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Ancient Chinese Charms and Coins

Introduction to Chinese Charms

China was one of the first countries in the world to use metal coinage and its ancient coin history can be traced back well over two thousand years. In addition to official coinage, China also has
a long history of producing “coin-like” charms, amulets and talismans.

Old Chinese charm

with Immortal, Tortoise

and Crane

Coins, as a form of money, represent
power.  Coin-shaped charms are, therefore, a very
compact form of power.  They are filled with symbolism
and are believed by the multitude of Chinese to have vast
powers.

Cast throughout the centuries, these ancient charms,
informally referred to by the Chinese as “ya sheng coins” (压胜钱),
“flower coins” (huaqian 花钱) or “play coins” (wanqian 玩钱), were not used as money but rather to suppress evil
spirits, bring “good luck”, “good fortune” and to avert
misfortune.

The Chinese also produced other “coin-like” pieces such
as “horse coins” (马钱), depicting famous historical horses, which were used for games and as gambling tokens.  Other metal coin-shaped pieces
traditionally included by collectors in the category of
charms are the chess pieces used in Chinese chess also known as “xiangqi (象棋) or “elephant” chess.

For the most part, all these old charms, horse coins and
chess pieces were privately cast and their quantities and
dates are almost impossible to determine. Nevertheless,
they serve as important cultural artifacts from the life of
the common Chinese throughout the centuries.

Private Casting of Charms and Coins

Zhou Dynasty Round Coin
Emperor Qin Shi Huang, now world famous for his army of terracotta
soldiers, was the first person to militarily conquer the
various “warring states” and thereby unify China in 221
BC. He then undertook the task of creating a central
government which included unifying scripts, weights and
measures as well as standardizing the monetary
system.

At the time, each of the warring states had its own form of currency which included coins, such as the example on the left, as well as other distinctive forms of money such as knives and spades.

For examples of the spade or shovel money, please see spade charms. Central governments usually attempt to monopolize the issuing of currency in order to minimize financial chaos. In so doing, private minting is usually prohibited.

Qin Dynasty ‘Ban Liang’ Coin

In order to standardize the monetary system, Qin Shi Huang abolished
the existing forms of money and established a round bronze coin with a square hole in the middle with a value of a “half tael”, better known as banliang (半两). Although this coin had a stipulated size and
weight, the large number of pieces that have survived from that era show a wide variation in size and weight. This means that, despite a unified monetary system, the right to cast coins remained decentralized.

China continued to have individuals casting private money as evidenced by the need for Empress Lu Hou of the Western Han (206 BC – 24 AD) to issue an edict in 186 BC prohibiting citizens from issuing private currency. However, in the year 175 BC, Emperor Wen abolished this prohibition and allowed the people to issue private currency. One of his favorite officials, Deng Tong, issued currency said to have “prevailed throughout the realm”.

Although subsequent dynasties time and again attempted to prohibit the private issuance of money, private coinage still took place. The primary purpose of the private coinage was, of course, to make a profit. But, a good part of the casting was because the Chinese believe that coin-like charms can avert misfortune, can be used to celebrate happy events, and can control evil. It is these types of “coins” we refer to as charms or amulets.

Reasons for the Emergence of Chinese Charms

Chinese Zodiac Charm

There are a multiple of reasons given for the emergence of amulets and charms. The ancient Chinese felt they were not able to resist natural disasters resulting from nature’s elements of wind, rain, lightning, thunder, water and fire. They felt unable to understand disease, dreams and death. This led to religious belief and a reverence for spirits.

This was also a time when there began a separation between manual labor and intellectual labor resulting in, for example, diviners who could divine the ominous, auspicious, calamity and happiness for the tribal chiefs, as well as shamans who could drive away the evil spirits and cure diseases.

This was also the incipient period for the appearance of states with kings who received the “mandate from heaven” and ruled citizens.

By the time of the Han Dynasty, Confucianism and Taoism (Daoism) were already prevalent and Buddhism was arriving which caused the people to feel that the power of heavenly spirits was something that could not be violated. Only by following the intentions of heaven could one enjoy constant good luck and avoid
calamity.

For these reasons, people wished that their lives would be happy,long-lasting, and wealthy with many sons and grandsons. After death, they hoped to quickly ascend to the world of the immortals or reincarnate as a person. People began to worship heaven, the Buddha, and the immortals by means of memorials and ceremonies, prayers,sorcery, divination and eulogy.

Because the people were accustomed to the forms of coinage in circulation at the time and because they were convenient to carry, charms and amulets began to appear in similar forms.

Early Precursors of Chinese Charms

While it is not known for sure when “good luck” charms first appeared in China, their precursors can be traced back to at least the 7th – 4th century BC. There are examples of “three character knives” of the State of Qi with the character ji (吉) meaning auspicious.

The last years of the Warring States period saw the production of a type of round
coin (一刀) that had the same character 吉. This character 吉 is generally believed to be derived from a
character on ancient oracle bones meaning to pray for luck.

