Spotlight queensland: Shop Fabric & Sewing Supplies Online

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Brisbane, Queensland, Australia // BTRlisten

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Spotlight on Brisbane

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01:53

The Hunter

Sacred Shrines

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06:06

Paranha

Cassowarys

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09:11

Slimey Bob

Marcus Blacke

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13:53

Jordan Merrick on How to Help Artists

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14:19

I Don’t Belong

Jordan Merrick

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18:47

Spotlight on Brisbane

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21:00

I’m Just Lost (False Peak Records)

Cloud Tangle

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23:58

Chelsea (False Peak Records)

Spring Skier

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28:16

No One Throws Televisions Out Of Windows Anymore (False Peak Records)

Dänmark

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32:29

Remy Boccalatte of False Peak Records Speaks on the Pandemic

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33:25

Cabin Fever (False Peak Records)

Remy Boccalatte

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37:05

Spotlight on Brisbane

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38:42

Lady Luck

JB Paterson

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42:30

Backpacker’s Blues

Bricklayers

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45:38

For Your Life

ebuskers

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50:38

Seasons

Miss Elm

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54:31

Spotlight on Brisbane

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56:43

Today Tonight (Coolin’ By Sound Records)

Dumb Things

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60:06

The Man Of Thumbs (Coolin’ By Sound Records)

The Gametes

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61:46

Canned Opening (Coolin’ By Sound Records)

Thigh Master

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65:24

Wake In Fright (Coolin’ By Sound Records)

Tape/Off

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68:59

Spotlight on Brisbane

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70:05

Sympathy

Hallie

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73:34

Landslide

Brief Habits

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76:08

Angels Pt. II (Love Theme)

Heartstop Beach

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79:31

Sneakers

Velociraptor

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83:16

Sad Girls

BLUSSH

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86:05

Matt from Flora Link Talks about the state of the world

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88:04

Detroit

Flora Link

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91:34

Spotlight on Brisbane

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93:46

Something To Wear Mix

Syrup

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97:43

Harry from Syrup on How to Support Artists During COVID 19

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98:25

Tried And True (Raise the Roof)

Jeremy Neale

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101:24

Morphine

Chakra Efendi

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105:00

Mugara

Wreckhouse

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108:05

Keep A Civil Tongue In Your Mouth

King Colossus

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111:26

Neon Leon

Me From The Future

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114:56

Spotlight on Brisbane

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117:13

Anhedonia Nights (4000 Records)

The Holy Rollercoasters

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119:36

No Place Like Nundah (4000 Records)

The Double Happiness

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123:39

Dreams (4000 Records)

Syrup, Go On

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126:51

Wabi Sabi (4000 Records)

Elder

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131:51

Oil Rigs (4000 Records)

Local Authority

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136:37

Spotlight on Brisbane

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137:41

Jungle Juice (4000 Records)

Marmaleene and The Moondusters

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Partner Spotlight: Queensland’s TechPath – ARN

Troy Adams (TechPath)

Credit: TechPath

The ‘Partner Spotlight’ series explores partners operating in the local channel landscape right around the country, from Cape York to Hobart, Byron Bay to Fremantle and beyond. In this edition, we focus on Queensland and Brisbane-based managed services provider (MSP) TechPath. 

Some people start a business as soon as they’re able, but for TechPath’s managing director Troy Adams, the journey started before he even left high school. 

Adams’ career in IT started when he was about 14 years old when he did a two-week stint at an IT shop for work experience, which primarily sold and built computers for consumers. 

At the end of the two weeks, Adams secured a job with the shop where he worked for the rest of his schooling life. During that time, he even started a bulletin board to help paying customers. 

Halfway through year 12, he was asked if he could do IT services at a family member’s workplace. It was from then that Adams, at the age of 17, started Better Computer Services.  

Starting a business can be difficult even for an adult, so for someone who wasn’t one, this brought its own set of challenges to the table. 

For example, Adams said that back in the early days of the business, he wasn’t allowed to own a cheque book or a credit card, so he’d have to pay in cash upfront for computer supplies.  

In those early days, he also had people occasionally remark that he looked “a bit too young” to be doing their IT work. 

“I guess they just don’t expect the business owner to be 17,” Adams said. 

The Better Computer Services name stuck up until 2013, when it was rebranded to TechPath. 

Hiring the hierarchy 

Today, the business has roughly 50 employees, but it wasn’t exactly a walk in the park for Adams to manage this many people.

In fact, he started to run into problems when the business got to around 18 employees in 2014, as TechPath had previously operated under a flat structure model. 

“Everyone reported to me, I made all the decisions and that meant people were always waiting for me to come back to them with answers on things,” Adams said.  

To fix this, team leaders were introduced, which worked for the business for a time. Then TechPath reached 45 people in 2020 and Adams was still taking on too much.  

“[W]e hit another bottleneck where decisions were still waiting on me. I hadn’t let go of enough of the operations. I was getting involved in service, in sales, in accounts, in finance. So, it was just a point where we had to change again,” he said.  

“That’s where the leadership team came in, so we’ve got someone who’s responsible for each department and clear lines of responsibility so we don’t step on their toes, let them run the department the way they want to and we meet as a leadership team on a weekly basis. That’s been an awesome change.” 

Read more on the next page…

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Spotlight on Gary Hondow – Queensland Genomics

Gary Hondow is a consumer advocate, father of four, and Queensland Genomics Community Group member. He was also awarded volunteer of the year at the World Hospital Congress in 2018. Gary has devoted a lot of time to Queensland Genomics Community Group projects and initiatives. This includes the creation of the Genomics Information Toolkit, which was an idea Gary brought to the Community Group as a way of giving families accurate information about genetic testing, the different kinds of tests, and where to go for genetic and genomic testing in Queensland.

 

Getting a diagnosis for a rare disease can be a long and challenging journey. Tell us about your family’s experience.

My son Dallas was born in 2008 with a very rare disease. Like many other people around the world, before genomic testing we had eight years of different tests, and driving four hours from Bundaberg to our specialists in Brisbane close to 200 times for Dallas.

Finally we were able to get whole genome sequencing for Dallas, and his genetic specialist was able to diagnose him with Van Maldergem Syndrome 2. Dallas is one of only 12 people in the world with that diagnosis.

 

What difference did it make for you and Sharmaine to get that diagnosis for Dallas?

There are many advantages with gaining a diagnosis – we now have less trips to Brisbane and this has enabled my wife to return to work and we have been able to buy a house.

The downside is that there is less support for Dallas now. We now only have three specialists who are very responsive to all issues Dallas has and they are our local paediatric specialist, our metabolic specialist and our neurologist.

So it is great to have a diagnosis – an official label, but with such a rare condition as Dallas has, there’s not a lot of evidence for treatment so we do feel a little bit on our own with Dallas’ healthcare now that he has the diagnosis.

 

What has worked well on Dallas’ healthcare journey?

We recognise that most people were just trying to do their best for Dallas. We’ve built a really good relationship with our specialists and we work together on Dallas’ care.

We feel a part of Dallas’ care team because it’s such a rare condition – our specialists have been learning alongside us and we all share our knowledge as we go along.

For example – After getting the diagnosis – our paediatrician, and our specialist and Sharmaine and I, all worked together to reduce Dallas’ medications from 13 a day, down to 2 a day.

Being able to work in partnership with his clinicians, has felt like the health system is delivering person centred care. Without that partnership approach, Dallas would still be on those 13 daily medications needlessly.

And we’ve had the opportunity to contribute to improving hospital & healthcare policies in a whole range of areas, including improving the process for inter hospital transfers between Wide Bay and the Children’s Hospital, and the introduction of food for families at the Children’s Hospital.

The change that I’ve seen in the health system over the last 4 years is astronomical.

Single use people – one stop flyers in the health system, 99% of the time have a great experience of the health system. But it’s families like ours that live the hospital life – that is where we see the gaps in the health system. It isn’t a criticism, it’s just about being able to voice our opinion to make the health system better.

 

Along the way, what kinds of things might have made your journey easier?

The Government did fund Whole Genome Sequencing for Dallas, myself and Sharmaine – after I bailed up the Health Minister at a Community Cabinet. So it would be good if testing was funded as then the test would be more accessible.

But during our journey to get a diagnosis and afterwards, we have often felt quite alone.

So it would be good to have someone we could call for advice about what to do next, or what support groups are out there. When people get a cancer diagnosis, it seems like there is a lot more support, or people they can call for advice.

Or even just information about what the different tests are. I spoke to lots of parents in waiting rooms over the years – most of them don’t know the difference between whole genome, or whole exome, or the different kinds of genetic testing that their child had gotten.

