepieces on an incredible scale. Of course, it was ultimately the Swiss whose neutrality during the war aided their ascendancy to global horological domination, a position they still enjoy today.

    Here are some of the most notable military watches developed and used during the Second World War by countries around the world.

    The A-11

    Omega Forums

    Housed in a positively diminutive (by today’s standards, anyway) 30-32mm case, the A-11 was manufactured by famed American watch companies Elgin, Waltham and Bulova according to a standard from the U.S. military. Mostly produced with black dials, white Arabic numerals and hands and 60-minute gradations, so many were made that the A-11 is sometimes referred to as “the watch that won that War.” Rarer white-dialed versions are sometimes seen, as well as examples issued to Commonwealth forces under the “6B” designation.

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    The 6B/159

    MWR Forum

    Produced by Omega, Longines and Jaeger-LeCoultre for use by RAF pilots and navigators, these watches featured white or black dials, Arabic numerals, central seconds, non-luminous, blue steeled hands and cases fashioned from “Duralumin” — an alloy of aluminum, copper, magnesium and manganese — that were fitted with steel backs. Interestingly, in the mid-1950s, the Ministry of Defense re-cased some of the old Omega 30 T2 SC movements from the Omega variants in new, stainless steel cases and provided them new dials.

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    The Wrist. Watch. Waterproof. (The “Dirty Dozen”)

    Analog / Shift

    Produced under contract to the British MoD, 150,000 of these watches were delivered to replace the various timepieces given the Army Trade Pattern designation. Contracted to 12 watch different companies — some of them big names in Swiss horology — they were delivered in late 1945, too late to see combat. Nonetheless, the Wrist. Watch. Waterproof. watches (which were only given their cinematic nickname by modern collectors much later) were built to high standards, with mechanical movements regulated to chronometer accuracy. Enough were produced that they can still be purchased today for a few thousand dollars.

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    The A.T.P.

    Farfo

    Though often overlooked, the A.T.P. (“Army Trade Pattern”) watches, in addition to 6B/159 and certain other timepieces, were the true workhorses of British forces during WWII, not the more famous “Dirty Dozen.” These were watches produced by close to two-dozen Swiss manufacturers that all shared a similar feature set: 29-33mm chrome-plated or steel cases, a 15-jewel, manually wound movements, white or silver dials with luminous pip or baton indices and hands and central or sub-seconds. Produced in enormous quantities, they’re readily available on the secondary market today.

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    The B-Uhren

    Antiquorum

    Watches are still produced today by myriad companies that take inspiration from this military classic. The Beobachtungsuhr (“observation watch”) was designed under specification from the German Luftfahrtministerium (air ministry) and manufactured by five companies: IWC, A. Lange & Söhne, Wempe, Lacher & Company/Durowe (Laco), and Walter Storz (Stowa). Two dial types, the A and B, were produced with slightly different layouts, and all were fitted into oversized, 55mm cases and were powered by handwound movements. The dial layouts, large onion crowns and utilitarian, no-nonsense looks of these watches has made them legendary in horological and military equipment circles.

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    The Weems

    Analog / Shift

    Though originally developed in the 1930s by Lieutenant Commander Philip Van Horn Weems of the U.S. Navy and produced by Longines, the “Weems” navigation watch concept was later licensed to Omega, which produced roughly 2,000 pieces for use by RAF personnel. (Jaeger LeCoultre also produced their own version). These unique watches, though small in diameter (roughly 33.5mm) featured a novel screw-down bezel that was used to synch the watch to a radio signal for navigational accuracy. Confusingly, they were also given the 6B/159 designation.

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    The Canteen Watch

    Menta Watches

    The “Canteen Watch” was produced by Hamilton and Elgin for the U.S. Bureau of Ships and issued to Underwater Demolition Teams personnel, whose job it was to clear harbors of obstructions and ordnance and to gather intelligence ahead of beach landings. They utilized manually-wound, central-seconds movements and featured a unique twist: a special screw-on cover over the crown connected to the watch case by a chain. This, in combination with a crystal that was soldered onto the case, was designed to prevent water incursion — an early, American attempt at a dedicated military dive watch.

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    The Panerai Radiomir

    Fellows Auctioneers

    Panerai’s first Radiomir watches were developed in 1936, produced in a run of 10 pieces in 1938 and improved upon in 1940 with reinforced lugs. Featuring oversized cases with luminous “sandwich” dials illuminated by a radium compound, they were powered by, at first, the Rolex cal. 816 (a decorated Cortebert movement), and later, by the Angelus cal. 240, an 8-day movement. These early Radiomirs saw service by the Italian Marina Militaire, and especially by the Decima Flottiglia MAS, an elite naval special operations unit that utilized manned torpedoes to attack Allied shipping and military forces.

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    The Fliegerchronograph

    The Saleroom

    Produced by Hanhart and Tutima in single and dual-pusher versions from 1939 and 1941, respectively, these aviation chronographs were earmarked for Luftwaffe personnel. Utilizing the cal. 41 from Hanhart, cal. 59 by Tutima (both dual-pusher designs) or the cal. 40 from Hanhart (single-pusher design), they featured nickel-plated brass cases, black dials with white Arabic numerals, central flyback seconds hands, 30-minute and running seconds counters and knurled rotating or smooth fixed bezels. A well-known, recognizable variant had a red-coated chronograph pusher, a design that’s still present in the modern Hanhart collection.

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    The Seikosha Tensoku

    Matthew Bain Inc.

    Seikosha, part of the Seiko group, produced different watches and clocks in the 1930s and 1940s for the Japanese military. The Tensoku (an abbreviation of tentai kansoku, meaning “astronomical observation”) was produced for pilots of the Mitsubishi A6M Zero, the aircraft infamous for its role in the attack on Pearl Harbor. Roughly analogous to Germany’s Beobachtungs-uhren, they featured oversized 48.5mm cases, manually wound movements, large onion crowns, Arabic numerical indices and coin-edge bezels.

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    Our Predictions In The Diver’s Category Of The 2021 Grand Prix d’Horlogerie de Genève (GPHG): Some Underwater Consensus

    Welcome to the 2021 edition of Quill & Pad’s early Grand Prix d’Horlogerie de Genève predictions in which the team picks favorites and explains why.