‘Ban Liang’ Coin with

big star below

square hole

There are examples of the Qin Dynasty (221 – 207 BC) banliang, mentioned
above, which appear to have raised dots on the surface which may have meant to represent stars.

Some of the ban liang (pan
liang) coins of the following Western Han (206 BC – 8 AD) have horizontal and vertical lines and raised dots which could be explained as representing the stars, moon and sun.

A detailed discussion of these ancient Chinese banliang coins and their images can be found at Chinese Coins and Emergence of Chinese Charms.

Chinese ‘Wu Zhu’ coin

with swastika

In 188 BC, the Western Han replaced the banliang coin with another round coin with a square hole in the middle called the wuzhu (五铢). This form of currency was actually then used for more than 700 years and became the longest circulated coin in China’s history.

Many of these coins have “auspicious symbols” including stars and star constellations, the moon, the sun, swords, auspicious animals such as the turtle and snake, etc. One such example of this type of auspicious wuzhu coin has swastikas both above and below the square hole as is shown here.

Please see the emergence of Chinese charms for more examples of these very old Chinese charms. Please also see ancient Chinese charm symbols: star, moon, cloud and dragon for a theory relating these symbols to the
fundamental belief of the ancient Chinese in Yin Yang and the Five Elements.

One of the first true

charms of the

Han Dynasty

Many scholars now believe that the first true charms and amulets appeared
during the Han Dynasty and archaeological evidence seems to bear this out.

Some of these early charms were meant to be worn.

The charm at the left, for example, is considered by many scholars to be among the very first true charms of the Han Dynasty and is discussed in
detail at Chinese Pendant Charms.

Evolution, Development and History of Chinese Charms

The major evolution and development of Chinese charms occurred during the period from the Six Dynasties (220 – 586 AD) to the Yuan Dynasty (1271 – 1368 AD). During this time, wordings on charms to wish for “happiness” and “longevity” became more common and widespread. Charms with Buddhist and Taoist sayings also appeared as did charms for marriage. These charms were now being made from such various materials as gold, silver, bronze, iron, tin,lead, jade, porcelain and paper. The styles of calligraphy also evolved from the Han script to the regular style, grass style, seal style and “Taoist magic symbol” style.

Old Chinese coin with

auspicious cloud

and moon

Most of the charms cast during the period from the beginning of the Han Dynasty (206 BCE) to the end of the Northern and Southern Dynasties (581 AD) were very similar to coins in circulation at that time or similar to coins of the not distant dynasties. What differentiated them was that simple symbols were added to the reverse side of the charms. These symbols included the sun, moon, stars, the tortoise, the snake, and the double-edged sword. Sometimes, depictions of people and the animals of the
Chinese zodiac were placed on the back of the charm. The obverse side of these charms resembled the coins in circulation at the time such as da quan wu shi (大泉五十), wu xing da bu (五行大布), yong tong wan guo (永通万国), and chang ping wu zhu (常平五铢).

Chinese ‘Wu Xing Da Bu’

charm

(obverse side)

Chinese charm with

snake, tortoise, Big Dipper,

and double-edged sword

As an example, please see this wu xing da bu
(五行大布) charm which, on the reverse side, has the snake above, the tortoise below, the double-edged sword to the right and the seven-star (Big
Dipper) constellation to the left of the square hole.

Open Work Charm displaying

two dragons

There was a major shift to the casting of open-work charms during the Tang (618 – 907 AD) and Song (960 – 1279 AD) dynasties. The themes of these open-work charms included flowers and plants, insects, fish, dragons, the phoenix, Chinese unicorn or qilin (kirin in Japanese), deer, horse, and figures of persons. Most of the open-work charms of this period were used for ornamentation such as for dress and personal adornment, accessories for horses, etc.

It was also during this time that charms with auspicious sayings on the obverse side, such as chang ming fu gui (长命富贵), were making their appearance. The reverse side of the charms showed various pictures reflecting the Taoist (Daoist) influences, the bagua, and the
twelve animals of the zodiac.

Chinese Zodiac Animal Charm

The twelve animals of the Chinese zodiac, representing the Twelve Earthly Branches (十二肖), were used to designate hours, days, months and years. These animals include the Rat, Ox, Tiger, Hare, Dragon, Serpent, Horse, Goat, Monkey, Cock, Dog and
Boar. An example of an ancient Chinese charm with the twelve zodiac
animals is displayed here. You may see additional old charms of this type at ancient Chinese Zodiac charms.

Charms with inscriptions such as fu de chang shou (福德长寿) and qian qiu wan sui (千秋万岁) were first cast at the end of the Northern Dynasties and then continued right through the Liao, Jin and Yuan Dynasties. Pieces used in table games such as the horse game, chess, and the drinker’s wager game also made their appearance during this period.

Old Chinese Horse Coin

The Song Dynasty (960 -1279 AD) saw a large number of charms cast. The quality of horse coins used as pieces in a board game and as gambling tokens reached its peak during this time.

If you have an interest in
these pieces, please see my page devoted to ancient Chinese horse coins.

Old Chinese Chess (xiangqi)

piece displaying soldier

holding weapon

Besides the board game played with horse coins, the Chinese also developed their own version of chess which we call “Chinese chess”.

