Milton keynes town centre: The Centre: MK (Milton Keynes) – 2021 All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (with Photos)

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50 reasons to love Milton Keynes (what, only 50?) | Cities

On Monday, Milton Keynes marks the 50th anniversary of its designation as a new town. To celebrate, we’ve selected 50 reasons to love Buckinghamshire’s leading collection of roundabouts. I know what you’re thinking: what, only 50?

1. The grid

The visionary city is based on a grid network. All main roads are designated H or V depending on whether they run horizontally or vertically. In the future, it is hoped, there will also be D and T boulevards, where D stands for diagonal roadways, and T for time machines.

2. WD-40

The world’s favourite retail mechanical lubricant is made in Milton Keynes. Only six people know the recipe, so imagine how much more squeaking there would be in the world if they died in a freak accident or were bumped off by business rivals.

3. Concrete cows

Among the city’s 220 works of public art is this 1978 sculpture by Canadian artist Liz Leyh consisting of three cows and three calves, roughly half life-size and so, you’d think, confusing to wandering livestock. Shortly after former culture minister Kim Howells raged against modern art’s “cold, mechanical, conceptual bullshit” in 2002, concrete cow pats appeared beneath the sculpture.

4. Parking

There are more than 20,000 parking spaces in central Milton Keynes, happily not all of them currently filled by cars.

5. Convenience

Some 7.5 million people live within a one-hour drive of Milton Keynes; it’s unfair to suggest that many of them would rather live two hours away.

Everyone’s favourite retail mechanical lubricant. Photograph: Alamy

6. Proximity to other places

Milton Keynes was originally envisaged as a London overspill zone, following the recommendations of governmental studies in 1964 and 1965 to build “a new city” incorporating existing towns such as Bletchley, Stony Stratford and Wolverton.

It has become so much more, while not quite overcoming native sniffiness. As writer Neil Gaiman once noted: “Milton Keynes is a new city approximately halfway between London and Birmingham. It was built to be modern, efficient, healthy and, all in all, a pleasant place to live. Many Britons find this amusing.”

7. Planning

The ideas of Californian urban theorist Melvin Webber, who believed that the traditional concentric city would be superseded by “community without propinquity”, proved influential among Milton Keynes planners. It was envisaged as a low-density, low-rise city of light industry and convenience. Hence the city’s distinctive 1km-sized “grid squares”, or suburbs, where “workers, managers, vicars and doctors” would mingle in shops, schools and AFUs (advanced factory units).

8. Parks

Architect Richard Llewelyn-Davies’s masterplan left 40% green space in the city, and two valleys as linear parks with lakes to hold floodwater. Today two-fifths of Milton Keynes is open space. If London had been built according to such principles, it would be the size of East Anglia.

9. Roundabouts

Milton Keynes has about 130 roundabouts. It is hard to be more precise about their number since it is growing all the time. Like concrete cow pats, but bigger, they appear mysteriously overnight.

10. Greenery

Sometimes you don’t think you’re in a city. Houses and industrial estates are often hidden behind grassy banks and thickets of willow, pine and dogwood. If Italo Calvino had visited he’d have had to have added a Milton Keynes chapter to his Invisible Cities.

11. It gets bullied

The city has its detractors. In the 1970s, fogeyish Private Eye founder Christopher Booker called it “the utterly depersonalised nightmare which haunted Aldous Huxley just 40 short years”, while more recently architectural critic Owen Hatherley damned the city for its “bland, kitsch, Thatcherite reality”, adding: “Today, Milton Keynes is still the non-place it was planned to be.”

12. A warm welcome

Milton Keynes was premised on the cultivation of community spirit and charitable sentiment. Dr Phyllis Starkey, MP for Milton Keynes South West from 1997-2010, wrote: “In the early days families arriving received a welcome pack with information on local facilities, and one house was designated a temporary community centre to create a focus for the new neighbourhood. Just a few more reasons why Milton Keynes is a model worth following.”

A plethora of spaces to park your car. Photograph: Shockpix Premier/Alamy

13. It’s a mystic portal to a higher realm

Midsummer Boulevard is so called because the sun rises at its east end on the summer solstice. This was no accident; in the trippy early 70s, architects consulted Greenwich observatory to obtain the exact angle required at their latitude in Buckinghamshire and then persuaded engineers to shift Milton Keynes’ grid of roads a few degrees. One solstice, the architects lit an all-night bonfire – and some marijuana – and played Pink Floyd on the green fields they would soon pave.

14. More shoreline than the entire island of Jersey

The 119 square miles city has 15 lakes and 11 miles of canals. (Birmingham, of course, boasts more miles of canals than Venice and more trees than Paris, so take it with a grain of salt.)

15. Progressivism

Milton Keynes is philosophically premised on something unusual in nostalgia-hobbled, class-stratified, can’t-do Britain. Pete Marland, leader of Milton Keynes council says: “People came to MK to be part of something new where everyone could shape their place called home. This created a community keen to progress and move forward.”

16. Driverless cars

Trials with Britain’s first driverless car through pedestrianised parts of Milton Keynes were a success last year. The two-seater LUTZ Pathfinder reached speeds of 15mph, which is faster than the average vehicle speed in London, where gridlocked motorists have recently created their own driverless cars by chucking the keys through the window and wandering off. By 2018 there is expected to be a fleet of 40 pods of driverless cars changing how people travel around Milton Keynes.

17. Electric cars

It is also a Go Ultra Low city with initiatives including a network of electric car charge points, and electric bus fleets. Last year Milton Keynes received £9m to encourage the use of plug-in cars to reduce emissions.

18. Ratio of shrubs to humans

Milton Keynes has more than 22 million trees and shrubs, around 100 for every resident.

Midsummer Boulevard, home to some of the city’s 22 million trees. Photograph: David Sillitoe/The Guardian

19. Really nice paths

It also has more than 180 miles of bridleways, footpaths and cycle tracks.

20. State funding

Milton Keynes started off as a state-funded city and today could serve as a model for how urban planning can confound austerity today. In the economically bleak 1970s, the government loaned Milton Keynes Development Corporation money, and “as soon as this land was developed, it became far more valuable: this uplift paid for MK’s infrastructure,” as Patrick Barkham pointed out in the Guardian.

21. It had Britain’s first multiplex

It also claims the UK’s first peace pagoda, its first purpose-built ecumenical church and its first kerbside household recycling.

22. Eco-houses

In 2008, eco-houses in Oxley Woods won architecture’s prestigious Manser award. These pre-fabricated properties, built in 2007 for just £60,000 each, could be knocked up in 24 hours and were hailed at the time by deputy prime minister John Prescott as a means of overcoming Britain’s housing shortage. Later reports highlighted leaking windows and mould, but let’s not spoil the story.

23. You can ski

At Snozone in the Xscape leisure complex are two 220ft-high real snow slopes, topped up each day with fresh snow. Excellent – even if Snozone should have a “w” and Xscape is an intolerable neologism.

24. Torvill and Dean

Skating duo Jayne Torvill and Christopher Dean. Photograph: Eamonn McCabe / The Observer/Hulton Getty

If you aren’t humming Ravel’s Bolero yet, you will after learning that the city’s Planet Ice rink was used for practice by the 1984 Olympic gold medal-winning ice dance duo.

25. The 40ft long, 15ft tall Tyrannosaurus rex at Gulliver’s Dinosaur Park

26. Its name

Unfortunately, it’s not true that Milton Keynes was named after two great, if ideologically opposed, economists. Nor is it true that the other name considered in 1967 for the city was John Maynard Friedman. However, the village of Milton Keynes – from which the 50-year-old city gets its name – was once Middletone, and owned by a Norman family named de Cahaines, from whom Keynes may have descended.

