Fountain pen stationery: The Best Fountain Pen Paper

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The Best Fountain Pen Paper

Selecting a paper for your fountain pen is like pairing a fine wine with cheese—different combinations bring out the subtleties and unique flavors of both. In the same way, finding a good paper allows you to realize the full potential of your fountain pen and ink, adding another dimension to both the pen and paper. There are many things to consider when selecting the best paper appropriate for your fountain pen. We delve into those considerations below, but skip to end if you just want to see our tried and true paper recommendations!

Considerations

Paper Color

A crisp, clean white is the standard for most fountain pen paper, but soft, cream colored paper is also available as an option that’s easier on the eyes. The brightness of white paper may vary across different manufacturers. A bright white paper is the best choice for inks to show their true color. If colored paper is more your style, Midori makes a range of colorful notebooks with matching colored paper that are fountain-pen-friendly!

Feathering

The dreaded effect of feathering occurs when the ink spreads through a paper’s fibers, resulting in an unattractive, web-like mess. Low quality paper is more prone to feathering while higher quality paper is specifically designed to resist the spreading of ink along its fibers. Aside from the paper itself, nib size and the ink formula also play a role in the degree of feathering.

Bleedthrough and Showthrough

Bleedthrough occurs when a paper is too thin or too absorbent, or when a fountain pen ink is particularly wet. The fiber on fountain pen paper is specifically woven to prevent bleed through, but you may still see traces of what you’ve written through the other side of the paper, known as showthrough. Showthrough level depends on the opacity of the paper, mostly affected by its thickness. A thicker paper will naturally have less showthrough.

Dry Time

Given different ink formulations, dry time varies by a paper’s absorbency—the greater the absorbency, the shorter the dry time. However, a paper’s absorbency is inversely correlated with it’s smoothness; in other words a paper that is more absorbent will tend to be rougher to write on. In practice, you will have to choose a balance between a short dry time and writing smoothness.

Sheet Style

Like regular paper, fountain pen paper comes in a range of sheet styles, from lined to blank to grid. A popular option is Rhodia’s dot grid ruling where light gray dots are arranged in a grid pattern, providing a nice guideline for writing without being intrusive. For those who prefer blank sheets, some manufacturers will include a template that you can layer behind the paper to help you keep your writing straight. To read more about sheet styles, see our Paper Notebooks Explained article.

Smoothness

To fully take advantage of a fountain pen’s smooth-flowing ink, an equally smooth paper is a must. Usually, the coating on the paper affects its smoothness level. A fully coated paper is slippery, making it difficult for the ink to absorb and dry. However, an uncoated paper is often toothy, which is difficult for fountain pen nibs to glide across. We recommend a half-coated paper for a smooth writing experience and reasonable dry time.

Price

Generally, paper made especially for fountain pen use will be more expensive. We have a couple of finds below that aren’t intended for exclusive fountain pen use, but are still fountain pen friendly at a lower price point.

Paper Recommendations

Tomoe River Paper

The exquisite Tomoe River Paper proves that a paper can be both both thin and high quality. These ultra thin pages are velvety smooth and highly resistant to bleedthrough. There is a high amount of show through however, which may render the back side of the paper unusable depending on your tolerance. This paper is perfect for those who need something lightweight. It comes in loose leaf sheets as well as notebook and note pad form (as shown in the picture). Called the Kanso, these notebooks are exclusive to JetPens.

Maruman Mnemosyne Notebook

In Greek mythology, Mnemosyne was the mother of the nine muses, and it’s easy to see why her namesake paper is an inspiration in itself. The paper found in these notebooks boasts a silky smooth surface, relatively fast drying time, and minimal show through. With an impressive array of sizes, sheet styles, and binding types to choose from, it’s easy to find a notebook or notepad that will help you channel the spirit of Mnemosyne. Read more about Mnemosyne notebooks in our comprehensive guide.

Midori Color Paper Notebook

Color lovers will enjoy the scrumptious hues of these notebooks! Midori didn’t skimp on their caliber—the paper has a satiny feel that fountain pens can effortlessly glide over. However the paper has a significant amount of show through, which is bothersome for those who want to use the back side. Nonetheless, colored notebooks suitable for fountain pens are few and far between, and this is a great, affordable choice if you want a colored notebook.

Midori MD Notebook

This small and simple notebook features Midori Diary paper, which is designed to give the user a pleasant writing experience. With a fairly short drying time and soft, smooth paper, this is a nice, inexpensive notebook for everyday use. However, the show through level is significant, which may be inconvenient if you want to use the back side of the paper. A slimmer, “light” version of this notebook is also available.

Rhodia DotPad Notepad

Fountain pen users love the dot grid pattern that is featured on this paper! This sheet style is subtle enough to not interfere with your writing, but clear enough to provide a nice guideline. The low level of show through is quite impressive, so we wouldn’t have a problem writing on the backside of this paper.

Rhodia R Premium Notepad

One of the smoothest papers we’ve had the pleasure of writing on, this premium paper is so buttery, we could run our fingers over it all day long. It has the least amount of show through out of all the featured papers. Fountain pen ink also dried reasonably quickly considering the smoothness of this paper. For those who want a luxurious writing experience, we recommend trying out this paper.

Kokuyo Campus High Grade MIO Notebook

The high quality MIO paper is extremely smooth, but provides some grip to keep your fountain pen nib from slipping and sliding everywhere. Ink dried fairly quickly on this paper and only showed through the back a slight amount. The paper is lightweight, making it perfect for carrying around around at school or at the office.

Apica Premium C.D. Notebook

Fountain pens glide gracefully over the rich, silky paper of this notebook. There is very little show through on this paper. However you do have to wait a bit longer for ink to dry. We love that the notebook contains a hefty 96 pages in both the A6 and B5 sizes, giving you plenty of space to write all your thoughts, notes, and observations.

Clairefontaine Triomphe Notepad

The meaning of “je ne sais quoi,” or that certain something, becomes clear when we use Clairefontaine’s renowned paper in the Triomphe notepad. With barely any show through and a silky texture, this extra-white paper is a joy to write on, making it a favorite among fountain pen users. A guide sheet is included that you can place under your blank page to help you write in straight lines.

Clairefontaine Collection 1951 Notebook

Clairefontaine is also famous for its classic composition notebooks. With the notebook’s touch of French sophistication, you never feel the drudgery of grade school when you use it. While not quite as smooth as the paper in the Triomphe notepad, it is an affordable choice for those who need a solid, reliable notebook for school or work. There is some show through, but you can get away with writing on the back side depending on your tolerance.

Tsubame Fools University Notebook

This charming notebook contains smooth, high quality paper that is not too slippery, but has a bit of grip to give you full control over your fountain pen. It has some show through and longer dry time, but not enough to get in the way of using the back side of the paper. There is also a cream version of this notebook for those who want an alternative to white paper.

Life Vermilion Notebook

Easy on the eyes, the creamy paper of the Life Vermilion notebook makes it a great everyday notebook. The minimal amount of show through means that you can easily use the back side of the paper. Be careful when you turn the pages though, because there is a moderate amount of drying time for the ink. You can choose from different sizes and sheet styles based on your needs.

Pilot Letter Pad for Fountain Pens

Made specifically for fountain pen use, this letter pad allows the fountain pen nib to glide effortlessly over it. The unique, wide rule of the paper gives you ample space to pen thoughtful notes and letters, and the soft white color is pleasant to look at. It’s not as practical for everyday use, but for special occasions, letters, or archiving your inks, it’s perfect.

Kobeha Graphilo Notebook

This elegant, premium notebook contains smooth off-white paper with just a bit of tooth that’s ideal for use with fountain pens. The paper resists feathering and bleedthrough even from the wettest inks. However inks do take a while to dry on this paper, so Kobeha has included a sheet of SUITO blotting paper. You can use it to absorb any slow-drying ink before closing the notebook. It comes in graph, lined, and blank styles.

Original Crown Mill Classic Laid Writing Pads

Original Crown Mill stationery is lightly textured with a woven pattern, creating a tactile sensation when writing. Ink dries relatively quickly on this paper, with no feathering. It does, however, show through the back of the paper slightly. This unlined paper includes a guide sheet. It is available in A4 and A5 sizes and white and cream colors.

If you don’t mind a slower dry time and more showthrough, smoother Pure Cotton Writing Pads are also available from Crown Mill.

G. Lalo Correspondence Sets

These elegant notecards have colorful borders and thick, ivory-colored paper. While they aren’t large enough for letters, there’s plenty of room for invitations or thank-yous. The thick material of the notecards prevents showthrough and bleedthrough, making them great for wetter inks or decorative calligraphy although the ink takes some time to dry. The paper has a subtle laid finish that is smooth to the touch but provides some control for your pen.

The notecards also come with matching envelopes. Though the envelopes are not as smooth as the cards, they resist bleedthrough and showthrough just as well.

What Is The Best Paper For Fountain Pens?