    The panelists are:

    Elizabeth Doerr (ED), co-founder and editor-in-chief

    Ian Skellern (IS), co-founder and technical director

    Joshua Munchow (JM), resident nerd writer

    GaryG (GG), resident collector

    Martin Green (MG), resident gentleman

    The Diver’s category contains watches linked to the field of diving, whose functions, materials, and design are suited to this activity.

    Nominated Diver’s watches in the 2021 GPHG

    MG: There is never a shortage of diver’s watches in the watch world, so it’s interesting to note that three of the six models were also nominated in the 2020 GPHG, although in different versions: the Doxa SUB 300, Reservoir Hydrosphere, and Ulysse Nardin Diver X couldn’t prevail last year against Breitling’s Superocean Automatic 48 Boutique Edition. Maybe they have more luck this year?

    ED: Interesting observation, Martin. And since Breitling is not competing in this category this year – though it is in competition in three other categories right now! – perhaps one of those you mentioned has a fighting chance.

    I’ve also decided to go with your method on evaluating this category by separating the desk divers from the real divers. And when you do that here, there are only a few left to choose from.

    GG: As usual, this year in this category we’re seeing a mix of tool watches that one might actually choose to use underwater as a dive computer backup and “desk divers” that will see their toughest duty during a light rain shower on the way to the office. A bit tough to navigate, but good fun.

    JM: When it comes to the Diver’s category, things start to take a turn toward being a bit tough on the nominees because, at least in my mind, a diving watch is a piece of technical safety equipment and so it must be functional first and foremost. The category isn’t named “Waterproof Fashion Watches” or “Aquatic Themed Watches” so a watch that really wouldn’t work well to dive with shouldn’t win.

    I understand that any serious diver (or even amateur diver) would wear a dive computer and not rely on a mechanical watch, but that doesn’t excuse the watch from being non-functional.

    IS: Agreed, Joshua. As far as I’m concerned, if a watch doesn’t fulfill, and ideally excel, the practical functions of a dive watch, then it shouldn’t qualify in this category. Fortunately, most of the preselected watches here do work well as real dive watches. Practicality for purpose was my first filter.

    Doxa SUB 300 Carbon COSC Aquamarine

    GG: Every year I say nice things about Doxa in this category, and every year the brand doesn’t win – at some point I will start to take it personally! The SUB 300 Carbon COSC Aquamarine has cool coloring, high-tech material science, Super-LumiNova indices, wetsuit bracelet expansion link, deep-water chops, and chronometer certification going for it. It’s not my top pick this time around (sorry!) but I’d certainly consider it as a fun watch and diving trip partner.

    Doxa SUB 300 Carbon COSC Aquamarine

    MG: Doxa can be seen as the godfather of diving watches, and one might even almost forget that the brand’s rich history even included timepieces like the Grafic, a Bauhaus-styled dress watch.

    What I like most about the chronometer-certified SUB 300 is that it is a tool, yet it still offers a vibrant contrast between the black carbon case and the aquamarine-colored dial, strap, and other details. This is form and function at its best. It is a capable diving watch, yet at the same time a statement of style. This also makes it my winner in this category.

    JM: The Doxa Sub 300 Carbon is an old classic in a new suit and should have a very solid fan club. While it never gained the luxury gravitas of watches like the Blancpain Fifty Fathoms, Rolex Submariner, or Panerai Submersible, the Doxa Sub 300 was a mainstay in the diving watch sector for years and still maintains a healthy respect.

    This model features everything you need in a competent diving watch, and the new carbon case is supplemented by a titanium inner casing to protect the movement to the 300-meter depth rating. But I fear it may be a bit divisive with the carbon case as it may not seem as durable as a steel watch, and this might cost it the top spot even though it is an awesome value. It’s my runner-up and I would be happy to see it recognized.

    Doxa SUB 300 Carbon COSC Aquamarine

    ED: Wow, that’s a fantastic color combination! It’s pretty and functional. Though I will nitpick by saying that that color is not really “aquamarine” – it’s too vibrant for that. It more a teal or almost turquoise. But I can let that slide.

    I’ve also decided to go with Martin’s method on this category by separating the desk divers from the real divers, so it’s relevant to note that Doxa has made real diving instruments since 1967; it’s actually this brand’s claim to fame.

    This watch comes in a total of six vibrant colors, one just as appealing as the next. The beautiful blue coloring of the dial and strap of this variation have convinced me that it works for both real and desk divers: it’s my winner here too, Martin.

    IS: The bright aquamarine blue dial and strap visually (and attractively) dominate this otherwise very practical underwater tool watch. We did see a model from this line in this category last year, but that’s more than balanced out by the Aquamarine’s many attributes. The indications are all highly legible, it’s large but not overly so, 300-meter water resistance is impressive for the price, and Doxa knows how to make real dive watches.

    It’s everything I want in a high-quality dive watch. I love it and think the jury will love it too. The Doxa SUB 300 Carbon COSC Aquamarine is my pick to win this category.

    Quick Facts Doxa SUB 300 Carbon COSC Aquamarine
    Case: 42.5 x 45 x 10.72 mm, forged carbon, titanium inner chamber for pressure resistance; screw-down crown; 300 m water resistance
    Movement: automatic Caliber ETA 2824, power reserve 38 hours, 4 Hz/28,800 vph frequency; official C.O.S.C. chronometer certification
    Functions: hours, minutes, seconds; date
    Price: $3,890 / 3,790 Swiss francs

    Louis Vuitton Tambour Street Diver Skyline Blue

    JM: I am enamored with this watch and its style, and it honestly feels like it would function rather well for a dive watch thanks to its internal rotating bezel, large lume-filled hands, clear indications, and lack of superfluous details to distract from the purpose of the watch. But – and this is a frustrated but – it only has water resistance to 100 meters (not the 300 it should have to be a dive watch), which is why it is called the “Street Diver.”

    Louis Vuitton Tambour Street Diver Skyline Blue on the wrist

    Also coming from Louis Vuitton, I am positive it will be dismissed by quite a few as simply a fashion watch. If it had 300 meters of water resistance, I would say that this is a solid competitor and could very well take the category. My actual choice for a winner is very similar to this watch but has the necessary depth rating to edge this piece out. Still, props to Louis Vuitton for making a solid water-resistant, diver-styled watch. If the brand increased that depth rating then I think people would have to take it seriously.

    MG: Louis Vuitton is very upfront regarding its diving watch named Tambour Street Diver: this fashionable brand knows that diver’s watches are in style these days and no longer purely a tool. While this watch is definitely not afraid of water, it would probably not be the first choice as a real diver.