27. The first public infinity edge pool

Sadly, this was demolished in 2010 just before English Heritage could list it.

28. MK Dons

The football club’s home is a 30,000-capacity all seater stadium in the city. Originally called Wimbledon FC, it controversially relocated from south London in 2003. Confusingly, today it shares its nickname with a new club – AFC Wimbledon, also known as the “Dons”. Fans of the former refer to themselves as “Wombles”, a moniker formerly applied to devotees of Wimbledon FC. These facts poignantly highlight the complex nature of cultural deracination and sporting commodification so prevalent in the modern game.

29. Britain’s smallest canal lock

Fenny Stratford Lock has a drop of about 1ft, which makes its existence appealingly daft.

30. Black Horse

Elisabeth Frink’s delightful 1978 sculpture Black Horse was commissioned by Milton Keynes Development Corporation, sponsored by Lloyds Bank and positioned outside one of its branches, long before we, the British taxpayer, had to bail out the boneheads who ran the bank into the ground.

Britain’s fastest growing city … of people and roundabouts. Photograph: Alamy

31. It is bidding to become European Capital of Culture in 2023

Perhaps the bidders recalled Arnold Wesker’s play, in which someone defends the town thus: “But after all Milton Keynes is the home of the Open University and it’s not all that dead here and there’s this gallery … ”

32. The Open University

Since 1971, more than 1,600,000 people have studied with the Open University, whose 48-hectare campus headquarters is in Milton Keynes. It is the fruit of Labour’s general-election manifesto commitment to establish what was variously called a University without Walls or a University of the Air; ie, a public distance-learning and research university that would give opportunities to many who would otherwise not be able to enjoy tertiary education, which is precisely what it has done, not to mention earning itself a stellar academic reputation.

33. Its F1 team

The Milton Keynes-based Red Bull Racing team won four back-to-back constructors’ and drivers’ championships from 2010-2013.

34. The Cowper & Newton Museum

This delightful museum in Olney was once the home of poet William Cowper, who wrote the immortal lines: “Variety’s the very spice of life / That gives it all its flavour.” If Cowper were was writing today he would probably substitute “Milton Keynes” for “variety”.

35. A 12ft wind tunnel for indoor skydivers

Cowper also wrote: “God moves in a mysterious way / His wonders to perform. He plants his footsteps in the sea, and rides upon the storm.” You can simulate that divine experience by climbing inside the iFly Indoor Skydiving tunnel.

36. Amazing Grace

All together now: “Amazing Grace, how sweet the sound / That saved a wretch like me. / I once was lost but now I’m found. Was blind but now I see.” These words were written by former slave trader turned abolitionist campaigner, the Rev John Newton (1725-1807), who lived in Olney.

The robot SKRYF writes some of Jackie Kay’s poetry at the Centre:MK shopping mall in Milton Keynes. Photograph: Frantzesco Kangaris/The Guardian

37. It is Britain’s fastest growing city

In 2013, Milton Keynes had around 255,700 residents – expected to rise to almost 300,000 people by 2026 and 325,000 by 2037. Thirteen people move there each day. How many leave each day, you ask? Apologies, I don’t have figures to hand.

38. Really

Like Cambridge, Oxford, Swindon and Norwich, Milton Keynes is a member of the Fast Growth Cities group. “Their ability to attract these knowledge-based businesses puts them in a strong position to continue to grow in the future,” wrote Centre for Cities researcher Marie Williams.

39. The internet of things

Milton Keynes is at the leading edge of digital research. In a joint project with Cambridge-based startup Neul, BT built 15 base stations across the city in 2014 connected to the internet with the aim of picking up signals from sensors in thousands of objects: bins that can send out alerts when they’re overflowing, soap dispensers that get clamorous when they’re empty, parking spaces that can let you know they’re free.

40. It wants to be Britain’s Silicon Valley

In November the National Infrastructure Commission’s interim report into the Cambridge – Milton Keynes – Oxford corridor stated Milton Keynes could become a global showcase for science, technology and innovation. If you look at a relief map, though, you won’t see a valley – silicon or otherwise – so much as a slight depression. To be fair, Britain’s Silicon Depression doesn’t really have a ring to it.

41. It has more show homes than any other city in Britain

This is the eighth entry on the tourism board’s list entitled 101 Facts About Milton Keynes. (“Think you know Milton Keynes? Well…”)

42. The National Bowl

This former clay pit was landscaped to form an amphitheatre in 1979 that, in its pomp, would attract as many as 65,000 alfresco punters per night to recline on grass overlaying a subsoil excavated by the many new developments. Bowie, Michael Jackson and Queen were among the stars who played there, and I recall watching Motorhead’s Lemmy gamely bawling Ace of Spades through Buckinghamshire mizzle. Sadly, its glory days seem to be over: this year’s Electric Daisy Festival of trance and electronica has been cancelled.

The Milton Keynes special edition of Monopoly. Instead of Old Kent Road it has Concrete Cows

43. Without Milton Keynes there would have been no OK Computer

In 1970, lovely jazzbo couple Cleo Laine and Johnny Dankworth set up The Stables, a thriving music venue, in the grounds of their home in the village of Wavendon near Milton Keynes. Amy Winehouse, Dave Brubeck, Dan Simpson, Joan Armatrading, Courtney Pine and Janis Ian are among the artists who’ve performed there. The couple also established the National Youth Music Camps at the Stables, one of whose alumni is Radiohead’s Thom Yorke. It’s an exaggeration to say without Milton Keynes there would have been no OK Computer, but let’s say it anyway.

44. It defeated the Nazis

Just as some find it hard to suspend their disbelief long enough to accept that Kate Winslet and Benedict Cumberbatch were our last line of geek defence against Nazi coding whizzes, so others find it impossible to believe that Milton Keynes was at the epicentre of Britain’s intelligence community. But it is nonetheless true. The world’s first semi-programmable electronic computer, Colossus, was installed at Bletchley Park. The Enigma code was cracked there too during the second world war, an intellectual feat considered to have shortened the war by two years.

45. The Milton Keynes City Orchestra

This orchestra has performed all over the world, and in August will once more delight us at the Proms in Campbell Park, to which the most sensible will arrive by National Cycle Routes six and 51.

46. Rachel Barnett

The city’s writer in residence is even now penning short stories about public art in central Milton Keynes to celebrate the 50th anniversary. Fingers crossed they will include The Riddle of the Concrete Cow Pats and the Lloyds Bank Black Horse Bailout Mystery.

47. It has its own Monopoly edition

The special set features its four stations (Milton Keynes, Fenny Stratford, Bletchley and Wolverton). Instead of Old Kent Road it has Concrete Cows and instead of Mayfair it has Bletchley Park.

48. It’s a model for new cities worldwide

The International New Town Conference, to be held in June in Milton Keynes, features seminars from city planners. Developments in India and China have been based on the MK formula. According to the blurb: “A city that started as the dream of politicians and planners in the late 1960s is now home to almost 270,000 residents and 11,000 businesses, and is a cultural artefact in its own right.”

49. Mall poetry

In 2014, a robot called Skryf etched lines from a poem called Equinox by Jackie Kay on the floor of the Centre MK shopping centre in a project for the Milton Keynes International Festival. It was a poem that Kay, who had been given up for adoption as a baby, was inspired to write after meeting her birth mother as an adult outside Boots in the shopping centre – and, later, losing her to dementia. The resulting artwork was beautiful and rather disturbing.

