Gymnastics fun facts: Gymnastics Facts for Kids

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What are some fun facts about gymnastics? – Mvorganizing.org

What are some fun facts about gymnastics?

10 Interesting Facts About Gymnastics

  • The Ancient Greeks prepared their young men for war by doing gymnastics!
  • Women weren’t permitted to compete in gymnastic events until the 1920s.
  • Acrobatic gymnastics, which were once referred to as Sport Acrobatics, are a group gymnastic sport for men and women.

Do female gymnasts do rings?

In all of the Olympic sports, women and men do not compete head-to-head, but the game’s the same. And while the uneven bars has evolved to become more like men’s high bar, an event like rings has no equivalent in the women’s program. None of the apparatuses demand static strength poses and holds from female gymnasts.

Why do female gymnasts have to dance?

Essentially, women gymnasts are expected to make their floor routines graceful, while still completing powerful moves — men are simply expected to focus on the power. Gymnasts like Simone Biles are proof that women, too, perform moves that necessitate unbelievable power on the floor.

How high are the rings in gymnastics?

Made of wood or metal, the rings are 28 mm (1.1 inches) thick and have an inside diameter of 18 cm (7.1 inches). They are suspended by straps mounted 5.75 metres (18.8 feet) above the floor, the rings themselves hanging 2.5 metres (8.2 feet) above the floor and 50 cm (19.7 inches) apart.

What are the rings called in gymnastics?

steady rings

Are gymnastic rings worth it?

Plastic rings are definitely cheaper and are nearly indestructible. Yet ultimately, I recommend getting wooden rings. The added expense is worth it if you plan on training with the rings for a long time. The specific rings I recommend are Rogue wooden rings; but really, just find what you’re most comfortable with.

How do you make a gymnastics ring at home?

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees, place one PVC pipe on a baking sheet, and cook for 10 minutes. Remove the PVC pipe, and immediately wrap it around a gallon paint can to shape it. Hold for a couple minutes and you’ll have your ring formed.

How do you make wood gymnastic rings?

DIY Wooden Olympic / Gymnastic / Crossfit Rings

  1. Introduction: DIY Wooden Olympic / Gymnastic / Crossfit Rings.
  2. Step 2: Make Some Plywood!
  3. Step 3: Draw Some Circles!
  4. Step 4: Jigsaw Them Circles!
  5. Step 5: Inside Circle!
  6. Step 6: Sand Them Baby’s!
  7. Step 7: Get Your Curve On!
  8. Step 8: DaDaa!

What is the best suspension training system?

  • Best Overall: TRX Strong System. Buy on Dick’s Buy on Best Buy.
  • Best for Beginners: TRX Fit System.
  • Best Advanced: TRX Elite System.
  • Best for Seniors: Costway Bodyweight Fitness Resistance Straps.
  • Best for Small Spaces: Lifeline Jungle Gym XT.
  • Best Weight Capacity: Clothink Bodyweight Resistance Straps Training Kit.

What are TRX straps made of?

These are the thing you need to gather to create your homemade TRX system: 9 meters of 1-inch tubular nylon webbing. One 2-meter rock climbing runner. Heavy-duty nylon thread.

What does the TRX locking loop do?

An ingenious feature of the TRX is the locking loop at the top, which ensures that even if the handles are set slightly lopsided, the fix can be made mid-set without having to stop the rep.

Is TRX training good for weight loss?

If you are looking for a quick trick to shed some excess belly fat, TRX could be a good place to start. Unlike almost any other training system available, TRX Suspension Training challenges your entire body in all planes of motion creating a huge metabolic effect and helps you build lean, toned muscle.

Does TRX damage door?

With the durable TRX Door Anchor, a padded head sits over the top of the door and locks the trainer in place. Closing (and locking) the door anchors the system securely. This mounting option is perfect for taking your trainer on the road with you and is designed to not leave any marks or damage the door.

What can I attach my TRX to?

The Best Ways To Set Up Your TRX Band

  • Over a door.
  • Ceiling mounted.
  • Beam suspension.
  • Weight rack suspension.
  • Railing suspension.
  • DIY.
  • Tree branch.
  • Goal post suspension.

Should I Mount TRX on wall or ceiling?

The best mounting option for the TRX is a ceiling anchor that’s 7 to 9 feet from the ground, and at least 6 feet away from the nearest wall. So a wall anchor is better than nothing if a ceiling anchor is not an option, but definitely go with a ceiling mounted anchor if you have that option available.

4 Interesting Facts About Gymnastics

SUMMER is a great time to challenge themselves and learn something new.  Gymnastics is also a wonderful sport, not requiring good weather and feels the same comfortable temperature even if eggs are cooking on the side walks.   Camps for 3 years to 18 and Classes for ages 1 to 99 start next week!

If you have decided to enroll your child in gymnastics, you’ve made a wise choice. Participating in this sport will keep your kid in good physical shape, improve coordination and balance, and teach discipline. To help you learn more, the staff at The Gymnastics Training Center of Rochester in Penfield, NY, share some fun facts about this graceful sport.

All About Gymnastics

1. Women’s Gymnastics Was Introduced After Men’s

Women weren’t allowed to participate in gymnastics in the first several Olympic games. Women’s gymnastics was finally included in the 1928 Olympics. However, their uniforms were different than the leotards worn today; female gymnasts couldn’t wear shorts that were shorter than four inches above their knees.

2. Ancient Greeks Practiced Gymnastics

Physical fitness was highly valued in Ancient Greece, so many men and women participated in running, jumping, and other activities related to gymnastics to become healthier and stronger. Gymnastics also helped men prepare for war. The sport improved their fighting skills and overall endurance.

3. Gymnasts Start Practicing Very Young

Gymnastics is considered a sport for the young, and most female gymnasts in the U.S. are just 16 years old. Many of them begin their careers when they are toddlers. It takes them many years to develop their skills, and those that become successful are considered elite gymnasts by the time they’re teens. 

4. Friedrich Ludwig Jahn Is the Father of Gymnastics

Gymnastics wouldn’t be where it is today without Friedrich Ludwig Jahn. When he moved to Berlin in 1809, he started a program for outdoor physical exercise for students and invented many pieces of equipment for gymnastics, including the parallel bars and balance beam. In 1811, he opened his first gymnastics club and spread the word about the sport.

Now that you know more about gymnastics, you may be even more excited to sign up your child. The Gymnastics Training Center of Rochester has a 22,00 square foot facility and offers everything from gymnastics to tumbling; they also use the latest equipment. They have a mission to help children have fun and challenge themselves in a safe and comfortable environment. For more information, call (585) 388-8686 or visit their website.

15 Fun Facts About Olympic Gymnast Simone Biles

All eyes will be on Simone Biles at the 2021 Summer Olympics in Tokyo, and she’s ready. In May, the 24-year-old gymnast became the first woman ever to land the the Yurchenko double pike in competition. Shortly after, she officially earned her ticket to the Summer Games and she’s set to the lead the six-woman U.S. Olympic gymnastics team to gold once again. Ahead of the competition, here’s an overview of everything you need to know about Simone on and off the gym floor.

15

She’s always been a natural daredevil.

Simone was a natural gymnast who started teaching herself to flip backwards off mailboxes as a little kid, according to NBC. She got her start in the sport of gymnastics at 6 years old, after a daycare field trip to a gym. Once she saw older girls doing their routines, she was hooked and started training right away.

14

She was adopted as a young child.

Born in 1997 in Columbus, Ohio, Simone was taken out of the home of her birth mother, who struggled with addiction, and placed in foster care with her three siblings. Her maternal grandfather, Air Force veteran Ron and his wife, retired nurse Nellie, stepped in to take care of the kids, officially adopting Simone at 6 years old as well as her little sister Adria. Their great aunt took in Simone’s older siblings.

During the Olympics, a commentator refused to call her adoptive parents anything but her “grandparents,” for which he later apologized. Simone responded: “My parents are my parents and that’s it.”

13

In Rio, she was the shortest athlete of all 555 U.S. Olympians.

Standing at just 4-feet-9-inches, Simone was the shortest out of all 555 athletes representing the United States in Rio in 2016. Here, she poses next to volleyball player David Lee. At 6-feet-8-inches, Lee is a whopping two feet taller than Simone.

12

Her younger sister Adria is a gymnast too.

Simone isn’t the only athlete in the Biles family. Her 22-year-old sister Adria Biles is also a talented gymnast. They are said to train together and give each other support.

11

She’s hitting a whole lot of “firsts.”

At age 24, she’s already made history. Not only is Simone the first female gymnast to win three world all-around titles in a row, she’s also the first Black gymnast to become the world all-around champion.