The Chinese call it “elephant chess” (xiangqi)
and the game includes elephants, cannons and even a river. To the left is an old Chinese chess piece.

For more images and information on old
Chinese chess pieces please see ancient Chinese chess (xiangqi) pieces.

Liao Dynasty Charm

(Qian Qiu Wan Sui)

During the Liao dynasty (916 – 1125 AD), the types of charms most commonly seen were those with fortuitous inscriptions such as the previously mentioned qian qiu wan sui (千 秋万岁), shown at the left, as well as waist-worn charms in the shape of fish, and charms with the
animals of the zodiac.

The Jin Dynasty (1115 – 1234 AD) saw the emergence of charms with some
special characteristics. This was the result of the merging of the cultural arts of a plateau nationality with the ceremonies and legal customs of the Han nationality, along with styles of charms that had developed since the Song Dynasty. The Chinese are very good in using symbolism, allusions, suggestions, and homonyms to describe their customs
and, during this period, drew on the experiences of the national minority of the Jin Dynasty to do so. For example, they used the symbol of the
dragon to represent the emperor and the phoenix to represent the empress. Tigers and lions represented the ministers of government. The pine tree and the crane symbolized longevity. The jujube fruit symbolized “morning or early” because of a shared pronunciation (zao). Similarly, a “chicken” represented “lucky” because both characters are pronounced ji.

The Ming (1368 – 1644 AD) and Qing (Ch’ing) (1644 – 1911 AD) dynasties saw the production of a very large quantity of charms with inscriptions of good fortune and celebration. Most of the charms and amulets you will
see on my website are from this period so please be sure to see my page on auspicious inscriptions — good fortune, wealth, longevity, honor, sons and official rank.

Old Chinese charm

showing children

Chinese
have traditionally sought what is called the “three many”, that is happiness, longevity and many children and grandchildren. They have also sought official position and wealth. Many of the charms from the
Ming/Qing (Ch’ing) era reflect these desires. Many of these charms also rely on implied meanings using figures of persons and animals. Depictions of the tortoise, crane, pine tree, rocks and the peach were used to symbolize longevity. The crane symbolized the arrival of a happy event.

Ming and Qing (Ch’ing) Dynasty charms further expanded the repertoire of visual puns to convey a hidden meaning. For example, it may seen strange to the uninitiated to frequently find depictions of bats on the charms of this period until one is informed that the character for a bat (蝠) has exactly the same pronunciation as the character for “happiness” (福). On many charms, these bats are shown upside down. This is because the Chinese word for “upside down” (倒) is pronounced exactly the same as “to have arrived” (到). A person seeing a picture of an upside-down bat on a charm might say “the bat is
upside-down” but anyone listening would just as easily hear this as “happiness has arrived” which, of course, is a good omen. For more detailed information on this topic please see the hidden meaning of Chinese charm symbols.

Chinese token

with trigrams

Bamboo Tallies

During the late Qing (Ch’ing) Dynasty, opposition to Manchu rule began to occur in parts of China. The Taiping Rebellion (1850 -1864 AD) was one such large-scale peasant uprising and an example of its rebel coinage can be seen at Peace Coins and Charms.

Tokens, such as the ones at the left, also began to appear during this period, particularly in Jiangsu Province. For a discussion of the metal tokens please visit Chinese Tokens. The bamboo tallies are discussed at Bamboo Tallies.

Chinese Charms of Different Shapes

Most Chinese charms are similar to old Chinese coins in that they are
round with either a square or round hole in the center.

However, old Chinese charms can take on different shapes according to their intended use.

Old Chinese Lock Charm

For example, lock charms are meant to help “lock” children to life and therefore resemble traditional Chinese locks but with auspicious inscriptions on their front and back.

For examples of old Chinese lock charms please see Ancient Chinese Lock Charms.

Old Chinese Fish Charm

The fish symbolizes “more” as in the sense of more good luck, fortune, long life, children, etc.

Fish charms symbolize perseverance in overcoming the barriers a person must pass through in life.

Images and historical information concerning old Chinese fish charms can be seen at Ancient Chinese Fish Charms.

Old Chinese Gourd Charm

Gourds have a very long history of use in China and are a prominent symbol of longevity.

The gourd is an important symbol in ancient Chinese myths. Hundun was a god of primordal substance and referred to as the Cosmic Gourd.

In Daoism (Taoism), the gourd represented heaven and earth. The gourd also symboized self-containment and self-sufficiency, and played an important role in alchemy.

The gourd was a symbol of one of the “Eight Immortals” and a “magic gourd” was described in the famous Ming dynasty novel “Journey to the West”.

For a very detailed discussion of old Chinese gourd charms please see Ancient Chinese Gourd Charms.

Old Chinese Peach Charm

The peach has a most interesting Chinese mythology and has come to stand for longevity and immortality.

Charms and amulets, as well as swords and arrows, that were made of peach wood also provided protection from evil spirits.

For a discussion of old Chinese peach charms and stories concerning the peach and the Queen Mother of the West and the Three Immortals, please see Ancient Chinese Peach Charms.