50. It’s a network of paradoxes

Car-fixated yet green, invisible yet present, philistine yet cultured, laughable yet earnest, English yet not. As Jackie Kay said, the city’s oxymoronic character is appealing: “The squares and the circles, the sacred and secular, the built landscape and park lands, the ecological and the creative. It’s a town built on a green ethos – they had a policy that if there was a well-established tree standing in the way, they would build the roads around it – and yet its public image is a bit of a joke. I like that.” Me too.

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This article was amended on 26 January 2017. An earlier version said Colossus was built at Bletchley Park. The original was designed and built at Dollis Hill, London, and ten months later, it was installed at Bletchley Park.

Central Milton Keynes (CMK) – Milton Keynes Council

Central Milton Keynes, known locally as CMK, is the city centre for Milton Keynes and a major regional shopping, leisure and employment centre.  CMK stretches from the railway station and West Coast Mainline to the Grand Union Canal (i.e. it includes Campbell Park), and, bounded to the north by Portway (H5) and the south by Childs Way (H6).  The total area of CMK is 342ha of which 99ha is Campbell Park. 

Development commenced on CMK in the mid 1970s with Lloyds Court the first completed building in 1976.  The then Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher opened the centre:MK in 1979. 

There used to be two local councils that represented the CMK area; CMK Town Council and Campbell Park Parish Council.  Following a parish boundary review in 2010 there is now one Town Council covering CMK, as defined in planning terms (i.e. including Campbell Park), divided in 3 ‘parish wards’.  

Central Milton Keynes has:

·         An annual footfall of over 50 million visitors

·         250 shops, over 90 restaurants, bars and cafes and 680 businesses

·         An area of 845acres / 342 hectares split into 20 grid blocks each approximately 1km intervals

·         Approximately 10,000 trees and over 65,000m2  of shrubs (equivalent to 10 football pitches)

·         59,000 street lights in CMK, this is as many as the whole of Cambridgeshire

·         Midsummer Boulevard runs east to west from the shopping centres to the station and is as wide as the M1 from building to building

·         3 tree lined dual carriageway boulevards running from the Central Station in the West to Campbell Park in the East

·         6 gates – the roads leading into and across the centre, North/South

17 roundabouts and 11 traffic light junctions

Last Updated: 9 August 2021


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Milton Keynes Shopping Building -Matthew | Area Development, Milton Keynes, Central Milton Keynes, Milton Keynes Development Corporation

Above shows Milton Keynes shopping centre being constructed.

 

Central Milton Keynes Shopping Centre is a regional shopping centre located in Milton Keynes Buckinghamshire, England which is about 50 miles north-west of London. It comprises two adjacent shopping lanes which are planted with sub-tropical and temperate trees and it is a grade II listed building. It opened on the 25th September 1979 by Margret Thatcher.

 

The cool, elegant, steel framed design was influenced by Ludwig Mies Van der Rohewith glazed shopping streets or arcades on the grand scale of the Galleriain Milan. The designer, Derek Walker, also likened it to the Crystal Palace. It was described in 1993 as “still the best-looking if no longer the biggest shopping centre in the British Isles”. Milton Keynes Shopping mall was designed with the public access to all the shops is flush and at ground level. Some of the shops e.g. John Lewis, Debenhams and “Next” have 2 or 3 floors inside.

 

A service road for deliveries runs above the shops, so that large trucks may service the shops at roof level, removing the peripheral service roads and loading bays at ground level that mark so many large shopping malls. This means all deliveries take place out of view of the shoppers.

 

The internal landscaping was very lavish with 47 plant beds with large plants and trees; temperate in the northerly arcade and semi-tropical in the southerly one.

 

The planters were finished in the same material as the floor, but approximately one third of these have been removed since the building was opened, with consequent loss of both planting and seating for shoppers, to accommodate market barrows and stalls extension in the centre.

 

In 1993, the building was extended at the western end, over much of what had been City Square to the even greater length of 720 meters. Another extension was added called Midsummer Place and is effectively a southwards extension of the centre but is owned and operated independently. (It was a planning requirement that it should not physically attach to the original building, so there is an approximately one meter gap between them). Midsummer Place was designed by GMW Architects of London and opened in 2000. This extension is built across (and thus closing) Midsummer Boulevard using a (covered and enclosed) plaza that contains some demountable kiosks: it is a further planning requirement that the Boulevard should technically be capable of being reopened (remain free of structures) at some future date. The new centre was constructed in part around an existing oak tree that briefly survived being built around (at a 0.6 meters (2 ft) higher level) until it succumbed to ‘technical drowning’ (undrained flooding) from about 2008.

The Shopping Building has a number of artworks. Of particular interest for its design and position is Liliane Lijn’s Circle of Light, designed in 1977 and commissioned by Milton Keynes District Council in 1978 as part of its ambitious and successful public art program. Suspended above Midsummer Arcade this takes the form of 23 armatures wound with copper wire – a reference to electric motors – hung to form a large copper disc 6m in diameter. Electric motors slowly rotate the individual rod-like armatures, and hanging like a great rising or setting sun it picks up on the arcade’s alignment

 

Other artworks of special interest include: the market clock in Midsummer Arcade; ‘Dream Flight’, ‘Flying Carpet’ and ‘High Flyer’ (bronze figures) by Philomena Davis (1989), now located in Silbury Arcade; ‘Vox Pop’ (a group of cartoon-like bronze people) by John Clinch (1979) in Queen’s Court, ‘Bollards and Sundial’ (an outsize sundial with the solstice points marked), by Tim Minett (1979) was in storage awaiting reinstatement in the building; and a section of a C4 mosaic pavement from the nearby C4 Romano-British Bancroft Villa, mounted on a wall internally.

 

My family moved to Milton Keynes in the 1970’s as my father was an engineer and played a role in creating the new city, and this included the building of the shopping centre.

 

centre:mk and intu Milton Keynes to remain open as city moves to tier 3

The centre:mk and intu shopping centres in Milton Keynes have confirmed the details of how they will stay open in tier 3.

Milton Keynes was moved into tier 3 status earlier this week after the UK government’s move to place the city into tier 3 following a local rise in coronavirus cases. The city will move into the harshest tier of the UK’s coronavirus restrictions from Saturday (19/12).

Under the nature of the UK government’s tier 3 restrictions, retailers are permitted to remain open but restaurants, cafes and bars can only offer takeaway services rather than any eat-in options.

The centre:mk confirmed all retailers will remain open, while their restaurants and cafes will move to takeaway only at each properitor’s discretion.

In a statement on their social media companies, they also confirmed that their Santa’s Grotto is to stay open.

The centre:mk said, “Following the latest government announcement from Saturday 19th December Milton Keynes will move into tier 3. Our Santa’s Grotto with Peter Rabbit & Friends will remain open following government guidance, with full measures in place.

“If you are unable to attend your booking, please contact [email protected] 48 hours before your booking time. All retailers will remain open to shop, however our restaurants and cafes will be closed for dine in. Many will be offering takeaway services, so make sure you are following our social media channels to keep up to date.”

Meanwhile, the adjacent intu Milton Keynes centre confirmed that retailers will stay open, while their restaurants and eateries will move to takeaway only and that all customers are to wear face coverings, wash hands and maintain social distancing.

They said, “In line with government guidance, intu Milton Keynes shopping centre will remain open as Milton Keynes is placed into Tier 3 from Saturday 19 December. Retailers will be open, but restaurants and eateries will only be permitted to provide takeaway services.

“We strongly ask all visitors to stay safe, wear a face covering at all time, wash their hands using the hand sanitisers provided and keep socially distanced. We are open late night and we would encourage people to plan their visit to avoid peak times where possible.”