Also I don’t know that the health system always understands how different the health system is for patients in rural areas compared to the city. Yes there is the Patient Travel Subsidy Scheme but that is just one small part of the challenges of being a rural or regional patient.

It’s hard for health administrators to see things from the perspective of someone like me, in a rural area, accessing super specialised healthcare. So I think it’s also important for the health system to have a way to take into account the perspective of patients like me and others, and what our journey has been through the health system.

Planning for Queensland’s Development Act

Rob Molhoek MP
Assistant Minister, Planning Reform
Department of State Development, Infrastructure and Planning Queensland Government

Rob is the Member for Southport and Assistant Minister for Planning Reform. He currently lives on the Gold Coast with his wife Melinda and their four sons, not far from where he grew up in Southport. Rob has worked in government, retail, broadcasting, media, wholesaling, entertainment, sport and development. Elected to Gold Coast City Council in 2004, he oversaw the city’s finance management, human resources, capital works, infrastructure planning & development. As Chairman of Finance & Internal Services he was responsible for annual operating and capital budgets in excess of $1.2b. He worked with government on plans for Australia’s first Desalination Plant, the new rapid transit system and development of the city’s long term infrastructure plans. Rob has a passion for community service and prior to his election to Parliament, Rob was the Director and National President of Bravehearts, the founding Chairman of the Gold Coast Community Fund and Chairman of the Gold Coast Titans Community Foundation. Between his commitments to Southport and his portfolio responsibilities he spends any spare time with his family, enjoying the enviable Gold Coast lifestyle.

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Greg Chemello
Deputy Director-General Planning
Department of State Development, Infrastructure and Planning Queensland Government

Greg has 30 years’ experience in the property and development sectors and has held senior professional, management and leadership roles with both property asset owners and advisory/consulting businesses and organisations.With qualifications in town planning, environmental science and business management, Greg has undertaken the roles of Development Manager, Project Manager and Design Manager on an extensive range of private and public sector development projects across the civic, sport/leisure/entertainment, residential, retail, commercial and industrial sectors. In addition to roles involved with delivery of developments and capital works, Greg has extensive business management experience having undertaken Director / General Manager / senior executive roles for a number of private companies and public sector organisations. Greg has developed considerable expertise in areas such as strategic planning, governance, change management, commercial negotiation and stakeholder management and communication.Greg’s current role as Deputy Director-General within DSDIP (leading the Planning Group) involves leading the reform of Queensland’s land use planning and development assessment system to facilitate economic development and empower local governments and communities. Key current challenges in this role are the single State Planning Policy, the state assessment and referral agency (SARA), the local government infrastructure planning and charges system, the new regional plans and of course the replacement of the Sustainable Planning Act with the proposed Planning for Queensland’s Development Act and associated regulations, codes and guidelines.

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Sarah Macoun
Partner, Planning and Environment
HopgoodGanim

Sarah’s expertise is in the areas of planning and environmental approvals, planning litigation and dispute resolution. Her practice involves advising developers, government entities, and mining and infrastructure proponents across the spectrum of planning and environment related legislation. Sarah provides front end advisory services, including project scoping, strategic planning advice and due diligence, through to representing stakeholders in planning litigation in the Planning and Environment Court, Court of Appeal and High Court, and assisting clients with environmental compliance. She also has a keen interest in infrastructure charging and negotiating infrastructure agreements.

In addition to advising across the range of Sustainable Planning Act issues, Sarah regularly provides strategic advice across the spectrum of environmental legislation impacting on projects and compliance, with particular focus on the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act, Environmental Protection Act, Vegetation Management Act, Nature Conservation Act and Water Act.

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Natalie Rayment
Director
Wolter Consulting Group  

Natalie is a Director of Wolter Consulting Group, a multi-disciplinary planning, urban design, environment, landscape and surveying consultancy servicing the government, development and infrastructure sectors. Natalie is responsible for the Planning Team’s role in managing our client’s development projects from due diligence to approval and plan endorsement. With more than 20 years experience, Natalie also regularly serves as an expert town planning witness in the Planning and Environment Court, is accredited for fast tracked approval processes with a number of Councils and is a Referee for the Building and Development Dispute Resolution Committee. Natalie also regularly participates on industry and government reference groups advocating for planning legislation reform.

Spotlight in Queensland – Locations

On this page, we display all the branch addresses, phone numbers, and working hours of Spotlight in Queensland, Australia. The company offers a wide variety of fabric, curtains, blinds, and home interiors.

Locations

Ashmore

345 – 351 Southport Nerang Road, Ashmore, QLD 4214 Australia.

Phone: (07) 5690 0998.

Opening Hours: Monday to Friday: 9:00 am – 5:30 pm. Thursday: 9:00 am – 9:00 pm. Saturday: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm. Sunday: 10:00 am – 5:00 pm.

Browns Plains

65 – 85 Browns Plains Road, Browns Plains, QLD 4118 Australia.

Phone: (07) 3800 2722.

Opening Hours: Monday to Friday: 9:00 am – 5:30 pm. Thursday: 9:00 am – 9:00 pm. Saturday: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm. Sunday: 10:00 am – 5:00 pm.

Bundaberg

Showroom C, Building 2, Corner Takalvan Street & Johanna Blvd, Bundaberg, QLD 4670 Australia.

Phone: (07) 4153 8200.

Opening Hours: Monday to Friday: 9:00 am – 5:30 pm. Thursday: 9:00 am – 9:00 pm. Saturday: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm. Sunday: 10:00 am – 5:00 pm.

Cairns

Corner Mulgrave Road & Tills Street, Cairns, QLD 4870 Australia.

Phone: (07) 4241 8300.

Opening Hours: Monday to Friday: 9:00 am – 5:30 pm. Thursday: 9:00 am – 9:00 pm. Saturday: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm. Sunday: 10:00 am – 5:00 pm.

Capalaba

1 – 7 Finucane Road, Capalaba, QLD 4157 Australia.

Phone: (07) 3114 3093.

Opening Hours: Monday to Friday: 9:00 am – 5:30 pm. Thursday: 9:00 am – 9:00 pm. Saturday: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm. Sunday: 10:00 am – 5:00 pm.

Carindale

1151 Creek Road, Carindale, QLD 4152 Australia.

Phone: (07) 3338 9800.

Opening Hours: Monday to Friday: 9:00 am – 5:30 pm. Thursday: 9:00 am – 9:00 pm. Saturday: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm. Sunday: 10:00 am – 5:00 pm.

Everton Park

429 South Pine Road, Everton Park, QLD 4053 Australia.

Phone: (07) 3855 9944.

Opening Hours: Monday to Friday: 9:00 am – 5:30 pm. Thursday: 9:00 am – 9:00 pm. Saturday to Sunday: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm.

Gladstone

Gladstone Central Shopping Centre, Tenancy 32A, 65-69 Dawson Road, Gladstone, QLD 4680 Australia.

Phone: (07) 4829 6365.

Opening Hours: Monday to Friday: 9:00 am – 5:30 pm. Thursday: 9:00 am – 7:00 pm. Saturday: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm. Sunday: 10:00 am – 5:00 pm.

Hervey Bay

Shop SS1, Stocklands Hervey Bay, 163 Boat Harbour Drive, Hervey Bay, QLD 4655 Australia.

Phone: (07) 4192 8500.

Opening Hours: Monday to Friday: 9:00 am – 5:30 pm. Thursday: 9:00 am – 9:00 pm. Saturday: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm. Sunday: 10:00 am – 5:00 pm.

Indooroopilly

272 Moggill Road, Indooroopilly, QLD 4068 Australia.

Phone: (07) 3878 5199.

Opening Hours: Monday to Friday: 9:00 am – 5:30 pm. Thursday: 9:00 am – 9:00 pm. Saturday: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm. Sunday: 10:00 am – 5:00 pm.

Ipswich

339 Brisbane Street, West Ipswich, QLD 4305 Australia.

Phone: (07) 3817 0100.

Opening Hours: Monday to Friday: 9:00 am – 5:30 pm. Thursday: 9:00 am – 9:00 pm. Saturday: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm. Sunday: 10:00 am – 5:00 pm.

Kawana Waters

566 Kawana Way, Birtinya, QLD 4575 Australia.

Phone: (07) 5493 6700.

Opening Hours: Monday to Friday: 9:00 am – 5:30 pm. Thursday: 9:00 am – 9:00 pm. Saturday to Sunday: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm.

Logan

Logan Mega Centre, 3525 Pacific Highway, Slacks Creek, QLD 4127 Australia.

Phone: (07) 3209 1822.

Opening Hours: Monday to Friday: 9:00 am – 5:30 pm. Thursday: 9:00 am – 9:00 pm. Saturday: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm. Sunday: 10:00 am – 5:00 pm.

