Spotlight knitting yarns: Acrylic Yarn & Wool For Knitting & Crochet

Acrylic Yarn & Wool For Knitting & Crochet

Why Knitting With Acrylic Yarn Is A Good Idea

Acrylic yarn is one of the most commonly sold types of yarn in New Zealand. Made from manmade fibres, acrylic yarn is strong and affordable, the perfect combination for crafters who regularly need some yarn for their crafting projects.

Because of the fact that acrylic yarn is made from manmade materials, there is a range of benefits associated with the use of this kind of yarn. If you are curious why you should use this kind of yarn over others, be sure to read on.

What Colours Are Available With Acrylic Yarn?

Acrylic yarns are available in a range of colours. After all, this is a manmade fibre that can be easily manipulated during the production process. Because of the latest technologies, manufacturers can also make these yarns colourfast, this means they will not run out or fade very easily.

Even though countless colours are available for acrylic yarn, some crafters will dye acrylic yarn themselves. When you are looking for a very specific colour, but cannot find it anywhere, simply buy some plain white and use some food colouring and water for the dyeing process. There are plenty of tutorials online on how to do this.

Why Is Acrylic Yarn The Better Option For Beginners?

Beginners will find that acrylic yarn is the best option in the catalogue, this because the yarn is more affordable than other types of yarn. As this yarn is cheaper, you do not have to worry if you make a mistake during the knitting process. Beginners can easily purchase a large quantity of yarn too, ensuring there is plenty of yarn to practice with.

Is Acrylic Yarn Easy To Maintain?

One common concern of crafters who use acrylic yarn for crafting projects is the maintenance level of their yarn. Some types of yarn are more delicate than others and this should certainly be remembered when choosing yarn for sweaters, scarfs, and other applications that require more durability.

Acrylic yarn is quite durable, especially when you compare it to other types of yarn such as wool and cashmere. You can easily clean this yarn in some water with a gentle laundry detergent. You can also put the finished product in the washing machine, as this type of yarn is quite resistant to shrinking and other common types of damage.

Will Projects With Acrylic Yarn Last?

Acrylic yarn is one of the most durable options, as mentioned earlier in this guide. Manmade fibres such as acrylic have a reputation of being extremely durable, this because of the petroleum used during the production process. Petroleum is a substance that takes years to degrade naturally, which means your projects can stand the test of time.

On the flipside, acrylic yarn is not as environmentally friendly as natural fabric fibres. As it is made from petroleum, lots of chemicals are involved in the production process. However, that does mean the durability is increased tremendously and this is something many people look for in yarn.

Even though acrylic yarn is extremely durable, it does not weigh a lot. Those who like blankets that are lovely and warm, but do not weigh too much, will find that acrylic yarn is the better option. The lightweight nature of acrylic yarn is explained by the synthetic polymers used to create the yarn, which are less dense than regular natural fibres.

Does Acrylic Have Any Heat-Regulating Properties?

When you knit a sweater from acrylic yarn, you obviously want your sweater to be warm. Fortunately, this is not a problem with this manmade material, as it will keep you warm in colder temperatures.

On the flipside, acrylic yarn is less breathable than natural fabric fibres. Even though it is brilliant at keeping you warm, it is less suitable for apparel that is used in warmer temperatures. Nevertheless, there are plenty of applications where such warmth is required, so this disadvantage will not limit you where crafting applications are concerned.

Another major benefit of acrylic yarn is its hypoallergenic properties. Some people are sensitive to materials such as wool, so acrylic yarn can be a great alternative to common types of wool yarn. It is also a great option who are prone to all kinds of allergies.

Member Spotlight: LoveCrafts | Welcome to the Craft Yarn Council

 

LoveCrafts was started in 2012 by three entrepreneurs who saw a need from others in their lives for a one-stop shop of inspiration for their favorite crafts. LoveCrafts was born and now you can shop for yarn, patterns and tools on the LoveKnitting and LoveCrochet websites.

There are several ways you can get inspiration through the LoveCrafts brands and even contribute to their community. Anyone is welcome to submit a pattern to their website and make money off of it. This is a huge benefit for makers, as LoveCrafts’ combined following is huge – between their e-newsletters, blogs and social media, they have a lot of people eager for new patterns to try.

Honestly, I feel like I could get lost in the LoveKnitting and LoveCrochet websites because of all the fun content they have. They even have Buzzfeed-esque quizzes. The one that particularly stood out to me is “Which FREE mindful pattern should I make?” because I’m always down for a pattern that helps me be more mindful and take my focus off what’s stressing me out. What’s better than getting lost in aimless Buzzfeed quizzes? Getting lost in aimless YARN quizzes!