Javid approves 3DReid’s Milton Keynes shopping centre expansion

The scheme designed by 3DReid, which was called in by former communities secretary Greg Clark in late 2015, will add 9,300m² of space to the centre, including a new dining quarter over two levels and a five-screen boutique cinema.

According to the AJ’s sister title Construction News, the project also involves the partial demolition of Oak Court, which will be remodelled as a public space. 

The scheme will sit next to Milton Keynes Shopping Centre (1979), designed by Derek Walker, Stuart Mosscrop and Chris Woodward, which was Grade II listed in 2010.

However, opponents of the Milton Kenyes project have said the site of the redevelopment is contrary to Milton Keynes’ Neighbourhood plan as it was building on land designated as public open space.

Milton Keynes Council said a lengthy public inquiry, in which it was forced to defend its original decision to approve the scheme in November 2015, had cost £150,000. 

‘There are no winners in this decision, as the challenge has inevitability caused some tensions,’ the council said in statement.

‘’Defending the decision was about our ability to balance all the policies of [the council] to ensure we have a vibrant and continually developing city centre that meets the changing requirements of visitors and businesses.’

The DCLG inspector examining the plans said: ‘The proposed development would result in harm to the neighbouring listed shopping building, but this would be less than substantial and, within that classification, at the lower end.

’The public benefits of the scheme would therefore outweigh this harm such that the setting of the listed building would be preserved.’

The Milton Keynes project is part of a £1.5 billion development pipeline for Intu in the UK over the next 10 years. 

 

Stuart Mosscrop and Chris Woodward’s Grade II listed Milton Keynes Shopping Centre (1979),

Stuart Mosscrop and Chris Woodward’s Grade II listed Milton Keynes Shopping Centre (1979),

3dreid flythrough

 

Midsummer Place, intu Milton Keynes Shopping

Midsummer Place, intu Milton Keynes Building, English Shopping Centre, Photo, Design, Store

intu MK Retail Development design by GMW Architects, UK: Southern England Architecture Information

19 Feb 2010

intu Milton Keynes Shopping Centre, Buckinghamshire

Location: Milton Keynes, England, UK
Date built: –
Design: GMW Architects

Midsummer Place Shopping Centre

photo Peter Cook © PeterCook/View

Midsummer Place is a major extension to Milton Keynes’ existing shopping centre, which forms the core of this New Town. Its design complements the heroic forms of the original with an equally modern, though perhaps freer and more varied series of spaces.

The link between this shopping centre and the existing retail malls, known as Midsummer Boulevard, gives the project a civic dimension. This space is the size of a football pitch and houses independent pavilions containing shops, restaurants and cafés. It is covered by an eighteen-metre-high wave-form roof with clear-glazed elevations.

Midsummer Place image / information from GMW Architects

GMW Architects

intu Milton Keynes Shopping Centre website: https://midsummerplace.co.uk/

Location: 67 Midsummer Place, Central Milton Keynes, MK9 3GB, England, UK

Architecture in England

Contemporary Architecture in England – architectural selection below:

English Architect

English Shopping Centres – Selection

Liverpool ONE Shopping Centre, England
Design: various architects

building image © Adrian Welch
Liverpool One Shops

Selfridges Store, England
Design: Future Systems Architects
Selfridges Birmingham

Trinity Quarter Shopping Centre, England
Design: EMBT+ Stanley Bragg Partnership
Trinity Quarter Leeds

GMW Partnership

Buckinghamshire Buildings

Buckinghamshire Building Designs

Stowe School Design Technology & Engineering Building
Architects: Design Engine

image from architecture practice
Stowe School Design Technology & Engineering Building
The Design Engine scheme for a new Design Technology & Engineering Building at Stowe School has been submitted for planning consent. Stowe School has been based since its founding in 1923 in the historically recognised Stowe House site, formerly the seat of the Dukes of Buckingham and Chandos.

Prestwood Infant School, Moat Lane, Great Missenden
Design: De Rosee Sa and PMR

photograph : Jack Hobhouse
Prestwood Infant School
Much-loved children’s author Roald Dahl was the inspiration for a new dining hall and after school facility in Buckinghamshire’s Prestwood Infant School. The author – who lived locally – had already apparently based the head teacher Miss Trunchbull in his popular book Matilda on a former real-life head teacher at the school.

Comments / photos for the Midsummer Place English Architecture – intu MK Retail Mall page welcome

Midsummer Place Shopping Centre image and building information

Website: Milton Keynes

Map Milton Keynes Town Centre Buckinghamshire England

Milton Keynes Buckinghamshire Map

Map Milton Keynes town centre Buckinghamshire, England, United Kingdom.

Town Centre Map for Milton Keynes Buckinghamshire UK

Milton Keynes Map: On this page we have provided you with a handy town centre map for the town of Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire, you can use it to find your way around Milton Keynes, and you will also find that it is easy to print out and take with you.

If you are visiting Milton Keynes, or perhaps even taking a holiday in Milton Keynes, you will no doubt be looking for local accommodation, facilities and attractions, and this map is perfect for this job. You will be able to find major roads and streets in Milton Keynes, and by using zoom (+) view smaller streets, avenues and lanes in the town, and also bus stops.

Using the map and its many features you can also see: Ramada Encore Hotel, Xscape, Conniburrow, Saxon Gate, Willen Lakeside Park, Milton Keynes Theatre and Gallery, Silbury Boulevard, Milton Keynes Council, Midsummer Place Shopping Centre, Bradwell Common, Fishermead, Holiday Inn Hotel Milton Keynes, South Loughton Valley Park, Midsummer Boulevard, Jurys Inn Hotel Milton Keynes, Child’s Way, Avebury Boulevard, Church of Christ the Cornerstone, Campbell Park, Linford Wood, Peartree Bridge, Milton Keynes Central Train Station (Railway Station), Downhead Park, Heelands, Leadenhall, Eaglestone and plenty more.

Left click and drag the Milton Keynes map to see areas outside the centre, or click the zoom out button (-) to get a wider view and see Milton Keynes’s surrounding areas and nearby places of interest.

More Maps:

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90,000 Milton Keynes, England: what to visit for a tourist

👁 12.9k (25 per week) ⏱️ 1 min.

Milton Keynes is a city in Buckinghamshire, in the southeastern part of Great Britain. Located 70 km northwest of London. The administrative center of the Milton Keynes unitary unit. The population of the city is 192 thousand people.

An interesting fact is that Milton Keynes is a completely new city, built entirely according to a pre-prepared plan.There is no historic city center typical of English towns, but there is a huge shopping center (English mall) 3 miles long, which is included in the Guinness Book of Records as the longest shopping center in Europe.

In the 1960s, it was decided to build new cities in the southeast of the country. This was necessary to solve the problem of overcrowding in the suburbs of London. Research was carried out and Buckinghamshire was identified as a possible location for a new large city.The new city was to become the largest of the new cities, its planned population – 250 thousand people. The name of the city was taken from the existing village of Milton Keynes.

The main feature of the Milton Keynes city layout is the network of intracity expressways with a step of 1 kilometer. There are traffic light roundabouts at the highway intersection. Throughout the city, there are paths for pedestrians, bicycles and sometimes horses. These paths intersect with roads through under or over road junctions.Thus, there is practically no direct intersection with road transport.

On the territory of the big city there are also very ancient villages, which were found by the Romans, existing since the 4th century AD. NS.

A popular attraction in Milton Keynes is the Xscape Center with its year-round indoor ski slope. More recently, Xscape also has an aero rig for skydiving.