Old Chinese Spade Charm

Chinese spade charms are distantly related to the spade (shovel) shaped money of the Zhou Dynasty (11th Century BC – 221 BC).

This shovel-shaped form of money was derived from the farming instrument used in farming.

Spade money was abolished during the Qin dynasty (221 – 206 BC) but then briefly revived during the Xin dynasty (9 – 23 AD).

For images of old Chinese spade charms and a brief history of their evolution from ancient Chinese spade money please see Chinese Charms — Spade Charms.

Old Chinese charm

meant to be worn

This type of Chinese charm has a canopy with three holes or loops on the top of its round body. It has the Chinese character gua (挂) at the top which means “to hang”.

It was meant to be a dress ornament worn on a person as a pendant on a necklace, a broach, hung from the waist, or it could be hung from a house rafter or other location.

Pendant charms are thought to be one of the first forms of charms and amulets to have appeared in China and can be currently dated back to the Han dynasty (206 BC – 220 AD).

There are a large number of varieties which include many different symbols and inscriptions.

To see many examples of this type of charm with detailed explanations of their meaning, please visit Ancient Chinese Pendant Charms.

Chinese Money Tree

In Chinese legend, there are trees known as “money trees”.

When a person shakes a money tree, coins will fall from its branches to the ground.

Very ornate “money trees” have been discovered in ancient Chinese tombs dating back to the Han Dynasty.

These trees that magically produce coins instead of leaves are believed to help guide the deceased to heaven and provide financial support.

The Chinese also believe that a “money tree” can bring wealth and good fortune to the living.

An interesting example of a Chinese “money tree” which “grows” ancient Chinese “coins”, even predating its own creation, is discussed at Chinese Money Trees.

Chinese charm with

boy on top

Chinese families have traditionally favored sons over daughters.

The “ideal” Chinese family was considered to have 5 sons and 2 daughters.

A charm with a boy on top reflecting the Chinese desire for many sons can be seen at Chinese Boy Charms.

This website includes many articles on ancient Chinese coins and charms.

You may find the “Chinese Coin Guides” and the “Chinese Charm Guides” listed below to be helpful.

Also, clicking on the menu (three horizontal lines) at the top of this page will take you to various articles on old Chinese coins, charms, horse coins, chess pieces (xiangqi) and paper money, as well as extensive information on old Korean coins.

Chinese Coin Articles

Chinese Coins
History and images of Chinese coins and other ancient forms of
money

Emergence
of Chinese Charms
The beginning of symbols appearing on Chinese coins

Chinese Charms with Coin
Inscriptions
Images and history of charms with Chinese coin inscriptions
(legends)

Ancient
Chinese Coins with Charm Features
Images and history of Chinese coins with charm characteristics
and features

Feng Shui Coins
Chinese coins used in feng shui and how to select the best coins to provide good luck, good fortune and protect against evil

Chinese Coins with Flower (Rosette)
Holes
Images, history, production technique, and meaning of old
Chinese coins with flower (rosette), “turtle shell”, “star”
and diamond shape holes

Chinese Cash Coins and
Fortune-Telling
How old Chinese cash coins were traditionally used for
fortune-telling

Chinese Coins and Traditional
Chinese Medicine
The use of old Chinese coins in traditional Chinese medicine

Ancient
Chinese Peace Coins and Charms
History and images of Chinese peace (Tai Ping) charms and
coins

Chinese Poem Coins
Images and history of Chinese poem coins and charms of Emperor
Kangxi of the Qing (Ch’ing) Dynasty

Chinese Money Trees
Images, history and meaning of Chinese money trees and coin
trees

Chinese Tokens
Images and history of old Chinese tokens with charm and amulet
features

Chinese Charms — Spade Charms
Images and history of ancient Chinese shovel and spade money
and the evolution into a charm form

Bamboo Tallies
Images and history of the Chinese type of token money known as
bamboo tallies


Chinese Coin Monographs

1910
Chinese Yunnan Spring Dollar
The 1910 Yunnan Spring Dollar is considered one of the rarest
of Chinese coins.

China’s
Biggest Ancient Coin
The largest and heaviest ancient Chinese coin was cast during
the Ming Dynasty and was unearthed in Yunnan Province in 1997.

The
King of Qing Dynasty Coins
Very rare “100 cash” pattern coin known as “The King of Qing
Dynasty Coins”.

Vault
Protector Coins
Large, thick, heavy and well-made coins with charm-like powers
to provide protection at the treasury

Empress
Dowager Cixi Commemorative Coin
A rare guang xu yuan bao
“one tael” silver coin produced at the Guangdong Province mint
to commemorate the 70th birthday of the Empress Dowager Cixi.

State
of Qin Silver Banliang Coin
Extremely rare and unique specimen of large and heavy silver
banliang coin from State of Qin

Two
Rare Coins Discovered in Ningxia
Rare Western Xia and Northern Song coins discovered in
Ningxia

Five Goat Coin
A rare Chinese copper coin struck at the mint in Guangdong
Province in 1936 displaying five goats.