And don’t even get me started on the super fun “Hue are you?” quiz, which asks a series of questions to figure out what color you’re most like, from grass green to buttercup yellow to pillar red. I got “Blue Washed Teal” and I am not surprised at all. After reading all about my result, they even offered several avenues for me to explore yarn crafting in my chosen hue. My favorite part was the “Knitting in blue guide,” which gives historical information on the color blue and tips on how to wear it.

If you’re looking for the next pattern to add to your repertoire, a new yarn to try out or a tutorial for a fun new technique, LoveCrafts is the way to go. Check out the LoveKnitting and LoveCrochet websites and let us know on Instagram what inspires you the most! 

Spotlight – Churchmouse Yarns & Teas

Bias ‘Before & After’ Scarf Using Isager Bomulin

Bias ‘Before & After’ Scarf Using Isager Bomulin

Baggu Canvas Bags

Baggu Canvas Bags

Pinking Shears Scarf Using mYak Baby Yak Lace

Pinking Shears Scarf Using mYak Baby Yak Lace

Smith Iced Teas

Smith Iced Teas

Mist Iced Tea Jug

Mist Iced Tea Jug

Slouchy Basic Beanie Using Rowan Softyak DK

Slouchy Basic Beanie Using Rowan Softyak DK

His Vest Using Rowan Softyak DK

His Vest Using Rowan Softyak DK

Essential Notions Kit

Essential Notions Kit

Oxford Socks Using Regia Merino Yak

Oxford Socks Using Regia Merino Yak

Oxford Socks Using Lang Jawoll Superwash

Oxford Socks Using Lang Jawoll Superwash

The Knitter’s Book of Socks by Clara Parkes

The Knitter’s Book of Socks by Clara Parkes

Mohair Bias Loop Using Lang Alpaca Superlight

Mohair Bias Loop Using Lang Alpaca Superlight

Linen-Linen Project Bag Using Rowan Creative Linen

Linen-Linen Project Bag Using Rowan Creative Linen

Color Play Scarf and Wrap Using Lang Alpaca Superlight

Color Play Scarf and Wrap Using Lang Alpaca Superlight

Oval Crochet Pouch: Striped Version Using Rowan Handknit Cotton

Oval Crochet Pouch: Striped Version Using Rowan Handknit Cotton

Churchmouse Project Pouches

Churchmouse Project Pouches

Cocoknits Kraft Caddy

Cocoknits Kraft Caddy

Arabella Mobius Cowl Using Rowan Alpaca Classic

Arabella Mobius Cowl Using Rowan Alpaca Classic

Boxy Lace Tee Using Rowan Creative Linen

Boxy Lace Tee Using Rowan Creative Linen

Picot Edge Baby Blanket Using Berroco Ultra Wool Handpaint

Picot Edge Baby Blanket Using Berroco Ultra Wool Handpaint

Bainbridge Brunch

Crocheted Beaded Necklace & Wrap Bracelet Using Habu Root Sizing Silk

Crocheted Beaded Necklace & Wrap Bracelet Using Habu Root Sizing Silk

Color Craze Cowl Using Camp Color CC Fingering

Color Craze Cowl Using Camp Color CC Fingering

Enameled Tags

Enameled Tags

Annabella’s Cowl Using Hand Maiden Maiden Hair

Annabella’s Cowl Using Hand Maiden Maiden Hair

Armography & Hairography Using Camp Color CC Fingering: Rainbow Is My Favorite Color Collection

Armography & Hairography Using Camp Color CC Fingering: Rainbow Is My Favorite Color Collection