The city is located equidistant from Oxford, Cambridge, London and Birmingham.Buckingham is just 20 minutes away (University of Buckingham is England’s only private university and Open University is the largest correspondence university in the world).

What to see in Milton Keynes

Regardless of whether you are in Milton Keynes for the whole vacation, for a week, or you are just passing through here, just 1 day, we will help you choose the most interesting places. There is something to see here – for example, sights, you will find information about each place with us: from opening hours to a detailed description with photos.Below is a list of the best places in Milton Keynes, based on ratings and user reviews of our site. You can also take part in the formation of the ranking of places by leaving your review and rating. This will help our future users choose what to see in Milton Keynes.

Top Attractions in Milton Keynes

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90,000 Attractions in Milton Keynes (UK) – City Attractions

Milton Keynes (eng. Milton Keynes

) is a city in the southeast of Great Britain in Buckinghamshire, 72 km north-west of London.

As a city in England, Milton Keynes is interesting in that it is a new formation, built entirely according to a pre-prepared plan. It lacks the historical urban core typical of English towns, but instead has a 3 mile long mall ( mall ), which is listed in the Guinness Book of Records as the longest mall in Europe.A feature of the urban planning is the grid of city-wide highways with a step of 1 kilometer; within the cell of this grid, the construction of the urban space has a more traditional form. There are roundabouts at the highway intersection to avoid waiting for a traffic signal.

At the same time, it includes villages that are still found by the Romans, that is, existing since the IV century AD. NS.

Throughout the city there are paths for pedestrians (i.e.n. redways), as well as paths for bicycles and sometimes horses. These paths intersect with roads through under or over road junctions. Thus, there is practically no direct intersection with road transport.

The center Xscape [1] with a year-round indoor ski slide is notable for entertainment. The building has an original structure and is a recognizable part of the city. (see photo). More recently, an aero rig for sky diving is also available at Xscape.

The city is located equidistant from Oxford, Cambridge, London and Birmingham. The city of Buckingham is only 20 minutes away (it is also worth mentioning that Buckingham University is the only private university in England, and Open University is the world’s largest correspondence university, that is, an educational institution with distance learning).

During the war years, Alan Turing worked at the British cryptographic center Bletchley Park. Later, the city of Bletchley became part of Milton Keynes.

Photos

Birth of a new city

In the 1960s, the UK government decided it needed new cities in the southeast of the country to tackle the problem of overcrowding in London’s suburbs. Research has identified northern Buckinghamshire as a possible location for a new large city spanning the existing Bletchley, Stony Stratford and Wolverton. The new city was to be the largest of the new cities, with a planned population of 250,000.people on an area of ​​88.4 sq. km. [2] The name of the city was taken from the existing village [3] . The selected location was deliberately chosen at the same distance from London, Birmingham, Leicester, Oxford and Cambridge with the aim that the city will become independent and become a full regional center itself. [4] . City planning was transferred from local government to the Milton Keynes Development Corporation (MKDC).

The corporation was determined to take into account the mistakes made in the construction of the previously laid cities.She laid the characteristic “grid” highways between the districts and intensive landscaping, lakes and parks. Central Milton Keynes was not conceived as a traditional city center, but rather as a business and shopping district that would complement the local hubs that are found in every square of the grid. The largest and one of the most recent British new cities, Milton Keynes has stood the test of time far better than other such cities and proved to be flexible and adaptable.

The radical grid plan was inspired by the work of Californian urban theorist Melvin Webber [en] (1921-2006).Webber’s idea was that in the telecommunications era, the old idea of ​​the city as a cluster was outdated and that in the future cities should be allowed to move freely within them. With the use of personal cars and the proliferation of e-commerce, his ideas, launched in the 1960s, have proven to be far-sighted.

Milton Keynes is located in accordance with the principles of logistics – equidistant from London, Cambridge and Oxford. It is only about 40 minutes by car to London, half an hour by high-speed train, and there are about 100 trains a day between London Euston Station and Milton Keynes.There are also several airports nearby – Luton, Heathrow, and Birmingham. It should be noted that the city is located in the center of a vast forested area with many lakes and canals.

The emergence and initial development of Milton Keynes was dictated by the direct need to relieve the overpopulated London – and it was a kind of “sleeping area” of the British capital. Then London companies began to move there, for which the new city was interesting for the relatively low cost of office space and a really very attractive location.After three decades of robust and successful economic growth, Milton Keynes is now a major city with a population of about 216,000 and continues to grow faster than any other city in Britain. Milton Keynes is comfortable and environmentally friendly. Here, the rhythm of a modern business city, with futuristic glass complexes in the center, is combined with great leisure opportunities and an almost country-style lifestyle. The city’s road system is based on the North American model of interchanges, so Milton Keynes can be traversed by car in just 15-20 minutes.and half of local residents are less than 3 miles from home to work. The city consists of several “squares”, each of them has its own cozy village, surrounded by a forested area. In general, the parks here are one of the main landscape elements, one might even say that the city itself is actually built into the park! All large shops are located in the city center, and local centers such as a clinic, a school, a cultural and sports center, a pub (what an English village without a pub!) Are located again according to the principle of logistics – close to the intersection of the main pedestrian arteries and city roads …A safe system of footpaths was one of the main ideas in the design of the city. Their total length is about 200 km, which, you see, is rarely seen in a city of the XXI century. A well-designed network of pedestrian and bike paths allows you to travel the entire city from one side of the city to the other, without ever crossing the traffic flow. A true paradise for hikers and cyclists! It is not surprising that the bicycle is a favorite means of transportation here, since even in winter the temperature outside rarely drops below zero.You can also meet horse-riding enthusiasts – they also have a place to roam. But the main thing is the economic success of the city. Due to its exceptionally convenient location and well-thought-out layout, Milton Keynes turned out to be attractive for investments; a number of head offices of many large companies and banks moved here, including such well-known ones as Daimler-Chrysler, Minolta, Xitec Software.

Milton Keynes was built in an area of ​​remarkable scenery. This area has a rich historical heritage.During the construction of the city of Milton Keynes, it was decided not to build buildings that are taller than trees. However, these restrictions have recently been lifted. Milton Keynes is a “city in the forest”, for a long time foresters planted trees all over the city. Among the attractions of Milton Keynes is the open-air National Bowl. Entertainment events are held here. This place was opened in 1979. There is a helicopter landing site near the National Bowl. In 1999, the Milton Keynes Theater was opened in the city.Due to its amazing architecture, this theater can claim the title of “Most Popular Theater in Britain”. Stables is located in Wavendon, on the southeastern edge of Milton Keynes. This is the place where lovers of jazz, blues, classical, popular and world music meet. Every year there are camps that accept young musicians. There is another place in the city that music lovers can visit – the Pitz Club. This club is located in the center of Woughton. Mostly the club is visited by fans of punk, alternative rock and heavy metal.Milton Keynes has two museums: the Bletchley Park Museum, a military cryptography museum, and the Milton Keynes Museum, which displays exhibits that introduce visitors to rural life. In 1990, the Polytechnic University was opened in the city. Cranfield University is located not far from Milton Keynes. There are also several secondary schools in the city.

On the other hand, the new plan also introduced minor disadvantages. With the prevalence of personal transport, public transport is experiencing problems with extremely low demand [5] .Also, innovations in telephone communications in city planning have unexpectedly led to problems with Internet access in many parts of the city today [6] , which, however, does not prevent the city from being one of the most Internet users in the UK [7] .