10

She’s had the same coach since she was 8 years old.

Gymnastics coach Aimee Boorman spotted Simone about a year after she started training and immediately noticed her natural talent. However, Aimee had not yet trained an elite gymnast — something that Simone actually saw as advantageous. “It was a learning process together,” she told NBC. “I think that’s what helped us both because we were both kind of clueless about it.”

9

She is scared of bees.

While Simone is an incredible athlete, she’s also a human being — and that means she gets scared of bees just like you do. After receiving the gold medal at the 2014 World Championships, another medalist pointed out to Simone that a bee was in her bouquet. Being an adorable then-16-year-old, she giggled and jumped off the podium to escape the little pesk.

8

When it comes to floor routines, she is unbeatable.

While Simone is one of greatest competitors in all events, her signature is the floor routine. Her tumbling passes are so difficult that her third tumbling pass is at the difficulty of most gymnasts’ first pass — the slot where most gymnasts put their hardest move. “In short,” Vox explains, “Biles can perform everyone else’s hardest tumbling pass after she’s completed two even more difficult ones. ” Wow. Just take a look at this routine from the 2016 P&G Championships, where Simone took home gold.

7

She has four German shepherds at home.

In addition to gymnastics, she loves her family’s pups. The Biles have four dogs: Maggie, Atlas, Lily and Bella, though one is not pictured here. Simone also has two Frenchies named Lilo and Rambo.

6

Pizza makes her happy.

Hey, even Olympians enjoy a slice or two every now and then! She posted this delectable pic with the caption, “Happiness.” We totally agree, Simone.

5

She loves experimenting with eye makeup.

The world went wild for Simone’s gorgeous shimmery liner during the ceremony for the team finals. Going from ruby slipper red to white to blue, her makeup made her eyes pop while showing U.S. pride.

4

She wants to get a “real job” after she’s done competing.

Given the athleticism and agility needed for the sport, gymnasts tend to have extremely short careers — a fact Simone is realistic about. “Gymnastics is just one part of my life, and I’m having as much fun with it as possible,” she told Us Weekly. “At some point, I’ll have to go get a real job.” We’re gonna go ahead and predict that she’ll be remarkable at whatever she chooses.

3

She’s the most decorated female gymnast in America.

Since the 2013 P&G Championships, Simone has dominated. In total, she’s won 25 medals at the World Championships with 19 of them being gold. Notably, she’s the first American to win a medal in every event at this competition. At her first Summer Olympic Games in 2016 in Rio, Simone earned five medals: four gold and one bronze.

2

She’s spoken out about her ADHD diagnosis.

A month after making history at Rio, hackers released Simone’s confidential medical records from the World Anti-Doping Agency database. The gymnast took to Twitter to speak out about being diagnosed as a child and taking medication approved by the USA Gymnastics. She wrote: “Having ADHD, and taking medicine for it is nothing to be ashamed of nothing that I’m afraid to let people know.”

1

She’s the first woman to complete a Yurchenko double pike skill on vault.

At the GK US Classic in May, Simone became the first woman ever to successfully land the Yurchenko double pike in competition. When asked why she wanted to perform this difficult move and others, which have been named after her, she said: “Because I can.”

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10 Fascinating Facts About Gymnastics From ‘The End Of The Perfect 10’

The history of gymnastics at the Olympics has as many highs and lows as an uneven bars routine; while there is a long tradition of glory, grace, power, and triumph, there have also been competitions and key players tainted by scandal along the way. The many sides of the sport are part of what makes it so fascinating, and we get to examine them all in writer Dvora Meyers’ new book, The End of the Perfect 10: The Making and Breaking of Gymnastics’ Top Score—from Nadia to Now.

Meyers focuses specifically on how gymnastics and its scoring system have evolved over the years, examining the impact of the so-called “Perfect 10” on the sport, both before and after its heyday. Her book interweaves fascinating stories of Olympics and Olympians past with gymnastics history, interviews with experts, and compelling commentary to create an accessible analysis. Whether you’re a die-hard gymnastics fan or you tune in once every four years, you’ll be captivated and — if you’re anything like me — wind up journeying down a black hole of gymnastics videos on YouTube.

Below are 10 gymnastics-centric fun facts from The End of the Perfect 10 that will get you pumped to cheer on Team USA in Rio.

1. The Scoreboard Wasn’t Ready For The First Perfect 10

The Olympic podium has seen a lot of happy tears — and probably ones of disappointment —over the years, but there have also been moving moments of protest. Meyers highlights the example of Vera Caslavska, who remains one of the most decorated athletes in Olympic history. During the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City, the gymnast made a quiet but powerful statement by tilting her head down and away during the playing of the Soviet national anthem in protest of the country’s recent invasion of her native Czechoslovakia.

4. Legendary Coach Bela Karolyi Was Never An Elite Gymnast Himself

Bela Karolyi has long been a key figure in American gymnastics, but the famed coach had a more impressive career competing as a boxer than as a gymnast. Nonetheless, that hasn’t stop him. He has trained champions like Comaneci, Mary Lou Retton, Kim Zmeskal, Dominique Moceanu, and more.

5. Female Gymnasts Have Gotten Shorter In Recent Decades

Dilip Vishwanat/Getty Images Sport/Getty Images

Gymnastics has evolved over the past several decades, and the changes have carried over to the sport’s preferred body type. Meyers lays out an engaging explanation for how various factors, from changing gender roles to the scoring system, have come into play, and the end result is telling: The average height of elite female gymnasts has dropped from 5-foot-3 to 4-foot-9 in the last 30 years, according to David Epstein, author of The Sports Gene.

6. Gymnastics Isn’t Just For Young Girls

KAZUHIRO NOGI/AFP/Getty Images

There have been so many age controversies in gymnastics that it’s easy to assume that you have to be young to succeed in the sport. While Meyers points out that there certainly are a lot of teens competing, it’s possible to compete when you’re older. In fact, the Rio Olympics will feature the oldest female gymnast in the Games’ history: 41-year-old Oksana Chusovitina of Uzbekistan, who is competing in her seventh Olympics.

7. The U.S. Women’s 2000 Olympic Team Received Bronze Medals… A Decade Late

JOHN MOTTERN/AFP/Getty Images

When the U.S. Women’s Olympic team came in fourth place — finishing off the podium — at the 2000 Sydney Games, their performance was considered to be a huge letdown, writes Meyers. It wasn’t until 2010 that they got any glory. In a strange turn of events, a Chinese gymnast applied for a job at the IOC, only for the committee to take note of the fact that the age she gave proved that she had been too young to compete in Sydney. Her team’s bronze medals were taken away, and the U.S. women received much-delayed medals.

8. The Last Perfect 10 Awarded At The Olympics Was In 1992

The last Olympics in which it was possible to earn a Perfect 10 was in 2004 in Athens, but the judges had already started being stingier with the coveted score. The final one was bestowed on Lavinia Milosovici at the 1992 Games in Barcelona.

9. Some Competitions Still Give Out Perfect 10s

Steve Grayson/Getty Images Sport/Getty Images

The Perfect 10 is no longer seen at the Olympics and other international competitions now that elite gymnastics has transitioned to a new scoring system, but it hasn’t gone away completely. College gymnasts still get to see the iconic score because the NCAA hasn’t made the switch.

10. Rio Will Feature A Unique World Champion

If you’ve followed any gymnastics coverage leading up to the Rio Olympics, you’ll have heard of Simone Biles. The powerhouse competitor is the only woman to ever win three consecutive world all-around titles. You’ll definitely want to watch her.

Images: Giphy (2)

Rhythmic Gymnastics: Top Things To Know About This Artistic Sport

Rhythmic gymnastics is a sport in which gymnasts perform on a floor with an apparatus: hoop, ball, clubs, ribbon or rope. The sport combines elements of artistic gymnastics, dance, and calisthenics; gymnasts must be strong, flexible, agile, dexterous and coordinated. Rhythmic gymnastics is governed by the International Gymnastics Federation (FIG). At the international level, rhythmic gymnastics is a women-only sport.

The most prestigious competitions, besides the Olympic Games, are the World Championships, World Games, European Championships, European Games, the World Cup Series, and the Grand Prix Series. Gymnasts are judged on their artistry, execution of skills, and difficulty of skills, for which they gain points. They perform leaps, balances, pivots, and flexibility movements, along with tossing, catching, rolling and otherwise manipulating the apparatus.

Rhythmic Gymnastics: A Brief History

In the 1800s rhythmic gymnastics operated under the guise of group gymnastics, and included a trace of elementary choreography. It grew slowly until the first experimental competitions appeared in eastern Europe in the 1930s when its newfound complexity began to draw a wider audience.