    My biggest objection is the small seconds as here it takes longer to check and see if your watch is still running than on a diver’s watch with a centrally mounted second hand. That aside, as a “desk diver” this watch is superb and even rather original in how several general diver’s watch design cues are incorporated.

    ED: I’m not a real fan of this watch. I get the trend and I get that Louis Vuitton is following that (and probably rather successfully), but I just can’t seem to love this stylized style, though I realize I’m probably in the minority.

    Of course, I would also hope that this watch would never be used as a real diver’s watch, either. That could be dangerous. However, the “Street” in the name already gives away that that wouldn’t be a good idea.

    Louis Vuitton Tambour Street Diver Skyline Blue

    GG: The Louis Vuitton Tambour Street Diver Skyline Blue has an odd, pinched look about it that gives away the fact that the movement, visible through the display back, is considerably too small in diameter for the size of the watch. It’s also the laggard among this group in water resistance. Overall, I think naming it a “street diver” is just about right.

    IS: The Louis Vuitto Tambour Street Diver Skyline Blue is a great-looking watch from above, but that small movement says to me that it is more about the looks (and price) than the mechanics. However, I tip my hat to Louis Vuitton for designing such a great new contemporary dive watch look.

    Most dive watch designs are all variations on a (Submariner) theme, and I love this fresh take: it looks modern but sacrifices nothing in practicality. The indications are all highly legible and the rotating inner bezel is secure. I would have preferred a larger movement but suspect buyers will appreciate the lower price the smaller movement allows. I don’t think it will win because of possibly decisive (you like or you don’t) contemporary design, but I rate it highly.

    Further reading:

    Louis Vuitton Tambour Street Diver: All Killer, No Filler?

    Quick Facts Louis Vuitton Tambour Street Diver Skyline Blue
    Case: 44 x 12.8 mm, stainless steel with navy blue PVD coating, 100 m water resistance
    Movement: automatic Caliber ETA 2895-2, 50 hours power reserve, 28,800 vph/4 Hz frequency
    Functions: hours, minutes, seconds; dive-time bezel under the crystal
    Price: $7,505 / 6,350 Swiss francs

    Milus Archimèdes Orange Coral

    ED: When did Milus get resuscitated and rebranded as a maker of sports watches? This is certainly new – at least in comparison to the elegant and rather expensive watches of the Milus I last knew in the mid-2000s.

    Milus Archimèdes Orange Coral on mesh bracelet

    As it turns out, Milus had a “Super Compressor” diver’s watch in the 1970s (that looks a lot like the historical Jaeger-LeCoultre Polaris to me). The “compressor” was a case back that compressed on gaskets underwater to create a tighter seal. Though this new watch looks nothing like that one, it certainly has a number of “right” elements to make it a more serious diver’s watch, including its signal orange dial, 300-meter water resistance, and a discreet helium escape valve recessed in the case band at 9 o’clock.

    As Milus is also donating a portion of the proceeds of the watch to an environmental foundation for its Orange Coral Project, I have to say (without ever having handled it) that this watch is an incredible bargain and I love that aspect.

    GG: The Archimèdes by Milus Orange Coral and Oris Aquis Date Calibre 400 41.5 mm both look to be solid, attractive, and affordable watches, and are certainly on trend with their brightly colored dials; that said, they are each so conventional in other ways that it’s tough to pick either at the top of the group.

    JM: This is my winner when it comes to features, style, and simplicity. It has the internal bezel like the Louis Vuitton but comes with screw-down crowns and the full 300-meter depth rating, taking the best of another favorite and making it better. It has a vintage appeal for those who like the more traditional diver styling, and it doesn’t add any extra details to clutter up the dial while still being functional in and out of the water. What’s more, this is the most affordable watch in the category by $1,000 and is 10 times less expensive than the highest-priced piece.

    To put the icing on the cake, proceeds from the sale of the Archimèdes go to adopt and save a section of a coral reef, creating a positive impact on the environment, something clearly close to the heart of Milus. This piece may not have the longest power reserve, an advanced escapement, or unique complications, but it does a fantastic job as a diving watch at a great price, and to me that is a high value deserving of a win.

    Milus Archimèdes Orange Coral on rubber strap

    IS: I just can’t pin this Milus Archimèdes Orange Coral down: I like it (I think) as a watch, and the Milanese bracelet adds a nice visual touch (for a dive watch, though?), but I can’t decide if it’s just an old 1970s design or a modern retro look. And why enter a watch on a mesh bracelet in a dive watch competition when you also offer it on a rubber strap? The inboard white date wheel (a pity it does not match the dial) highlights how small the movement is in the case, but I’ve no doubt it is up to the job and it keeps the price down. I can’t see it as a winner, but wouldn’t be surprised if it has lots of fans.

    MG: Between all the competing watches, the Milus is perhaps the most old school. In my opinion, a bit too much even. While this is one watch that I never handled, the dial is off to me. While I think that the design is classic, the Arabic numerals 6, 9, and 12 make it look cluttered. And unlike the hour markers, they are not outlined in black, making them look a bit cheap.

    Given this watch’s sturdy ETA movement, 300-meter water-resistance, and sensible size of 41 mm, it does offer everything you can ask for in a diver, though.

    Quick Facts Milus Archimèdes Orange Coral
    Case: 41 x 11.9 mm, stainless steel; 300 m water resistance, extra crown for setting the underglass diver’s bezel
    Movement: automatic ETA Caliber 2892-A2, power reserve 42 hours, 28,800 vph/4 Hz frequency
    Functions: hours, minutes, seconds; date
    Limitation: 50 pieces
    Price: 2,119 Swiss francs
    Remark: watch delivered with both rubber and steel mesh straps

    Oris Aquis Date Calibre 400 41.5 mm

    ED: Oris has always been one of my favorite brands for sensible prices and great quality. And I am finding that 2021 has just been this brand’s year – Oris seems to be able to do no wrong. The movement in this watch is incredible with its five-day power reserve, and 300-meter water resistance is nothing to sneeze at. The dark color scheme of this watch might prevent it from being terribly useful as a real diver, but it certainly comes close to the idea. This watch also comes in two other colorways, one of which is a blue so beautiful it makes me wonder why the brand entered this green-dial variation.

    With a ten-year guarantee (!!), this is my runner-up in this category.