Attractions

  • Open University
  • Xscape [en]
  • Willen Lake [en]
  • Planet Ice [en]

Twin Cities

  • Bernkastel-Kues, Germany
  • Almere, Netherlands

Cm.also

  • County of England
  • russian_special_report

Notes

The editors of the Futurist edition – about the British Milton Keynes, where they automate road traffic, analyze data on housing and communal services and introduce self-driving cars.

A city without a center and smart traffic lights

By the 1960s, the outskirts of London were overpopulated due to chaotic development and a growing population. The British authorities solved the problem – they created a new city near the capital.

The city is planned as a single project with a system of gridded square districts. They are equidistant from each other and connected by highways.

Until October 2017, a new revolution awaits the Milton Keynes road network. 2,500 cameras and motion sensors will be installed in parking lots, squares and main highways.

Milton Keynes’ architects were inspired by California urban theorist Melvin Webber. He believed that modern cities should not concentrate important institutions and organizations in the center, but evenly distribute opportunities throughout the territory.

Green and boring

Milton Keynes has a lot of green spaces and the city is monitoring this. Parks, lakes and straight lines of trees along roads and parking lots are inscribed in each area: they give the neighborhoods a personality.

Getting used to Milton Keynes is not easy. Almost the entire city looks the same: a well-groomed track, a pedestrian zone, neat rows of cars in parking lots, two or three-story houses and tree alleys with even crowns.

However, it is precisely because of its artificiality that Milton Keynes is one of the fastest growing cities in the UK.It is often chosen for their headquarters by companies like Mercedes-Benz, Volkswagen or Suzuki. Milton Keynes is creating jobs and technologies faster than anywhere else in the UK to develop urban environments.

Cinema with a smell and trains with a mood

“I was very surprised by the water, it was all over my face. I even wanted to wipe it off. It was cool, ”a middle-aged Briton happily tells the BBC.

In February 2015, Britain’s first 4DX cinema opened in Milton Keynes.For additional sensations, the chairs swayed, sprayed the smells of coffee, gunpowder, flowers and sprayed water from spray guns in accordance with the plot of the film. Residents of Milton Keynes are already accustomed to the fact that new technologies are tested on them.

Innovative companies come to the city, local authorities develop programs from private startups to national projects. The population of Milton Keynes is ripe for change. Surveys of city residents showed that two-thirds of respondents are interested in self-driving cars on the roads – this is twice as high as in the rest of the country.

In 2015, the first driverless car appeared on the streets of Milton Keynes. The Lutz Pathfinder electric car was developed by the RDM Group in cooperation with scientists from Oxford. The car accelerates to 24 kilometers per hour and can travel up to 64 kilometers without recharging.

Self-driving transport is an important area for the British economy. Milton Keynes is gradually becoming the center for the study of road traffic in the country. The government has launched Catapult Centers across the country, a technology research laboratory.A Transportation Systems Research Center has also opened in Milton Keynes.

In 2016, Milton Keynes joined the government’s Go Ultra Low Cities program. So he became one of eight cities, which were allocated funds for the development of infrastructure for electric vehicles. The goal is to bring 100,000 electric cars onto the roads of Great Britain.

The city that knows everything about itself

The main focus of Milton Keynes’ development is the MK: Smart program. This is a project to collect data on the operation of major urban systems (transport, citizen behavior, plumbing, energy, entertainment, and others).The city uses sensors, satellite readings, surveillance footage, sociological statistics.

The Milton Keynes authorities want to use this data not only for their own purposes, but also provide access to it for every citizen. Drivers will find out where there are free parking spaces within a radius of 500 meters. Apartment owners will understand how to profitably use the water supply and heating of their home. Businessmen will receive a report that residents are more likely to choose in cafes, supermarkets or amusement parks.

For a deeper implementation of analytics, the city also provides data to private companies. The City Council believes that this only improves the economic condition of Milton Keynes. Among the partners of the city there is an international IT company from India Tech Mahindra, which opened its representative office in the city 15 years ago.

Tech Mahindra also studies social media to gauge the effectiveness of the government’s communication with citizens, and even monitors street lighting in the area around its office.

“We’re not building homes, we’re building a community,” a city councilor said of Milton Keynes.

#Future

Sources

90,000 SPECIAL PROJECT: UK CITIES. Milton Keynes is an English utopia

Milton Keynes, or simply M-Key, as the locals call it, is a very young city. It was built in 1967 with the aim of relieving the capital of the city at least a little.They predicted a great future for the city, but today, after 50 years, the city has not been awarded the title of city .

County: Buckinghamshire

90,002 90,029 Population 90,030: 248,800 (2011 census)

Average salary: £ 90,030 90,029 £ 690 90,030 per week (Office for National Statistics, July-September 2018)

Housing prices

Prices for rent and purchase of housing in some cases can be one and a half to two times lower than in the capital.

If removed

The average rental cost, according to statistics from the agency Valuation Office for September 2018, is £ 90,029 895 90,030 per month. While in London this amount is £ 90,029 1,473 90,030. In M-Kay, renting a room will cost on average £ 90,029 510 90,030, one-bedroom living space – £ 90,029 £ 695, 90,030 with two bedrooms – £ 90,029 £ 875, 90,030 with three – £ 90,029 £ 1025.

Buy

According to HM Land Registry in November 2018, the average property value in the capital is £ 90,029 £ 472,901 90,030 and in Milton Keynes £ 90,029 267,229 90,030.The average price of an apartment is £ 90,029 154,243, 90,030 terraced houses – 90,029 £ 223,289 90,030, semi-detached houses – 90,029 £ 266,302 90,030, and a detached house – 90,029 £ 267,229.

Everything according to plan

MK Map is clear blueprint of developers and architects. Everything was planned out to the smallest detail. Let’s start with the fact that the location of the city is not at all accidental. The city was founded on 88 square kilometers equidistant from London, Cambridge, Oxford and Birmingham.The city itself is built on the type of American cities with a gridded square building system. All districts are located at an equal distance from each other and are connected by highways. Now the city is expanding, and this system has already ceased to adhere to. In terms of construction, attention was also paid to unloading and facilitating movement. Therefore, there is a clear separation of the roadway, cycling and pedestrian. This is a perfect example of how to make a city convenient for everyone. Well, and, of course, we just have to mention 90,029 roundabouts, of which there are as many as 124 in MC! That is why the locals joke that the residents of the city roll to the right, and the car tires on the right side are worn out more.

In the original plans of the city, the idea was traced to distribute all important objects evenly throughout the territory without a specific center. As a result, each of the districts is equally convenient and developed, but M-Kay still has a center with offices and a huge shopping center.

The city is famous for its 1978 sculpture “Concrete Cows” by Canadian artist Liz Leich. Now the sculpture is in the M-Kay Museum. Photo: wikimedia.org

Suitable for families

“M-Kay has always been associated with families, – says Thomas, a father of two sons, who came here eight years ago from Lithuania, – our friends already lived here, and we moved without hesitation.” Many are attracted by the abundance of greenery in the city. It was originally built as “forest city” . There are many parks and lakes here. The roadways are also framed by evenly planted trees.

Last year 23 of 86 primary education institutions were rated by Ofsted as “exceptional” ( outstanding) . At the same time, the results of many of them are above the national average, but often below the regional level. The city also has private schools (Webber Independent School and Milton Keynes Preparatory School), and residents of the city have a chance to get into grammar schools in Buckingham and Aylesbury.“ Affordable housing prices make it possible to get closer to good schools. , – says Jurgita, 29 years old, who has lived here for more than ten years, – this is how we got into one of the best in the city.”