For many fountain pen users, choosing a high quality paper is just as important as choosing which pen and ink to use. If you’ve never given much thought to the paper you write on, hopefully this article introduces a whole new dimension to your writing. In this article, I’ll introduce some of the basic paper concepts, as well as make a few brand recommendations for the best paper for fountain pens (jump there now).

Paper Size and Weight

If you’re an American, you’ve probably heard of legal and letter paper sizes (and if you’re not an American, you can probably safely skip this section), but if you’re new to paper, you might find some of the different paper sizes a little confusing. For example, there’s A4, A5, B4 and B5. How do you know which is bigger and which will work best for writing? Well, here are some links that are a great reference for the A and B measurements. In the “A” link, you can also see how legal and letter sizes compare.

Notice how the dimensions of each larger number are half the size of the smaller number. That means a sheet of A4 paper is equal to two sheets of A5 paper. While larger numbers mean smaller paper dimensions, as you go up in alphabet letter from A to B, the paper dimensions increase. That means a sheet of B5 paper is larger than A5 paper.

Ultimately, the sizes you find the most often are A4 and A5. Most loose-leaf paper and notepads come in these sizes. While you can find some quality paper in letter size, the majority of the best paper for fountain pens will be either A4 or A5.

The A5 journal (top) is half the size of the A4 notepad (bottom)

Paper weight refers to its thickness. You might see a lot of different measurements for paper weight, including a measurement in pounds. Just look at this chart that shows how many different ways paper weight might be measured. As you might notice, if you see a paper weight that’s measured in pounds, it can be hard to tell how thick it actually is. In order to avoid any confusion, the most universal measurement is GSM (grams per square meter). Not coincidentally, you’ll find most quality paper is measured in GSM.

If you use 8.5″x11″ copy paper, you’ll probably find the weights measured in pounds. On the chart I referenced, that is the Bond Weight. So, if you enjoy using the amazing HP Premium32 paper, it has a 120gsm paper weight. Compare this to something like Tomoe River, which has a weight of 52gsm, and you can see how much variance in thickness there can be in between different types of quality writing paper.

10 sheets of HP 120gsm paper (left) are much thicker than 10 sheets of Tomoe River 52gsm paper (right)

Paper Quality

Let’s go ahead and talk now about paper quality. Of course, using quality paper will have the biggest impact on your writing experience. If you use paper that feathers and bleeds with fountain pen ink, your writing will not look very nice and could actually be difficult to read. If you use paper that your nib does not glide across smoothly without getting snagged, you won’t enjoy writing on it.

There’s more to paper quality than just working well with fountain pens. You’ll also need to decide what qualities you want your writing and writing experience to have. Do you want to use a heavier weight of paper to lend a little more substance to your writing? Do you want a paper that accentuates your ink’s sheen? Do you want an ultra-smooth paper or one that offers a little feedback when you write?

Another paper quality consideration is whether to use paper that is made out of wood pulp, cotton or a blend of the two. Paper with a cotton content is typically considered to be the most durable and archival, but not everyone prefers it. Unless you have specific needs for the archival quality of your paper, the choice between which type of paper you’ll like best entirely comes down to personal preference.

Intended Use

The way you intend to use the paper will also make a difference. If you plan to write letters or use notepads or loose-leaf paper, you’ll have some different options than if you plan to write in a notebook or journal. Some quality notepad paper manufacturers, such as G. Lalo, don’t make bound notebooks or journals. Some notebook manufacturers, such as Leuchtturm1917, don’t make notepads. Some, such as Rhodia and Midori, make both notepads and notebooks. This is something to keep in mind if you go looking for products from your favorite paper company… they might not be available in every style you want.

A notepad (left) has loose sheets of paper you can tear out. A journal (right) is like a book.

Paper Cost

The cost of the paper you choose can be a big factor. While you can easily buy an inexpensive spiral bound notebook or ream of 500 sheets of cheap copy paper without spending a lot of money, that paper is not something you’d want to use with your fountain pen. High-quality paper is going to cost you a bit of money. Of course, no where near what you’d expect to pay for a good fountain pen or even a bottle of ink, but you might be surprised at what paper can cost.

One of the most popular papers amongst fountain pen users is Tomoe River. If you choose a pack of 50 sheets of their 68 gsm paper, you’ll pay about $0.37 per sheet. Compare that to a ream of basic copy paper where each sheet costs about $0.01. That is a significant difference in cost! Of course, this is an extreme example, but chances are you’ll be paying closer to Tomoe River prices than cheap copy paper prices for good paper.

For journals and notepads, it’s the same story. A quality notepad might cost $5-$15, while a journal or planner can cost significantly more. If you think about it, it makes sense to spend the money on a high-quality journal or planner. These are items that you’ll be using every day, so having quality paper that leads to a good writing experience should be a high priority.

The Best Paper For Fountain Pens – Recommendations

Now that you know what makes a paper good for fountain pens, I’ve got a few recommendations. Keep in mind, there are many different types of paper out there and the best way to figure out which is best for you is simply to use them. With that being said, here are a few of my favorites:

Midori Paper: Midori is probably my favorite overall paper. It has a good weight and feel, is smooth to write on but does offer a little bit of feedback, and shows shading and sheen very nicely. It also comes in both notebooks and loose-leaf paper.

Tomoe River 68gsm Paper: Tomoe River has attained an almost-legendary status amongst fountain pen users and I consider myself a fan as well. Not only is Tomoe River the paper king of sheen, it is also quite smooth and doesn’t bleed through. This is very surprising considering how thin it is. This thinness is also important to me since I’m able to use it to write to my pen pals who live in other countries without spending a lot of money on postage. I do personally prefer the slightly heavier 68gsm paper compared to the 52gsm paper, which I feel is just too thin to have an amazing writing experience.

HP Premium32: HP Premium32 paper, while maybe not the most exciting paper you can buy, is some of the most affordable fountain pen friendly paper around. It is one of the first papers I reach for when I need to jot something down.

Rhodia Paper: Rhodia is a great all-around paper. It is high-quality, relatively inexpensive, easy to find and comes in pretty much any option you desire (notebooks, notepads, planners, journals).

Interested in trying some of these papers before buying an entire notebook? Head over to my shop and pick up a paper sample pack.

Ask The Desk: Stationery – The Well-Appointed Desk

Yesterday on Twitter Roxtime asked

Where do you buy writing paper?

When she asked, I had just posted a photo of my outgoing mail on Instagram so I assumed she meant stationery rather than bound notebooks and the like.

There are lots of lovely options for stationery and writing paper but, like notebooks, each option has its own set of criteria, costs and advantages. I hope to cover a few but please leave comments and questions if I missed something.

If you’re looking, first and foremost, for paper for fountain pens then I would recommend purchasing Original Crown Mill ($9 for a pad of 100 half-sheets) or G. Lalo ($12 for 50 half-sheet pad) paper and envelopes ($9-$14.50 for pack of 25), both available at Goulet Pens and other fine shops that sell fountain pens and stationery.

Paper Source sells full 8.5″x11″ sheets of paper (a 10-pack is about $2.50 though I’d avoid the metallics which tend to resist ink more so than plain paper) in packs and could be cut in half for a more classic letter size in an array of colors. Not of all the paper will be great for fountain pens but its a small investment and most papers should work well with other sorts of writing tools like gel ink pens, ballpoint or rollerball. Or you could order paper directly from a paper company like French Paper — straight from the source.

If you’re feeling particularly decadent, you could purchase some of Smythson’s fine writing paper ($25 for 50 sheets) Crane and Co. carries letter sheets, some can be personalized as well but this is not an inexpensive option.

If you’re looking for flat cards, Greer Chicago carries some Original Crown Mill and G. Lalo card sets with tissue-lined envelopes and deckle edges — quite sumptuous! The Vickerey also sells a lot of European style notecard sets.

If what you’re wanting is something with decorative designs on it, first I’d recommend Rifle Paper Co. They have some lovely stationery sets and various flat and folded notecards. Chronicle Books also carries lots of paper sets and blank notecards with a wide array of designs. The paper is not always the best for fountain pens, if that’s a concern but the sets are lovely and often come with stickers to seal or use to address your envelopes.

If you still haven’t found what you’re looking for I’d recommend heading to Etsy. Some of the great options I found were letterpress lined papers from Ilfant Press, playful letter sets from La Paperie, and lots of vintage stationery and letter sets. Just do a search for “vintage writing paper” or “vintage letter sets” and you should find lots of options to choose from.

And finally, if you’ve decided to go with a plain paper option but would still like to add some flourish to it, you can look about the internet for downloadable PDF files that you could copy onto your stationery. I would recommend copying one sheet first and testing to make sure that the copier did not coat your paper in fuser oil of other ink resistant goo before copying onto all of your lovely paper. A great example of well-designed, free downloadable stationery is from How About Orange (show above).

The recent Uppercase Stationery Guide is a great resource for finding a stationery shop or custom printer near you.