Bonneville Using Shibui Vine

Bonneville Using Shibui Vine

LoFi Cowl Using Camp Color CC Fingering: High Fidelity Collection

LoFi Cowl Using Camp Color CC Fingering: High Fidelity Collection

Layer Cake Wrap Using Camp Color CC Fingering: Sweet Tooth Collection

Layer Cake Wrap Using Camp Color CC Fingering: Sweet Tooth Collection

Churchmouse Yarns & Teas Tote

Churchmouse Yarns & Teas Tote

Enameled Tags – Letters

Enameled Tags – Letters

Enameled Tags – Numbers

Enameled Tags – Numbers

Oval Canister Tags

Oval Canister Tags

Curve Tea Mug with Infuser

Curve Tea Mug with Infuser

Striped Chevron Scarf Using Berroco Modern Cotton DK

Striped Chevron Scarf Using Berroco Modern Cotton DK

Simple ‘Tee’ Using Shibui Vine

Simple ‘Tee’ Using Shibui Vine

Starlight Using Camp Color CC Fingering: Rainbow Is My Favorite Color Collection

Starlight Using Camp Color CC Fingering: Rainbow Is My Favorite Color Collection

Lemon Curd

Lemon Curd

Currently Unavailable

Shortbread House of Edinburgh

Shortbread House of Edinburgh

Crocheted Moebius Cowl Using Hand Maiden Maiden Hair

Crocheted Moebius Cowl Using Hand Maiden Maiden Hair

Spotlight on Synchrony Yarn – Brown Sheep Company, Inc.

Every great yarn has a story — our unique yarn called Synchrony is no exception. It’s time to spin a yarn about spinning yarn.

Many wonderful things have been invented by mistake — or, a mistake that turns into something unexpectedly better than planned. I believe chocolate chip cookies fall into this category.

About a decade ago, a worker in our mill mistakenly added some cones of wool fiber in place of cotton– the two fibers can look similar when they are in ready-to-spin form. The result was an interestingly beautiful yarn with a tweedy appearance. This “surprise” yarn was so appealing that Brown Sheep Company decided to introduce it as a new line of yarn: Serendipity Tweed (the original name of the yarn — read on for more of the story). This blend consisted of 60% cotton and 40% wool.

Serendipity:

  1. the occurrence and development of events by chance in a happy or beneficial way.

Wool and cotton accept dye differently, so the strands of each fiber come out differently from the dye vat. For some colors, the difference is striking while for others it’s more subtle.

Several years down the road, our hand painter decided to experiment with hand-dyeing this yarn base in a rainbow of multicolored combinations. The result was beautiful, and so Brown Sheep introduced the line of yarn called Synchrony.

Synchrony:

  1. the way in which two or more things happen, develop, or move at the same time or speed.

The name is a play on the combination of fibers: cotton and wool. The two work delightfully together, despite not having been combined traditionally.  Cotton is cool and wearable, while wool is springy and soft.

Synchrony was so well-received by our local yarn shops that we decided to combine the two yarns into one line. Synchrony now consists of both the solid colors (formerly Serendipity Tweed) and the hand painted colorways.

 

We think you’ll love Synchrony for just about any spring or summer project: it’s great for making garments, accessories, baby blankets, and more. The colors are bold and vibrant, and Synchrony is well-suited for knitting, crocheting, or weaving.  In DK weight, this yarn can sub in to a wide variety of patterns.  You can truly enjoy the best of two amazing natural fibers, cotton and wool, working their magic in harmony!

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Penna – Universal Yarn Creative Network

Today, I wanted to give you a sneak peek at an upcoming design and gush about one of our lovely new yarns: Penna.

Penna in 110 Dovetail.

You might have noticed Penna pop up in your local yarn store recently. This lace-weight yarn is light as a feather, ridiculously soft, and has a beautiful halo. It is a blend of 50% baby Suri alpaca for a hazy effect, 28% extra fine merino for softness, and 22% nylon for strength. This yarn is a great alternative to laceweight mohair yarns, to which some people are more sensitive. The palette contains sixteen gorgeous colors.

Plume Cowl, shown in 111 Whisper, 112 Rose Kiss, & 113 Raspberry Tart.

One reason we brought this yarn in is because of its versatility. You can hold it as a single strand or as a carry-along with another yarn. If you’re holding it single, we recommend using a large needle for a loose, airy gauge. That’s what really makes this yarn shine. Take the Plume Cowl, for example. Knit at a gauge of 16 stitches over four inches with a suggested needle size of US 8 (5 mm), this accessory is like a cloud for your neck and shoulders. It’s as simple as can be – just seed stitch in the round, with a few color changes to create a nice gradient.

Penna in 113 Raspberry Tart placed on top of the Plume Cowl.

Personally, one thing I love about this yarn is that it pairs well with other yarns. I think it would look beautiful to add a halo to stash staples like Deluxe Worsted, but I wanted to see what Penna was like when held together with a self-shading or self-patterning yarn. We have quite a few of those, but the one that struck me as the most suitable match for Penna is Whisper Lace. Both yarns are so fine, the fabric they create together will still be lightweight. A blend of wool and silk, Whisper Lace is great for warmer weather and the transitional seasons – add the warmth and haze of baby Suri alpaca to that, and you can create perfect projects for autumn and winter.