Mackay

Tenancy 2, Mackay Bucasia Rd & Holts Rd, Mackay, QLD 4740 Australia.

Phone: (07) 4852 3100.

Opening Hours: Monday to Friday: 9:00 am – 5:30 pm. Thursday: 9:00 am – 9:00 pm. Saturday: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm. Sunday: 10:00 am – 5:00 pm.

Morayfield

312 – 344 Morayfield Road, Morayfield, QLD 4506 Australia.

Phone: (07) 5490 4100.

Opening Hours: Monday to Friday: 9:00 am – 5:30 pm. Thursday: 9:00 am – 9:00 pm. Saturday: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm. Sunday: 10:00 am – 5:00 pm.

Mount Gravatt

1290 Logan Road, Mount Gravatt, QLD 4122 Australia.

Phone: (07) 3317 6099.

Opening Hours: Monday to Friday: 9:00 am – 5:30 pm. Thursday: 9:00 am – 9:00 pm. Saturday: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm. Sunday: 10:00 am – 5:00 pm.

North Lakes

Primewest Centre, 958 North Lakes Drive, North Lakes, QLD 4509 Australia.

Phone: (07) 3049 8500.

Opening Hours: Monday to Friday: 9:00 am – 5:30 pm. Thursday: 9:00 am – 9:00 pm. Saturday: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm. Sunday: 10:00 am – 5:00 pm.

Rockhampton

341 Yaamba Road, North Rockhampton, QLD 4701 Australia.

Phone: (07) 4928 0888.

Opening Hours: Monday to Friday: 9:00 am – 5:30 pm. Thursday: 9:00 am – 9:00 pm. Saturday: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm. Sunday: 10:00 am – 5:00 pm.

Springfield

1 Main Street, Springfield Central, QLD 4300 Australia.

Phone: (07) 3152 2966.

Opening Hours: Monday to Friday: 9:00 am – 5:30 pm. Thursday: 9:00 am – 9:00 pm. Saturday: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm. Sunday: 10:00 am – 5:00 pm.

Toowoomba

918 – 922 Ruthven Street, Toowoomba, QLD 4350 Australia.

Phone: (07) 4688 0000.

Opening Hours: Monday to Friday: 9:00 am – 5:30 pm. Thursday: 9:00 am – 9:00 pm. Saturday: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm. Sunday: 10:00 am – 5:00 pm.

Townsville

364 – 374 Bayswater Road, Cnr Duckworth St, Garbutt, QLD 4814 Australia.

Phone: (07) 4447 7200.

Opening Hours: Monday to Friday: 9:00 am – 5:30 pm. Thursday: 9:00 am – 9:00 pm. Saturday: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm. Sunday: 10:00 am – 5:00 pm.

Upper Coomera

Tenancy 4, Cnr Days Rd & Old Coach Rd, Upper Coomera, QLD 4209 Australia.

Phone: (07) 5668 3900.

Opening Hours: Monday to Friday: 9:00 am – 5:30 pm. Thursday: 9:00 am – 9:00 pm. Saturday: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm. Sunday: 10:00 am – 5:00 pm.

West Burleigh

177 Reedy Creek Road, West Burleigh, QLD 4219 Australia.

Phone: (07) 5576 1633.

Opening Hours: Monday to Friday: 9:00 am – 5:30 pm. Thursday: 9:00 am – 9:00 pm. Saturday: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm. Sunday: 10:00 am – 5:00 pm.

Queensland Women’s Week Spotlight: Meet Dr Linda Pfeiffer

Looking for inspiration to begin a career in STEM? Look no further! Dr Linda Pfeiffer is the perfect role model.

Looking for inspiration to begin a career in STEM? Look no further! Dr Linda Pfeiffer is the perfect role model.

Linda has a range of teaching experiences across all levels of education and works with industry, community groups and local schools to improve STEM outcomes.

Linda is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Education and the Arts, CQUniversity, based at the Gladstone Marina campus.

In 2016, she took out the 2016 Queensland Women in STEM Prize for her work with schools on science education and engagement events.

Tell us about the new Australia Pacific LNG STEM Central facility in Gladstone?

I was instrumental in setting up a new facility in Gladstone for all things STEM-related. The new Australia pacific LNG STEM central facility opened in August last year. It has been used by local teachers to help them embed STEM into the classroom, as well as community groups to help them understand and engage in STEM.

The new facility hosted a Seniors Week event, where senior groups enjoyed a tour around the facility and got to experience some of the activities. The activities included drones, lego robotics, ozobots, electronic circuits, mathematics games, 3D printer and holograms. It has also hosted the Conoco Phillips Science experience in October last year, a three day event where 85 students from years 9 and 10 participate in hands-on science.

What’s your favourite thing about teaching STEM?

I love inspiring people to realise that science and solving problems are a part of everyday life. Science is interesting and exciting and should not be viewed as hard or scary. Applying science to real-world contexts in a creative way is my favourite part of teaching STEM.

What has been your career highlight?

Winning the 2016 Queensland Women in STEM Prize was amazing. I would also have to say graduating with my Doctor of Science Education in 2013 was also a huge highlight. Finally (if I can have three) opening the Australia Pacific LNG STEM Central facility with so many wonderful supporters. It was very surreal seeing the facility come to fruition after two years of planning.

What are you currently working on?

I am preparing to visit Canberra for a STEM showcase in March, and I am currently working on two books — both about STEM education in primary classrooms.

What do you say to young girls thinking about studying STEM?

STEM careers are very rewarding and you have the opportunity to make big impacts on the world. There should not be any barriers to studying STEM, including gender. Get out there and show the world what you can do!

Secrecy laws in spotlight as Queensland journalist faces possible jail for protecting sources

There is a landmark court case underway in Queensland that threatens to jail a journalist for up to five years, yet his identity cannot be revealed, the case was heard almost entirely behind closed doors, and access to all transcripts has been restricted.

It was lucky the media knew it was even on because it was absent from the daily court list.

Sensitive court matters are often given titles like ‘One Matter’ but not to list a case at all was described by one senior lawyer as “extraordinarily rare”.

The media found out because, well, journalists find things out and that is what’s at the heart of a case that threatens to radically change the way the media operates in Queensland.

According to a previous Supreme Court case, the journalist — referred to only as F — received a tip-off from a police officer in 2018 about an impending raid on the home of a murder suspect who was also the subject of a joint counter-terrorism investigation.

He dispatched a reporter and a camera operator to the address and they managed to catch the arrest on camera.

The leak of information was considered a serious breach by the authorities and the Crime and Corruption Commission (CCC) launched an investigation into how it fell into the hands of the media.

Last August, the Supreme Court dropped a bombshell ruling that ‘public interest immunity’ did not extend to journalists protecting their sources.(

ABC News: Gemma Hall

)

Star chamber hearing

Within a few months, they thought they found their source — charging a police officer with three offences — giving the details to F and revealing the existence of a surveillance device.

The corruption watchdog had also hauled F into a star chamber hearing — an interview where witnesses are compelled to answer questions or face the penalty of a $26,690 fine or up to five years in jail.

Download the ABC News app for all the latest.

F argued he did not have to answer due to a “public interest immunity” but last August, the Supreme Court dropped a bombshell ruling that it did not extend to journalists protecting their sources.

The fate of F is now in the hands of three Court of Appeal judges who allowed in the handful of journalists waiting outside the courtroom for the final 30 minutes of the hearing.

If his appeal fails, F could expect the CCC to schedule another star chamber hearing to force the answers it seeks and, if it doesn’t get them, launch a prosecution.

It seems a long way from the original target of these coercive powers.

The CCC thought they found the source and charged a police officer with three offences.(

ABC News: Patrick Williams

)

The Criminal Justice Commission (CJC) was born out of the Fitzgerald Inquiry, empowered to break down the cone of silence that had for so long protected corrupt cops and organised criminals.

The CJC was remodelled as the Crime and Corruption Commission in 2001 but the explanatory note attached to its act of parliament maintained its focus on organised crime and misconduct of public officials.

In the Newman government era, the CCC used its star chamber powers to target outlaw motorcycle gangs, whose members found themselves compelled to answer questions that would incriminate others and help the wider law enforcement crackdown on bikies.

Now it’s caught up a journalist who received a tip-off from a police officer.

The number of journalists who could be prosecuted with this sort of precedent is chilling, even if the commission decides not to make a martyr of F.

Push for shield laws in Queensland

The journalists’ union, the Media, Entertainment and Arts Alliance (MEAA), is already using the case to push for shield laws.

“What this case shows is what’s lacking in Queensland — every other state has shield law protection,” Queensland MEAA president Michelle Rae said.

“The journalist was doing their job, they were protecting the source on a story that had public interest.