    Oris Aquis Date Calibre 400 41.5 mm

    MG: Oris is another brand capable of making great diving watches, and the Aquis has always been a personal favorite of mine. This one follows the trend of green watches, and although I still find it an odd hue to see on a diving watch, it looks good.

    What I like about Oris is that the brand is also on point with ensuring that its movement also evolves. Its Caliber 400 offers a five-day power reserve, ten-year warranty, and recommended ten-year service intervals. That makes for an impressive diving watch at a still relatively modest price.

    IS: I’m with you, Martin: the Oris Aquis Date Calibre 400 41.5 mm offers a lot of value for the money, especially with that magnetic-resistant escapement in the impressive ten-year warranty movement. That all makes for a great diver’s tool for me too. But the green dial just doesn’t work for me, and it doesn’t look like a 2021 model watch; the design needs a refresh.

    Oris Aquis Date Calibre 400 41.5 mm

    JM: The Oris Aquis Date is an incredibly solid watch with some great features such as a five-day power reserve, silicon escapement, and a 10-year warranty. It also is the second most affordable watch after the Milus, something that should never be discounted for a tool watch. But I feel the design is lacking in creativity or clear brand recognition; it seems a bit too diluted and akin to other big names and micro brands alike, leaving little lasting impression on me after I see it. It is a great value, and I really like Oris and what it has been doing for conservation as well, but I don’t know if this watch stands out enough to win. I’m sure most people will like it, but will they love it enough to pick it for the trophy?

    Quick Facts Oris Aquis Date Calibre 400 41.5 mm
    Case: 41.5 x 13.1 mm, stainless steel, 300 m water resistance
    Movement: automatic Caliber 400, 120-hour power reserve, 28,800 vph/4 Hz frequency, silicon escapement
    Functions: hours, minutes, seconds; date, power reserve
    Price: $3,500 / 3,250 Swiss francs
    Remark: ten-year guarantee

    Reservoir Hydrosphere Bronze The Greg Lecoeur Edition

    GG: I love the look of the Reservoir Hydrosphere Bronze Greg Lecoeur Edition. In fact, I prefer its overall appearance and deep blue gradient dial even to the more dramatic Ulysse Nardin. I’m still put off, however, by the fussy two-scale bezel for dive timing necessitated by the retrograde minutes indication that makes this piece pretty much useless as an actual dive watch. The choice of bronze as a case material also seems a bit odd for a watch designed to be immersed in salt water, but as a landlubber piece it is appealing indeed.

    Reservoir Hydrosphere Bronze The Greg Lecoeur Edition

    MG: While I love the work of Reservoir, this makes no sense to me as a diving watch. In a dangerous environment, where mistakes can be lethal, the last thing you want is a watch that can be somewhat confusing. However, it looks remarkably good on land.

    ED: This watch has never made much sense to me as a real diver’s timepiece. It is attractive, and I also like the combination of unusual displays, but I would hope this piece is never actually relied upon as an underwater instrument: its signature retrograde minutes and jump hour complication render the reading of elapsed underwater time just about impossible for me (and probably anyone else) to read in a hurry. It would seem like a nightmare scenario underwater, especially if you are panicking in any way.

    Also to note: Reservoir also entered a bronze variation in the 2020 GPHG Diver’s category, and this one is CHF 500 more even though it is essentially the same watch with a different name and color scheme.

    Reservoir Hydrosphere Bronze The Greg Lecoeur Edition

    IS: I don’t get it. I like Reservoir’s distinctive look, but don’t understand how it qualifies (for the second year in a row) in the Diver’s category. Yes, the Hydrosphere Bronze The Greg Lecoeur Edition is rated to a respectable 250 meters, so I suppose that’s enough to qualify. However, on a diver’s watch you want maximum legibility, and the maximum is using the full 360 degrees of the dial space for the largest possible indications, numerals, and markers. The retrograde minutes – minutes being the most important indication on the dial of a diver’s watch – here only use only two-thirds of the dial space. That’s too much of a “design versus instrument” compromise for me in a dive watch.

    JM: I really like Reservoir and its instrument styling, especially since it employs jump hours and retrograde minutes, some of my favorite horological mechanisms. But like my original requirements for this category state, a diving watch must first and foremost be functional. I do not think the fun mechanics are a good fit for a diving watch as reading the elapsed dive time isn’t intuitive thanks to the smaller scale of 60 minutes and that the bezel has two different sections to use depending on what time the dial reads. This is too confusing for reading at a glance and could easily be messed up. So even if I like the style, I just don’t think it has what it takes to be a great dive watch.

    Further reading: Reservoir Watch Supercharged Classic: (Relatively) Affordable Swiss Quality

    Quick Facts Reservoir Hydrosphere Bronze The Greg Lecoeur Edition
    Case: 45 x 14.9 mm, bronze with ceramic bezel and helium valve, 250 m water resistance
    Movement: automatic Caliber ETA 2824-2, 37-hour power reserve, 28,800 vph/4 Hz frequency
    Functions: jumping hours, retrograde minutes; power reserve indication
    Limitation: 50 pieces
    Price: 4,850 Swiss francs

    Ulysse Nardin Diver X Cape Horn

    GG: The Ulysse Nardin Diver X Skeleton either is, or isn’t, a proper dive watch, but it’s my pick in this year’s category. I’m a fan of UN’s “X” design theme overall, and I think the brand has done a solid job applying the design cues to a credible dive watch. I particularly like the concave, unidirectional bezel that flows into the domed front crystal, and the copious use of Super-LumiNova meets the legibility test.

    Ulysse Nardin Diver X Cape Horn

    At least from the photos, the titanium case and blue Carbonium bezel are well matched and provide a touch of visual contrast without losing coherence. The 200 m water resistance is in the middle of the group of nominees, but that doesn’t deter me from awarding it my top spot.

    ED: Ulysse Nardin appears to have entered much the same watch it did in 2020. However, there are more differences than just the skeletonized dial, what looks like a different color scheme, and strangely 100 meters’ less water resistance.

    The new Diver X Cape Horn is powered by the new openworked UN-372 caliber with 96 hours’ worth of power reserve.

    The titanium case features a blue Carbonium bezel, a material that is a lightweight and durable composite material used in aerospace. Aside from a great strength-to-lightness ratio, it leaves a marbled effect on the surface that is unique in each watch.

    Nonetheless, it is too difficult to read to be used for real diving.