(shoutout to Letter Writers Alliance for the Uppercase Stationery Guide tip)

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Fountain Pen Friendly Paper — The Gentleman Stationer

I’m often asked to recommend “fountain pen friendly” paper. Though what constitutes “fountain pen friendly” is highly subjective, since certain people ignore/tolerate things like bleed-through and feathering more than others, I thought I’d do a Deals & Drops where I focused on good paper, at all price points. (As always, there are a few other things thrown in, and general Amazon recommendations can be found here.) 

Disclaimer: This post contains links to paid sponsors and affiliates. 

  1. Story Supply Co Pocket Staple – Edition 407 (via Pen Chalet). Though I’m not using as many pocket notebooks as I used to, SSC makes great paper that handles fountain pen ink relatively well. 
  2. Leuchtturm 1917 A5 Hardcover Notebook (via Pen Chalet). A go-to if you’re looking for a Moleskine-esque black notebook with upgraded paper.  
  3. Rhodia Webnotebook (via Pen Chalet). The Rhodia “Webbie” is a classic hardbound notebook popular among fountain pen enthusiasts. Rhodia paper is a step above Leuchtturm, though it’s also a bit pricier.
  4. Baron Fig Paper (via Baron Fig). The Confidant is my go-to for hardbound notebooks, and I burn through their Mastermind Desk Pads on a weekly basis. 
  5. Maruman Mnemosyne (via Anderson Pens). Fans of spiral-bound notebooks swear by Maruman.  
  6. Midori MD Notebook (via Amazon). Midori paper is another high quality Japanese paper option, slightly less slick than Rhodia/Clairefontaine, and thicker than Tomoe River. The MD notebooks come in a range of sizes.
  7. Midori Cotton (via Anderson Pens). Another quality offering from Midori. Cotton paper is more absorbent and softer than Midori’s standard paper.  
  8. LIfe Stationery (via Vanness Pens). Life Stationery is another Japanese brand popular among fountain pen fans. Their paper can be harder to find in the U.S., but Vanness carries a good selection if they can keep it in stock. 
  9. Inky Fingers Notebooks (via Vanness Pens). The creation of Matt Armstrong of Pen Habit fame, the Inky Fingers notebooks feature environmentally friendly and sustainable wheat-straw paper, which has some nice texture.
  10. Clairefontaine Clothbound French-Ruled (via Goldspot). I’ve always had a soft spot for Clairefontaine paper, since it was the first really nice paper I ever used. The French-ruled side bound 6*8 size makes for a great journal. 
  11. Montegrappa Fortuna Blue Blazer (via Goldspot). Montegrappa has released its latest pen in the Fortuna series, and it’s a “fireblue”-style stainless steel version. I need to see one of these at a show.
  12. Montegrappa Fortuna Camouflage (via Pen Chalet). These earth-tone “camouflage” materials always turn out well.   
  13. Pilot Vanishing Point Yellow/Satin Black “Bumblebee” (via Paul’s Paper & Pens). I picked one of these up a while back, and it’s amazing! Another great color you can currently only grab from non-U.S. retailers.
  14. Sailor 1911 Royal Tangerine Fountain Pen (via Pen Chalet). While we’re on the subject of bold colors, check out Sailor’s latest North American exclusive. 1911 Large version is also available. 
  15. Nanami “Seven Seas” Notebooks (via Nanami Paper). The “Seven Seas” notebooks contains hundreds of sheets of super thin, yet fountain-pen-friendly, Tomoe River paper. My personal favorites are the Crossfield grid notebook and the Cafe Note B6. 
  16. Taroko Design Notebooks (via Etsy / Taroko Design). More great Tomoe River paper options, a very reasonable price points. 
  17. Cross Star Wars Sale (via Cross). Cross is continuing their sale on Star Wars-themed pens, including their journals, Click gel pens, and Townshend Fountain Pens. The “Stormtrooper” fountain pen that I’ve previously reviewed is on outlet pricing. 
  18. Nock Co. Spiral Pad (via Nock Co.). Fans of steno pads will appreciate this Nock Co. version, featuring their dot-dash paper. 
  19. Studio Neat Panobook (via Amazon). Though the Panobook may not be the most fountain-pen friendly paper out there, I like that the pages are perforated, and it’s unique shape allows it to fit just beneath the keyboard.
  20. Fisher Space Pen Astronaut Pen Black Titanium Nitride (via Amazon). Fisher Space Pen has released a black titanium nitride version of their classic “astronaut” pen.  It looks great!     

The Best Paper For Fountain Pens

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Searching for the best paper for one’s fountain pen is a very common quest in the pen world. Like fountain pen ink, paper is relatively affordable and sold in unlimited varieties so this is a hunt that can last for decades.

Let’s cut down on that search time with some suggestions on the best fountain pen paper.

What Is Fountain Pen Paper?

Fountain pen paper is not a specific, or defined thing, but rather any paper that people feel is well-suited for use with a fountain pen. Different people will feel differently about papers, but there are a number of papers that are generally accepted to be “fountain pen-friendly.”

There is no ISO standard for fountain pen paper the way there is for paper sizes or pen refills. Fountain pen paper is whatever you think it is!

What Makes For Good Fountain Pen Paper?

The qualities for good fountain pen paper are going to vary based on who you ask, but they will generally have the same resistance to potential fountain pen ink defects. Notable fountain pen ink-to-paper defects include bleeding, feathering, and show-through (ghosting). A good paper will minimize these to the extent possible.

Where debate comes up is for qualities like quick dry times. Many people, left-handed individuals in particular, will prefer paper with fast dry times. But fast drying often means more feathering and less sheen.

Top Fountain Pen Paper Paper

There is a lot of opinion involved here, but the items listed will be combination of our top paper for fountain pens as well as papers that that community at wide likes to use. Keep in mind, these are our favorite papers! These papers appear in all sorts of different notebooks, notebook sizes, and bindings, some of which we’ve listed below each entry, but that list is by no means exhaustive.

Midori MD Paper

Midori MD paper is the company’s high-end diary paper that has been produced since the 1960s. It’s smooth, but not insanely smooth, and holds up very well to ink. This isn’t paper that generally seems too special or unique, but it’s really a great all round paper.

Found In
  • Midori MD Notebook A5
  • Midori MD Notebook B6
  • Midori MD Notebook Journal

Tomoe River

Tomoe River is at once a great paper and an overrated paper. It’s high level of ink resistance makes for very slow drying times, but when ink dry, they look fantastic. Seemingly pedestrian inks look great and high sheen inks look fantastic.

Found In
  • Tomoe River 68gsm Loose Paper

Silvine

Silvine paper is rather rough, even more so than Midori’s cotton, and rather absorbent, but it’s super pleasant to us. The paper is heavy (90gsm) and tough enough to hold up to a full paper of writing, front and paper. Silvine paper is found in a number of sizes of handsome red notebooks.

The paper is for people who love feedback and control, not butter-on-ice smoothness, so know what you are getting before you track this notebook down. This is especially true because while the notebooks are easy enough to find in the UK, you don’t see them too often in the US.

Found In

Midori Cotton

Midori Cotton paper is a high quality paper, made in Japan, out of 20% real cotton. Cotton makes for absorbent, fast-drying paper with a really nice texture to it. The MD Cotton paper is more textured than Midori’s standard paper so make sure you know what you are buying.

Found In
  • Midori Cotton Paper Pad A4
  • Midori Cotton Paper Pad A5

Runners Up

Rhodia

Rhodia paper, usually housed in an iconic orange pad, is relatively affordable and super popular, at least in part because it’s so easy to find. Rhodia paper is extremely smooth and coated so the paper is slow to dry. This is a bad choose for lefties and people who are prone to smearing paper, but it’s a good paper overall.

If you like to buy local then you can almost certainly find Rhodia notebooks nearby.

Maruman Mnemosyne

Mnemosyne is very similar to a Rhodia paper, just a bit smoother (maybe?) and and packages in cooler looking notebooks.  Mnemosyne notebooks are harder to find and a good deal more expensive though so while it’s quite nice, it generally isn’t something you need to track down unless you find that it comes in a notebook size that is just perfect for you.

FAQs

What is fountain pen paper?

Fountain pen paper is not a specific, or defined thing, but rather any paper that people feel is well-suited for use with a fountain pen. Different people will feel differently about papers, but there are a number of papers that are generally accepted to be “fountain pen-friendly.”

What makes for good fountain pen paper?

The qualities for good fountain pen paper are going to vary based on who you ask, but they will generally have the same resistance to potential fountain pen ink defects. Notable fountain pen ink-to-paper defects include bleeding, feathering, and show-through (ghosting). A good paper will minimize these to the extent possible.

Do fountain pens require special paper?

No, they do not. Many fountain pen users prefer paper that they believe works better for fountain pen ink, but it is not required. Fountain pen ink is very watery compared to ballpoint pen ink so it can bleed and feather on normal, printer paper (also known as copy paper) and cheaper notebooks. Fountain pen-friendly paper will prevent these defects while bringing out the color in the ink.

Fountain Pen friendly notebooks that aren’t Rhodia or Tomoe River

In the fountain pen world, Tomoe River and Rhodia are probably the paper brands that you would hear quite often. They have earned their place in the fountain pen network because of the high-quality paper and especially its ink resistance with fountain pen ink.