In terms of higher education, MC is the headquarters of The Open University. But since this is a correspondence institution, there are only a small number of graduate students in the city. Cranfield University is located not far from the city, and in M-Cay itself there is a local college, as well as a branch of the University of Bedfordshire – University Campus Milton Keynes, which is planned to grow into an independent university.

The city is good for families not only with schools and parks. There are 90,029 theaters, galleries, a cinema, an artificial ski slope, children’s entertainment centers and clubs.

The world’s first correspondence institution, Open University, was established here. Photo: wikimedia.org

There is enough work here too

Although London is only half an hour away by train, it is not at all necessary to tie yourself to the capital – there is work here too! M-Kay boasts one of the most prosperous economies in the southeast of the country, while the economic growth rate in the city has always been above average.It is even considered one of the most attractive places to do business outside London, which puts it on a par with cities such as Oxford, Manchester and Cambridge. Headquarters of Argos, Red Bull Racing, Network Rail, Mercedes-Benz and other are located here. “90,031 The population is very young, many friends have their own businesses, while others work in small companies,” says Thomas.

For hobbyist

It is not easy for many to get used to MK.You can often hear that this place is boring and strange. Not surprising, because almost the entire city looks the same. This is the difference between the artificial city, which is Milton Keynes, from the naturally formed one.

But this is his plus. The city is expanding, innovative companies come here, and local governments are willing to take on private startups. For example, in 2016, an unmanned vehicle Lutz Pathfinder was tested on the streets of M-Kay. 90,030 And three years ago, Milton Keynes and the surrounding area became the first participants in the government’s Go Ultra electric car infrastructure program.

In 2015, the Uswitch portal ranked MK as 97th among the best cities in the UK, although in 2013 the city performed significantly better and took 57th place. Low housing prices and a convenient location of the city entail social problems. For example, from 2017 to 2018, the crime rate in the city increased, especially the number of robberies. For these reasons, many settlers choose the quiet suburbs near MQ. “ This is a city for a measured, comfortable life, – adds Jurgita, – it has no zest, but you can easily fall in love with it!”

Residents of the city ponder where it is better to live – in the capital or in M-Kay?

 Prepared by Veronica Goria-Savo

 

OTHER UK CITIES:

 

90,000 Keynes is… What is Milton Keynes?

Milton Keynes (eng. Milton Keynes ) is a city in the southeast of Great Britain in Buckinghamshire, located 72 km north-west of London. The administrative center of the Milton Keynes unitary unit.

As a city in England, Milton Keynes is interesting in that it is a new entity, built entirely according to a prearranged plan. It lacks the historically formed urban core typical of English towns, but instead has a shopping center. mall ) is 3 miles long, which is listed in the Guinness Book of Records as the longest shopping mall in Europe. A feature of the urban planning is the grid of city-wide highways with a step of 1 kilometer; within the cell of this grid, the construction of the urban space has a more traditional form. There are roundabouts at the highway intersection to avoid waiting for a traffic signal.

At the same time, it includes villages that were still found by the Romans, that is, existing from the 4th century AD.NS.

Walkways for pedestrians (so-called redways) run through the entire city, as well as paths for bicycles and sometimes horses. These paths intersect with roads through under or over road junctions. Thus, there is practically no direct intersection with road transport.

The center Xscape [1] with a year-round indoor ski slide is notable for entertainment. The building has an original design and is a recognizable part of the city. (see photo). More recently, an aero rig for sky diving is also available at Xscape.

The city is located equidistant from Oxford, Cambridge, London and Birmingham. The city of Buckingham is only 20 minutes away (it is also worth mentioning that Buckingham University is the only private university in England, and Open University is the world’s largest correspondence university, that is, an educational institution with distance learning).

During the war, Alan Turing worked at the British cryptographic center Bletchley Park. Later, the city of Bletchley became part of Milton Keynes.

Photos

  • Ecumenical Church of Christ the Cornerstone

  • Part of Shopping Center – Midsummer Place

  • Royal Garden at Center MK

  • Xscape Entertainment Center

Birth of a new city

In the 1960s, the UK government decided on the need for new cities in the southeast of the country to solve the problem of overcrowding in the suburbs of London.Research has identified northern Buckinghamshire as a possible site for a new large city spanning the existing Bletchley, Stony Stratford and Wolverton. The new city was to become the largest of the new cities with a planned population of 250 thousand people on an area of ​​88.4 square kilometers. [2] The name of the city was taken from the existing village [3] . The selected location was deliberately chosen at an equal distance from London, Birmingham, Leicester, Oxford and Cambridge with the aim of making the city independent and becoming a full-fledged regional center itself. [4] . City planning was transferred from local government to the Milton Keynes Development Corporation (MKDC).

The corporation was determined to take into account the mistakes made in the construction of the previously laid cities. She laid the characteristic “grid” highways between the districts and intensive landscaping, lakes and parks. Central Milton Keynes was not conceived as a traditional city center, but rather as a business and shopping area that would complement the local hubs that are found in every “square” of the grid.The largest and one of the most recent British new cities, Milton Keynes has stood the test of time far better than other such cities and proved to be flexible and adaptable.

The radical grid plan was inspired by the work of Californian urban theorist Melvin Webber [en] (1921-2006). Webber’s idea was that in the telecommunications era, the old idea of ​​the city as a cluster was outdated and that in the future cities should be allowed to move freely within them.With the use of personal cars and the proliferation of e-commerce, his ideas, launched in the 1960s, have proven to be far-sighted.

Milton Keynes is located in accordance with the principles of logistics – at an equal distance from London, Cambridge and Oxford. It is only about 40 minutes by car to London, half an hour by high-speed train, and there are about 100 trains a day between London Euston Station and Milton Keynes. There are also several airports nearby – Luton, Heathrow, and Birmingham.It should be noted that the city is located in the center of a vast forested area with many lakes and canals.

The emergence and initial development of Milton Keynes was dictated by the direct need to relieve the overpopulated London – and it was a kind of “sleeping area” of the British capital. Then London companies began to move there, for which the new city was interesting for the relatively low cost of office space and a really very attractive location.After three decades of robust and successful economic growth, Milton Keynes is now a major city with a population of about 216,000 and continues to grow faster than any other city in Britain. Milton Keynes is comfortable and environmentally friendly. Here, the rhythm of a modern business city, with futuristic glass complexes in the center, is combined with great leisure opportunities and an almost country-style lifestyle. The city’s road system is based on the North American model of interchanges, so Milton Keynes can be traversed by car in just 15-20 minutes.and half of local residents are less than 3 miles from home to work. The city consists of several “squares”, each of which has its own cozy village, surrounded by a forested area. In general, the parks here are one of the main landscape elements, one might even say that the city itself is actually built into the park! All large shops are located in the city center, and local centers such as a clinic, a school, a cultural and sports center, a pub (what an English village without a pub!) Are located again according to the principle of logistics – close to the intersection of the main pedestrian arteries and city roads …A safe system of footpaths was one of the main ideas in the design of the city. Their total length is about 200 km, which, you see, is rarely seen in the city of the XXI century. A well-designed network of pedestrian and bike paths allows you to travel the entire city from one side of the city to the other, without ever crossing the traffic flow. A true paradise for hikers and cyclists! It is not surprising that a bicycle is a favorite means of transportation here, since even in winter the temperature outside rarely drops below zero.You can also meet horse-riding enthusiasts – they also have a place to roam. But the main thing is the economic success of the city. Due to its exceptionally convenient location and well-thought-out layout, Milton Keynes turned out to be attractive for investments; a number of head offices of many large companies and banks moved here, including such well-known ones as Daimler-Chrysler, Minolta, Xitec Software.