    MG: Like you, I have the same issue with this Ulysse Nardin that I do with the Reservoir: it is a great-looking watch but skeletonizing it doesn’t help its legibility. That simply makes it great for land, swimming, and snorkeling. It still comes up short of winning this category in my book.

    Ulysse Nardin Diver X Cape Horn

    IS: My guess is that the bold, aggressive style of the Ulysse Nardin Diver X Skeleton will be polarizing (again, you love it or you don’t) and split the jury. What rules the Diver X Skeleton out for me here is that the watch’s main feature – that big skeletonized X – makes it too hard to take seriously as a diver’s watch. Maximum legibility is high up in my criteria for this category.

    JM: This is a bad dive watch that is still really cool and has a lot of nice details. The dial is too confusing to see at a glance, though I could forgive that if it disappears at depth and only the lume is visible. But still, the emphasis of this watch isn’t diving; it is aesthetics and showcasing its very cool movement and silicon escapement. It’s also the most expensive watch in the category, coming in over 20,000 Swiss francs, and I just don’t see it being held up comparably to the other more purpose-built diving watches.

    It’s a cool watch from a brand I really enjoy, but it seems like the brand entered this piece more for marketing than competition, because we all know that Ulysse Nardin can make a great and simple diving watch.

    Further reading: Ulysse Nardin Blast: Highly Volatile Explosive

    Quick Facts Ulysse Nardin Diver X Cape Horn
    Case: 44 x 15 mm, titanium with blue Carbonium bezel, 200 m water resistance
    Movement: automatic Caliber UN-372 with silicon escapement, 96-hour power reserve, 21,600 vph/3 Hz frequency
    Functions: hours, minutes, seconds
    Limitation: 175 pieces
    Price: 21,000 Swiss francs

    Predicted winners

    Martin: Doxa SUB 300 Carbon COSC Aquamarine

    Elizabeth: Doxa SUB 300 Carbon COSC Aquamarine

    Ian: Doxa SUB 300 Carbon COSC Aquamarine

    Joshua: Milus Archimèdes

    Gary: Ulysse Nardin Diver X Cape Horn

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– Android Central Android CentralTime to shine for Kenneth Cole New York Watches! | DA MAN MagazineDA MAN Magazine – Make Your Own Style! | A definitive guide to men’s premium fashion and lifestyle, as well as Hollywood celebrities. – DA MAN Magazine DA MAN MagazineZiiiro Watches Saturn Watch in Gunmetal – Design Milk Design MilkBest Tritium Watch in 2021 – Task Purpose Task PurposeBest dive watch 2021: stylish watches to suit any budget – T3 T3Motorola launches Moto 360 (3rd-generation) smartwatch at Rs. 20,000 – NewsBytes NewsBytesMoto 360 back from the dead as a classy Wear OS smartwatch – SlashGear SlashGearIt’s Time to Add a Quartz Watch to Your Collection – Yahoo Lifestyle Yahoo LifestyleFossil Hybrid HR review: Not quite the next Pebble, but a good start (Updated) – Android Police Android PoliceWorld’s first Day Night watch is a bold design that will revitalize every watch collector’s collection – Yanko Design Yanko DesignMoto 360 (2019) review: a familiar blend of good hardware and bad software – The Verge The VergeSkagen Jorn Hybrid HR smartwatch review: Style and battery life – Neowin NeowinMoto 360 (3rd Gen) review: The pioneer of Android wearables is back, sort of – Pixel Spot Pixel SpotSkagen Falster 3 X by KYGO smartwatch review – GSMAren__ GSMAren__Misfit Vapor 2 review: A year too late – Android Authority Android AuthorityBest watch 2021: Stylish sports, casual and fashion watches for any budget – Expert Reviews Expert ReviewsFossil Gen 5E Smartwatch review: The Essential Wear OS experience is perfectly average – Android Central Android CentralCZAPEK GENÈVE, ANTARCTIQUE RATTRAPANTE ‘SUNRISE’ – Christie’s Christie’sFossil Gen 5 smartwatches announced with speakers and better iPhone support – TechRadar TechRadarThree-hand watches – Five three-hand watches under 3,000 Swiss francs – Trends and style – WorldTempus WorldTempusTop 10 Best Wrist Watch With Roman Numerals 2020 – Bestgamingpro – Best gaming pro Best gaming proBraun Launches Sleek AW 10 EVO Analog Watch – Highsnobiety HighsnobietyCARL F. BUCHERER, HERITAGE BICOMPAX ANNUAL WATCH – Christie’s Christie’s10 top hybrid smartwatches for any style and budget in 2020 – Gearbrain GearbrainFossil Meta Watch: Phone updates on your wrist – SlashGear SlashGearA Week On The Wrist: The IWC Portugieser Chronograph – HODINKEE HODINKEEEmporio Armani Connected (2018) review – TechRadar TechRadarTime For The Big Screen: Carl F. Bucherer Celebrates Premiere Of John Wick: Chapter 3 — Parabellum In New York City – PRNewswire PRNewswireThis beautiful wooden watch is modern and traditional – Gadget Flow Gadget FlowSkagen Falster 3 Review – TrustedReviews TrustedReviewsArmani Exchange AX Connected review – Wareable WareableMoto 360 (2020) vs. TicWatch Pro 2020: Which should you buy? – Android Central Android CentralIntroducing: The Omega De Ville Trésor 40mm With Manually-Wound Master Chronometer Caliber – HODINKEE HODINKEENew: Girard-Perregaux Free Bridge Free Bridge Infinity Edition – the renewing of an icon – Deployant DeployantThe $3000 MIH Gaia Watch Is Inspired by Brutalist Architecture – Bloomberg BloombergMB F – Horological Machine N°9 ‘Sapphire Vision’ – Trends and style – WorldTempus WorldTempusGiordano Watch for Men – Economic Times Economic TimesMoto 360 Review (3rd Generation) – One Of The Best Wear OS Watches – Forbes ForbesIntroducing: The Audemars Piguet Royal Oak Selfwinding 34mm – HODINKEE HODINKEENew and reviewed: Armin Strom Gravity Equal Force – Deployant DeployantThe 9 best men’s watches under $250 – Business Insider Business InsiderSkagen Falster 3 Review: Come for the Design – Droid Life Droid LifeSkagen Falster 3 vs. Falster 2: What are the differences and should you upgrade? – Android Central Android Central

    Back Side 3mm Acrylic Panel Brushed Stainless Steel Waterproof Backlight Channel Letter Sign With Screw

    Back 3mm Brushed Stainless Steel Acrylic Panel Waterproof Backlight Channel Letter Sign with Screw

    -1pc backlit lettering can be brushed and polished steel, if you want complex surface, can stick

    UV film

    Steel surface or acrylic UV print.