Chinese
Burial Money
Various forms of buried money to be used by deceased in
afterlife

Coin
Dragon
Dragon made of cash coins discovered in the Hall of Mental
Cultivation in the Forbidden City

Taiping
Rebellion Coins Saved from Furnace
Rare iron coins from the Taiping Rebellion were secretly
hidden so as not to be used as scrap iron for a steel furnace
during the Great Leap Forward.

Chinese
“10 Cash” Coins Overstruck on Korean “5 Fun” Coins
Near the end of the Qing (Ch’ing) Dynasty, Japanese samurai
and Korean businessmen conspired to counterfeit Chinese “10
Cash” copper coins using Korean “5 Fun” coins as blanks.

Chinese
“World of Brightness” Coin
Discussion of the mysterious “World of Brightness” coin which
resembles the quang xu tong
bao coin.

Bodhidharma
Holding a Wu Zhu Coin
Daruma doll showing Bodhidharma holding a “tai he wu zhu” coin

Kingdom
of Chu “Tian Ce Fu Bao” Gilt Bronze Coin
Very rare gilt bronze coin from Kingdom of Chu of Five Dynasties
and Ten Kingdoms period

Lu Xun and
Chinese Coins
Lu Xun, one of China’s greatest modern writers, also contributed
to the design of the dragon and phoenix silver dollar.

Qi
Xiang Tong Bao Engraved Mother Coin
Very rare Qi Xiang Tong Bao mother coin from Qing dynasty

Sun Yat-Sen
“Memento” Coin
The meaning of the symbols on this silver dollar coin with a
portrait of Sun Yat-Sen commemorating the founding of the
Republic of China.

Song
Dynasty Biscuit Coins
Biscuit or cake coins of the Song dynasty

“Drilled
Hole” Ban Liang Coins
Unusual ban liang
coins with drilled holes unearthed in Gansu Province.

Turtle-Shaped
Coin of the Han Dynasty
Silver coin of the bai jin san pin

China’s
Largest Gold Coin
China’s largest gold coin was also the largest gold coin in the
world when it was produced in the year 2000.

‘Kai
Yuan Tong Bao’ Clay Mould
Only known specimen of clay mould used to cast Kai Yuan Tong Bao
coins of Tang Dynasty

Unusual
Variations of the ‘Kai Yuan Tong Bao’ Coin
Several interesting and unusual coins based on the Tang dynasty
Kai Yuan Tong Bao coin

Zhong
Kui — “Peking Opera” Star and “Demon Slayer”
Zhong Kui, the popular “Peking Opera” star and the immortal
“Demon Slayer” who has protected Chinese households for
centuries, is portrayed on this modern silver coin.

State
of Qi Six Character Knife Money
Six character knife-shaped money from ancient State of Qi

Ancient
Chinese Coin Exhibit at the Qi Heritage Museum
The Qi Heritage Museum has the best collection in the world of
Chinese money from the late Zhou and Warring States Period

Korean
Inscription on Ancient Chinese Knife-Shaped Money
A Korean scholar believes the unidentified inscription on this
Chinese knife money is written in ancient Korean script

Buy
Donkey Burgers with Ancient Chinese Coins
Buy “donkey burgers” and pay with ancient Chinese money at a
restaurant in Beijing.

Body
Armor Made of Old Chinese Coins
Old Chinese coins used as body armor by the Tlingit people of
North America.

Three Hole Spades
Very rare “three hole spade” coin sets world record as most
expensive ancient Chinese coin.

Rare
‘Three Hole Spade’ Sold at Auction
The only known specimen of a large (one liang) three
hole spade minted at Yang Jian in the State of Zhao during the
Warring States period has been sold.

Admiral
Zheng He and the Yongle Tongbao Coin
China’s maritime explorer Admiral Zheng He and the Ming Dynasty
“yongle tongbao” coin recently discovered in Kenya.

Carrying
Cash in Imperial China
Photo of a man carrying Chinese cash coins during the Qing
dynasty

Stringing Cash
Coins
Rare photograph of men putting Chinese cash coins on strings
during Qing dynasty

Cycling
Across Imperial China
Two Americans ride bicycles across China during the Qing dynasty
and face challenges carrying loads of Chinese cash coins

Chinese
Coins and Bank Logos
Chinese coins and the design of Chinese bank logos.

World’s
Largest Copper Coin Sculpture
A Tang dynasty ‘Kai Yuan Tong Bao’ coin is the largest
copper coin sculpture in the world

Young
Numismatists in China
Young children playing with ancient Chinese coins found on
their property

Coins
and Charms of the Shui Nationality
Very rare coin of the Shui people dating from the Northern Song
Dynasty.

Southern
Song Coin for Jin Army Defectors
General Liu Guangshi of the Southern Song army minted zhao
na xin bao
coin to encourage defection from Jin army

Earliest
Peasant Rebellion in China to Mint Coins
Ying yun yuan bao coin in Shanghai Museum

Chinese Coins and Archaeology

Ancient
Coins Discovered in Golden Horse River
Villagers in Chengdu, Sichuan Province discover a large
quantity of ancient Chinese coins in the “Golden Horse River”.