Rhythmic gymnastics evolved from a host of related disciplines. It incorporates elements from classical ballet, such as pli?s and arabesques, as well as the German system of emphasizing apparatus work for muscle development and the Swedish method of using free exercise to develop a rhythm.

The FIG recognized rhythmic gymnastics as an official discipline in 1963, and a year later organized an international tournament in Budapest. In 1964 the tournament was officially declared the first Rhythmic Gymnastics World Championships, and Ludmila Savinkova of the Soviet Union became the first world champion.
The number of athletes grew as interest spread to other parts of the world. Gymnasts from the United States first appeared at the championships in 1973, and rhythmic gymnastics slowly emerged from the shadow of the long-established artistic discipline to enter the Olympic program in 1984.

Since its integration into the Games in 1984 in Los Angeles, rhythmic gymnastics has always been a part of the Olympic program. In its inaugural year, it was Canada?s Lori Fung who won the gold medal. Until 1992 in Barcelona, only one individual event was on the program. A second, team event was added to the program in 1996 in Atlanta.

Rhythmic Gymnastics: Gymnasts

Olympic rhythmic gymnastics is only for female participants. Gymnasts start at a young age and become age-eligible to compete in the Olympic Games and other major international competitions on January 1 of their 16th year (For example, a gymnast born on 12-31-2004 would be age-eligible for the 2020 Olympics). Gymnasts typically start training at a very young age and those at their peak are typically in their late teens (15?19) or early twenties, but since recently it is common to see gymnasts achieving their peak after reaching their twenties.

Top rhythmic gymnasts must have many qualities; balance, flexibility, coordination, and strength are some of the most important. They also must possess psychological attributes such as the ability to compete under intense pressure, in which one mistake can cost them the title, and the discipline and work ethic to practice the same skills over and over again.

Currently, a gymnast can perform in the individual event or in the group event. They perform routines in 12 x 12-meter areas, accompanied by music. Since 1995, groups consisted of 5 gymnasts, but originally six gymnasts composed a group, although around the 1980s this could be even eight. The duration of a group exercise should be two and a half minutes, one minute more than the individual one, which is one minute and a half.

Rhythmic Gymnastics: Apparatus

The FIG selects which apparatus will be used in competitions, only four out of the five possible apparatuses are sanctioned. Hoop and rope were the first apparatus used at World Championships, followed later by ball, ribbon, and clubs.

Rope

It may be made of hemp or synthetic material that retains the qualities of lightness and suppleness. Its length is in proportion to the size of the gymnast. When the middle of the rope is held down by the feet, both ends should reach the gymnasts? armpits. One or two knots at each end are for keeping hold of the rope while doing the routine.

The rope must be colored, either all or partially. It may be either of a uniform diameter or be progressively thicker in the center provided that this thickening is of the same material as the rope.
The fundamental requirements of a rope routine include leaps and skipping. Other elements include swings, throws, circles, rotations, and figures of eight.

Hoop

A hoop may be made of plastic or wood, provided that it retains its shape during the routine. The hoop is chosen based on the gymnast?s size and should not extend beyond the hip bone when placed standing up on the floor. The interior diameter is from 51 to 90 cm and the hoop must weigh a minimum of 300g. Children and hope divisions, a minimum of 225 grams. The hoop may be of natural color or be partially or fully covered by one or several colors, and it may be covered with adhesive tape either of the same or different color as the hoop. Hoops are often customized using colored tapes to match the design of the leotards.

The fundamental requirements of a hoop routine include rotation around the hand or body and rolling, as well as swings, circles, throws, and passes through and over the hoop.

Ball

It is made of either rubber or synthetic material (pliable plastic) provided it possesses the same elasticity as rubber. Senior and junior gymnasts are 18 to 20 cm in diameter and must have a minimum weight of 400g. The ball can be of any color.

The ball should rest in the gymnast?s hand and not rest against the wrist or be able to be grasped. Fundamental elements of a ball routine include throwing, bouncing or rolling. 

The gymnast must use both hands and work on the whole floor area whilst showing continuous flowing movement. The ball is to emphasize the gymnasts flowing lines and body difficulty.

Clubs

It is made of either rubber or synthetic material (pliable plastic) provided it possesses the same elasticity as rubber. Senior and junior gymnasts are 18 to 20 cm in diameter and must have a minimum weight of 400g. The ball can be of any color. The ball should rest in the gymnast?s hand and not rest against the wrist or be able to be grasped. Fundamental elements of a ball routine include throwing, bouncing or rolling.

The gymnast must use both hands and work on the whole floor area whilst showing continuous flowing movement. The ball is to emphasize the gymnasts flowing lines and body difficulty.

Ribbon

It is made of satin or another similar material cloth of any color; it may be multi-colored and have designs on it. The ribbon itself must be at least 35 g (1.2 oz), 4?6 cm (1.6?2.4?) in width and have a minimum length of 6m (20?) for seniors and 5m (16.25?) for juniors. The ribbon must be in one piece.

The end that is attached to the stick is doubled for a maximum length of 1m (3?). The ribbon is fixed to the stick by means of a supple attachment such as thread, nylon cord, or a series of articulated rings. Compulsory elements for the ribbon include flicks, circles, snakes and spirals, and throws. It requires a high degree of co-ordination to form the spirals and circles as any knots which may accidentally form in the ribbon are penalized. During a ribbon routine, large, smooth and flowing movements are looked for. The ribbon may not stop moving or else points are taken off.

Scoring System

In rhythmic gymnastics competitions exercises are evaluated by the following parameters which are reviewed every four years, the system defining the FIG Code of Points. After each Olympic games, the scoring process is modified.

In the current Code of Points (2017-2020), the final score of a routine is the sum of the difficulty score and execution score. Penalties incurred will also be deducted from the final score. The difficulty score is open-ended with no maximum score, while the execution score has a starting value of 10 points. There are also penalties, which are realized by subtracting points from the final note for certain specified mistakes made by the gymnast.

There are many benefits to your children participating in gymnastics, even if they don?t compete professionally. It?s a healthy form of exercise that instills discipline, hard work, and dedication. Your child can learn all about expression through artistic movement while creating lasting relationships with their coaches and peers.

Fun Facts About Rhythmic Gymnastics

There are some interesting things about this competitive sport that you may not know! For example, even though rhythmic gymnastics is a female-only Olympic Sport, there are other competitions that include male participants. Japan and several countries in Europe already have their own national category for men?s rhythmic gymnastics.

Gymnasts must not only do the splits but also push it past the 180-degree status quo. In order to accomplish those leaps and acrobatic moves, athletes must be able to do oversplits. These moves require them to bend their legs completely in front and behind them!

Canadian athlete Lori Fung won the first individual Olympic gold medal. And Spain won the first group gold medal. Overall, however, Russia has dominated the sport in both the individual and group Olympic competitions.

Athletes typically begin their training at an early age work for years before they can have the chance to compete professionally. They must become masters of their artistry and perform under extreme pressure. Trainers painstakingly create each routine in minute detail and then practice for hours every day. However, gymnasts will tell you that while it?s a hard path to take, they find great satisfaction in their sport.

There are many benefits to your children participating in gymnastics, even if they don?t compete professionally. It?s a healthy form of exercise that instils discipline, hard work, and dedication. Your child can learn all about expression through artistic movement while creating lasting relationships with their trainers and peers.

If you?re interested in enrolling your child in this artistic sport, reach out to the Los Angeles School of Gymnastics or visit our website to get started!

12 Amazing Facts About Simone Biles

Simone Biles is the most decorated female gymnast ever, with 30 World and Olympic medals. The 24-year-old has won 25 World medals, including 19 golds—the most in gymnastics history. At the Olympic Games in Rio in 2016, Biles became the first female U.S. gymnast to win four gold medals at a single Games.

She’s also a seven-time U.S. all-around champion and the first woman to win five World all-around titles, three World balance beam titles, and five World floor exercise titles. She’s hoping to add to the haul at the Olympic Games in Tokyo this summer. Here are 12 more facts from Biles’s fascinating life so far.

1. Simone Biles started gymnastics following a field trip in daycare.

The 4-foot-8-inch Biles was born in Columbus, Ohio, and now lives near Houston, Texas. When Biles was 6, she took a daycare field trip to Bannon’s Gymnastix outside of Houston and imitated the older gymnasts. The coaches spotted her talent and sent a letter home to her parents suggesting Biles take up the sport. Biles worked with coach Aimee Boorman through the Rio Olympics, took a year off, and then began training with Cecile and Laurent Landi in October 2017.