    2 is about 3-5 cm thick, so it is not suitable for large letters.If Big letters, they will be very heavy, not very good for

    Delivery and installation. LED backlit sign LED sign with letters

    3 for installation, usually for siclicon sealant. Or screws.

    4. Light color may vary, red, blue, green, white and so on. Depends on your needs.

    5 for transformers, we will offer a suitable one according to the use, indoor or outdoor.

    Product description:

    90,023 50,000 hours (non-stop)

    Product name Back 3mm Brushed Stainless Steel Acrylic Panel Waterproof Backlight Channel Letter Sign with Screw
    Material Acrylic, 304/201 Stainless Steel
    Workmanship Laser cutting, welding, stick, polishing
    Size Can be customized (shape, colors)
    Light style Can be backlit
    Thick Typically 2-5 cm
    Warranty 1-2 years
    Service life
    Installation Usually use screws
    Delivery method Express (5-6 days) Air (6-7 days), Sea (15-30 days)

    Style we can do

    Our services

    Material and contact details

    Wire contact to waterproof transformer

    Why choose us?

    Company information

    We are a professional sign manufacturer with 8 years experience in all kinds of signage.Backlit LED Sign

    Over the past years, we have made countless signs according to the requirements of our client, both for personal use and for large projects. 3D metal logo, 3D resin sign, full body luminous acrylic signs, 3D plastic light box, 3D stainless steel metal lettering All these signs are very popular and loved by our customers.

    Currently, most of them are our returning customers.Many new comers join us. 304 stainless steel channel backlit logo sign edge lit sign and logo

    Professional designers, district inspectors, advanced machinery and equipment, a strong team … Always make sure we can offer good quality products and services. We do our best all the time.

    Questions and Answers

    Q1: What’s the guarantee for your products?
    A1: 2 years warranty for acrylic

    B2: what is the working temperature?
    A2: works in wide temperature range from -40 ° C to 80 ° C.

    Q3: Can you make custom shapes, designs and letters?
    Answer 3: Yes, we can make shapes, designs, logos and letters as customers need.

    Q4: How do I get a price for my product?
    A4: you can send your design details to our email or contact our online sales manager
    A4: all the above prices are calculated at the widest point; If the length and width are more than 1 meter, then they will be calculated by square meter

    Q5: I have no drawing, can you design it for me?
    A5: Yes, we can design it for you according to your effect you want

    Q6: What’s the lead time of the average order? What’s the delivery time?
    A6: Average order lead time is 3-5 days.And 3-5 days by Express; 5-6 days by air; 25-35 days by sea.

    Q7: Is the sign suitable for local voltage?
    A7: please rest assured the transformer will be provided then.

    Q8: How can I install my sign?
    A8: 1: 1 setup paper will be sent with your product.

    Q9: What packaging do you use?
    A9: inside bubble and outside three-layer wooden case

    Q10: my sign will be used outdoors, are they waterproof?
    A10: All materials we use are anti-corrosion and the LED inside the sign is waterproof.

    Tame Time with Magic Maurice Lacroix

    Are you ready to tame your time? How? It’s very simple! New watch! This is a perfect gift for the new year – dear, unique, representative … Magic. As magical as the holiday itself. We invite you to take a closer look at the bright flashes of the collections from the Swiss elite manufactory Maurice Lacroix – a gift with such a name will be unsurpassed.

    Each Maurice Lacroix collection is a kaleidoscope of styles, moods, various look variations, a practical application of lifestyle metamorphoses, if you like.Experimenting with color and material, playing with combinations, putting the puzzle in a new way each time, and then copying the result and remaking it into the next version, Maurice Lacroix creates a unique watch with repetitive details. Changing just one component, placing an element in a new environment, the designers please people in the guise of elegant dandies and independent brutals, make it possible to try on the same model for classics and casual, transform the written outline and leave only the essence: reading the time, sometimes very extravagant …

    Elegance and lightness Aikon Chronograph

    Swiss precision is embedded in the quartz heart of this elegant chronograph watch.The hours, minutes and seconds are read by the three central hands. At the 6 o’clock position there is a sub-dial that also displays the continuous running of seconds. The date indication window is organically inscribed in it. At the 9 o’clock position there is a half-hour counter of the chronograph. Tenths of a second are displayed on the dial at 12 o’clock.

    Faceted hands and index markers are rhodium plated. The hour and minute hands are partially covered with a white SLN luminescent coating with a green glow.

    The designer’s fantasy materialized in several versions, juggling with the color of the dial and case, as well as playing with combinations of the used palette. The model is offered on a five-row steel bracelet, a leather strap or a rubber strap.

    Specifications Maurice Lacroix Aikon Chronograph

    • Collection: Aikon
    • movement: quartz, chronograph,
    • housing: stainless steel,
    • glass: sapphire, anti-reflective treatment,
    • case color: silver (optional combination in the collection, complemented by PVD coating in pink or yellow gold),
    • dial color: black, blue, silver,
    • strap / bracelet: rubber; leather strap in black, blue or brown; stainless steel bracelet,
    • clasp: butterfly clasp, matt and polished bouchonné,
    • case diameter: 44 mm,
    • water resistance: 10 ATM.

    Sophistication Pontos Day Date

    Lovers of textured patterns will surely appreciate the sophisticated design move that transformed the dial into a stylized display. A circular satin finish from the center, imitating the sun’s rays, looks very impressive with a grainy matte surface. You see: the date windows are located at the 6 o’clock and 12 o’clock positions, they are united on both sides by semicircles of a scale made in the same style.This creates the feeling of overlapping layers: an additional frame is put on the main dial, which is the key for reading the date and time.

    As a bonus, you will receive a transparent case back that reveals the rectilinear beauty of the back side of the movement.

    Reliable automation framed by minimalism subtly hinting at its presence – a watch for real gentlemen. Moreover, a gentleman can be an athlete or a politician – not the point. Modesty in the amount of detail awakens the imagination, turning unspoken into fantastic images.So the model will ideally help out in cases when you do not know what kind of watch to wear today, since its sophistication will adorn absolutely any secular outlet.