Villagers
Dig for Coins in Grand Canal
Villagers dig for old coins in ancient Grand Canal in Shandong

Coins
Discovered at Rufu Stone Pagoda
Song Dynasty coins discovered by archaeologists help date the
Rufu Stone Pagoda in Hainan Province.

Chinese
Villager Unearths ‘Old Coin’ While Digging Ancestral Grave
Villager frightened when he saw the ‘old coin’ move

Tons
of Song Dynasty Iron Coins Discovered
Several tons of Song Dynasty iron coins were recently discovered
in a field near Cangzhou, Hebei Province.

Coin
Design Discovered on Wall Bricks from Kingdom of Min
Design of Chinese cash coins found on bricks of an ancient city
wall from the Tang Dynasty.

Bricks
with Coin Design Discovered in Southern Dynasty Tomb
Many bricks used the construction of this Southern Dynasties
tomb have the design of a Chinese cash coin

Ancient
Kingdom of Min Coins Cast in Quanzhou
Clay moulds used to cast the Kingdom of Min coins were
discovered while digging for the Chinese traditional medicine
“golden juice”.

Song
Dynasty Coin Moulds Found in Salt Lake
Coin moulds for Song dynasty coins found in Salt Lake in Shanxi

Unique
Western Xia Coin Written in Seal Script Unearthed in Ningxia
Rare Western Xia qian you yuan bao coin written in seal
script unearthed

200,000
Ancient Chinese Coins Found in Old Well
Approximately 200,000 Song Dynasty coins were discovered in an
old well in Suzhou, Jiangsu Province.

1,000
Coins Discovered in Han Dynasty Grave
More than 1,000 “Large Coin Fifty” (da quan wu shi) coins were excavated from a
Han Dynasty grave.

12,000
Song Dynasty Iron Coins Unearthed in Shanxi Province
More than 12,000 iron coins from Song dynasty recovered from
ruins in Shanxi

Tons
of Chinese Coins Found in Sunken World War II Japanese Ship
About 3.3 tons of foreign coins, mainly Chinese silver coins
from the 1920’s and 1930’s, have been recovered from a Japanese
freighter that was sunk by an American warplane off the west
coast of Korea during World War II.

How
Chinese Archaeologists Clean Coins
How archaeologists cleaned badly corroded coins unearthed at a
tomb in Fuzhou, Fujian Province.

Coffin
Contains Coin Instead of Corpse
Archaeologists unearth a coffin containing a coin but no corpse.

More
than 2,200 Rare “Later Jin Dynasty” Coins Discovered
Tomb robbers captured after unearthing rare coins from the Later
Jin Dynasty (1616-1636 AD).

A
Thousand Coins Discovered at Cishi Pagoda
A thousand Tang and Song dynasty coins discovered during
restoration of Cishi Pagoda in Hunan

Smallest
Chinese Coin in History Unearthed
Watch video from China Central Television of what may be the
smallest Chinese coin ever discovered.

Largest
Cache of Ancient Coins Unearthed in Xinjiang Province
More than 14,000 coins unearthed in Xinjiang Province

Knife
and Spade Money from State of Yan Unearthed in Hebei
Large hoard of knife and spade money from the ancient State of
Yan was unearthed by a farmer digging a well in Hebei Province.

600
‘Ming Knives’ from the State of Yan Unearthed in Hebei
Villager in Hebei Province accidentally discovers a buried clay
pot containing 600 specimens of ‘ming knife money’ from the
State of Yan.

Knife
Money from State of Qi Unearthed in Shandong
Farmer digs up “four character” knife money from ancient State
of Qi

Ancient
Kushan Empire Coins Unearthed in Ningxia
Silk Road coins from the ancient Kushan Empire unearthed in
northwest China’s Ningxia Hui Autonomous region.

3
tons of Coins Excavated from Ruins of Han Dynasty Mint in
Inner Mongolia
Three tons of coins and many clay moulds were recently excavated
from the ruins of a Han Dynasty mint in Inner Mongolia.

Coins
Made of Turtle Shell Discovered at Famen Temple
“Kaiyuan Tongbao” coins made from sea turtle shell were
discovered at Famen Temple where a sacred relic of the Buddha is
kept.

Kaiyuan
Tongbao Coins Unearthed at Fuhaiyuan Temple
Buried cache of “kaiyuan tongbao” coins weighing 27.5 kg
unearthed at 1,100-year-old Fuhaiyuan Temple.

700-Year-Old
Coin Pit Discovered in Hunan Province
Watch a video report on a Song and Yuan dynasty money pit
recently discovered in Hunan Province.

Digging
for Coins Despite Lurking Danger
In the midst of unexploded ordnance from WW2, treasure hunters
in Chongqing dig for old Chinese coins in dry Jialing River
riverbed.

Mystery
Surrounding 100 Tons of Song Dynasty Iron Coins
Three theories in regard to the mystery surrounding 100 tons of
Song Dynasty iron coins discovered near Cangzhou in Hebei
Province.