2. Simone Biles’s sister also trained in gymnastics.

Simone and her younger sister, Adria, were raised by their parents, Nellie and Ron, their biological grandparents who adopted the girls at a young age. Adria also competed in gymnastics and trained alongside Simone until the age of 16. Adria calls her sister “fearless” and told ESPN that when they were little, Simone would jump off a second-floor railing onto a couch one floor below. The sisters look a lot alike, so much so that even though Adria is about 6 inches taller, fans mistook her for Simone at the Rio Olympics so often that Adria finally stopped trying to correct people and let them snap her photo.

3. As a child, Simone Biles was diagnosed with ADHD.

In 2016, Russian hackers broke into the World Anti-Doping Agency’s website and publicized various athletes’ private medical records, including Biles’s. Biles was diagnosed with ADHD as a child and takes Ritalin, a stimulant that is on the agency’s banned list. However, Biles has approval from USA gymnastics to take the medication in a therapeutic-use exemption. Biles took to Twitter to send a message that taking medication for ADHD is nothing to be ashamed of.

4. Simone Biles has four gymnastics moves named after her.

To have a move named after them, a gymnast must submit it to a governing body for consideration and then successfully land it at a major competition. There are four moves that bear the name Biles: two on floor, one on beam, and one on vault. In addition, in May Biles became the first female gymnast to successfully perform a vault move called the Yurchenko double pike in competition. The move involves a roundoff back handspring onto the springboard, then vaulting high enough to complete two flips in a pike position.

Controversy ensued when the judges gave it a scoring value of 6.6, similar to other, less risky moves. Biles and others criticized the International Gymnastics Federation for artificially deflating the point value of the Yurchenko double pike to discourage less-skilled athletes from attempting it for their own safety—and to prevent someone like Biles from running away with a competition.

5. There’s a goat on Simone Biles’s leotard.

Biles wears a rhinestone goat on her leotard, partly to take a swipe at haters and partly to inspire kids to be proud of their abilities. The goat symbolizes G.O.A.T., or “Greatest Of All Time.” Biles said she wanted kids to acknowledge when they’re good at something rather than downplay it. Her social media followers helped her name it Goldie.

6. Simone Biles has her own emoji.

The “Simoji,” a 99-cent app, features a variety of cartoon gymnast figures in Biles’s likeness. Biles said in a quick-hit YouTube interview with USA Gymnastics that her favorite emoji overall is the winking smiley face with its tongue sticking out.

7. Simone Biles crushed her competition in the handstand challenge.

Last April, actor Tom Holland created a social media challenge that entailed putting on a t-shirt while doing a handstand against a wall, then nominating someone else to do the same. Biles shut everyone down when she increased the difficulty level by taking off a pair of sweatpants while doing a handstand. In less than a minute. With no wall for support.

8. A bee once chased Simone Biles around the medal podium.

At the 2014 World Championships in Nanning, China, 16-year-old Biles was holding a bouquet of flowers on the podium after winning gold in the individual all-around when Romanian silver medalist Lorisa Iordache pointed out a bee. Biles tried to shake the bee out of the bouquet, which of course prompted it to buzz around in anger. Biles dropped the flowers, screamed, and ducked and danced away from the insect, laughing all the while.

9. Simone Biles competed at the 2018 World Championships despite a painful kidney stone.

Biles led her team to gold at the World Gymnastics Championship in Doha, Qatar, despite visiting the ER the night before the event. Biles said she had been experiencing stomach pain on her right side for a couple of days and went to the hospital as a precaution, thinking of appendicitis. Testing revealed a kidney stone, which Biles didn’t pass prior to the competition. Instead, she went out and posted the highest individual scores for beam, vault, and the floor events, and was second on uneven bars. She also had a vault named after her.

10. Simone Biles’s boyfriend didn’t know who she was when they started dating.

Biles is dating NFL player Jonathan Owens, whom she met just before the pandemic. It may be hard to fathom, but Owens, who plays for the Houston Texans, says he hadn’t heard of Biles. He did notice that Biles had 4 million followers on Instagram and surmised she must be good at what she does—and soon found out what an understatement that was.

11. Simone Biles loves dogs.

Biles owns two French bulldogs named Lilo and Rambo. They appear regularly on their Instagram account, @thebilesfrenchies, where they have more than 47,000 followers. Lilo and Rambo spend a lot of time with Owens’s own bulldog, Zeus, who’s also on social media. At one point, Biles and her family had four German Shepherds.

12. After meets, Simone Biles treats herself to pizza.

Biles is known for busting stereotypes of how female gymnasts should look and perform, and she carries that outside of the gym as well. Her Instagram feed shows her having fun with her family and friends (and dogs), not to mention occasionally engaging in some food and drink that plenty of non-elite athletes enjoy. She likes tequila and margaritas, tweeted about fried pickles, and has repeatedly professed her love for pizza, going so far as to say she treats herself to pepperoni pizza after every meet. While in St. Louis for the Olympic trials in June, she indulged in the famous square slices at Imo’s Pizza, and upon returning home to Texas, tweeted that she already missed it.

National Gymnastics Day – National Day Archives

National Gymnastics Day – National Day Archives

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On what day is National Gymnastics Day celebrated? September 19

What is National Gymnastics Day? This day both honors and encourages upcoming gymnasts and coaches in the sport. Gymnastics’ origins are found in Ancient Greece in which troops would use gymnastic-like movements to train for battle.

Here are some other fun facts about Gymnastics:  

  • In ancient Greece, vaults did not exist…so they jumped over bulls instead.
  • Acrobatic gymnastics used to be called Sport Acrobatics.
  • In modern Olympics there are eight events including Floor Exercise, Vault, Pommel Horse, Rings, Parallel Bars, Horizontal Bar, Uneven Bars and the Balance Beam
  • However, women are the only ones allowed to compete in the Balance Beam and Uneven Bars events.
  • Men are the only ones allowed to compete in Rings, Parallel Bars, Horizontal Bars and Pommel Horse.
  • Competitive gymnasts start training at 2 years old.

Who founded this day? This day was created by the United States in 1998.

What is the hashtag? Use the hashtag #NationalGymnasticsDay when sharing on social media.

How to celebrate: Here’s how you can celebrate the gymnastic athletes in your life:

  • Write them an encouraging note
  • Go to a gymnastic meet
  • Try it out yourself! Take a gymnastics class.

There are many other national days on our website. Try browsing one of our categories, or even create your own!

90,000 INTERESTING FACTS ABOUT GYMNASTICS!

Rhythmic gymnastics in Russia.
In Russia, rhythmic gymnastics is considered one of the most popular sports. There is no city or large urban-type settlement, wherever they go in for this sport. At the Summer Olympic Games, most of the champions and prize-winners in rhythmic gymnastics are Russians: Alina Kabaeva, Yulia Barsukova, Irina Chashchina, Evgenia Kanaeva, Daria Dmitrieva, Margarita Mamun, Yana Kudryavtseva and others.
Some features of rhythmic gymnastics

Warm-up for young gymnasts
Younger gymnasts’ training is limited to a few hours a day. Older age – up to fourteen hours a day. The main qualities of a gymnast are willpower, endurance and plasticity. As a rule, already at the age of 16, many athletes have to part with gymnastics or switch to sports ballet. Only a few gymnasts continue their sports careers until the age of 23-25, and only a few continue to compete at an older age.
Compared to artistic gymnastics, rhythmic gymnastics is a safer sport. However, very high demands are placed on the appearance of athletes. More recently, rhythmic gymnastics has begun to transform into aerobics and fitness, so many girls can continue their lives in sports. In sports aerobics and fitness aerobics, most of the participants are former gymnasts.

Refereeing.
It should be noted that rhythmic gymnastics, or rather, the assessment of the results of performances is an extremely subjective thing.More than once there have been serious scandals and even disqualifications of judges due to unequal treatment of athletes.
One of the most notorious incidents occurred at the European Championship in Zaragoza in 2000 with Elena Vitrichenko. Because of this, questions have repeatedly been raised about changing the refereeing procedure (similar to what is happening now in figure skating) or about removing this sport from the Olympic program.

Doping.
Rhythmic gymnastics was not spared by the problem of doping drugs.They are, of course, not taken to improve endurance or muscle mass. The main problem of gymnasts is being overweight. Therefore, the main drugs used are diuretics (diuretics), which, in turn, are prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA).

90,000 interesting facts about “Gymnastics for All” in different countries – European Gymnastics Center

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7 minutes

Published: 9 February
2016

All over the world, one of the most popular areas of mass sports, along with running or swimming, is “Gymnastics for All” or, in other words, Recreational Gymnastics, which attracts children and adults to classes.