    Specifications Maurice Lacroix Pontos Day Date

    • Collection: Pontos
    • movement: automatic (26 jewels, balance oscillation frequency 28800 pph, 4 Hz), power reserve 38 h,
    • case: polished stainless steel, transparent case back,
    • glass: sapphire, anti-reflective treatment,
    • case color: silver (optional in the collection – combination with PVD coating in yellow gold color),
    • dial: blue, silver, black, dark gray,
    • strap: black or brown leather strap (optionally – three-row stainless steel bracelet),
    • case diameter: 41 mm,
    • water resistance: 10 ATM.

    Severity Pontos Chronograph

    Another elegant chronograph. This model will amaze, first of all, by the subtlety of execution – the elegant ring of the case encircling the sapphire crystal, the severity of the dial, with its pile of circles, the transparent case revealing the impeccable movement.

    Again favorite colors: blue, graphite, black; a shimmer of yellow gold and the soft glow of polished steel.

    Time counting is dispassionately controlled by a precise automatic mechanism, playing for you second by second, displaying periods from their different sides in additional counters.

    Specifications Maurice Lacroix Pontos Chronograph

    • Collection: Pontos
    • movement: automatic, with chronograph function, ML112 or ML157 (25 jewels, 28,800 vph, 4 Hz), 46h power reserve,
    • case: polished stainless steel,
    • glass: sapphire, anti-reflective treatment,
    • body color: silver,
    • dial: blue, silver, black, dark gray,
    • strap: black or brown leather strap (optionally – three-row stainless steel bracelet),
    • case diameter: 43 mm,
    • water resistance: 10 ATM.

    Courage Masterpiece Skeleton

    The skeletonized hand-wound model opens the eyes of time from its secret, usually closed side. A throbbing heart, naked on both sides, does not look defenseless and vulnerable. On the contrary, this persistent courage demonstrates strength. A force surrounded by MauriceLacroix signature elegance.

    Games with color solutions are useless here: against the background of the content, frivolous frames out of the form seem quite insignificant …

    Finish – satin finish, Grand Colimaçon pattern, sandblasted treatment, chic gold, black rhodium plated with an elegant touch.

    The second hand is placed in a decentralized dial.

    Specifications Maurice Lacroix Masterpiece Skeleton

    • Collection: Masterpiece
    • Movement: ML134, manual-winding (17 jewels, balance oscillation frequency 18,000 rpm, 2.5 Hz), 45-hour power reserve,
    • housing: stainless steel,
    • Crystal: Domed Sapphire, Anti-Reflective,
    • reverse side: screw cap with wide sapphire crystal,
    • body color: silver, black,
    • brown or black genuine alligator strap (black calfskin lining and black stitching),
    • case diameter: 43 mm,
    • water resistance: 5 ATM.

    Magical splendor Masterpiece Chronograph Skeleton

    This model takes center stage in our review. It is this skeletonized chronograph that has combined all the qualities that we described above: boldness and lightness, refined elegance and undoubted chic.

    Every millimeter here is enveloped in a radiance of luxury. Not a frivolous glamorous shine, but a noble calm male luxury. Which does not need extra words …

    The filigree finish of the dial and its elements looks like a work of art.

    The hands traveling along it are diamond cut, black gold or 4N gold plated, and SLN plating (with a green glow). The chronograph hand (red, blue or gold – the same 4N finish) marks the seconds with a lacquered point. The circles of the subdials are striking both in the form inscribed in them and in their performance (circular satin finish, plating from black gold or 4N gold).

    Precise passes of color – scarlet and aquamarine – look fantastic here, like dazzling beams of seconds from somewhere else …

    A reliable automatic movement beats in the frame of all this luxury.

    The line includes a limited edition version of this stunning skeleton – in deep blue. The release is limited to only a hundred copies …

    Specifications Maurice Lacroix Masterpiece Chronograph Skeleton

    • Collection: Masterpiece
    • movement: ML206, automatic (25 jewels, balance oscillation frequency 28,800 rpm, 4 Hz), power reserve 48 h,
    • housing: stainless steel,
    • glass: sapphire, anti-reflective treatment,
    • case color: black, silver (optionally – with a gold bezel), blue,
    • dial: silver or black gold,
    • strap: brown, black or blue, made of genuine alligator leather,
    • body diameter: 45 mm,
    • clasp: folding clasp with push buttons (steel version), pin (black PVD version),
    • water resistance: 10 ATM,
    • production of the model in a blue PVD-coated case is limited to 100 pcs.

    New Year is a special holiday. Mystical. This chiming of the clock, the last pretentious “bom-m-m” – a short, lightning-fast moment that transports us in time – from the year that has passed into the year that has already come. Stopped for a moment midnight.

    New watches, donated and worn for the holiday, act as a kind of symbol of time management. Exactly due to the mysticism of the event itself 🙂 Or – an instrument of its management. It seems that with their help it is possible to tame the very being.So if you really tame the time, why not take advantage of the elegant, sophisticated, austere and bold chic Maurice Lacroix? ..

    New | Watchpaper.ru – site about watches

    For the past 6 years, Audemars Piguet has been the official timekeeper of the legendary Tour Auto vintage car race. Each year, in honor of this event, Audemars Piguet launches a new watch model. This year, the race marks the launch of the 2011 Millenary Tour Auto.

    New Audemars Piguet Millenary Tour Auto 2011 is enclosed in an oval case …

    Continue Reading

    04/01/2011 2011, News, News, Watches

    Longines presents the Column-Wheel Chronograph Record at Baselworld 2011. The design of the model released by Longines in 1960 was taken as a basis and modernized.

    The new Longines Column-Wheel Chronograph Record is housed in a round 41 mm stainless steel case.Water resistant up to 30 meters.

    Black or milky white dial …

    Continue Reading

    03/31/2011 2011, News, News, Watches

    Davidoff has released a new men’s watch – Velero Gent Automatic Chronograph, elegant and functional.

    The new Davidoff Velero Gent Automatic Chronograph is housed in a round 45 mm case made of 316L stainless steel.The dial is protected by a convex sapphire crystal with double-sided anti-reflective coating. The reverse side is also made of sapphire crystal. Water resistance – …

    Continue Reading

    03/30/2011 2011, News, News, Watches

    The creation of women’s watches with complications has already become a tradition for the Swiss company Patek Philippe. This time, her collection includes the first women’s split-chronograph, which is called the Ladies First Split Seconds Chronograph.