“No worker should have to face the thought of jail for doing their job.”

Queensland MEAA president Michelle Rae says no worker should have to face jail for doing their job.(

ABC News: Tim Swanston

)

In the lead-up to last year’s state election, then-attorney-general Yvette D’Ath wrote in a letter to the union that she would consider the laws.

“If returned following the upcoming state election, the Palaszczuk government has committed to considering the outcomes of recent case law, how journalist protections are operating in other Australian jurisdictions, and the suitability of these models within Queensland’s legal framework,” Ms D’Ath said.

Former Law Society president Bill Potts echoed the call, saying “we need to have shield laws”.

If Queensland does join the rest of the country in adopting shield laws, it could lead to a truly perverse legal outcome — one journalist prosecuted while all others are protected.

The number of journalists who could be prosecuted with this sort of precedent is chilling.(

ABC News

)90,000 Queensland Cultural Center – Brisbane United Museum Complex

In 1974, the Australian State of Queensland decided to merge the existing Art Gallery, Queensland Museum, Queensland State Library and Theater Arts Center into one museum complex. This is how the Queensland Cultural Center was born, which is located in the Central Business District of the city near popular Brisbane hotels.

In 1972, the Queensland Art Gallery was built in the South Bank area.The area of ​​the gallery is 4700 square meters, and it is one of the largest galleries in Australia. It also houses permanent exhibitions of world famous artists such as Renoir, Van Gogh, Picasso, and numerous temporary exhibitions of contemporary artists and sculptors.

The Art Gallery includes a separate gallery of Modern Art, the building of which was built in the neo-constructivist style and is located near the William Jolly Bridge. Here you can see the work of local artists, including the handicrafts of the indigenous peoples of Australia.There is also an exposition of artists from Asia and Oceania.

The Theater Arts Center was founded in 1985. It includes the oldest Queensland theater, Cremorne. This theater was founded back in 1911, but burned down in a fire in 1954. Since the theater was a favorite meeting place for the townspeople, and also gave a start in life to many talented actors, artists and directors, it was decided to restore it and include it in the Queensland Cultural Center.

The Queensland Museum opened in 1986 in South Bank, after changing many of its residences throughout the state.Museum with a total area of ​​about 6500 sq. M. The museum presents archaeological finds, a zoological exhibition, technical exhibits of all times and peoples.

Visitor Information:

Address: Stanley Place, South Brisbane, Queensland 4101, Australia (Cultural Center Station).

Contact phone: +61 (0) 7 3840 7303

Entrance: is free.

Working hours: daily from 10:00 to 17:00 (except April 25 (Anzac Day) – from 12:00 to 17:00)

Weekends: Good Friday, Christmas (25-26 December ).

Near the Museum is the Queensland Library, founded in 1899 and previously located on William Street. Open to the public from Tuesday to Friday (10:00 – 17:00).

Another cultural center is the Sir Thomas Brisbane Planetarium, which is also equipped with an observatory, photographic exhibition and a small theater.

Albion, Queensland – Albion, Queensland

Suburb of Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

Albion is an inland northeastern suburb in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.According to the 2016 census, the population of Albion was 2,296.

Geography

Albion is bounded by Wooloowin in the north, Ascot in the east, Newsted in the south, and Windsor in the west, with Breakfast Creek defining the suburb to the south and southwest. Sandgate Road, the main road on the north side of Brisbane, runs through the center of the suburb. A wide variety of housing styles can be found in Albion, from former working cottages to modern brick houses and block houses.

Breakfast Creek is an area in the west of the suburb (27.4388 ° S 153.0458 ° E).
27 ° 26’20 ″ S 153 ° 02′45 ″ E / / -27.4388; 153.0458 (Breakfast Stream)

Albion Park Paceway, first established in the 1880s, is a racing team and race track located in Breakfast Creek, an area in southern Albion.

History

Albion Hotel, Brisbane, approx. 1866, after which the suburb of Albion is named.

The name Breakfast Creek comes from the Breakfast Point , which was a rocky spot in the lower stream and was named by explorer John Oxley during his exploration of the Brisbane River in 1823.

The name Albion comes from the Albion Hotel, built by Thomas Hazeldon (also spelled Hazeldon), which was named so because the white wall of John Petrie’s quarry reminded Hazeldon of the white cliffs of England (Albion is the old name of England, from the Latin albus means white).From 1866 to 1870, the owner was Edward Hudson. The low-lying parts of Albion came into focus when the marshy area near Cove Creek was designated a racetrack. In 1885, it became the headquarters of the Smithfield Pony Club and then, in 1895, the Albion Park Racetrack. Many Chinese migrants settled here, and the Temple of the Holy Triad was built on Higgs Street for the local population in 1885-86.

Brecci Creek Public School opened on July 7, 1890. It closed on 11 August 1961.It was located on the west side of Agnes Street (27.4404 ° S 153.0468 ° E).
27 ° 26’25 ″ S 153 ° 02′48 ″ E / / -27.4404; 153.0468 (Breakfast Creek Public School)

On September 27, 1880, John Cameron put up eight parcels of Corunna Estate for auction.

In December 1884, the Albion Township Estate, consisting of ninety-one parcels of land, was auctioned by Arthur Martin & Co., Auctioneers. The map advertising the auction shows the estate’s proximity to Breakfast Creek.

On October 28, 1899, the sixty land parcels of Albion Hill, which were converted from 1 to 60 part of parcel 3 of parish 162, Enogger parish, were put up for auction by Isles, Love & Co. The advertising map indicates the proximity of the estate to the Albion train station, from where 76 trains leave daily. The land for sale was located between Camden Street, Albion, Ford Street and Old Sandgate Road (now Bonnie Avenue), Clayfield.

On December 5, 1926, Roman Catholic Archbishop James Dahig laid the foundation stone for St Columbus’s College in the Highlands at 451 Sandgate Road (27.4282 ° S).sh. 153.0463 ° E ). The school officially opened on Sunday, January 29, 1928, as a boys’ school owned by the Christian Brothers. In 1985, the Christian Brothers transferred the management of the college to the Diocese of Brisbane. This caused a number of changes, namely the abandonment of primary school in favor of secondary school. In 1996, girls entered the school, and in 1997 the school moved to Kabulcher. The Albion site was converted to the Clayfield Aged Village, but retained three historic buildings: Highlands, O’Driscoll Hall and Whitecliff.27 ° 25’42 ″ S 153 ° 02′47 ″ E / / -27.4282; 153.0463 (St Columbus’s College (former))

According to the 2016 census, the population of Albion was 2296.

Heritage Lists

Albion Hotel, 2013, listed on the Brisbane Heritage Register.

Whitecliff 1930

Albion has a number of heritage sites, including:

  • Abbotsford Road: Abbotsford Road Bridge
  • Birkbek Street 21: Dunaworthy
  • 12 Gore Street: former MUIOOF Lodge Hall
  • 58 Grove Street: Early Cottage
  • 32 Higgs Street: Temple of the Holy Triad
  • 60 Hudson Street: Former Albion Flour Mill
  • 2 Kingsford Smith Drive: Breakfast Creek Hotel
  • 17 Lever Street: Herberton Cottage
  • 16 McLennan Street: Fire of Hope Baptist Church, Mansion and Hall
  • 27 McLennan Street: Emerald Residence (now Fakenham)
  • 40 McLennan Street: Argyle Residence
  • Sandgate Road: Remains of 2nd Breakfast Creek Bridge (North)
  • 282 Sandgate Road: Shops
  • 297 Sandgate Road: Albion Building
  • 299 Sandgate Road: Wyllie’s Buildings (Shops)
  • 300 Sandgate Road: Albion Hotel (second hotel on site, not the one that gave the name to the suburb)
  • 327 Sandgate Road: Former Commonwealth Bank
  • 334 Sandgate Road: Albion Exchange
  • 336 Sandgate Road: Shops
  • 344 Sandgate Road: Former Albion Public Hall
  • 349 Sandgate Road: Former Albion Post Office
  • 366 Sandgate Road: Corner Bench and Original Bakery Oven
  • 414 Sandgate Road: Shop and Residence
  • 469 Sandgate Road: St Columbus Christian Brothers College, Whitecliff, Highlands (former)
  • 475 Sandgate Road: Shops
  • 10 Stoneleigh Street: Residence ‘Whetfield’
  • 24 Stoneleigh Street: 19th century cottage
  • 63 and 65 Stoneleigh Street: Caders Duplex

Demographics

According to the 2011 census, 1986 people were registered in Albion, of which 48.4% were women and 51.6% were men.

The median age of the Albion population was 33, which is 4 years lower than the national average of 37.