Its main functions are health improvement, recovery and active rest. Moreover, this context does not at all mean the well-known sports or rhythmic gymnastics, which are available only to young girls and boys with outstanding abilities. The main benefits of Gymnastics for All are: affordability, diversity, entertainment, beauty and dynamism.

In general, Recreational Gymnastics classes are built around simple gymnastics, rhythmic gymnastics, acrobatics, trampoline jumping, sport dance and aerobics.These are general developmental exercises, training on apparatus, exercises with gymnastic and fitness attributes (hoops, balls, ribbons, skipping ropes, etc.), as well as staging theatrical sports and dance performances, and participating with these numbers in mass gymnastic festivals and competitions as part of national teams.

Recreational Gymnastics classes are especially important in childhood, as they contribute to the correct harmonious physical and psychological development of the growing body, and they are also very popular with children.Gymnastics contributes to the formation of a muscular corset, correct posture, coordination, endurance and flexibility of the child, as well as such essential moral qualities in life as willpower, hard work, dedication, introspection, self-confidence and stress resistance. In addition, doctors recommend gymnastics to every second child.

Such forms of physical activity are also successfully practiced among pensioners and people with disabilities.

People from different countries who are fond of gymnastics, regardless of age and physical fitness, unite in a mass gymnastic movement, travel all over the planet, exchange creative experiences, participate in world festivals as part of national teams, which are organized by the International Gymnastics Federation.

Major international Gymnastics for All festivals take place every year, but many countries also organize similar events of their own.Among them, for example, a festival for juniors – Eurogym, for seniors – “Golden Age”, for children and adults “Gym for Life Challenge”.

And the culminating point of this activity is the world Gymnastrades, which, like the Olympic Games,

held every four years and brings together up to 22 thousand participants – non-professional gymnasts from no less than 50 countries of the world.

The purpose of most of these festivals is not a competitive aspect, but to demonstrate their capabilities in public and get pleasure from it.The president of the International Gymnastics Federation, Bruno Grandi, at 81, and the organization’s general secretary, Andre Guisbuhler, take part in similar performances.

All these people are united by a love for gymnastics, for physical perfection and positive emotions that they acquire in the process of training. Moreover, the peculiarity of Recreational Gymnastics classes is that a person does not have to perform heavy and prolonged physical activity, and before that it takes a long time to persuade himself to go to workout.

Every year more and more countries are joining this international gymnastics movement. Many of them give even more preference to the development of “Gymnastics for All” among the population than the Olympic disciplines. The most illustrative examples are the Scandinavian countries, the USA, Switzerland, Germany, China, South Africa and others that are striving to make recreational gymnastics the main sport in the country.

For example, many people who have ever visited Japan or China note with admiration how every day, throughout the day, in completely different parts of the city, from central squares to lawns in parks, one can observe how children, adults, grandmothers and grandfathers get together and do gymnastics.They simultaneously perform various dance exercises with simple elements of acrobatics or stretching, make rearrangements, creating various figures and symbols.

Every year in China, in large cities and provinces, mass gymnastics classes are held, which gather more than 50 thousand people. One of these last actions took place at the end of October 2015 in the Chinese province of Henan. Similar festivals called Turnfest are very often held in Germany and Switzerland, they gather from 20 to 70 thousand participants, depending on the number of participating regions.

The number of “Gymnastics for All” clubs in small Switzerland reaches more than a thousand. At the same time, the significance of mass gymnastics in this country is confirmed by statistics. Twice a year, Switzerland and Germany host the national gymnastics festival Turnfest, which brings together competitions in all types of gymnastics. It runs throughout the week and consists of performances by teams in various types of Gymnastics for All, professional gymnasts, gymnasts with disabilities, as well as competitions in athletics, basketball, fitball and other national team sports.

Turnfest annually gathers from 7,000 to 20,000 participants, depending on its scale (there are small and large festivals), and Turnfest of the federation (from the French Fete federale de gymnastique), which takes place every 6 years – up to 70,000 participants.

In Denmark, only team gymnastics and acrobatics between the ages of 5 and 50 are taught in more than 130 clubs. In Iceland, with a population of 300 thousand people, there are 8 separate gymnastics clubs and 18 sections, and the number of people involved in each club reaches 500 people.

There are 390 gymnastics clubs in Finland with about 124,000 students. The Finnish Gymnastics Federation is the largest European organization for the development of both children and adults’ sports.

In Sweden, the National Gymnastics Federation is also the largest sports organization and also a leader in promoting fitness among women. There are 1,100 gymnastics clubs in Sweden with about 224,000 athletes.Most of the clubs are designed for sports for fun, with only 29,000 gymnasts practicing professionally and competing.

For people who do gymnastics unprofessionally, there are a large number of festivals, tournaments, children’s and family sports camps, seminars.

A feature of the Scandinavian countries is that fitness and all its varieties (aerobics, step, Pilates, yoga, oriental dances, etc.)are considered part of gymnastics, and fitness clubs are run by national gymnastics federations.

In Germany, there is a whole federation for children’s gymnastics, the creation of which was initiated by the main gymnastics federation. This organization is engaged in research and development of programs to improve the quality of gymnastics education for children. They include educational programs for schools, kindergartens, gymnastics clubs, for children with disabilities.Competitive programs are being developed for each category of children, including those vacationing in health and sports camps. Special events are organized for children that will involve them in sports and at the same time create fun and active leisure time. These are massive gymnastic festivals, tournaments, holidays, shows, where children have the opportunity to combine sports with theatrical art, dancing, and most importantly, fun and entertainment.

As confirmation of the need to develop this project, research institutes in Germany cite real pessimistic data on the physical development of children of various ages who lead a motionless lifestyle.For example, according to their data, half of children aged four to six years old cannot jump on one leg, or cannot coordinate simple motor actions, and children aged 10 to 16 years cannot bend forward by touching the floor with their hands.

To compare the indicators of physical development and its impact on the health of children, studies are being conducted of children who have just started playing sports (three months) and those who have already been involved in a long time (a year, two).

Gymnastics for All has developed on all continents.In Africa, it is especially popular in South Africa, where the emphasis is on gymnastics in schools and gymnastics, which is developing as a form of the veteran movement.

In Russia, the development of “Gymnastics for All” was first started by the European Gymnastics Center, which at the heart of its work uses the leading European system of improving the population through recreational gymnastics.

The work of the Center is based on the formation of people’s interest, motivation and pleasure from physical activity.

If you have any questions, you can consult with our specialists by phone +7 (495) 477 32 69 or by leaving a request for a free trial lesson.

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90,000 Some facts about gymnastics | Interesting Facts

Artistic gymnastics is a beautiful, dynamic form of physical activity that requires complete dedication from athletes. Let’s take a look at some interesting information that will help you understand the full depth of this great sport.

The origin of gymnastics

Gymnastics originated in ancient Greece, during the ancient Olympiads.It is worth noting that in addition to the complex of basic exercises, it included swimming, running, boxing, wrestling and even horseback riding.

Outside Greece, gymnastics was studied in China and India. In these countries, there were sets of exercises aimed at developing flexibility and increasing physical strength. Now they have transformed into separate disciplines that we know as yoga and wushu.

Even before our era, devices were used that outwardly very similar to modern gymnastic apparatus.For example, in ancient Rome, the basics of horseback riding were taught on a special simulator, which today decorates any gym and is called a “horse”.

Modern gymnastics

The modern era of gymnastics begins in 1881, when the European Gymnastics Association was founded. In 1897, it was reformatted into the International Organization of Gymnastics and has been operating to this day. Gymnastics became so popular that it was included in the compulsory program of the first Olympic Games.In the modern program, athletes compete in gymnastic apparatus, freestyle and vault exercises.

Olga Korbut (four-time champion) became the legend of artistic gymnastics. In honor of her name, one of the elements is even named – “Korbut somersault”. Olga became the first gymnast in history to perform it. By the way, because of the high risk of injury, the sports committee banned this trick.

Gymnastics & Rules

Warm-up plays a special role.If an athlete misses it before the competition, then the judges remove points from him or the entire team. In addition, the coach cannot talk to his pupil during his performance, and the athlete can be removed from the competition for clothes of an unknown sample.

The Amazing: Gymnastics and Animals

Did you know that the best gymnasts in nature are orangutans? In 2010, one of the Dutch zoos was forced to hire the Olympian Epke Sonderland to teach the monkeys some acrobatics lessons.The fact is that these primates in captivity have forgotten how to even jump from branch to branch. The athlete coped with the task, the orangutans were happy to repeat all the movements and soon began to climb no worse than before. If monkeys are so degraded without regular training, then what to expect from humans.