Tomoe River and Rhodia aren’t the only papers in the world that are “fountain pen friendly”. If you’re still unsure what this means, watch this video by Brian Goulet.

Best for long-form journaling

The vintage-looking Life Noble notebook is one of the few notebooks. The paper quality is amazing. It might be in between the Rhodia and the Tomoe River. It won’t be able to withstand wet inks and thick nibs like a Tomoe River would but it does show off sheen fairly well. This notebook is great for fountain pen enthusiasts who use fountain pens for long-form journaling. Life Noble has offerings of different rulings such as blank, lined, and graph.

Read more from JetPens

Best in design

Lamy launched their own line of notebooks in 2019 and comes to no surprise that it is also fountain pen friendly. These notebooks aren’t at par with Tomoe River or Rhodia but they handle ink pretty well for average size nibs. The Lamy notebooks stand out quite a bit because of their unusual ruling – it’s a 4mm grid with horizontal solid lines (a bit reminiscent of the Hobonichi Techo ruling).

The overall design of Lamy is pretty intentional. It has a brush-steel cover that is reminiscent of Lamy 2000’s metal finish. It also includes ribbon bookmarks, pen loop, and also an elastic band.

Read the review from Pen Addict.

Best for Bullet Journaling

One of the many colors of the Leuchtturm1917

I was surprised to find out that the Leuchtturm1917 was fountain pen friendly. At first I thought it wouldn’t resist ink well because of grievances I’ve heard from the Bullet Journal community (mostly because of the 80gsm paper). It will ghost or show through just a little bit but the Leuchtturm1917 is fountain pen friendly. I didn’t even bother to use a Leuchtturm when I started getting really into fountain pens.

For some reason, when I tried out Morning Pages, I was pleasantly surprised with the performance of my inks on this paper! I enjoyed it so much that I was able to use an entire Leuchtturm for Morning Pages (written exclusively with fountain pens). The Leuchtturm’s ability to resist fountain pen ink has a threshold – using a broader nib would cause the ink to bleed and the lines to feather.

Apica CD

Best for fast writing and quick notes

While this resembles a standard composition notebook, this notebook is surprisingly fountain pen friendly. It’s quite similar to the design of the Life notebook. I find that notebooks like these are best for memory keeping and long-form journaling because of the book style binding. While visibly similar, the Apica paper doesn’t show off ink properties the way Life does.

Did we miss anything? Leave your favorite fountain pen friendly notebooks in the comments below!

P.S. Scribbles that Matter almost made the cut but I haven’t had substantial evidence that they are fountain pen friendly

A Review (Part 1 of 2) — The Pen Addict

(Susan M. Pigott is a fountain pen collector, pen and paperholic, photographer, and professor. You can find more from Susan on her blog Scribalishess.)

Brad sent me the Fountain Pen Friendly Paper Collection by Yamamoto Paper to review several months back. It sat quietly in my queue, until one evening, a few weeks ago, I removed the plastic and flipped through the pad. I was stunned into silence. I’ve received paper collections before, but I’ve never seen anything like this one. Preceding each set of paper there’s a golden parchment page that details where the paper is made, the history behind the paper, and a brief description of its characteristics.

I totally geeked out, reading the descriptions then tracing my fingers over each paper, feeling its smoothness or texture, measuring its thickness, delighting in its crinkles as I turned the pages. Audible gasps and exclamations of “Ooooo,” emerged from my home office. I carried the pad reverently into the living room where I told my husband that I was holding a veritable treasure trove of precious paper. He just shook his head and went back to reading his book. I do not understand him.

The paper in this collection isn’t just paper. Rather, each set reflects the science and artistry of various paper makers who developed the paper for specific purposes. I am fascinated by this, because the interaction between pen, ink, and paper is often a mysterious alchemy. Some papers bring out the vibrant colors and sheen of ink. Other papers offer a more tactile writing experience because of their texture. Still others have the perfect combination of thickness, texture, and absorption that makes writing an absolute pleasure. And who doesn’t love the crinkly feel and sound of quality paper?

Below, I include the description of each paper (as written by Yamamoto Paper) followed by my own observations. To test the paper, I used twelve pens with various nibs and ink types and eight different inks for swabbing. I wanted to offer a variety of nib sizes from fine to extra broad (music). I also attempted to use many different brands of inks, but ultimately I emphasized color over manufacturer variety.

This is part one of my review, in which I discuss the first nine papers in the collection. Next week I will review the remaining nine.

Pens

Chinese Fountain Pen (STATIONERY MONT 163 PEN)

The story of one Chinese pen

Background

Somehow I got the idea that something needs to be changed. And I started with a pen. Like with an open nib and a piston refilling ink. Having rummaged a little on Ali, the handle was selected. Rod medium (medium), although the site says 0.7 mm, but as I understand it, all manufacturers have a different opinion on this.Delivery took less than a month (2014.03.14 – 2014.04.06 (yes, this is April, but only got around to writing today)), a week of which she spent at the airport / at customs, etc.

Eliminated in a regular Chinese yellow bag,

from the inside filled with a “bubble”, in which there was the very box with the product.

Lies in a small box made of thick paper. The handle itself lies in a bag made of a material resembling polyethylene foam. All this is packed {that egg is in a duck, that duck is in a hare} in a regular bag.
After unpacking:

I will not be able to share my expert opinion, since this is my first fountain pen, and I did not find the time when they wrote in schools. Therefore, I’ll just tell you my subjective impressions:
in the hand it is like an ordinary pen from the “good”,
the cap snaps into place normally, with a pleasant click,
for the entire time of use, it did not flow even once, although I carried it with me in a thin bag (it was a fierce April and I was afraid that it would leak from the temperature drop, but you’re not here!)
beautiful feather.nothing peeled off, not painted with ink. A feather you want to keep clean.
writes well: does not smear, does not miss words (well, as long as there is enough ink, of course)
the filling is the most common: a container for ink with a screw piston (as I understand it, you can use ready-made ink cartridges), good thread. Not metal.

From the immediately noticed disadvantages only that the cap does not snap into place on the back side of the case and, if you do attach it, it constantly strives to fly off it.

This review could have ended, but it was not there!

The first week of use turned out to be unsuccessful for the pen: it fell out of the synopsis on the fly and fell with acceleration on the concrete floor. The cap took the whole blow. He picked it up and looked: not a scratch. But not particularly fragile in appearance, weight, and sensation, the cap could not withstand the weight of the massive (as it turned out) feather and cracked. The photo is already in the studio.

This, of course, is more of an omission on my part. It’s time to already know that Chinese pens are not ready to accept our harsh realities.

But then the most interesting thing began: after <3 months of daily merciless use (one refueling, by the way, is enough for 2-3 days or ~ 15 pages in large handwriting }) use in place of the "grip" there was a swelling of paint. moreover, it appeared just in the place where the fingers do not have direct contact with it.

He did not fix either the first or the second defect, because … it was just not when it was, and the first did not interfere too much.I can’t say that I’m a bad owner, but we didn’t work out right away with this pen. Soon the pen fell and the nib shifted relative to the stop (Rippled element under the nib itself. I don’t know what it is called correctly). I do not publish the photo, everything is so clear. After that, it became worse to write and, in general, for the sum of the reasons, was sent to retire.

All. My first review. I’m not going to finish with fountain pens (2 cans of ink left). In the comments I would be glad to “listen” to your opinion and advice in the new choice.

Fountain pens and their advantages

Ballpoint and gel pens are inexpensive and easy to use. However, their predecessors – fountain pens – do not give up their positions and have a lot of fans. Let’s figure out why.

Fountain Pen: The Highest Writing Culture

Feather models are not outdated. Today, it is with them that European schoolchildren write at the initial stage of mastering writing.Also, students and other people use these devices when performing large volumes of recording.

Let’s list the main advantages of these pens:

  • Ease of writing. The pen glides over the paper very easily and freely, without pressure. The hand doesn’t get tired for a long time, and you can write for hours. This is especially important for large volumes of work.
  • Health. If you work a lot at the computer, you run the risk of developing carpal tunnel syndrome. This is due to the fact that the movements of the hand on the mouse and keyboard are rather monotonous, and the nerve on the hand is pinched.The feather helps to cure this disease and prevent it. It is enough to write on A4 sheet for them once a day. This way of writing implies smooth and varied hand movements – the best warm-up.
  • Saving. People who have to write a lot use more than a dozen rods per year. For the same period, a couple of bottles of good Waterman or Parker ink will be enough. In total, this is cheaper than rods.
  • The beauty of handwriting. The pen helps to form correct, good handwriting.In addition to aesthetic pleasure, this is an excellent help in business.
  • New sensations. You can change the ink as often as you like. You can match the color to the mood or style of the document, even to the shade of your eyes or tie. In addition, different nibs write differently – the thickness and saturation of the line, the elasticity of the nib, the shape of the body, etc. vary.
  • Finally, the most prestigious are the feather models.