3,000
Tang Dynasty ‘Kai Yuan Tong Bao’ Coins Unearthed in Xinjiang
Latest news reports state that nearly 10,000 “kai yuan tong bao”
coins from the Tang Dynasty have been unearthed in the ancient
Silk Road city of Kucha.

Song
Dynasty Coins in a Ming Dynasty Tomb
A Ming Dynasty tomb with exquisite paintings but containing Song
Dynasty coins instead of Ming Dynasty coins is discovered near
Xuzhou, Jiangsu Province.

Archaeological
Blind Boxes and Ancient Chinese Coins
Chinese museums offer archaeological blind boxes for people to
dig for cultural artifacts just like an archaeologist

China
TV Shows Ancient Coin Cache Being Dug Up in Anhui
Watch Chinese TV news broadcast showing archaeologists digging
up more than 500 pounds of Song Dynasty coins in Anhui Province.

Tang
and Song Dynasty Coins Dug Up in Yancheng
Villagers dig for coin “treasure” buried in river mud in
Yancheng

Coins
from Han, Tang, Song and Jin Dynasties Unearthed in Gansu
Archaeologists discover 114 kg of coins from the Han, Tang, Song
and Jin dynasties buried at a site in Dingxi City, Gansu
Province.

Byzantine
Gold Coin Found in Tomb of Emperor Jiemin of Northern Wei
Byzantine gold coin (solidus) discovered in tomb of Emperor
Jiemin of Northern Wei

Xin
Dynasty Coins Found in Korean Tomb
Coins cast by Wang Mang of the Xin dynasty found in Korean tomb


Return to Ancient Chinese
Charms
and
Coins

Korean Coins

The first bronze coins
were cast during the reign of King Sukjong (肅
宗) of the Koryo Dynasty (Goryeo 高麗)
during the period 998-1097 AD.  The inscriptions are
written in Chinese characters and the coins are modeled
after those of the Northern Song Dynasty (960-1127) of
China.

This
coin was cast during the years 998-1097 AD of the reign of
King Sukjong.

The inscription is tong
guk tong bo (dongkuktongbo
東國通寶) and the characters
are read in the following order: top, bottom, right, left.

The inscription translates as “Eastern country currency”.

The inscription is written in seal script (篆書)
but other specimens exist in clerical script (隸書), regular
script (楷書), and running script (行書).

Most specimens of this coin have the characters written in
this order.  However, there also exists a rare
variety of this coin written in regular script (楷
書) in which the inscription is read clockwise
beginning with the top character.

Similar to the Northern Song Dynasty coins which
they imitate, these coins also have blank reverse sides
with no characters or other symbols.

There are a number of varieties of this coin. 
Diameters range from 23 ~ 25 mm with weights from 2.4 ~ 3
grams.

The example shown above is known as the “long cap” variety
because the top horizontal stroke of the bo (寶)
character, located to the left of the square hole, extends
downwards toward the bottom of the character on both
sides.

In addition to this small cash coin, there were also
larger “Value Two” coins cast with a diameter of about 30
mm and a weight of about 5.8 grams.  These Value 2
coins are well-made and are extremely rare.  Most
have been excavated in the area of Kaesong (開城), the
present capital of North Korea, which was the ancient
capital city of Korea.

This particular coin has a diameter of 23 mm and a weight
of 2.6 grams.

This
coin was also cast during the years 998-1097 of the reign
of King Sukjong (肅宗) of the Koryo Dynasty (高麗).

The inscription is 東
國重寶 (tong guk
chung bo, tong
guk jung bo, dongkukjungbo)
and the characters
are read in the following order: top, bottom, right, left.

Specimens of this coin also exist with the inscription
read in a clockwise manner but they are considered scarce.

The inscription translates as “Eastern country heavy
currency”.

All tong guk
chung bo coins are written in a simple regular
script (楷書).

These coins tend to be thicker and heavier than the tong guk tong
bo (東
國通寶) coin shown above.

There are several varieties of this coin with the
differences being in the way the characters are written
and how broad or narrow is the outside rim.

Most of these coins are about 25 mm in diameter and weigh
2.8 ~ 3.6 grams.

This particular coin has a diameter of 24 mm but weighs a
hefty 4.2 grams.

The 三
韓通寶 (sam han
tong bo) coins were cast
during the years 1097-1105 AD of the reign of King Sukjong
of the Koryo Dynasty (高麗). 
These coins are similar to the hae dong and tong guk coins in that they imitate the
coins cast during the Song Dynasty of China.

Coins with this inscription exist written in seal script (篆
書), clerical script (隸書) and running
script (行書).

There is a very rare version of the coin with the “three”
(三) written in “official script” as 叁. 
Only one or two specimens of this coin are known to exist.

All of these coins have blank reverses.

The sam han tong bo
coins tend not to be well-made.  The
rims are not uniform and the characters are not distinct.

The coins are fairly scarce.

Most of the coins have diameters of 23-25 mm and a weight
of 2.6-3.4 grams.

This particular coin has a diameter of 25 mm and
a weight of 2.1 grams.