67.7% of Foggy Albion residents were born in Australia, up from the national average of 69. 8%; The next most common countries of origin were New Zealand 4.4%, England 3.1%, India 3%, Italy 1.2%, China 1.1%.

79% of people spoke only English at home; The next most popular languages ​​were 2.1% Italian, 1.2% Mandarin, 1.1% Nepali, 1% Arabic, 0.8% Punjabi.

Of the total population of Albion, 1.2% were indigenous.

In terms of wealth, the average weekly individual income in Albion is about A $ 200 higher than the Australian average, and the average weekly family income is A $ 220 higher. The suburbs have a significantly higher proportion of residents who have never been married (49.0%) compared to the Australian average (33.2%), and, in turn, the proportion of people who are married is lower (29.6%). against 49.6%).

Transport

In the Queensland Rail City network, Albion is served by an Albion train station on the Airport, Doomben, Caboolture, Shorncliffe and Sunshine Coast lines.

Historically Albion lay on the Clayfield tram line along Sandgate Road. It was administered by the Brisbane City Council until April 13, 1969.

Education

There are no schools in Albion. The closest elementary schools are Windsor Public School in nearby Windsor to the west, Wooluvin Public School in neighboring Wooluvin to the north, Eagle Junction Public School in nearby Clayfield to the northeast, and Ascot Public School in neighboring Ascot to the east.The nearest high school is Kidron Public High School in Kidron to the north.

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Albion, Queensland

Suburb of Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

Albion
Brisbane, Queensland

Panorama from Albion towards the Bowen Hills, c. 1915

Coordinates 27 ° 26′01 ″ S153 ° 02′39 ″ E / 27.4336 ° S W. 153.0441 ° E / -27.4336; 153.0441 (Albion (suburb)) Coordinates: 27 ° 26′01 ″ S 153 ° 02′39 ″ E / 27.4336 ° S W. 153.0441 ° E / -27.4336; 153.0441 (Albion (suburban))
Population 2.296 (2016 Census) [1]
• Density 1.640 / km 2 (4250 / Sq. Miles)
Postal code (s) 4010
Area 1.4 km 2 (0.5 sq. Miles)
Time Zone AEST (UTC + 10: 00)
Location 5.1 km (3 miles) NN east of Brisbane GPO
LGA (s) City of Brisbane
(Hamilton Ward) [2]
Government electorate (s) Clayfield
inner northeastern suburb in Brisbane City, Queensland, Australia. [3] in the 2016 Census The population of Albion was 2,296. [1]

Geography

Albion is bounded by Wooloowin in the north, Ascot in the east, Newstead in the south, and Windsor in the west, with Breakfast Creek defining the suburb to the south and southwest. Sandgate Road, the main road on the north side of Brisbane, runs through the center of the suburb. A wide variety of housing styles can be found in Albion, from former working cottages to modern brick houses and block houses.

Breakfast Creek is an area in the west of the suburb (27 ° 26′20 ″ S 153 ° 02′45 ″ E / 27.4388 ° S 153.0458 ° E) / -27.4388; 153.0458 (Breakfast Creek)). [4]

Albion Park Peyseway, first established in the 1880s, is a harness racing club and dog racing trail found in Breakfast Cove, an area in southern Albion. [ need a quote ]

History

Albion Hotel, Brisbane, approx. 1866, after which the suburb of Albion is named.

The name Breakfast Creek comes from Breakfast Creek , which was a rocky spot in the lower stream and was named by explorer John Oxley during his 1823 exploration of the Brisbane River. [3] [5]

The name Albion comes from the Albion Hotel, built by Thomas Hazeldon (also spelled Hazeldon), which was named so because the white wall of John Petrie Quarry reminded Hazeldon of the white cliffs of England (Albion – old name of England, from Latin Albus means white).From 1866 to 1870, the owner was Edward Hudson. [3] The lowlands of Albion came into focus when the marshy area near Breakfast Cove was designated a racetrack. In 1885, it became the headquarters of the Smithfield Pony Club and then, in 1895, the Albion Park Racetrack. Many Chinese migrants settled here, and the Temple of the Holy Triad was built on Higgs Street for the local population in 1885-86. [6]

Breakfast Creek Public School opened on July 7, 1890.It closed on 11 August 1961. [7] It was on the west side of Agnes Street (27 ° 26′25 ″ S 153 ° 02′48 ″ E / 27.4404 ° S 153.0468 ° E . / -27.4404; 153.0468 (Breakfast Creek Public School)). [8]

On September 27, 1880, John Cameron put up eight parcels of Corunna Estate for auction. [9] [10]

On October 28, 1899, the sixty land parcels of Albion Hill, which were converted from 1 to 60 of Division 3 of Part 162, Enogger Parish, were put up for auction by Isles, Love & Co. [11] [12] The advertising card indicates that the estate is located near Albion train station, from where 76 trains leave daily. The land for sale was located between Camden Street, Albion, and Ford Street, and Old Sandgate Road (now Bonnie Avenue), Clayfield.

On December 5, 1926, Roman Catholic Archbishop James Dahig laid the foundation stone for St Columbus’s College in the Highlands at 451 Sandgate Road (27 ° 25′42 ″ S 153 ° 02′47 ″ E)d. / 27.4282 ° S W. 153.0463 ° E / -27.4282; 153.0463 (College of St Columbus (former))). [13] [14] The school officially opened on Sunday, January 29, 1928, as a boys’ school run by Christian Brothers. In 1985, the Christian Brothers transferred the management of the college to the Diocese of Brisbane. This caused a number of changes, namely the abandonment of primary school in favor of secondary school. In 1996, girls entered the school, and in 1997 the school moved to Caboolture. [15] [16] Albion has been converted to the Clayfield Aged Village, but retains three historic buildings: Highlands, O’Driscoll Hall and Whitecliff. [17]

2016 Census The population of Albion was 2,296. [1]

Heritage Lists

Albion Hotel, 2013, listed on the Brisbane Heritage Register. Whitecliff 1930

Albion has a number of heritage sites, including:

  • Abbotsford Road: Abbotsford Road Bridge [18]
  • 21 Birkbeck Street: Dunaworthy [19]
  • 12 Gore Street: Former MUIOOF Lodge Hall [20]
  • 58 Grove Street: Early Cottage [21]
  • 32 Higgs Street: Temple of the Holy Triad [22]
  • 60 Hudson Street: Former flour mill Albiona [23]
  • 2 Kingsford Smith Drive: Breakfast Creek Hotel [24] 17
  • 17 Lever Street: Herberton Cottage [25]
  • 16 McLennan Street: Fire of Hope Baptist Church , Mansion and Hall [26]
  • 27 McLennan Street: Emerald Residence (now Fakenham) [27]
  • 40 McLennan Street: Argyle Residence [28]
  • Sandgate Road : Remains of 2nd Breakfast Creek Bridge (North) [29]
  • 282 Sandgate Road: Shops [30]
  • 297 Sandgate Road: Albion Building [31]
  • 299 Sandgate Road: Wyllie’s Buildings (Shops) [32]
  • 300 Sandgate Road : Albion Hotel [33] (second hotel on the site, not the one that gave the suburb its name)
  • 327 Sandgate Road: Former Commonwealth Bank [34]
  • 334 Sandgate Road: Albion Exchange [35]
  • 336 Sandgate Road: Shops [36]
  • 344 Sandgate Road: Former Albion Public Hall [37]
  • 349 Sandgate Road: Former Albion Post Office [38]
  • 366 Sandgate Road: Corner Shop and the original baking oven [39]
  • 414 Sandgate Road: Shop and Residence [40]
  • 469 Sandgate Road: St. Columbus Christian Brothers College, Whitecliff, Highlands (former) [41]
  • 475 Sandgate Road: Shops [42]
  • 10 Stoneleigh Street: Residence ‘Whetfield’ [43]
  • 24 Stoneleigh Street: 19th century cottage [44]
  • 63 and 65 Stoneleigh Street: duplex Caders [45]

Demographics

2011 Census Albion had 1986 inhabitants, of which 48.4% were women and 51.6% were men.

The median age of the Albion population was 33, which is 4 years lower than the national average of 37.

67.7% of Foggy Albion residents were born in Australia, up from a national average of 69.8%; The next most common countries of origin were New Zealand 4.4%, England 3.1%, India 3%, Italy 1.2%, China 1.1%.

79% of people spoke only English at home; The next most popular languages ​​were 2.1% Italian, 1.2% Mandarin, 1.1% Nepali, 1% Arabic, 0.8% Punjabi.