Prestigious Waterman and Parker

fountain pens

Branded writing instruments are essential fashion accessories.If we talk about manufacturers, then first of all it is worth mentioning Parker and Waterman fountain pens, which have become the standard of style and quality.

Our online store can offer you many options for models from Parker and Waterman for every taste. For a respectable businessman, for example, the elegant model Waterman Exception Night & Day Black CT F.

And if you’re looking for a gift for a lady, check out the Parker Duofold Historical Colors Centennial White Ivorine GT F gold-plated pen.

90,000 Soviet clerical tricks. How to Use a Fountain Pen How to Make an Ink Pen from a Bird’s Feather

A fountain pen is always more than just a pen, it is a loyal companion who follows you everywhere when you make a to-do list for today, cross out completed items from a work plan, write down the phone number of a beautiful girl you just met. signing a greeting card or business documents.On our website you can purchase an original one. A fountain pen is always treated differently – it is not at all the same as a simple ballpoint pen
, which can be thrown away if it breaks.

Fountain pen is like Zippo lighter

– it fits comfortably in your hand and pulls your pocket nicely. If your loved one breaks down, you will first think about the possibility of repair, not replacement.

Usually, experienced fountain pen owners know all about how to handle their pen, how to care for it, how to tidy it up if something happens to it.So our article is primarily addressed to beginners who are faced with an important problem for the first time. Why fountain pen
may require repair? After all, any Parker product is reliable and designed for centuries! Most often, it is precisely the repair of a pen that is bent as a result of a fall is required. Nobody is insured against accidents! So, the pen is bent, and this is not a cause for panic. What to do in such cases?

There are three ways to deal with the problem.

Method one, official

Contact the authorized service center.The Parker brand has official services in Russia. If there is such a service center in your city, consider that the problem has already been solved – specialists will be able to cope with almost any damage. As a last resort, a bent nib is easier to replace than trying to repair it. The main advantage of contacting a service center is the quality service that they will provide you there. Typically, branded services employ professionals who already have experience in solving such problems. A significant disadvantage is the high cost of services.If we are talking about a cheap pen, it’s easier to buy a new one or try to fix the situation with more affordable means first. And if you do not live in the capital, chances are high that your city simply does not have an official service center. Then you will inevitably have to look for other options.

Method two, available

A jewelry workshop can help out if there is no service center in your city, or the specialists have asked for too high a fee for their services.There are jewelry workshops of different levels in any city. Jewelry tools are quite suitable for repairing a gold feather, and a good master probably has the necessary skills. It would seem that this method has no drawbacks – and it is easier to find a jeweler, and the cost of work will be much lower than in the service. However, it is still worth considering the choice of the master very carefully. This should be a good specialist, ideally, already having experience in such work. Otherwise, you will have to again. Keep in mind that the cost of repairs from a jeweler can be up to 50% of the cost of the pen itself, so think about it: maybe the repair does not make sense at all, unless the pen is dear to you as a memory?

Method three, do it yourself

This method is suitable for fearless fountain pen owners who are not afraid to ruin their favorite thing completely.If you can learn how to correct a bent nib yourself, you will be able to apply your skills more than once in the future.

The main difficulty in self-repair is removing the pen from the pen. It all depends on the model – you can remove the pen from some pens in no time, with others you need to tinker and find out exactly how this is done so as not to break the pen. Of course, when you are going, you will not be interested in how easily the pen is removed, and even more so you will not foresee that after a while you may need repairs.Therefore, you will have to comprehend the theory in practice. In some cases, repairs can be carried out without removing the pen.

There are two ways to straighten a bent feather at home using available tools. Experienced fountain pen owners advise using ordinary chopsticks. The first repair method is as follows: place the pen on a hard surface (a rubber or silicone mat on which the pen will not slip is ideal), and then gently iron the bent part with the sharp end of the stick until you achieve the desired result.The second method is only used if you have removed the nib from the pen. Put a chopstick on the table in front of you, place a feather on its surface, placing it lengthwise, with the tip towards the sharp end of the chopstick. The nib should fit as tightly as possible to the surface of the stick. Then take a second stick and gently smooth out the damaged area, as in the first method. Chopsticks are ideal for this type of repair because they are tough enough to repair damage without scratching the nib.The choice of sticks also matters – it is best to choose not round, but slightly ribbed sticks, the narrowing of which has a rectangular shape.

If you think your is a Parker pen
is not valuable enough to contact a service or a jeweler, try to fix the damage yourself. If you succeed, it will give you valuable experience that may come in handy in the future. As a last resort, you can always get a new pen and try to handle it more carefully.You can also buy a Zippo lighter

and practice refueling it yourself.

I have several “elementary” posts, for example “”, “”. There is something missing about writing instruments.

Therefore, today I am citing a reprint from the wonderful blog “YaSkrepka” called “How the fountain pen works.” The article is very good, you can’t write it better. As always, I recommend subscribing to this blog.

There are already a lot of posts about various pens, including fountain pens, on yasstrepka.How do they work? What is the principle of writing with a fountain pen? I learned the answer to this interesting question in the pen-ru LJ community “Pens and pencils,”. It turns out that the nib assembly of an ink pen can be divided into three parts:

  1. Feeder-Pen Block
  2. ink reservoir (disposable or refillable)
  3. handle body with cap.

For a classic open nib fountain pen, this block looks like this:

The diagram requires a little explanation.We all know a can of condensed milk. And probably everyone knows the scheme for drinking condensed milk from a can – you need to punch 2 holes, through one of which you need to drink. What is the second hole for? If it is not done, a reduced pressure is created in the can without air flow and the liquid (condensed milk) stops flowing out of the can.

The ink pen is usually done a little differently. To simplify the design, the air supply channel and the ink supply channel were combined into one. And the ink flow rate (and for different types of pens – for example, F and B need a different amount of ink when writing) is regulated by the width or, more correctly, by the channel cross-sectional area.go in the lower part of the channel and are brought to the feather. Air through the air hole in the nib enters through the channel into the ink container and compensates for the pressure difference. Therefore, the combination of the air inlet, pen type and ink / air passage affects the normal ink supply.

In addition, two more elements of the pen play a significant role in this – a collector in the feeder and … ink. The collector is commonly used in open nib pens. Its function is interesting – it is a buffer, a microreservoir between the pen and the ink tank.These slots hold a small amount of ink for the pen to compensate for the writing speed.

Different writing speeds require different ink flow rates. You can “set” a certain average speed, but then when writing slowly, the pen will write boldly, at medium speed – optimally, and at high speed – there will be gaps in the letters. The collector in this case, at a slow speed, draws off excess ink into its system of ribs, and at a high writing speed, using the capillary effect, it gives up the accumulated ink.

Ink also greatly influences the character of writing. The thick ink in an EF nib pen will simply prevent you from writing, and too thin ink and a B nib can cause blots and very thick lines.

In addition to density, a significant role is played by the wettability coefficient, which is regulated by the addition of certain surfactants to the ink recipe.

In fountain pens, ink is prevented from pouring out of atmospheric pressure. If you draw water into a cocktail straw and clamp one end, then the water will be securely locked in it.But this technology works as long as the pressure is stable. If you board the plane with such a straw, then some time after take-off some of the water will still pour out, since at altitude in the cabin the pressure drops by about 25%. In the case of a fountain pen, an ink stain would form in the pocket.

The most important part of a leak-proof fountain pen, the feeder, is partially or completely hidden under the nib. Above are one or, as in Monblanc pens, two capillary channels through which ink flows to the nib.The ribs of the feeder act as a kind of buffer on which excess ink accumulates and from which, in case of increased ink consumption, reserves are taken. The ink is retained on the edges by capillary action. Despite the seeming simplicity, the solution is very nontrivial, requiring outstanding knowledge of mechanics and physics.

However, it is not necessary to take off for a catastrophe with an inkblot – a normal fluctuation in atmospheric pressure or a small shock is sufficient. To prevent this from happening, a rather ingenious solution was invented – a feeder with a ribbed collector.All excess ink was retained on the ribs due to the capillary effect. The feeder also performed other functions – the ink was supplied to the pen through a channel, the cross-section of which determined the rate of their receipt. Since the ink consumption was inconsistent when using a pen, the collector also served as a kind of buffer.

There are a wide variety of nibs available to suit a wide variety of writing styles. Classic, with a spherical tip, differ in its diameter – from EF (Extra Fine – 0.3 mm) to BB (Extra Bold – over 0.8 mm).Nibs with a flat tip, which can also be beveled for the left or right hand, are used for calligraphic writing.

An equally important part of the pen is the nib, its quality determines the comfort of using the tool and the beauty of writing. The finest Montblanc nibs are made from sheet gold alloy with varying thickness – from 0.18 mm at the base of the nib to 0.52 mm at the nib. This provides a light springy moment, well known to Montblanc wearers, and enhances writing comfort.The body of the feather is stamped, bent, polished, engraved, and the tip of a harder metal is welded on. From the traditional sphere to the beveled flat nib for calligraphy, it is then shaped to suit the writing style. Some Montblanc boutiques have computerized systems that allow, after a test task, to give out unique parameters of your writing style, according to which you can choose the right nib for you, and if you want to and on a budget, make a unique nib just for you.