Gymnastics and Science

Have you ever wondered where gymnasts get strength for their performances? The whole secret is in the laws of physics. For example, if an athlete needs “X” energy to perform one somersault, then how much strength does he need to perform five such exercises? Think 5.But no. If everything is done in dynamics, then “X” and “5 × X” in terms of energy consumption will practically not differ. Here you use the flywheel principle. Yes, yes, the same one that was once used in windmills. The flywheel is considered to be the first man-made battery. The essence of its work is as follows: when the device spins up, it stores additional energy, and then, as needed, gives it back. Therefore, five somersaults are as realistic as one. Similar physical laws apply in almost every exercise.Experienced athletes are not only familiar with them, but also successfully use them in their performances. Gymnastics is not easy beauty, incredible accuracy and physical strength. It is also intelligence that helps make miracles a reality.

90,000 Interesting facts about gymnastics

There are many types of gymnastics – sports, artistic, aesthetic, rhythmic, finger, medical, industrial, respiratory. Acrobatics also belongs to this sport. Artistic and rhythmic gymnastics are considered the most difficult sports.Here are some interesting facts about gymnastics.

Features

The word “gymnastics” comes from the ancient Greek word “hymnos”, which means “train”.

Artistic gymnastics is the most extreme kind of sport. Competitions involve tricks so complex that they are often life-threatening. New complex elements are constantly appearing in artistic gymnastics. But some elements are prohibited due to the fact that they are very dangerous. For example, the “Korbut loop” was banned; it was made by Olga Korbut, an athlete from the USSR.

Rhythmic gymnastics is not such a dangerous sport, but no less difficult, tricks with a hoop, ribbon, skipping rope, clubs require a good reaction, because athletes throw the projectile to a height of eight meters. While the projectile is falling, rhythmic gymnastics must perform a difficult trick.

Only men took part in the ancient Olympiads and in the first Olympiads of modern times. Women began to compete in 1928.

Therapeutic gymnastics differs from physiotherapy exercises in that in remedial gymnastics exercises are done slowly and on the spot, and in physiotherapy exercises they are done quickly, you need to move a lot.

Artistic gymnastics is a sport in which children compete with each other (even children take part in the Olympic Games). At the age of 15, many become masters of sports. You can take part in international competitions from the age of 15, in the Olympic Games – from the age of 16. The older the gymnast, the more difficult it is for her to do complex tricks. Girls usually end their sports careers at the age of 18, and boys at the age of 21.

Gymnasts often do push-ups and plank exercises during training.It should be borne in mind that these exercises are very dangerous, as they load the heart. Therefore, you should not allow extreme fatigue, pushing up from the floor or making a “bar”.

At the 1896 Olympic Games, gymnastics was a general sports discipline, it included rope climbing, shot put, pole vaulting.

Videos of prohibited tricks in artistic gymnastics. Attention! Dangerous to life, do not repeat!

Records

Two athletes became absolute champions in artistic gymnastics three times in a row – Svetlana Khorkhina and Nadezhda Comanechi.

In 1904, at the Montreal Olympics, US gymnast George Eiser, who had a wooden prosthesis instead of one leg, won six medals in one day – three gold, two silver and one bronze.

The artistic gymnast from the British city of Leeds, Ashley Watson, did a back somersault, flying between the crossbars, which were at a distance of more than five meters from each other. Before the representatives of the Guinness Book of Records recorded the record, Ashley Wattsot made eight unsuccessful attempts.

South African athlete Zama Mofokeng performed 34 back somersaults, landing and starting with one hand. The interval between each touching the ground did not exceed three seconds.

Spaniard Andreu Vivos Tomas in 2001 made 59 revolutions on a pommel horse in one minute.

In 1995, the Belarusian gymnast Vitaly Shcherbo overcame 50 meters with a back somersault in 10 seconds.

90,000 Truth and fiction about rhythmic gymnastics

Rhythmic gymnastics is not a sport, but an art

To some extent, this is so.The first teachers in rhythmic gymnastics before that had their own studios or schools where they taught dance or rhythmic gymnastics. Therefore, the goal of training was at first to teach girls to move gracefully and freely control their bodies. Also, the theory of the French teacher François Delsarte was taken as a basis, who believed that every human experience is accompanied by certain body movements and, therefore, by reproducing these movements, one can evoke certain experiences in the viewer.

Still, rhythmic gymnastics is more a sport than an art. Daily eight-hour workouts, nerves, perseverance, constant victories over oneself – all this indicates that rhythmic gymnastics belongs to sports, but, undoubtedly, with elements of art.

A coach means more to gymnasts than parents.

Indeed, professional gymnasts spend more time with a coach than with their families.However, throughout her creative life, a gymnast, as a rule, has more than one coach. First, this is a specialist in initial training. Then – the teachers of the youth team. And only then top-level coaches appear.

There are more tears than joy in rhythmic gymnastics.

This is true at first. Despite interesting lessons for the child with objects, the first tears appear almost immediately. The pain when you are put on a twine, stretching.Tears, if something is not immediately obtained with a club or ribbon, nervous experiences before performances, the bitterness of defeat. But there are also injuries! However, rhythmic gymnastics develops flexibility, grace, endurance, teaches a person to control his body, gives self-confidence. And, of course, all tears are forgotten after the first victory!

The gymnasts eat little.

On the one hand, weight must be monitored. And there are times when you need to lose two or three kilograms.Then the gymnasts go on a diet. But after the weight has reached the desired value, you can afford to eat more. In addition, grueling training will simply prevent the gymnast from getting better. And the energy for the competition is still needed!

The level of rhythmic gymnastics has recently increased all over the world.

Yes this is true. And the main reason is the coaches from Russia and other countries of the former USSR, who now teach around the globe.If earlier good gymnasts met only in Eastern Europe, now we see many excellent athletes in China, Japan, the USA and other countries.

At major rhythmic gymnastics tournaments, the winners are known in advance.

No, it’s not like that. Of course, there are favorites, there are gymnasts with names, but even a champion can make a mistake! Especially often, unforeseen situations occur with an object: the tape can tie, the ball can roll away, the mace can fall.

Rhythmic gymnastics judges are biased.

The International Gymnastics Federation has changed the grading system several times in order to emphasize the technical elements and reduce the subjectivity of the grades. And yet, the assessment of performance in this sport remains extremely subjective. It often happens that at first you need to work for your own name, receiving underestimated marks, and then the name begins to work for the athlete, adding points to her.

Sports life in rhythmic gymnastics is very short.

Yes, 24 years in rhythmic gymnastics is already the limit. However, there is a perfectly logical explanation for this. In this sport, they train a lot, bend their backs, stretch, therefore, health does not allow them to do gymnastics longer. In addition, gymnasts also start their careers quite early. A child makes his first steps in this sport at 3-5 years old, since the body at this age is more susceptible to the development of flexibility and coordination.At the age of 16 they already become seniors. Only a few gymnasts continue their sports careers until the age of 22-24.

90,000 Facts about gymnastics. Interesting facts about artistic gymnastics

Facts about gymnastics. Interesting facts about artistic gymnastics

Artistic gymnastics is a beautiful, dynamic form of physical activity that requires complete dedication from athletes. Let’s take a look at some interesting information that will help you understand the full depth of this great sport.