That brings me to the original point of this post. I’m working on a design that pairs Whisper Lace and Penna. I’ve chosen Whisper Lace in 213 Cool Ripples – a blue and grey multi, with Penna in 110 Dovetail – a soft, warm grey. I love the way Penna and Whisper Lace are playing together. Solid-colored Penna softens the transitions from one color to the next in the Whisper Lace.

The beginnings of a crescent-shaped shawl knit in Whisper Lace and Penna.

You can see the humble beginning in the photo above. I decided a shawl would be the perfect project. Lately, I’ve been really into crescent-shaped shawls, so that is the shape I’ve chosen for this design. Four stitches are increased on each edge every right-side row, and two stitches are increased on each edge every wrong-side row. This is what creates the dramatic curve. I’m letting the yarn speak for itself here: nothing more than simple Stockinette stitch for most of the shawl. I plan to finish this project with an applied lace border. I’m undecided on whether I should use a solid, contrasting color for the border, or if I should stitch to stick to the pairing used throughout the rest of the shawl. Only time will tell, but I’d love to hear your thoughts! Let me know in the comments below.

Happy crafting!

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Ravelry Spotlight- Estelle Worsted Projects – Estelle Yarns Blog

As most knitters and crocheters often find themselves doing, we were browsing through Ravelry over a cup of tea recently, and decided to search our own yarn, Estelle Worsted to see what you talented people have been busy making with it.

Upon doing so, we discovered that there is a truly fantastic collection of projects that have been knit using our popular worsted weight acrylic, wool, nylon yarn! And after contacting each of the knitters and crocheters for their permission (and to simply gush!), we thought that we would share a few with you.

First up, we have the Ravelry user hotcheese, who knit a Mavis Cowl, designed by Melissa Thomson. Using less than two skeins of Estelle Worsted in shade Q61218 Limoncello, this cowl looks cozy, sophisticated, and like a real treat to knit! A fun way to add a pop of colour to an otherwise plain coat/outfit, we seriously love how this cowl of Sarah’s turned out! The added bit of shaping to the top keeps it snug against your neck, so as to avoid any snow or brisk winds from making their way down you front! We definitely have one of these in our queue… and can’t wait to cast on pronto!

Next up, we have crocheter extraordinaire Suzanne. Suzanne found a cardigan that she loved on Pinterest, and through some crafty Google searching, managed to figure out the pattern- Bankok Jacket by Shannon Mullet-Bowlsby. The end result could not be more beautiful! Made using seven skeins of Estelle Worsted in shade Q61205 Black, which she purchased at River City Yarns in Edmonton, this sweater truly is a work of art. Details can be found on Suzanne’s Ravelry page, including photos of her simply stunning finishing and workmanship. Such an inspiration!

Since accessories are always a great way to try out either a new yarn, or a new technique, we love the idea of using Estelle Worsted to knit up a Banff Hat by Tin Can Knits, just like Margaret (aka ladyquiltsalot on Ravelry).  Using stranded knitting to produce a lovely tree motif around the perimeter of this hat, you can have a lot of fun with colour combinations. And while we can’t say for sure, we suspect that there may even be enough yarn leftover to reverse the colours for a second hat! Job well done Margaret! It’s gorgeous.

Have you had a chance to knit with our Estelle Worsted yet? If so, leave a link to your Ravelry project page in the comments! We would love to see your work.

And if you haven’t yet had a chance to knit with the Estelle Worsted, be sure to pop into your local yarn shop to see if they have any in stock! The colour range is vast, so there is sure to be a shade for each and every one of you.

Happy knitting and crocheting everyone!

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Client Spotlight: Craft Yarn Co.

When Barrie Turney was 15, her grandmother taught her how to knit. “I just took to it,” she says. “I had a hard time sitting still so knitting gave me a fun way to occupy my hands.” She kept it up as a hobby, even when she was working as a Harley-Davidson mechanic. “I knitted on my lunch breaks,” she says.

Last year, though, Turney decided to take her artisanal craft to another level. “There wasn’t a good yarn shop in the Rome area,” she says. “I saw a need for it, and I already had the passion for it.”

With assistance from ACE, Turney established Craft Yarn Company, turning her love for fiber arts into a successful business that is both colorful and cozy. She used the $19,000 loan for inventory and construction costs. “I did everything I could to reduce the start-up costs and make it work,” says Barrie, who added her father as a guarantor.