The city of Milton Keynes was built in an area of ​​remarkable scenery. This area has a rich historical heritage.During the construction of the city of Milton Keynes, it was decided not to build buildings that are taller than trees. Recently, however, these restrictions have been lifted. Milton Keynes is a “city in the forest”, for a long time foresters planted trees all over the city. Among the attractions of Milton Keynes is the open-air National Bowl. Entertainment events are held here. This place was opened in 1979. There is a helicopter landing site near the National Bowl. In 1999, the Milton Keynes Theater was opened in the city.Due to its amazing architecture, this theater can claim the title of “Most Popular Theater in Britain”. Stables is located in Wavendon, on the southeastern edge of Milton Keynes. Lovers of jazz, blues, classical, popular and world music meet here. Every year there are camps that accept young musicians. There is another place in the city that music lovers can visit – the Pitz Club. This club is located in the center of Woughton. Mostly the club is visited by fans of punk, alternative rock and heavy metal.Milton Keynes has two museums: the Bletchley Park Museum, a military cryptography museum, and the Milton Keynes Museum, which displays exhibits that introduce visitors to rural life. In 1990, the Polytechnic University was opened in the city. Cranfield University is located not far from Milton Keynes. There are also several secondary schools in the city.

On the other hand, the new plan also introduced minor disadvantages. With the prevalence of personal transport, public transport is experiencing problems with extremely low demand [5] .Also, innovations in telephone communications in city planning have unexpectedly led to problems with Internet access in many parts of the city these days [6] , which, however, does not prevent the city from being one of the most using the Internet in the UK [7] .

Attractions

  • Open University
    – the largest correspondence university
  • Xscape [en]
    – an entertainment center of unusual shape and large dimensions.includes a year-round snow slide, a sky diving facility and an 18-screen cinema.
  • Willen Lake [en]
    – a large lake, center of water activities. includes a cable car for water skiing, etc.
  • Planet Ice [en]
    – an indoor ice rink used for both professional training and recreational skating

Twin Cities

Cf.also

Notes

Milton Keynes Flower Delivery Florist

Milton Keynes, a large city in the south-east of England, is recognized as the administrative center of England. Known for its welcoming and orderly culture, Milton Keynes is a great travel destination. There are many reasons to love this large modern city, from shopping malls to Dinosaur Park theme center and many other relaxing parks.
Among the best parks in the city is Shanley Wood.It is a suitable place to have a picnic with family and friends. Filled with giant oak trees and wildlife, it will not only be the perfect getaway, but also a place for amazing adventures.
In the park, you will see flowers such as Bells. This flower has colors ranging from deep purple, pink, white to blue, and has a bulbous shape. There is also Celandine in the park, this member of the buttercup family has yellow, open petals. Enjoy the Tree Anemones (Anemone), a member of the buttercup family, and is white-yellow in color.Enjoy the park. You have a great moment of socializing with friends and family in the midst of beautiful nature.

Categories:

USD 77.76

Humor

Roses, lilies, carnations and gerberas

USD 143.90

Affection

24 roses

USD 66.31

Responsible Love

Roses, lilies and carnations

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Happy marriage

Lilies, orchids, carnations and orchids

USD 112.58

Love for nature

16 roses and gypsophila

USD 86.20

Luxury

Roses and lilies

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USD 84.65

Tenderness

Roses and gypsophila

USD 60.66

I still love you

5 roses and gypsophila

USD 84.65

Tenderness

Roses and gypsophila

INFO INFO INFO

USD 77.76

Secret hobbies

Lilies, roses, carnations, gypsophila

USD 99.46

Wonderful

12 roses and lilies

USD 97.65

Wonderful

Sunflowers, roses and orchids

INFO INFO INFO

90,000 Cheap Flights to Milton Keynes – Discount Tickets: Save Up to 55%

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Milton Keynes Flight FAQ

  • Are there any travel regulations for Milton Keynes during the COVID19 pandemic?

    Entry restrictions, schedule changes and flight cancellations are subject to change and updated frequently. If you are planning to travel to Milton Keynes, see the latest information provided by the airline you are booking for.You can also get more information under COVID19 Restrictions on Entry / Exit to Countries / Regions.

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  • Which attractions are popular in St.Milton Keynes?

    Milton Keynes has a lot to see: (1km from city center) (1km from city center) Christ the Vine Community Church (2km from city center)

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Milton Keynes hotels

988 Hotels near Milton Keynes

Peartree filter Lodge Waterside

Waterside accommodation with free WiFi and free parking.All destinations in Milton Keynes are easily accessible from the hotel. All the rooms a…

DoubleTree By Hilton Milton Keynes

Stadiummk, Stadium Way Hotels

8.7

incredible

4818 reviews

Milton Keynes

Built into the MK Stadium Dons Football Club and Marshall Arena, the DoubleTree By Hilton Milton Keynes features stylish accommodation only a few minutes’ drive away from Milton Keynes City Center.The modern rooms have luxury beds, LCD…

Holiday Inn Express Milton Keynes, an IHG Hotel

Eastlake Park, Tongwell St, Fox Milne Milton KeynesHotels

8.7

incredible

3706 reviews

Milton Keynes

Holiday Inn Express Milton Keynes is located just 800 meters from the M1 motorway. Free Wi-Fi is available in all areas. Free parking is available. The Holiday Inn Express Milton Keynes is located in the …

Holiday Inn Milton Keynes Central, an IHG Hotel

500 Saxon Gate West

Located in Milton Keynes, within a 10-minute drive from junction 14 of the M1 motorway, Holiday Inn Milton Keynes swimming Central offers conference facilities, an indoor pool and a fitness center.Within walking distance from The Center MK, Xscape…

Jurys Inn Milton Keynes

Midsummer Boulevard Milton Keynes Hotels

8.3

Excellent

3360 reviews

Milton Keynes 50003

A walk from Milton Keynes Railway Station, this Jurys Inn is close to the city’s business and shopping centers. It boasts a 24-hour reception, complimentary Wi-Fi, a bar and restaurant. The stylish bedrooms at the Jurys Inn Milton Keynes f…

Novotel Milton Keynes

Layburn Court, Saxon Street, Heelands Milton Keynes is 3 minutes’ drive from downtown Milton Keynes.It offers spacious rooms, free parking, and a leisure center with a heated indoor pool, gym and sauna. Spacious rooms …

Ramada Milton Keynes

Welcome Break Newport Pagnell Services, Junction 14/15 M1 Milton Keynes Hotels

7.6

Excellent

2228 reviews

Milton Keynes

Situated off the Mituated Ramada Milton Keynes has free WiFi, a bar and free parking. Central Milton Keynes is only a 10-minute drive away.Each room at Ramada Milton Keynes is modern and has en suite facilities. They all offer a digital plasma-scr…

easyHotel Milton Keynes

Silbury BoulevardMilton KeynesHotels

7.4

Excellent

2381 reviews

Milton Keynes

Set within 10 km km of Bletchley Park, easyHotel Milton Keynes offers rooms with air conditioning in Milton Keynes. The property is non-smoking and is located 300 meters from Milton Keynes Magistrates Court.easyHotel Milton Ke…

Mercure Milton Keynes Hotel

Two Mile Ash Milton KeynesHotels

8.2

Excellent

1623 reviews

Milton Keynes

Hill. From here you can quickly reach Luton Airport and take the A5 and M1 motorways. There is a restaurant on site. The recently refurbished rooms at the Mercure Milt …

Campanile Milton Keynes – Fenny Stratford

2/5

40 Penn Road, Fenny Stratford, Bletchley Keynes

Campanile Milton Keynes – Fenny Stratford is located in the south of Milton Keynes.

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