Of the total population of Albion, 1.2% were indigenous. [46]

In terms of wealth, the average weekly individual income in Albion is approximately A $ 200 more than the Australian average, and the average weekly household income is A $ 220 higher. The suburbs have a significantly higher proportion of residents who have never been married (49.0%) compared to the Australian average (33.2%), and, in turn, the proportion of people who are married is lower (29.6%). against 49.6%). [46]

Transport

On the Queensland Railway Network, Albion is served by Albion Railway Station on the Airport, Doomben, Caboolture, Shorncliffe and Sunny Beach lines.

Historically Albion lay on the Clayfield tram line, along Sandgate Road. It was run by Brisbane City Council until April 13, 1969

Education

There are no schools in Albion. The closest primary schools are Windsor Public School in neighboring Windsor to the west, Wooloowin Public School in neighboring Wooloowin to the north, Eagle Junction Public School in neighboring Clayfield to the northeast, and Ascot Public School in neighboring Ascot to the east. Queensland Globe. State of Queensland. Retrieved October 16, 2020.

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90,000 Steve Irwin: Attention to Australia’s Favorite Crocodile Hunter

The famous crocodile hunter, Steve Irwin, was a true blue Australian with an infectious personality who lived in khaki and had a special love for the wild. This year, 2016, marks the tenth anniversary of his unexpected death. We take a look at his adventurous life, a life that amazed audiences around the world, and who could forget his famous phrase Screams!

Humble Beginnings

Steve Irwin was born into a home filled with dangerous snakes, lizards, injured birds and orphaned kangaroos, fueling his passion for wildlife from the beginning.His mother Lin took care of both the injured and the orphans, and Steve said she was “Mother Teresa of Wildlife Restoration.” Meanwhile, his father Bob was a wildlife expert with an interest in herpetology – a zoology associated with amphibians and reptiles. A love of wildlife, especially reptiles, was noticed in Steve from a very young age. At the age of six, Steve caught his first venomous snake, common brown, and often came late to school due to roadside lizards rescuing with his mom.

Moving with family to Beerwehr, Queensland, Irvins opened Beerwehr Reptile and Fauna Park in 1970 and this was the start of a charming little reptile park. With a love for the reptiles growing every day, Steve fought the first crocodile at the age of nine under the supervision of his father. The captured crocodiles were “little troubled crocodiles” that hung around the ramps. Steve quickly learned to jump and fight these large reptiles in the boat.

With a sixth sense for wildlife growing inside him, Steve has captured over 100 crocodiles as a volunteer for the East Coast Queensland crocodile management program – some of these crocodiles have been moved while others have been moved to his family’s park.

North Queensland

In 1980, Irvins Wildlife Park was renamed Queensland Reptile and Fauna Park – and Steve called the park his home. However, during the 1980s, Steve moved to many remote areas in far North Queensland, rescuing crocodiles from poachers’ guns. With his small dog, Sui, Steve developed a crocodile capture and control method that is now used by crocodiles around the world.

By 1991, Steve took over the management of his family’s park.Along with the help of his best mate, Wes Mannion, they worked many hours to preserve the foundations and care for the wildlife.

Crocodile Hunter Born

Soon after Steve took over the park in 1991, he met the tourist Terry, an American naturalist. Their relationship whirlwind saw them get married in 1992.

“I thought there was nobody in the world. He sounded like ecological Tarzan, the superhero guy who is bigger than life. – Terry Irwin

Instead of going on their honeymoon, Steve and Terry began filming a wildlife documentary.This documentary was so successful that it became a series – nicknamed Steve – “Crocodile Hunter”; debuting on Australian television screens in 1996 and North America in 1997. As an Australian wildlife expert, conservationist and now an international television personality with a broad Australian accent, Steve’s infectious personality has brought him worldwide fame.

Films and Documentaries

Steve has starred in many documentaries and films with The Crocodile Hunter.In 1998, he worked with director Mark Strickson to create The Ten Deadliest Snakes in the world. The nation’s famed children’s music group The Wiggles filmed their Wiggly Safari at the Australian Zoo in 2002. Steve and his family appeared in this full-length feature film rearing children about Australian wildlife.

Alongside this, Steve appeared in interviews including The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, announcing the development of a Discovery Kids show for his daughter Bindi.However, this Bindi the Jungle Girl series began in 2007 after Steve’s death.

In 2006, Steve also featured his voice for the elephant seal named Trev, in the cartoon Happy Feet. After going through post-production, this film was dedicated to Steve.

Welcome to the Australian Zoo

In 1992, Lin and Bob Irwin left the park, leaving Steve in charge. Working aimlessly, he improved and expanded the wildlife park, and in 1998 he renamed the park the Australian Zoo – with the vision that it is the best zoo in the world.

With its popularity in the United States and around the world, by 2002 the Australian Zoo was recognized as the main attraction in Queensland. Steve has been an active promoter of tourism in Queensland and Australian tourism in general.

In July 2006, Steve drew up a ten-year business plan for the future of his beloved zoo.

family

Steve’s peer relationship with Terry saw the greeting of their first child, Bindi, in 1998.Steve described his daughter as “the reason he was placed on Earth.” As a daddy girl “who worshiped the land he walked on,” they were seen as cooking, surfing and everything in between.

In 2003, they welcomed the birth of their son Robert, who joined Steve in his circles throughout the zoo. As a spitting image of his father, Robert – Bindi’s life – loved his parenting life and wildlife.

Wildlife Warriors

“I consider myself a warrior of the wild.My mission is to save the endangered worlds. ” – Steve Irwin

Founded in 2002, Steve and Terry formed the Steve Irwin Conservation Foundation. Promote education on how to protect affected, endangered and endangered wildlife. This organization was later renamed Wildlife Warriors Worldwide, and Terry remains today a patron and significant advisor.

Steve also helped find and set up the International Crocodile Rescue Service, the Lin Irwin Memorial Fund (in memory of his mother who died in 2000) and the Iron Barck Wildlife Rehabilitation Fund.

awards

Steve Irwin has received many awards and honors. First, in 1997, Steve and his father discovered a new species of turtle on the coast of Queensland – as a result of this discovery, he was given the honor to name this new species. This species of turtle is known as Irwin’s tortoise (Elseya irwini) after his family. Other awards include the Australian Government’s Centenary Medal (2001), Tourism Export of the Year (2004) and the Australian Year (2004).

In his honor, the Sea Conservatory Society’s M / V Robert Hunter was renamed M / Y Steve Irwin. The road that runs past the Australian Zoo – Glass House Mountains Road – was renamed Steve Irwin Way in 2007; and in 2009, a newly discovered Australian species of air-breathing land snail was named after him: Stevirwini’s Screams.

A Nation in Mourning and Legacy

On September 4, 2006, Steve filmed an underwater documentary entitled “The Deadliest Ocean” along Butt Reef, near Port Douglas, Queensland.While swimming in deep water during a break from filming to provide footage for the upcoming TV show Bindi, Steve approached the ramp at an approximate interval of two meters. Initially, he thought he had punctured a lung, but a prickly jerk pierced his heart. Footage from this incident is believed to be the only fatality ever recorded on video; however, at the request of his family, all copies of this material were destroyed.

This unexpected incident was not only a shock to his family and nation, but to the entire world.Flags along Sydney Harbor Bridge were lowered to half mast in his honor, thousands of fans visited the Australian Zoo to pay their respects, and then Prime Minister John Howard expressed the suffering of the nation, stating that “Australia has lost a wonderful and colorful son”,

Steve was buried in a private ceremony at the Australian Zoo in a burial site that is not accessible to visitors.

Steve’s Last Adventure

The world famous American channel Animal Planet aired the series “The Crocodile Hunter” entitled “Steve’s Last Adventure”.This three-hour documentary featured footage of Steve’s travels and adventures from around the world; including Borneo, Himalayas, Yangtze River and Kruger National Park.

Nation says goodbye

A Public Memorial Service was held on September 20, 2006 at the Crocoseum Zoo in Australia. Presented by Russell Crowe, the service was broadcast across Australia, USA, UK, Germany and Asia and was seen by over 300 million viewers. The latest tribute saw the zoo at the zoo recount his iconic phrase Screams in Yellow, after Steve’s truck was last driven out of Krokosey for the last time.

Crocodile Hunter Remembrance Steve Irwin Day (November 15) is an international annual event celebrating his passionate life.

Ten years

This true blue Australian has changed the world with innovative ideas and extreme conservation efforts. Known for throwing bites from venomous snakes, tackling crocodiles, and rescuing those in need, Steve has been at the forefront of animal conservation.

Praising Steve for introducing the public to the natural world, Sir David Attenborough said, “He taught them how wonderful and interesting he was, he was a natural communicator.”

His inheritance will live forever. After all, in his words, “Kroc’s rule!”