In a building that once served as a recording studio, she did some spiffy remodeling. “I could not have opened this business without the love and support that came from ACE,” she says. “Believe me, I called just about every day with a jillion questions, and everyone was so patient and helpful.”

Avoiding acrylics, Craft Yarn Company specializes in natural yarns – wool, bamboo, cotton, and cashmere. The shop works with independent, boutique yarn dealers who employ some dyes that are exclusive for Turney. “We have colors that you simply can’t get anywhere else,” she says, “and we sell supplies to get you started.” The shop has one employee, who teaches classes in knitting and crocheting.

Barrie has become a fixture in this part of town, which is gentrifying into an arts district with several restaurants and plenty of foot traffic. She conducts several workshops and social events, such as the “Sip & Stitch” networking series, and she serves as a donation site for Knitted Knockers, a group that provides comfortable prosthetics for women who have undergone mastectomies. She also sells yarn, knitting and crochet accessories through her website.

“So far, so good,” she says. “I stay very busy, and I’m living my dream.”

 

 

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Ito Yarns

ITO means yarn or thread in Japanese. ITO – Fine Yarns from Japan, are special yarns made in Japan, a country with a long tradition in the textile industry. These yarns are unique and special due to specific manufacturing processes, composition of materials and colors.

Official website ito-yarns.com

Japanese artistic tradition is based on unique products and creative experimentation when it comes to the choice of methods and materials.This approach is reflected in the ITO yarn collection, a fine yarn from Japan.
The main line of yarn is presented precisely in fine threads made from various materials with different characteristics and structures. Fancy yarns with special effects round off the range.

ITO’s concept is to experiment with yarn, color and composition: combining several threads into one or using different threads in knitting a single garment for special effects. This approach is often used in Japanese knitwear design.

Combining different ITO yarns allows you to control several features:
Thread Thickness – You can knit in one thread on small knitting needles for small garments or in multiple threads to create warmer, heavier garments.
Feeling – The ITO yarn collection contains yarns of very different compositions. The combination of the various
materials often creates an amazing touch feeling! You can change the characteristics of the yarn yourself by choosing a combination: colder – warmer, more plastic – harder, coarser – softer.
Color – Just like in painting, ITO yarn colors can be mixed, matched, and endless shades and color gradients.
Look – By choosing your own yarn combination, you create a unique fabric. Every knitted garment created in this way is one of a kind.

We invite you to experiment and create with ITO-fine yarns from Japan!

Yarn Acrylic HS codes (2020): 5515, 6116108000, 6110

Fabrics made of synthetic (polyester, acrylic, modacrylic) fibers, including mixed with artificial threads, woolen yarn for sewing clothes 5515
Personal protective equipment for hands made of cotton yarn or polyamide or acrylic threads, coated with nitrile or latex, to protect against general industrial pollution and mechanical influences, from chemical effects 6116108000
Women’s knitted outerwear from cotton yarn, woolen yarn, from artificial (viscose, acrylic and rayon) threads, from synthetic (polyester and polyamide) yarns and their combinations, including with VLO 6110
Machine-made products from pure-woolen, woolen, half-woolen yarn, from synthetic (polypropylene, polyester, acrylic) fibers, from artificial (viscose) fibers, from artificial leather and m 5701
Fabrics of synthetic (polyester, acrylic, modacrylic) fibers, including mixed with artificial fibers, threads, woolen yarn for sewing clothes, 5515
Fabrics of synthetic (polyester, acrylic, modacrylic) fibers, including mixed with artificial threads, woolen yarn for sewing clothes, 5515
Fabrics of synthetic (polyester, acrylic, modacrylic) fibers, including mixed with artificial (viscose) threads and woolen yarn for sewing clothes, 5515
CARPETS AND CARPETS, machine-made from pure-woolen, woolen, semi-woolen yarns, synthetic polypropylene, acrylic fibers, artificial leather and fur: carpets, carpet runners. 5701
Knitted second layer hosiery for adults made of woolen yarn with the addition of acrylic threads: leg warmers 6115940000
Textile clothing material: fabrics, material, made of cotton yarn, silk threads, chemical threads (acrylic, modacrylic, polypropylene, polyamide, polyester), woolen threads, mixed threads 580300
Women’s first layer hosiery from cotton fiber (yarn) mixed with synthetic (polyamide, polyurethane (elastane)) fibers, from synthetic yarn (acrylic, polyamide, polyurethane (e 6115220000
Personal protective equipment for hands of cotton yarn or polyamide or acrylic threads, including those coated with polyvinyl chloride, nitrile, polyurethane or latex, to protect against general industrial contamination 6116108000
Knitted upper second layer for children over one year old and adolescents, from half-woolen yarn, from wool yarn mixed with acrylic fibers 6110111000
Products of the second layer knitted for boys and girls in nursery, preschool, school groups and adolescents from cotton yarn, including with the addition of synthetic (polyester up to 20%, acrylic up to 30%) threads (in 6110201000
Toys for children’s creativity made of paper, cardboard, textile materials, yarn, plastic, metal, wax, wood, soap base, complete with acrylic paints, rhinestones, brushes, glue, feathers, with mechanisms 9503007000
First layer hosiery for adults from cotton yarn with the addition of elastomeric yarns, from woolen yarns and yarns with the addition of synthetic (acrylic, polyamide, elastomeric) n 61159