One of the final operations is performed with the finest diamond saw. It is this almost invisible cut that, due to the capillary effect, delivers ink to the tip and paper. All that remains is to manually polish it and insert it into the handle.

Fountain pens were used in the 19th century because they are very comfortable. But the old pens had one drawback: they wrote with ink that got dirty. But if you insert a ballpoint into the nib, the pen will be both comfortable and stylish.

To make a ballpoint pen from a bird feather, you need an old pen, a nib and a little patience.

What the pen is made of

An old ballpoint pen (better than Bic, since they have a thin core),
– a feather of a bird (goose, swan, peacock, stork or any other),
– scissors,
– yarn.

How to make a pen

Find a bird feather. It can be any pen that you feel comfortable in your hand. But keep in mind that long tail feathers are the best.The larger the nib, the better. This will make the handle bar easier to fit inside.

Always wash feathers found outside. You can wash the pen under running water, carefully removing bugs and dirt from it. It should be beautiful, flawless.

Disassemble the ballpoint pen. Take the rod out of it. Cut off the tip of the feather with scissors. Try to insert the rod inside. If it is too long, cut off the tip with scissors and try again to insert it into the nib. It is good if there is a little ink in the rod, since then you will not get dirty with it.

Take yarn and cut about 50 cm. Place the end of the yarn on top of the end of the feather where the pin is inserted and leave a piece about 7 cm long. Start wrapping the second, longer end of the yarn around the feather and short end.

Try to wrap as tightly as possible. When the handle is tight enough, tie both ends of the yarn. Five knots should be enough. To keep the tips from sticking out, you can glue them to the feather.

Handle ready.

Other nib ballpoint pen options

Alternatively, tape can be used with glue.Glue should be applied to the inside of the pen. If the nib is too narrow, it can be cut from the side. Then add super glue, insert the core inside the nib and let the nib dry. Instead of glue, you can use scotch tape wrapped around the bottom of the nib, but then the pen will not look so pretty.

For a more comfortable grip, the feather can be shaved a little from the down, which is usually attached to the bottom of the feather. To do this, you can use an ordinary clerical knife. Peru, if desired, can be given a different shape using the same tool.Gently run the knife along the feather, from bottom to top, taking care not to break it.

It all depends on personal preference and the look of the pen. Peacock feathers are so beautiful that they are best left as they are; for a softer feather, you can leave them in water overnight.

The feather can be colored with hair dye. Dissolve the paint in a plastic container and dip the nib in it several times. Then rinse the pen with water.

Transparent fountain pen Lingmo LORELEI ink with eyepiece EF stationery nib


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Calligraphy markers, pens and nibs

In recent years, such areas of creativity as sketching and the practice of graceful writing have gained particular popularity. In order to succeed in calligraphy and quick drawing, you will need dedicated stationery. In the online store krasniykarandash.ru you can buy a pens, markers or calligraphy nibs at one of the lowest prices.

What products do we offer you?

Our site contains more than 100 names of tools for creativity. We offer the following products in this category:

  • sketch pen;
  • drawing brush pen;
  • calligraphy marker;
  • decorative writing fountain pen;
  • kits for sketching and calligraphy;
  • replacement cartridges;
  • feather tips;
  • writing units;
  • calligraphy training booklet.

Products differ in price, material and color. So, for lovers of the classics, we have chic Victorian-style sets, as well as real goose feathers with mascara drives. And those who are accustomed to using modern tools will love the stylish pens and markers.

Why choose our store?

Warranty. We only offer original stationery. If you want to make sure of their authenticity, we will provide certificates of conformity for any item from the catalog.

Convenient calculation. You can pay for calligraphy tools in cash and by credit card. You can also pay with us through internet acquiring.

Delivery. Our couriers will deliver your order to any address in Moscow and other cities of Russia. You can also pick up the goods yourself at the nearest pick-up point or retail store.

Pay attention! In retail stores of the Red Pencil network, you can use a gift card to pay for stationery.

To buy a calligraphy pen, click the “Basket” icon and fill out the form. You can ask all your questions to our manager. To do this, contact him at 8 800 301-30-80.

Stationery for left-handers

Stationery for left-handers


Lefties face difficulties and annoying inconveniences every day when they use a regular pen for writing, office scissors or a ruler: ink smears while writing; when you need to draw a line on the paper with a ruler, you have to keep your hand in an uncomfortable position, and in order to cut a sheet of paper with scissors, you need to bend over to see the cutting line.

Our selection of stationery products are specially designed for left-handed people and are great for everyday left-handed use.

Left-handed pens


Left-handed pens can be divided into 3 types:

1.with ergonomic grip section,

2.with quick-drying ink,

3.with curved …

At the same time, several types can and most often are combined in one handle.

I. Ergonomic grip section

The grip section of these grips has specially positioned indentations for comfortable grip on the left hand. There are also handles that have not only a grip section, but the entire body has an ergonomic shape, thanks to which the handle literally “lies” in the left hand. These pens are comfortable to hold in the left hand, and with their help, writing becomes easier, and the correct placement of the fingers has a positive effect on posture and posture while writing.

Examples :

Ballpoint pens Stabilo Easyball, LeftRight, Smartball; Maped Visio Pen.

Rollerball Stabilo EasyOriginal

Gel pen Stabilo Easygel.

Lamy ABC pencils, Faber-Castell Scribolino.

Fountain pens should be singled out as a separate item. Feathers for left-handers have a special marking – LH or L (left-handed), usually the line thickness corresponds to the average (M – medium). These nibs differ from standard nibs in a cut that takes into account the specifics of writing with the left hand: it is typical for left-handers to “push” the pen forward, while right-handers, on the contrary, “pull” it across the paper.

Examples : Lamy ABC, Lamy Safari, Herlitz My.Pen Urban, Pelikan Pelikano Junior and Faber-Castell Scribolino.

If your child is left-handed and is just learning to write, pay attention to the special KUM holders marked with L, which tell your child how to hold a pencil or pen correctly. These holders slide on a regular straight pen and easily convert it into a left-handed writing instrument. KUM manufactures products for left-handers with the assistance of German psychologist Johanna Barbara Settle (left-hander), who is the author of many famous German books and scientific papers on the upbringing and development of left-handed children.

II. Quick-drying ink

This type of pens uses special ink (the grip section can be completely normal, universally right- and left-handed). This ink dries quickly after being applied to paper, and when you move your left hand to the right, the written text is not smudged, and the ink does not stain your hand. These pens are popular among both left-handers and right-handers, the choice of models is very diverse. They produce ballpoint pens, gel pens, rollerballs, pens with caps and with a button, with an ergonomic grip section, etc.Here are some of them.

Examples :

Ball: Pilot BPS-GP, Pilot Super Grip, Pilot RexGrip.

Gel: Pilot Frixion, Pilot G-Tec-C4, Pilot P-500, Pilot G6 Alfagel, Pilot G2, Pentel HyperG, Pentel Energel, Uni-ball Signo 207.

Rollers: Troika, Pilot Vball Grip, Pilot Hi -tecpoint.

Hybrid (low viscosity ink): Zebra Surari, Pilot Metropolitan, Pilot Acroball, Uni-ball Jetstream.

III. Curved nib

Pens of this type are not widely used, but they are gradually gaining popularity.The heart of these pens is the curved nib, which provides good visibility of the working surface of the sheet as if “through” the writing instrument. If you take an ordinary straight pen and write with it with your left hand, the body of the pen will very accurately obscure the written inscription. And in the handle of type 3, the body is bent in the right place so as not to obstruct the view. Thanks to this shape, the left-hander does not need to bend his arm and take an uncomfortable position while writing.

When writing, the nib of the pen is almost perpendicular to the paper.This is convenient in that it does not scratch the paper and does not cause the discomfort that can appear when the pen is tilted normally.

Examples : Ballpoint pens Flair Angular Pen, Yoropen.

Rulers, sharpeners and scissors for left-handers

When using ordinary scissors, the left-hander does not see the cut line, and it often happens that the paper cannot be cut, but only bent. Scissors for left-handers differ in the location of the blades: left over right (like a mirror image of scissors for right-handers). They do not bend or wrinkle the paper, and allow you to visually control the cutting line. Scissors are available for both children and adults, with ergonomic handles for a comfortable grip.

Examples: Kum Lefty; Maped Sensoft 3D, KID, Office, Optimum; Westcott and Westcott Easy Grip; Brunnen; Lefty Cullinan.

In the rulers for left-handers, the scale is applied from right to left, thanks to this, when guiding the line with the left hand from zero, the natural position of the hand is maintained, and the drawn line is not smeared by the hand.

Examples: Kum Flexi Shatterproof; Brunnen; Koh-I-Noor; Maped Left.

The left-handed sharpener uses the same “mirroring” principle: the blade is set with the cutting edge so that the pencil is sharpened counterclockwise. This allows left-handers to maintain a natural hand position and minimizes the risk of lead breakage during sharpening. In addition, many sharpeners have a special ergonomic shape.