90,000 Australian MPs turned parliament into a brothel

“Scandalous quagmire”, “toxic culture”, “disgusting sickening situation” and many other epithets with which foreign media accompany news from Australia. The focus is on the country’s parliament. Where, as it turned out, girls with reduced social responsibility were regularly taken.And they used their services there.

Where exactly this happened is a separate and very piquant story, we will tell it a little later. But it is worth clarifying: the topic of sex scandals for Australians in recent days is almost the main one. And there are specific reasons for this.

Here, for example, from a recent – the confession of the Minister of Health of the state of Queensland: they say, she more than once became a victim of dirty harassment in the same parliament. A little earlier, a former government employee complained about the rape – they say, she was forced to have sex by a “high-ranking politician”.

In addition, confessions of other women are published, who claim to have repeatedly received “dirty sexist hints” from legislators and officials. Now parliamentary prostitution has also surfaced.

Everyone seems to have got used to harassment in politics, whether in America, in Australia or in Europe. But another scandal threatens to become a new milestone in the history of parliamentarism. The Australian Prime Minister is ready to take drastic measures in the fight against the licentiousness of lawmakers.

“I am shocked by these disgusting and shameful actions. For a month, there have been reports of inappropriate actions by members of the government and ministers. True, as you know, complaints came on anonymous terms from representatives of different parties. We must restore order in the building: for a while, forget about politics and solve the problem, “says Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison.

Postpone the political agenda and take care of the moral character of the people’s representatives. This has probably never happened in world political practice.After all, the Australian parliamentarians went so far as to summon prostitutes directly to the parliament building, and they chose not even their own offices as a place of carnal pleasures, but a prayer room.

The Australian journalists chose a former government employee to be the hero of the scandal, in the story they call him by name – Tom, and hide his face. It was he who provided video footage of colleagues’ sexual pleasures. According to Tom, male employees took prostitutes to the parliament building, filmed videos themselves and sent them to a group chat.Why the parliamentarians chose the prayer room as a place to satisfy carnal pleasures, Tom does not specify.

According to Tom, there has been a sex mess in the Australian parliament for years.

“The collective West has done a lot over the past few years to finally dispel the myth about itself as a kind of place, which is such a heaven on Earth, where everything is gorgeous and beautiful. And they themselves have a lot of problems that need to be dealt with, and then already trying to teach someone, “- said political scientist Ivan Arkatov.

The revelations of Tom’s informant in an exclusive on Australian television, who lifted the blanket of the parliamentary bed, are apparently only the beginning of a grandiose sexual scandal. Today, the former chief of staff of the Prime Minister, and now a well-known Australian journalist decided to turn up the heat, so much so that specific characters of Australian politics are already starting to sweat:

“When the work computer of one of the dismissed employees was cleaned in parliament, it became clear that this employee regularly met with other men right in the middle of the working day and arranged orgies with them right in their offices.Now I recognized the same employee in a man who, judging by the published photos and videos, was masturbating in the prayer room. “

According to experts, in the near future the Australians will have no time for politics. The series, which can be safely called “O times! O morals!”, Seems to be just beginning. Ahead is more than one series of revelations about the behind the scenes of the political life of a distant continent.

90,000 Russia – Australia: “New Horizons of Cooperation”

Prospects for bilateral relations and issues of strategic partnership became the focus of attention of the participants of the Fifth Russian-Australian Congress on the Development of Economic Cooperation.The Forum opened on the Gold Coast of the Australian state of Queensland.

On the Russian side, more than 30 representatives of state and financial structures took part in it, including Deputy Chairman of the Duma Committee on Natural Resources and Environmental Management Vasily Tarasyuk, Minister of Economic Development and Foreign Relations of the Khabarovsk Territory Alexander Levintal, directors of a number of large joint-stock companies and industrial enterprises.

The Australian side was represented by the Minister of Small Business Development and Multinational Culture Chris Cummins, ex-Premier of Queensland Rob Borbidge and Mayor of the Gold Coast City Ron Clark, as well as prominent economists of the country.

The organizers of this meeting were the Russian Academy of Business and Entrepreneurship, the Russian Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs, the ASMO-press Publishing House, the Trade Representation of the Russian Federation in Australia, the Australian Government – the Australian Trade Commission with the participation of the Prime Minister of Queensland, Peter Beatty.

According to the President of ASMO-press Irina Gorbulina, the main attention of the Congress is focused on cooperation in such promising areas as oil and gas production and production of oil and gas equipment, transport, trade, information technology, food industry, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics production, architecture and construction, financial and investment activities, education and tourism.

The chairman of the Federation Council of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation Sergey Mironov, as well as the Minister of Agriculture of the Russian Federation, co-chairman of the Russian-Australian intergovernmental commission on trade and economic cooperation, Alexei Gordeev, sent greetings to the participants of the congress.

They, in particular, say that the current anniversary meeting opens up wide opportunities for building up mutually beneficial economic cooperation, implementing joint projects in various fields of economy and investment.Despite the geographic remoteness of Russia and Australia, the development of bilateral trade and economic relations has recently clearly become more and more noticeable dynamism. This year is also indicative in this respect. In May, the first ever Australian business forum in Russia “Australia Week in Moscow. New Facets of Cooperation”, organized by the Australian Trade Commission, was held with great success. The main event of the forum was a trade exhibition that showed Russians the whole variety of Australian export industries: from winemaking and consumer goods to innovative technologies used in the mining industry and metallurgy.

The Australian-Russian Congress will strengthen and expand the business contacts and ties between entrepreneurs of both countries established during Australia Week in Moscow, and will open up new directions and forms of mutually beneficial cooperation. In addition to the traditional spheres of interaction for our countries: agriculture, food industry, there is a huge potential for the development of bilateral relations in such areas as transport infrastructure, information technology, medicine and pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, architectural and construction complex, education and tourism.

Russia’s integration into the world economic system and, in particular, the entry of our country into APEC in 1995, as well as the stable dynamics of economic development, characteristic of both the Russian Federation and Australia, serve as a solid foundation for the expansion of mutually beneficial relations between the two countries. About this in an interview with the correspondent. ITAR-TASS said the Deputy Chairman of the State Duma Committee on Natural Resources and Environmental Management Vasily Tarasyuk, who heads the Russian delegation at the forum.According to him, more and more Russian and Australian enterprises and companies are showing interest in mutually beneficial cooperation, which is clearly evidenced by the growing volumes of bilateral trade and investments from year to year.

Speaking at the congress, Tarasyuk expressed confidence that the current meeting will serve as a solid foundation for the formation of a favorable environment and the creation of stable trade and industrial ties between Russia and Australia, deeply integrated into their national economies.

The dynamics of the development of Russian-Australian relations is extremely positive and over the past two years has reached a qualitatively new level. This point of view was expressed in an interview with the correspondent. ITAR-TASS Minister of Economic Development and Foreign Relations of the Khabarovsk Territory Alexander Levintal. According to him, such a promising trend is primarily due to the practical steps that Australian companies are taking in the joint development of oil and gas fields on the Sakhalin shelf.Currently, the size of such investments is estimated at hundreds of millions of dollars, but compared to investments by other foreign companies in the economy of the Russian Far East, these figures remain insignificant. The dynamics of the development of Russian-Australian relations is positive and over the past two years has reached a qualitatively new level. “For the fruitful development of economic cooperation between our countries, Australians need to overcome a certain conservative barrier and destroy negative stereotypes about Russia, where joint business remains a rather risky business,” Levinthal emphasized.

The gold coast of the Australian state of Queensland occupies a special place in the development of Russian-Australian tourist contacts. As stated in an interview with the correspondent. ITAR-TASS mayor of the city of Gold Coast Ron Clark, despite the considerable distance between the two states annually this resort is visited by more than five million people, including at least ten thousand Russian citizens.

According to him, the current meeting will give a kind of impetus for the further fruitful development of tourist, business and cultural exchanges between Russia and Australia, as well as enrich its participants with new ideas within the framework of comprehensive strengthening of mutually beneficial cooperation.

ITAR-TASS, 09.08.2005

Brisbane – Walk (3)

Cats instead of gargoyles, ghosts in government offices and much more you discover as you walk through a small stretch of Brisbane in the old district.

– Cats on The Mansions, Brisbane, Queensland

Late Spring Vacation

Brisbane – Walk (3)

And so, in the vulgar part of my story, I began to describe the beginning of the walk through the historic part of the city – Colonial Brisbane Heritage Walk .I stopped by talking about Queens Gardens [4] , which had many interesting objects, but I was not finished, so let’s continue.

Land Administration Building

– Land Administration Building and Queens Gardens park

The building behind the Queen Victoria Monument was in the early 1900s as part of the group surrounding the park Queens Gardens .It was one of the most famous and important government buildings in Queensland and included the Treasury Building and the State Library.