Linen products: towels made of cotton yarn mixed with synthetic (polyester, polyamide, polyurethane, acrylic, modacrylic, polypropylene, nylon) fibers (threads), from cotton 6302
Women’s knitted items of the second layer of synthetic (acrylic) yarn, including mixed with cotton threads: jumpers, articles 461916 – 1566 pieces, 461917 – 1566 pieces, 461922 – 1840 pieces, 461924 -1656 pieces 6110309900
Hats for adults for men and women, knitted of acrylic yarn, with and without lining: hats, caps (berets), caps 650500
Hats of the 2nd layer for children over 1 year old from synthetic (acrylic) yarn with the marking “Hello Kitty”, “Tatty Teddy”: hats. 6505009000
From hand. Protective knitted gloves made of acrylic yarn to protect against general industrial pollution 6116930000
Hats of the 2nd layer for children over 1 year old and adolescents of synthetic (acrylic) yarn, marked “Hello Kitty, Me to you, ACER”, including in sets: hats, 6505009000

Yak and camel down yarn, 100% cashmere with worldwide shipping

Welcome to the SARLAG online yarn shop!

We make accessible to few available to everyone!

All raw materials used for yarn production are collected in Mongolia.

Mongolia for some people is a mysterious, unknown country. Local residents are the descendants of legendary nomadic conquerors. Therefore, for many, until now, life is strongly associated with animals. You may not know some details about this country. But the fact that many people wear things made of Mongolian wool on a daily basis does not require proof.

Almost in any home you can find products made of Mongolian wool:

  • clothing and accessories;
  • blankets, pillows and throws;
  • underwear.

Yarn from Mongolia is:

  • camel down, which is two times lighter than a sheep’s wool analogue;
  • very warm yak wool;
  • delicate, weightless cashmere.

What is Mongolian down valued for?

Weaving and knitting industry exists in all regions of the planet where people live. They use the natural undercoat of various animals. And, it is quite logical that there are certain quality standards. According to them:

  • Real cashmere is produced only in Mongolia, China, Afghanistan, Kazakhstan, Tajikistan;
  • Camel yarn is a premium material.And the best is the Mongolian wool obtained from the two-humped camels that live in this region.

A similar situation is with yak down, which are common in the mountainous regions of this country.

Clothes obtained from such yarn have the following characteristics:

  • It is pleasant to the touch and with constant contact with the skin;
  • it is cozy in winter and comfortable in summer;
  • does not cause allergic reactions;
  • helps to improve human well-being;
  • looks beautiful, can be worn for a long time.

Variety of Mongolian products from down and yarn in the online store SARLAG

SARLAG offers to buy not only camel, yak or cashmere yarn, but ready-made products:

  • Warming belts and knee pads;
  • blankets and blankets;
  • mittens and gloves.

The peculiarity of each variant is that only a certain fluff is used, without any additives. This makes it possible to preserve all the necessary qualities, characteristics of the yarn inherent in a particular animal.

You are guaranteed to be warm. You will learn what real comfort means even in the most severe frosts. Or there is always an option to choose yarn according to its type and color in order to independently knit clothes, the right thing, an accessory. Those who knit on machines choose bobbin yarn. But those who knit on needles have recently begun to pay more attention to yarn in bobbins. That is why we offer yarn in both bobbins and skeins. Our clients always have a choice. And they love it!

Other advantages for the customers of our online store are as follows:

  • Delivery throughout Russia, Europe, North America and other countries of the world.We work with Russian Post, EMS, CDEK, Boxberry. Choose the option that is convenient for you;
  • You can choose from – three methods of payment for the order: transfer to an account, by credit card, using the international PayPal system;
  • We do not work with intermediaries. Therefore, our prices are pleasant for a client of any level.

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