Examples: Stabilo LeftRight (for leads 2.0 mm), Kum Lefty and Medi Grip, Stabilo Easy (for regular pencils, as well as EasyGraph and EasyColors pencils), Maped Igloo.

Write with pleasure!

correct use and care. How to write with a fountain pen? How does a fountain pen work GIF

The first acquaintance with a fountain pen begins with the fact that when we see it from friends or comrades, we take it in our hands. Then the first question arises: “How to write with a fountain pen?”

A sharp pen can easily damage a sheet of paper: scratch or pierce it through.In inept hands, a fountain pen is not at all a flexible writing instrument, and then another question arises: “Why doesn’t she write? How does it work? ”

How to use the fountain pen

The first experiences of novice writers are often full of errors, as they are accustomed to writing with ballpoint pens, the principle of which is completely different from writing with a pen. But knowing the rules outlined below, you can enjoy the process of writing and be satisfied with its results.

The principle of operation of the “ball” in the handles we are used to:

  • 1 – the tip of the ball rod consists of a hollow tube and has a pressed-in small ball on one side open, and on the other in contact with ink (paste) in the rod;
  • 2 – when the pen moves on the paper, the ball rotates, and the paste envelops the surface of the ball from its side, the turn of the ball and the ink falls on the paper, leaving an ink trail.The line follows the movement of your hand, also neat and relaxed.

It is also necessary to push the handle vertically to provide sufficient friction for the ball to rotate continuously. Depending on the quality of the handle, the pressure should be more or less strong, but the position of the handle should only be vertical. Therefore, the pens do not write on vertical surfaces, the tilt of the pen is such that the paste flows from the ball, and it does not come into contact with the ink, so there is no trace left on the paper.

How to work with a pen or how to write with a fountain pen:

  • 1 – the writing part of the pen is a pen, the ink is between the teeth of the pen at its very tip and comes into contact with the paper when pressed very lightly;
  • 2 – the line is obtained when the pen is drawn along the surface of the paper with a slight movement, slightly touching the paper;
  • 3 – the inclination of the fountain pen to the surface of the paper is less than that of a ballpoint pen, which is more comfortable for the hand and reduces stress on the arm muscles.Accordingly, the efficiency when writing with a pen is higher, and it is fashionable to write without painful sensations for longer.

Other rules for working with special flexible and semi-flexible and wide feathers are not considered in this case. They are designed for calligraphy and poster art.

From these nuances comes the lightness and naturalness of writing with a fountain pen. It was not for nothing that a few decades ago, children were recommended to first learn to write with a pen, but only when mastering the basic skills of calligraphy did they switch to writing with ballpoint pens.Handwriting from such a pen is developed straight and understandable, it is interesting for a child to draw neat letters with beautiful ink.

Fountain pen writing sequence

Take a fountain pen filled with ink in your working hand, tilt it slightly towards the elbow, towards yourself, and slightly to the side, so that it is convenient to draw a line with the pen. In this case, the pen touches the sheet of paper with a light movement. If the result is no ink line, check to see if there is fountain pen ink on the nib tip and in the special reservoir.

If there is ink, but she does not write, then there may be a breakdown of the pen or the ink supply mechanism. You should check it yourself or give it to the master. A working fountain pen should write easily and naturally, without excessive pressure on it. Also, in no case should she scratch the paper and leave traces from the pen.

If there is no ink, then the next question arises: “how to refill the fountain pen?”

Today, you can order windows, hatches and gates, and other various designs from the Metal Project company.For complete information on what exactly the company is producing. The company’s website will help you find out why you need fire doors and other fire protection structures. On the site you can also familiarize yourself with the history of the company, as well as the field of activity of “Metal Project”.

There are already a lot of posts about various pens, including fountain pens, on yasstrepka. How do they work? What is the principle of writing with a fountain pen? I learned the answer to this interesting question in the pen-ru LJ community “Pens and pencils, calligraphy”. It turns out that the nib assembly of an ink pen can be divided into three parts:

  1. Feeder-Pen Block
  2. ink reservoir (disposable or refillable)
  3. handles with cap.

For a classic open nib fountain pen, this block looks like this:

The diagram requires a little explanation. We all know a can of condensed milk. And probably everyone knows the scheme for drinking condensed milk from a can – you need to punch 2 holes, through one of which you need to drink.What is the second hole for? If it is not done, a reduced pressure is created in the can without air flow and the liquid (condensed milk) stops flowing out of the can.

The ink pen is usually done a little differently. To simplify the design, the air supply channel and the ink supply channel were combined into one. And the speed of ink supply (and for different types of pens – for example, F and B need a different amount of ink when writing) is regulated by the width or, more correctly, by the cross-sectional area of ​​the channel.Ink goes to the bottom of the channel and is fed to the nib. Air through the air hole in the nib enters through the channel into the ink container and compensates for the pressure difference. Therefore, the combination of the air inlet, pen type and ink / air passage affects the normal ink supply.

In addition, two more elements of the pen play a significant role in this – a collector in the feeder and … ink. The collector is commonly used in open nib pens. Its function is interesting – it is a buffer, a microreservoir between the pen and the ink tank.These slots hold a small amount of ink for the pen to compensate for the writing speed.

Different writing speeds require different ink flow rates. You can “set” a certain average speed, but then when writing slowly, the pen will write boldly, at medium speed – optimally, and at high speed – there will be gaps in the letters. The collector in this case, at a slow speed, draws off excess ink into its system of ribs, and at a high writing speed, using the capillary effect, it gives up the accumulated ink.

Ink also greatly influences the character of writing. The thick ink in an EF nib pen will simply prevent you from writing, and too thin ink and a B nib can cause blots and very thick lines.

In addition to density, a significant role is played by the wettability coefficient, which is regulated by the addition of certain surfactants to the ink recipe.

The feather body is made of alloy steel, gold, titanium, and sometimes platinum. In very cheap pens, the nib and the nib (ball) are made of steel; in more expensive nibs, the ball is made of iridium or other hard-to-wear materials.

By the way, the creator of the pen-ru community “Pens and pencils, calligraphy”, Alexey Stakhnov, professionally makes pens. About one of his pen I have already – it turned out very worthy.


A fountain pen is an indispensable accessory for a business person, which indicates his high status, but at the same time, an outstanding personality. It may seem to many that it is inconvenient to write with a pen and have to endure blots and streaks on paper, but this is not at all the case. If you learn how to use it correctly, you can amaze others with perfect handwriting and beautiful lines.

Today, fountain pen writing lessons are becoming a must in elementary school, as they reduce the stress on the joints of the hand and prevent the development of inflammation. Learning to hold a pen in their hands and write with it on paper, schoolchildren develop patience and love for beauty in themselves.

The difference between a fountain pen and a ballpoint pen

What is so great about fountain pens that many are beginning to give preference to them. First of all, it is an unforgettable feeling that you experience while writing.Having learned how to use it correctly, you will understand how primitive the ball ink feed mechanism is.

What are the differences between the fountain pen:

  • it is heavier than a ballpoint;
  • there is no need to put pressure on her when writing;
  • it does not strain the joints;
  • lines are clearer and smoother;
  • produces perfect handwriting;
  • writes at an acute angle;
  • while writing the hand is relaxed and lies on the paper.

You just have to try this amazing stationery once and you will never exchange it for a simple ballpoint pen.

If you decide to buy a fountain pen

If you decide to get a pen, then choose a pen wisely. Remember that it will serve you for a long time, maybe more than a decade, if it is made of durable materials. There is a large selection in stores today, and you will definitely find your pen. Hold it in your hand, lean it against the paper, feel the body.

Then notice what it’s made of. It is better to choose a metal case, although it is heavier.But if you are buying a pen for a student, give preference to plastic. The feather itself, of course, should be metallic, maybe even gold or silver. But its tip, which is in direct contact with the paper, should be made of a more durable material, such as iridium. Many people advise not to buy an expensive first pen, but it is better to immediately purchase a decent copy that will be of high quality and durable.

Also note whether the pen has a replaceable cartridge or is built-in.The built-in one will help to significantly save on refueling, but the replacement one is much easier to use. Pens have survived to this day, which, as in the old days, need to be dipped in an inkwell, but only a professional can “tame” them.

How to learn to write beautifully with a fountain pen

It is not very difficult to get used to this business; it is enough to set aside a few hours for it. To write comfortably, squeeze the pen between your middle finger, index finger, and thumb so that you step back one and a half centimeters from the tip.Place your hand on the sheet and begin to draw a straight line. You can press down on the nib a little to feel the thickness of the writing change.

The angle between the paper and the pen should be approximately 45 degrees, but you can change it as you see fit. Draw curved lines, learn to write letters. The main thing is not to rush. Writing with a pen takes a little longer than a ballpoint pen, but much more interesting and enjoyable.

There are many video tutorial sites on the Internet where you can watch how to learn not only to write, but also to draw with a fountain pen.Believe me, real masterpieces come out from under the hands of the artist.