The origin of gymnastics
Gymnastics originated in ancient Greece, during the ancient Olympiads. It is worth noting that in addition to the complex of basic exercises, it included swimming, running, boxing, wrestling and even horseback riding.
Outside Greece, gymnastics was studied in China and India. In these countries, there were sets of exercises aimed at developing flexibility and increasing physical strength. Now they have transformed into separate disciplines that we know as yoga and wushu.
Even before our era, devices were used that outwardly are very similar to modern gymnastic apparatus. For example, in ancient Rome, the basics of horseback riding were taught on a special simulator, which today decorates any gym and is called a “horse”.
Gymnastics in our time
The modern era of gymnastics begins in 1881, when the European Gymnastics Association was founded. In 1897, it was reformatted into the International Organization of Gymnastics and has been operating to this day.Gymnastics became so popular that it was included in the compulsory program of the first Olympic Games. In the modern program, athletes compete in gymnastic apparatus, freestyle and vault exercises.
Olga Korbut (four-time champion) became the legend of artistic gymnastics. In honor of her name, one of the elements is even named – “Korbut somersault”. Olga became the first gymnast in history to perform it. By the way, because of the high risk of injury, the sports committee banned this trick.
Gymnastics and Rules
Warm-up has a special role to play. If an athlete misses it before the competition, then the judges remove points from him or the entire team. In addition, the coach cannot talk to his pupil during his performance, and the athlete can be removed from the competition for clothes of an unknown sample.
Amazing: gymnastics and animals
Did you know that the best gymnasts in nature are orangutans? In 2010, one of the Dutch zoos was forced to hire the Olympian Epke Sonderland to teach the monkeys some acrobatics lessons.The fact is that these primates in captivity have forgotten how to even jump from branch to branch. The athlete coped with the task, the orangutans were happy to repeat all the movements and soon began to climb no worse than before. If monkeys are so degraded without regular training, then what to expect from humans.
Gymnastics and Science
Have you ever wondered where gymnasts get the strength for their performances? The whole secret is in the laws of physics. For example, if an athlete needs “X” energy to perform one somersault, then how much strength does he need to perform five such exercises? Think 5.But no. If everything is done in dynamics, then “X” and “5 × X” in terms of energy consumption will practically not differ. Here you use the flywheel principle. Yes, yes, the same one that was once used in windmills. The flywheel is considered to be the first man-made battery. The essence of its work is as follows: when the device spins up, it stores additional energy, and then, as needed, gives it back. Therefore, five somersaults are as realistic as one. Similar physical laws apply in almost every exercise.Experienced athletes are not only familiar with them, but also successfully use them in their performances. Gymnastics is not easy beauty, incredible accuracy and physical strength. It is also intelligence that helps make miracles a reality.

Interesting cases in artistic gymnastics. A bit of history

The word “gymnastics” has Greek roots, but opinions differ from what word it came from. Some argue that the word “hymnos” – “naked”, was taken as a basis, the second, that the word “gymnaso”, which translates as “train, exercise”.It should be noted that great attention was paid to sports, attention was focused on cardio loads: running, wrestling, boxing. Horseback riding was considered compulsory.

Gymnastics was known back in the days of Ancient Egypt, as evidenced by drawings with the simplest sports exercises. It is considered to be one of the oldest types of physical activity. In ancient countries, gymnastics was part of combat training.

Gymnastics was first introduced at the Olympic Games in 1896.The participants in the competition were exclusively men. Female gymnasts first took part in the Games only in 1928.

Rhythmic gymnastics is now a separate Olympic sport. This is a combination of grace and excellent physical shape. Exercises and gymnastic elements are performed to music using additional objects: a hoop, ball, rope, ribbon, clubs.

Artistic gymnastics is also an Olympic sport, but, unlike rhythmic gymnastics, both men and women compete in artistic gymnastics.

Gymnastic exercises allow you to get in good physical shape, align your posture, improve the vestibular apparatus. Static strength exercises, for example, in weightlifting, have many contraindications, and gymnastics can even be therapeutic and can help in the treatment of many diseases.

Source: https://interesnyefakty.com/stati/interesnye-fakty-o-hudozhestvennoy-gimnastike-nekotorye-fakty-o-sportivnoy-gimnastike

The whole truth about rhythmic gymnastics.They have their own flock there, their friends and like-minded people. A child in sports is not alone and is not cut off from his peers, but rather the opposite.

Young athletes also have time for all important children’s affairs, because 3-4 hours a day is not a day and night. They just get used to doing everything quickly and to the point. Weekends are planned a couple of weeks in advance and free time is valued much higher than that of “ordinary” children, and is occupied only with what is really important. Problems begin just after the decision to leave the sport – not everyone can immediately cope with this huge pile of free time, they do not know what to do with themselves, they feel sad and fall into apathy.

As for the financial side of the issue, at first glance, the amounts that go to children’s sports seem unreasonable and unaffordable. If you look at the family budget of the average family of a young athlete, then almost everything falls on the “sport” column. In addition to, in fact, the monthly fee for the lesson (initially rather large, because in serious sections they do not undertake to study for a penny), there are also: hours of individual training, rent of trampoline halls and what else is needed to improve qualifications, all kinds of “rolling” on the ice from figure skaters, classes with choreographers from gymnasts, acrobatics from dancers and similar important electives.Is it possible to do without this? It is unlikely, if you are serious about it, then it is stupid to spend so much time on some activity and at the same time not try to grow and develop in it. Competition suits, all kinds of balls, clubs, swords, swords, skates, pointe shoes and other professional equipment also cost a lot of money. The higher the quality – the higher the performance of the athlete – the higher the place in the competition. In order to jump double and triple jumps in figure skating, special, very difficult shoes are required, which cannot be bought so easily in “sporting goods”.The ball for rhythmic gymnastics must be made of a special material and have special properties. A leotard for performances should be lightweight, comfortable, beautiful and sewn, as a rule, to order, for each athlete individually.

Article about gymnastics.

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There are many rumors about rhythmic gymnastics. Let’s try to figure out which of this is fiction and which is true?
Rhythmic gymnastics is not a sport, but an art.

This is true to some extent.The first teachers in rhythmic gymnastics before that had their own studios or schools where they taught dance or rhythmic gymnastics. Therefore, the goal of training was at first to teach girls to move gracefully and freely control their bodies. Also, the theory of the French teacher François Delsarte was taken as a basis, who believed that every human experience is accompanied by certain body movements and, therefore, by reproducing these movements, one can evoke certain experiences in the viewer.

Still, rhythmic gymnastics is more a sport than an art. Daily eight-hour workouts, nerves, perseverance, constant victories over oneself – all this indicates that rhythmic gymnastics belongs to sports, but, undoubtedly, with elements of art.

A coach means more to gymnasts than parents.

Indeed, professional gymnasts spend more time with a coach than with their relatives. However, throughout her creative life, a gymnast, as a rule, has more than one coach.First, this is a specialist in initial training. Then – the teachers of the youth team. And only then top-level coaches appear.

There are more tears than joy in rhythmic gymnastics.

This is true at first. Despite interesting lessons for the child with objects, the first tears appear almost immediately. The pain when you are put on a twine, stretching. Tears, if something is not immediately obtained with a club or ribbon, nervous experiences before performances, the bitterness of defeat.But there are also injuries! However, rhythmic gymnastics develops flexibility, grace, endurance, teaches a person to control his body, gives self-confidence. And, of course, all tears are forgotten after the first victory!

Gymnasts eat little.

On the one hand, the weight must be monitored. And there are times when you need to lose two or three kilograms. Then the gymnasts go on a diet. But after the weight has reached the desired value, you can afford to eat more. In addition, grueling training will simply prevent the gymnast from getting better.And the energy for the competition is still needed!

The level of rhythmic gymnastics has recently increased all over the world.

Yes, it really is. And the main reason is the coaches from Russia and other countries of the former USSR, who now teach around the globe. If earlier good gymnasts met only in Eastern Europe, now we see many excellent athletes in China, Japan, the USA and other countries.

At major rhythmic gymnastics tournaments, the winners are known in advance.

No, it is not. Of course, there are favorites, there are gymnasts with names, but even a champion can make a mistake! Especially often, unforeseen situations occur with an object: the tape can tie, the ball can roll away, the mace can fall.

Rhythmic gymnastics judges are biased.

The International Gymnastics Federation has changed the grading system several times in order to emphasize the technical elements and reduce the subjectivity of the grades. And yet, the assessment of performance in this sport remains extremely subjective.It often happens that at first you need to work for your own name, receiving underestimated marks, and then the name begins to work for the athlete, adding points to her.

Sports life in rhythmic gymnastics is very short.

Yes, 24 years in rhythmic gymnastics is already the limit. However, there is a perfectly logical explanation for this. In this sport, they train a lot, bend their backs, stretch, therefore, health does not allow them to do gymnastics longer. In addition, gymnasts also start their careers quite early.A child makes his first steps in this sport at 3-5 years old, since the body at this age is more susceptible to the development of flexibility and coordination. At the age of 16 they already become seniors. Only a few gymnasts continue their sports careers until the age of 22-24.

The whole truth about gymnastics. How dangerous is gymnastics for a child? The whole truth from my own experience

Everyone told me: in no case, you can’t! You will ruin the child! Injuries, starvation, problems at school, lost childhood … And very expensive too! But I didn’t listen to anyone: I took my daughter by the hand and took her to the nearest gymnastics club.

To be honest, I had no idea what it would turn into for me! It was then that our long-established and measured family life gave us a wave. Now absolutely everything – diet, daily routine, free time, budget, conversations – is subject only to a painstaking training process. Now I know everything about children’s rhythmic gymnastics, and now I will tell you in a nutshell.