    The elegant round case of the new Patek Philippe Ladies First Split Seconds Chronograph, 33.2 mm in diameter, is made of 18-carat pink …

    Continue Reading

    03/29/2011 2011, News, News, Watches

    The Swiss company Cecil Purnell has released a new watch model – La Grande Date.

    As the name suggests, its main feature is its large date aperture.

    The novelty Cecil Purnell La Grande Date is enclosed in a round case, made of 18-carat white or pink gold.The case is water-resistant up to 50 meters.

    The skeletonized dial is protected by …

    Continue Reading

    28.03.2011 2011, News, News, Watches

    The beginning of 2011 for the Dutch company Gronefeld is marked by the release of the second model One Hertz. The first model, One Hertz 1912, came out in 2010 in a limited edition of 12 pieces. Made of steel, it was presented in gray and black tones.The new model is called One Hertz Dune and is executed in gold.

    New by Gronefeld One Hertz …

    Continue Reading

    03/25/2011 2011, News, News, Watches

    Urban Jurgensen has released a new model of Chronometer P8, the main feature of which is the chronometer escapement movement.

    The novelty Urban Juergensen Chronometer P8 is enclosed in a round 42 mm case, made of platinum or 18-karat gold, pink or yellow.The front and back sides of the case are made of sapphire crystal.

    The dial is made …

    Continue Reading

    03.24.2011 2011, News, News, Watches

    The Italian company Meccaniche Veloci has released new watch models that have joined the famous Quattro Valvole collection. One of these models, the Meccaniche Veloci Quattro Valvole 42 Three Hand, will be discussed in this article.

    The case of the new Meccaniche Veloci Quattro Valvole 42 is made of titanium (diameter 42 mm).Front side – convex sapphire crystal with …

    Continue Reading

    03/23/2011 2011, News, News, Watches

    Watchmaker Martin Braun has founded a new watch company Antoine Martin and is going to present the first watches of this brand at Baselworld 2011.

    The Antoine Martin Quantieme Perpetuel QP01 watch is housed in a round case made of 18-carat gold, pink or white, or steel with a black DLC coating.Front side – …

    Continue Reading

    22.03.2011 2011, News, News, Watches

    The Ball company has released a new watch model in honor of fearless scientists and researchers who are ready to challenge the elements in the name of science. The circulation of the issue is limited to 1999 copies.

    The Ball Storm Chaser DLC Glow watch is housed in a round 43 mm stainless steel case with black DLC coating.Front side …

    Continue Reading

    21.03.2011 2011, News, News, Watches

    The new, twelfth, Rodinia model has appeared in the Andersen Geneve collection of watches with a world time indicator. It is named after the hypothetical supercontinent Rodinia, which existed about 1 billion years ago and united all the land on Earth. The official presentation of the new watch will take place at the upcoming Baselworld 2011 exhibition.

    Continue Reading

    03/18/2011 2011, News, News, Watches

    Bulova Accutron is going to present an updated version of the Kirkwood Skeleton at Baselworld 2011 upcoming this month.

    The new Bulova Accutron Kirkwood Skeleton is housed in a 40 mm case, made of stainless steel and plated with rose gold. The dial is protected by an anti-reflective sapphire crystal.The reverse side is transparent. The water resistance of the case is up to 100 …

    Continue Reading

    17.03.2011 2011, News, News, Watches

    Water resistance – Laikrodziai.lt

    What does water resistance ” actually mean?

    The water resistance of the watch is rated by laboratory pressure measurements and comparisons by placing the watch at a specific depth under water.However, the inscription WR 3 ATM (Water resistance 3 atmospheres) on the watch case does not mean at all that with such a watch you can dive to a depth of 30 meters. Despite the fact that the watch can remain intact in such conditions for a short time, sooner or later it will still let water inside the case. Based on our professional experience, we can say that if you want to swim with a watch, then you need to purchase a watch that has a screw-down time adjustment crown on the thread, as well as a case back that is screwed on the thread.Otherwise, the watch will sooner or later let moisture inside the case, since the rubber gaskets inside the watch wear out over time, just like the tires of a car wear out when driving.

    The usual inscription “Water resistant” does not mean at all that you can swim with this watch. Such watches are not afraid of only short-term accidental wetting (for example, when washing hands).

    The water resistance of the watch is measured by creating artificial pressure using special equipment.However, if you remember school physics lessons, pressure also depends on speed. The faster the watch reaches the surface of the water (for example, when flapping while swimming), the more pressure it will be subjected to. It is for this reason that water, having created a pressure exceeding that for which the watch is designed, can enter the watch mechanism through the gasket of the watch translation head, through the gaskets of the buttons or through the gasket on the back of the watch. If only “water resistant” is written on the watch, then even an ordinary shower jet can create an excess pressure on the watch.

    Also, keep in mind that all parts of the watch that are water resistant should be checked periodically and replaced if necessary, as they will wear out over time.

    How waterproof is Is your watch ?

    This is very easy to identify. Just look at what is written on the back of the watch. For example: Water resistant, Water resist, WR 3 ATM, WR 10 BAR, WR 200 Meters, etc.

    Brief information about the meaning of these designations:

    Water resistance

    Permitted use

    WR
    Water Resist
    Water Resistant

    A watch with this water resistance (1 atmosphere) is not suitable for diving in water.Watches with this water resistance are only protected from accidental drops of water.

    WR 30 Meters
    WR 100 Feet
    WR 3 ATM
    WR 3 BAR
    WR 30 M

    Water resistance, which protects the watch from accidental splashes of water or rain. With such a watch you cannot swim and dive into the water.

    WR 50 Meters
    WR 165 Feet
    WR 5 ATM
    WR 5 BAR
    WR 50 M

    A watch with this level of water resistance is adapted to everyday contact with water, for example.: when washing hands, etc. Swimming with such a watch is not recommended.

    WR 100 Meters
    WR 330 Feet
    WR 10 ATM
    WR 10 BAR
    WR 100 M

    With such a waterproof watch, you can already swim in fresh water, but you cannot dive.

    > = WR 200 Meters
    > = WR 660 Feet
    > = WR 20 ATM
    > = WR 20 BAR
    WR 200 M and more

    This waterproof watch can be used for sports, swimming and diving with oxygen tanks.

    However, remember that regardless of the water resistance of the watch, you cannot go to the bathhouse or the pool with any watch. The chemicals in the pool water (most often chlorine) damage the rubber gaskets of the watch especially quickly, so the watch begins to leak water.

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