The answer to this question will help to get the study of the mechanism of the fountain pen. It consists of a body with a cap, an ink reservoir and the pen itself. When you start writing, ink flows out of the cartridge, but exactly in the amount required for writing. When you stop, the leftovers come back.

When buying a pen, you can choose the thickness of the nib that will be comfortable for you, then you do not have to press, adjust, spoil the paper and nib.Focus on the letters on the case:

  • F – thin;
  • M – average;
  • B – wide.

Therefore, you should not be afraid that you will stain paper, table and clothes, that the pen will leak at the most crucial moment. These times are a thing of the past. Today, manufacturers are worried about the quality of their products, as the demand for fountain pens is growing and competition is increasing.

Is it worth changing a regular pen to a fountain pen

What is the secret of the popularity of this stationery.The usual tribute to fashion or something more. Without exception, everyone, starting to write with fountain pens, never returns to ballpoint or gel.

The secret is in their obvious advantages:

  1. Reduces stress on the arm. When you write with a ballpoint pen, you have to press on it, hold it almost vertically, which puts the brush in an unnatural position. This property is also useful for prolonged typing on the keyboard, which is bad for the health of the joints.
  2. By practicing writing with a pen, you acquire calligraphic correct handwriting. This will help solve the problem with the incorrect slope of the letters, their clarity.
  3. You develop fine motor skills. Doing something unusual for your hands, bring many parts of the brain into activity.
  4. Writing trains perseverance and attention. Learning to write with a fountain pen takes a lot of effort, but when you get it done, you will be thrilled.
  5. Develop creativity.Writing with a pen isn’t just about recording information. You involuntarily start drawing letters to make them look more beautiful, develop your own unique style, draw rather than write.
  6. Fountain pens attract attention. If you sign, undoubtedly attract the curious and enthusiastic gazes of others.

If you want to add variety and novelty to your everyday life, then learn to write with a fountain pen. Soon you will notice that such a routine activity as filling out reports or signing forms will cease to tire you, but will be enjoyable.

How to ruin a fountain pen

If you want your pen to serve you for a long time, then you need not only to buy a quality product, but also to avoid the following mistakes:

  1. Tear paper with a pen. Small particles will enter the ink delivery mechanism and clog it. Also, the tip itself will deteriorate and stop writing smoothly.
  2. Leave the handle open. Always cover the nib with the cap after use to prevent ink from drying out.
  3. Do not clean the handle.Every time you change a cartridge or refill ink, place the pen under the running water. She will clean the mechanism from dust, paper particles and dried ink.
  4. Drop the pen. Even with minor damage that is not visible to the eye, the nib may bend and stop writing.

A fountain pen is not a luxury; today it is available to everyone. Therefore, do not ignore the opportunity to learn how to write beautifully and correctly, train your mental and creative abilities and just get aesthetic pleasure.

Video: Learning Calligraphy

If you haven’t used fountain pens yet, you will be pleasantly surprised to hold one in your hands.

Yesterday I was at the car wash and signed my check with a fountain pen
. At that moment, the lady behind the counter asked me to show my pen. I hesitated, because I really love my pen and giving it to someone in the hands is almost the same feeling that you get when strangers try to touch your child.You either have to endure this (especially from the elderly), or say that the baby is sick, when in fact you just want to be left alone.

But I have been using the services of this car wash for many years, and every time the same lady met me at the checkout. So I held out a pen to her. She asked if it was a pen and turned it over, trying to write something. The pen refused to write, only scratching the paper.

From the way the lady held the pen in her hand, I concluded that she was dealing with a fountain pen for the first time.So I explained to her, how to hold the pen correctly.
and how the ink supply works. If she had positioned the nib correctly at the right angle, I could have answered shorter by just naming the brand.

I didn’t take the time to explain how a fountain pen can improve handwriting, how much easier it is to hold, how much easier it is to use on the wrists. Now I would like you to know how much easier it is to use fountain pens. If I had known this myself earlier, I could have prevented the feeling of pain in my arm during prolonged writing.

Most people who use a fountain pen for the first time do not know how to position the pen on the paper and try to hold the pen almost vertically, as you are used to holding a ballpoint. But this position does not allow sufficient contact of the pen with the paper, so the pen will scratch the paper and skip letters.

How to hold a fountain pen correctly

A special feature of the fountain pen is that ink is fed to the paper by capillary principle.A certain amount of ink is transferred to the tip of the pen, which is necessary to write a word or a sentence. In this case, the excess ink goes back. Fountain pens require maintenance, they must be rinsed with water, refilled when ink runs out. Modern manufacturers offer cartridges and converters for easy refilling of fountain pens. But the time and effort you put into caring for the pen is well worth it: you will use an excellent nib for a memorable writing experience.

To write with a fountain pen, you must learn to hold it correctly. The pen may seem heavy the first time, but in fact it is much easier to move it on paper than a ballpoint pen. This happens because the writing does not require pressure, the pen glides easily over the paper, and the hand does not get tired. Fountain pen writing has a beneficial effect on handwriting, making it clearer and more beautiful.

Place the pen on your middle finger, grip it with your index and thumb. It is recommended to leave a distance of one and a half centimeters to the edge.If the distance is too far, the hand will get tired; if it is too small, you can smudge the ink on the paper by touching the text you have just written with your hand. Align the metal part of the pen nib at an angle of approximately 45 degrees to the paper. The logo on the pen should be facing you and the plastic tip should be facing the paper. This position is most convenient because most fountain pens have rounded nibs. The ink drain hole on the nib is centered between your index finger and thumb.With a little getting used to the fountain pen, you can move your hand downward, choosing the most comfortable position for the pen in your hand.

The hand in which you are holding the pen should be on the table with your wrist, little finger, and the entire outside of your hand resting on it. This is how it will be convenient for you to write. At 90,075 writing with a fountain pen
Note that when you click on the pen, the lines will be thick.

When the lady at the car wash took the pen upright and brought it to the paper, I held my breath because I didn’t want her to drop my pen.When she failed to draw a continuous line, I took her hand and positioned her so that she could write the words. When she succeeded, I saw in her eyes the same happiness that I felt myself when I first tried the fountain pen.

I am now confident that she will definitely buy her first fountain pen and there will be more fountain pen users soon. I really love fountain pens, I spend more time writing letters, but my handwriting is getting better. They are much lighter in hand than ballpoint pens, as simply touching the paper with the pen will cause ink to flow where the ballpoint pen needs to be firmly pressed to make the ink touch the paper.

Fountain Pen Next Steps

When I use a fountain pen to fill my magazine with light pages, I am reminded of the use of such pens by since the 1800s.
. The feather glides so easily at the behest of thought until it hits the heavy fibers. In this case, you have to slightly lift the pen, tearing it off the paper.

I could use modern smooth paper, but there is something romantic about such a rough, fibrous surface, something that brings me back to the time when fountain pens were just invented.

The lady at the car wash said she would like to ask the boss to get her a nice fountain pen like mine, but she doesn’t know where to get one. This question baffled me, because I buy fountain pens exclusively on the Internet – it’s hard to find them in regular stores.

It takes a little time to learn how to use a fountain pen. It must be held correctly. However, after just a few minutes of practice, once you know how to position the pen, you can’t go without a fountain pen.You will use it much more often than your regular ballpoint pen because you don’t have to work hard to get your pen to write.

In fountain pens, ink is prevented from pouring out of atmospheric pressure. If you draw water into a cocktail straw and clamp one end, then the water will be securely locked in it. But this technology works as long as the pressure is stable. If you board the plane with such a straw, then some time after take-off some of the water will still pour out, since at altitude in the cabin the pressure drops by about 25%.In the case of a fountain pen, an ink stain would form in the pocket.

The most important part of a leak-proof fountain pen, the feeder, is partially or completely hidden under the nib. Above are one or, as in Monblanc pens, two capillary channels through which ink flows to the nib. The ribs of the feeder act as a kind of buffer on which excess ink accumulates and from which, in case of increased ink consumption, reserves are taken. The ink is retained on the edges by capillary action.Despite the seeming simplicity, the solution is very nontrivial, requiring outstanding knowledge of mechanics and physics.

However, it is not necessary to take off for a catastrophe with an inkblot – a normal fluctuation in atmospheric pressure or a small shock is sufficient. To prevent this from happening, a rather ingenious solution was invented – a feeder with a ribbed collector. All excess ink was retained on the ribs due to the capillary effect. The feeder also performed other functions – the ink was supplied to the pen through a channel, the cross-section of which determined the rate of their receipt.Since the ink consumption was inconsistent when using a pen, the collector also served as a kind of buffer.

There are a wide variety of nibs available to suit a wide variety of writing styles. Classic, with a spherical tip, differ in its diameter – from EF (Extra Fine – 0.3 mm) to BB (Extra Bold – over 0.8 mm). Nibs with a flat tip, which can also be beveled for the left or right hand, are used for calligraphic writing.

An equally important part of the pen is the nib, its quality determines the comfort of using the tool and the beauty of writing.

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