Me and my daughter Lisa. Photo from personal archive

Why it is impossible to do rhythmic gymnastics

At the very beginning, “knowledgeable” acquaintances told me a lot of sentimental things about gymnastics.These are, first of all, professional injuries – acute and chronic:

  • muscle and tendon strain;
  • injuries of the knee and ankle joints;
  • damage to the foot;
  • back pain …

In addition, they argued that rhythmic gymnastics is a very difficult sport. Indeed, to perform various elements, the girl must stretch properly; and without pain and tears, gaining the necessary flexibility will not work.

And more:

  1. A strict diet and fasting are constant companions of the young athlete.
  2. There will be problems with school due to constant absences.
  3. Big expense, because gymnastics is a very “expensive” sport. This is the payment for group lessons and individual training, the purchase of sports uniforms and equipment, as well as the costs associated with travel to training camps and competitions.

Minor injuries, pain, tears, diet, spending – I faced all this almost immediately. Therefore, I agree. But …

Lisa is in training. Photo from personal archive

Why it is possible and necessary to do rhythmic gymnastics

I myself am a former athlete, I was engaged in artistic gymnastics.Therefore, I understand perfectly well that rhythmic gymnastics is one of the least traumatic sports. If, of course, an experienced coach in a professional club is working with your baby. And the undoubted benefits for health and beauty more than cover all possible costs.

The main reasons why it is necessary to send a girl to rhythmic gymnastics are:

  1. Appearance: slimness, flexibility, beautiful figure.
  2. Health: harmonious formation of the body, strengthening health and the immune system, getting rid of the initial stages of certain diseases, disease prevention.
  3. Character: firmness, determination, resistance to stress, endurance, resilience and self-control.
  4. Education: discipline, responsibility, healthy habits, including proper balanced nutrition.

I think that sports doctors, psychologists and parents of young athletes will fully support me.

Lisa in training. Photo from personal archive

Looking at children, I understand how important sports could play in their lives.At least in its initial, “harmless” phase. It is a pity that many parents do not understand this, listening more to the opinion of demagogues and reinsurers.

The benefits of rhythmic gymnastics and sports in general are enormous and priceless! If you were not taken by the hand to the section at one time, this does not mean that your child should be deprived of this opportunity.

When she grows up, I want my daughter to become a slender and beautiful girl, healthy and strong, with a strong character and good upbringing.I love her too much to let her mess around.

Source: https://interesnyefakty.com/novosti/interesnye-fakty-o-gimnastike

Gymnastics. Why do you need gymnastics

The word “gymnastics” comes from the Greek gymnastike, which literally means “train”, “exercise”. Gymnastics is understood as a set of physical exercises that promote health, the development of muscles and the musculoskeletal system. For most people, such exercises are associated with morning exercises.But besides this, gymnastics can be practiced professionally, like any sport. Moreover, even small children are taken into this sport.

Don’t underestimate gymnastics. They allow you to keep the body in good shape, develop dexterity, strength, endurance, and contribute to weight loss.

Daily exercise has a positive effect on the respiratory and cardiovascular systems, therefore it is often used as a therapeutic, prophylactic and restorative agent for many diseases.

Morning exercise energizes the whole day and increases efficiency.

Non-professional types of gymnastics are recommended for people of almost any age – from young to old. So, in preschool education, it is used in physical education and morning exercises: this allows hyperactive kids to throw out excess energy, and calmer kids – to cheer up and tune in to a fun and active day. For older people, simple exercise can help them maintain joint mobility and avoid limiting their ability to move.

It has been proven that regular gymnastic exercises improve metabolism, have a positive effect on blood circulation and increase immunity.

Therefore, doctors strongly recommend including gymnastics in their lifestyle for everyone who has no contraindications to its implementation.

10 interesting facts about gymnastics. Interesting facts about gymnastics

Many of us admire the flexibility of some people, as it is not available to everyone. Especially when it is on the move.Gymnastics leaves no one indifferent, moreover, sometimes it causes some envy that athletes can do this, but you cannot. You can call it a sport, or you can call it a kind of art through which experienced gymnasts express themselves and communicate with the audience. Below are some interesting facts about gymnastics that might interest you.

Facts about gymnastics
1. The term comes from Greek words and means according to one version – “exercise”, according to the second – “naked”.In ancient times, there were gyms in Greece where physical education was instilled. A special technique was developed, which was strictly followed. In particular, the soldiers were trained to mount a horse and related procedures that are necessary for this. This formed a gymnastic base that has evolved over time. During the same period, she entered the educational system of Greece. After joining the Roman Empire, gymnastics took a different form.
2. Men’s gymnastics was included in the Olympic Games in 1896.Female gymnasts first appeared at the Olympics in the 1920s.
3. Gymnasts from the Soviet Union impressed everyone with their performances from the first years of participation. Thanks to television, sports have been popularized among viewers.
4. Gymnastics is also known as one of the oldest forms of physical exercise!
5. Some early examples of gymnastics can be found even on ancient Egyptian artifacts. For example, the drawings depicted on them give an idea of ​​the existence of this sport in those days.People perform various gymnastic exercises on them. In addition to men, women are also present.

6. Rhythmic gymnastics is another form of gymnastics that is also popular with its fans. Women have been able to compete in the Olympic Games in this sport since 1928.
The Goals of Gymnastics
Gymnastics is a human blessing in many ways. It is not just a form of physical exercise, with its help a positive attitude towards life is formed, which is the main principle.
In addition to artistic gymnastics, there is also a public one, which is called fitness. In addition, there is yoga gymnastics, where the emphasis is on breathing. Classes should be conducted either outdoors or in rooms with good ventilation. Special clothing for gymnastics helps a lot, which makes it possible not to feel cramped.

Purposeful gymnastics will help a person develop the strength of his own body. Vision and coordination of movements will improve.Gymnastics will help you develop the correct posture, which is very important for your health.
The use of music of different rhythm allows the student to develop a sense of rhythm, balance and a sense of time. Another goal of gymnastics is to develop personal memory. The latest techniques and concepts help a person not only improve it, but also use it to the limit of their ability.

Gymnastics is a one-man and at the same time a team sport in which you have to constantly communicate with different people.Thus, she helps a person develop social skills that will come in handy in their personal life.
Some more facts
At the Olympic Games in 1896, gymnastics included pole vaulting, shot put, rope climbing, etc.
You can start training gymnastics from 2 years old. Only 16 years of age or older are allowed to participate in the Olympic Games.
The optimal age for women is 14-18 years, for men – 18-21 years.

For the first time at the Olympic Games, the Romanian gymnast Nadia Comaneci won 10 points among women in 1976 in Montreal, the last 10 points – Lavinia Milosovici, also from Romania.Among men, the highest score was first won at the Olympics in 1924 by Albert Sequin.
Only two gymnasts were three times in a row champions in the European all-around – Nadia Comaneci (Romania) and Svetlana Khorkina (Russia).
Lilia Podkopayeva (Ukraine) is the only Olympic champion in personal performances without an overall team victory (Ukraine took 5th place).
George Asher of the USA won the World Vault title when he was blind in his right eye and had a wooden leg.

Source: https://interesnyefakty.com/stati/hudozhestvennaya-gimnastika-interesnye-fakty-hudozhestvennaya-gimnastika-istoriya-interesnye

Video 10 FACTS YOU DIDN’T KNOW ABOUT in rhythmic gymnastics | Interesting Facts | COMPETITION

“The fact that so few protests were satisfied in rhythmic gymnastics at the 2020 Olympics proves that the refereeing was competent,” according to the Ukrainian judge – Gymnastics

Ukrainian judge of the international category in rhythmic gymnastics Lydia Vinogradnaya explained a large number of protests in the final of the personal all-around in Tokyo 2020, as well as the long scoring of the Russian woman Dina Averina, who eventually became the second.

“Protests are the eternal entertainment of rhythmic gymnastics coaches. If suddenly some kind of protest is accepted from someone, then the coaches feel the “blood” and begin to apply for everything and always.

At the Olympics, the FIG clearly hit the jackpot in protests. And the fact that so few protests were satisfied proves that the refereeing was competent.

Let me give you a simple example of how the system works in difficulty. The score is given by two judges and a supervisor. If there is a difference between them, the system is blocked, the assessment is reviewed by the superior jury and a verdict is issued, whose assessment counts.If the coach submits a protest, the score is revised by the superior jury, but if there was a block before, then in fact it does not make sense, since the superior jury has already revised the exercise and made its decision.

The Olympic Games are interesting competitions: there is only one panel of judges judging. Usually at competitions there are at least two teams – each judges through the view (in the all-around one judge the hoop and clubs, the second – the ball and the ribbon).

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