Land Administration Building [6] is a prime example of Edwardian Baroque architecture – built by renowned Queensland architect Thomas Pye. The construction of the building was started in 1901 and completed in 1905. It originally housed the State Premier and his administration and the Queensland Executive Council, as well as the State National Art Gallery, which was removed from the building in 1930.In 1971, the offices of the Executive Council and the Cabinet of Ministers also moved to new premises and since then the building has been known by its current name.

Moreton Bay Courier

Edition Moreton Bay Courier [7] , which was also known as Brisbane Courier , and since 1933 The Courier -Mail) , founded in 1846 by James Swan and became the first newspaper in the state.It was created as a weekly, but the frequency of issues steadily increased, in January 1858 it began to appear twice a week, in December 1859 three times a week, and then daily.

First Edition The Courier-Mail was published on 28 August 1933, after Keith Murdoch’s Herald and the Weekly Times acquired and merged Brisbane Courier and Daily Mail. In 1987, Rupert Murdoch’s News Limited acquired control of the publication and issued shares in Queensland Newspapers Pty Ltd.

The sculpture of a rolled-up newspaper at the corner of George and Charlotte Streets is intended to remind of the printing house where this first newspaper of the state of Queensland was published.

– Moreton Bay Courier
– Thomas Joseph Ryan Monument in Queens Gardens

Back to Park Queens Gardens and look at the statue of Thomas Joseph Ryan Monument [8] , who was the Labor Party Prime Minister of Queensland (1915-19) , which he joined in 1904.

Statue by Edgar Bertram Mackennal. Thomas Joseph Ryan is depicted in the robes of a lawyer because he received his law degree at the University of Melbourne. Ryan’s government laid the foundations for Queensland’s labor laws, implemented many social reforms, and empowered women to run for parliament. He was a supporter of the Irish Revolution. Ryan is well known for his stance on conscription during the First World War.

State Library

– State Library of Queensland

The Brisbane Public Library was established by the government of the Queensland Colony in 1896, later, in 1898, it was renamed the Queensland Public Library and opened its doors to the public in 1902. In 1934, the Oxley Memorial Library (named for explorer John Oxley), opened, was used as a center for research and study.In 1943, both libraries were merged under one management.

The now known The old State Library [9] , occupied the building in the late 1950s, is now a tourist attraction. In 1966 the building was renovated and expanded, and in 1971 it became known as State Library of Queensland

The building was designed by the colonial architect Francis Drummond Greville (FDG) Stanley.It was modeled after 16th century Italian architecture. Built between 1876 and 1879, it was the first purpose-built house for the Queensland Museum. Unfortunately, the building turned out to be insufficient for museum purposes and the library occupied it. In 1988, the State Library moved to new, larger premises at the Queensland Cultural Center in Southbank.

Miller Park

There is no permanent structure on this site.The site now referred to as Miller Park [10] is located on a small plot of land between William Street and Queen’s Wharf Road. At the end of the convict era, it was a grassy slope that had been used as a shortcut between the city and the river since the mid-nineteenth century.

In the years when the number of immigrants arriving exceeded the available space for their temporary accommodation, tents for single men were erected on this site, and then a temporary structure for the same purposes.In 1913, the building was supplemented by the commissariat and shops, a door was inserted into the northwest wall facing the previous upper floor, in order to have quick access through the gangway to the vacant land.

In the 1980s, when Brisbane City Council redesigned and improved this section of land, it was named Miller Park , after Lieutenant Henry Miller of the 40th Regiment, responsible for establishing and settling Moreton Bay. , the first convict settlement, which marked the beginning of Brisbane’s history, in May 1825.

Commissariat Store

– Commissariat Store

The Commandant, Captain Logan, proposed to build a permanent Commissariat Store [11] , in Moreton Bay. In April 1828, the acting engineer in New South Wales, William Dumaresq, sent a plan from Sydney to Moreton Bay to build a permanent Commissariat Warehouse .Construction was supervised by the Moreton Bay operations manager, Lieutenant Brainbridge. Construction began in July 1828, using basic prison labor assisted by skilled stonemasons from the Quarrymen and from Sydney. The stone was quarried from the rocks at Kangaroo Point. The lime for the mortar was obtained from the incineration of oyster shells at Amity Point on Stradbroke Island or the newly created lime kiln at Limestone Hill in Ipswich.

The original two-story building was completed at the end of 1829, as reflected in the Royal coat of arms of King George IV on the building above the pediment.Features of the building included a brick drainage system for the entire base, as well as an 18-foot retaining wall at the rear and a gate at the front overlooking the river. Commissariat Store was used as a store for purchasing and storing goods and rations, as well as food, clothing and tools for the colony.

It is now a museum. Open from Tuesday to Friday from 10 am to 4 pm.

Immigration Depot

– Immigration Depot

This building, owned by the Former Department of Mines, was built as Immigration Depot [12] in 1865-66.The building was built on a part of the site of the former commandant’s garden, which was once laid out here.

By the middle of the 19th century, the Colonial Government was actively pursuing an immigration program for free settlers. The first immigrants arrived from abroad on December 15, 1848 and were temporarily housed in old military barracks, which were located near Treasury Buildings , but by the 60s of the 19th century, the barracks deteriorated to such an extent that they were described in the local to the press as “a pitiful and dilapidated shack … a disgusting barn.”After that, it was decided to build a new building near the ferry station. Designed by Queensland’s first Colonial architect Charles Tiffin. The building was originally one-story with a basement.

In December 1887, the new Yungaba Immigration Terminal at Kangaroo Point was built, and William Street Station operated as a backup facility until 1889. In 1890, the building was adapted to form the first offices for the newly created Department of Agriculture.The building was then reconstructed and expanded to accommodate more offices and laboratories. By December 1890, the building housed the Museum of Economic Botany. In 1922, the building underwent another reconstruction.

In 1940, the building housed an old photographic studio and a storage room. A photographic studio caused serious damage in a fire (1944). In the late 1990s, the building housed Federation Centennial Offices and is now home to the National Endowment of Queensland.

Government Printing Office

– Government Printing Office

Government Printing Office [13] between 1862 and 1983, consisted of a number of buildings.As the first purpose-built government printing plant in the state of Queensland, it played an important role in the administration of the colony and then the state of Queensland. It currently consists of two buildings built over three different periods – a three-story brick building facing William Street built 1872-74; a three-story brick building built along Stephens lane between 1884-87; and a three-story brick building built along George Street between 1910-12.

A prime example of Gothic architecture, the arched building of the Government Printing Office at William Street was designed by colonial colonial architect Stanley and built in 1874 after an earlier wooden printing house was destroyed.

George Street Building [15] is famous for having the ghost of a young man who, according to legend, was caught and killed in the printers when he stood up to see why they stopped working.

Executive Building

– Executive Building

Executive Building [14] is a 17-storey building, built in 1972.A completely ordinary concrete building, but in the reconciliation in front of it there is a sculpture of Cleva Elizabeth II in her best years.

I do not understand at all why this building came to be as an object of the route.

The Mansions

– The Mansions

The Mansions [16] An unusual and beautiful three-story building of six houses located at the corner of George and Margaret Streets.The building was designed by GHM Addison, and built by RE Burton in 1889, during the Victorian era and the houses were historically intended for private residence. This building is iconic for Brisbane and a rare example of the American Romanesque style applied to a number of terraced houses. The Mansions are simple red bricks with cat sculptures on the parapet of the building. What surprised and pleased me. Classic columns are propped up by arcades and triangular pediments mark the entrances.There are no cast iron laces typical of Australian terraces.

One of the earliest residents of The Mansions was the first female physician in Queensland and Australia, the first female surgeon, Dr Lillian Cooper.

After the First World War, the building became an overnight house and in 1954 was bought by the Queensland government, which was used as offices.

Queensland Club

– Queensland Club at

Gerog Street

Queensland Club Building [18] was designed by Francis Drummond Greville Stanley and built from 1882 to 1888.

The Club itself was created in December 1859 after the apparent success of the Northern Australian Club in Ipswich, and coinciding with the establishment of Queensland as a separate colony. Adopting the British tradition of private clubs by influential members of the community, it provided recreational spaces and accommodations for people of common interests and socio-economic backgrounds. The members of the club were mainly pastoralists, politicians and business and professional people.

As membership increased, more space was required and in 1881 the club acquired three allotments at the corner of George and Alice Streets, which was known as the Hodgsons Corner.The proximity to the government headquarters made it appropriate for the new club premises.

The building was opened in June 1884 and contained 41 dorms for members, eight bathrooms, a dining room, a billiard room, a smoking room, a visitor’s hall, offices and necessary kitchens, rooms for employees and toilets, providing a “home away from home” for the male elite society.

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