The 三
韓重寶 (sam han chung bo, sam han jung
bo) coin
was cast during the years 1097-1105 AD.

The inscription translates as “Three Han heavy currency”.

“Three Han” was another name for ancient Korea which
consisted of three states with names ending in
“Han”.  These were Ma Han (馬韓), Jin Han (辰韓) and Biun
Han (辨韓).

This coin was made during the same time period as the 三韓通寶 (sam han tong bo)
discussed above but, in general, appears to be slightly
more refined.

Some sam han chung bo
coins, such as the example at the left, have inscriptions
written in the following order: top, bottom, right, left.

Other specimens have inscriptions written to be read in a
clockwise manner starting with the character at the top.

All sam han chung bo
coins have blank reverses.

Based on differences in the size of the characters and how
broad or narrow the rim is, there are a number of
varieties of this coin.

Most of these coins are approximately 25 mm in diameter.

This particular specimen has a diameter of 25 mm and a
weight of 4 grams.

The inscription on
this coin is read clockwise, beginning with the character
at the top, as 海東通寶 (hae dong tong bo).

The inscription translates as “Eastern Sea currency”.

The “Eastern Sea” refers to Korea which is located east of
the Yellow Sea.

These coins began to be cast in the 7th
year (1097 AD) of the reign of King Sukjong (肅宗) and
continued to 1105 AD.

Coins with this inscription were also cast
with the characters read in the following order: top,
bottom, right, left.

This coin is written in seal script (篆書) but other
specimens exist in clerical script (隸書), regular script
(楷書), and running script (行書).

This coin has a diameter of 25 mm and a weight of 2.9
grams.

The
inscription on this coin is read clockwise as 海
東重寶 (hae dong
chung bo, hae
dong jung bo)
which translates as
“Eastern Sea heavy currency”.

These coins began to be cast in the 7th
year (1097) of the reign of King Sukjong (肅宗) and
continued to 1105 AD.

Only coins written in regular script (楷書)
are known to exist.

Certain characteristics of these coins may indicate
that they were cast before the 海東通寶 (hae dong t’ong bo)
coins.  For example, these coins tend to
be thicker and the Chinese characters tend to be
plainer.  They more closely resemble the Korean
version of the 乾 元重寶 (qian yuan zhong bao)
coins.

Most of these coins are about 25 mm in diameter and weigh
about 4 grams.

This example has a diameter of 25 mm and a weight of 3.1
grams.

There also exist versions of this coin with the
inscription 海 東元寶 (hae dong won bo)
written in regular script (楷 書) which closely
resemble the Chinese Song Dynasty coins.  The Chinese
characters are very large.  The coins are about 24 mm
in diameter but relatively heavy at about 5.1 grams. 
On the reverse sides, below the square hole, there appears
to be what looks like a Chinese character.  If it is
a character, however, it has not yet been identified.

The 海東元寶 coins are
very rare and most old Korean reference books do not even
include them.

The only recent specimens have been excavated in the
area near Kaesong (開城), the present capital of North Korea.

Coins of King
Sejong (

世 宗) of the Yi Dynasty

In 1392 AD, General Yi Songgye (李成桂) of the Yi Dynasty
(Choson or Chosun or Joseon Dynasty 1392-1910 AD)
proclaimed himself to be King Taejo (太祖) and changed the name of the
country to Choson
(朝鮮).

Choson tong bo (朝
鮮通寶) coins were actually cast during two time
periods.  The first period was during the 5th
7th years (1423-1425 AD) of the reign of King Sejong
(世宗) when the
coins were cast written in “orthodox” script
(楷書).

The coin at the left is an example of a choson tong bo
(朝
鮮通寶).  The characters are read in the
following order: top, bottom, right, left.

The inscription translates as “Choson
currency”.

The characters on these coins tend to be clear and
distinct.  The reverse sides are blank.

The coins are about 24 mm in diameter and weigh 3.2 – 4
grams.

There are many varieties of this coin.

This specimen has a diameter of 24.5 mm and a weight of
2.4 grams.

Coins of King Ingo (


) of the Yi Dynasty

The second time coins with the inscription Choson tong
bo (朝
鮮通寶) were cast was 200 years later in the 3rd
year (1625 AD) of the reign of King Injo (仁
祖)
of the Yi Dynasty (Choson or Chosun or Joseon
Dynasty 李紀).

Unlike the earlier Choson
tong bo (朝鮮通寶) coins, these coins had the
inscription written in “official style” (palbun 八分)
as in the
example
at the left.

The coins tend to have a yellow-brown color and the
characters are not very standardized.  The strokes
can be thin or thick and small or large.  Some
varieties have broad rims while others have narrow rims.

Both government and private versions were cast and,
therefore, coins can vary from well-made to crude.

Unlike the earlier version of the coin, coins with
inscriptions written in clerical script (隸書)
are much scarcer.

Finally, there exists a “Value Ten” version of the
coin.  These coins have a diameter of 45 mm and a
weight of about 30 grams.

These “Value Ten” coins are very rare.

Chosŏn T’ong Bo “Value Ten”
and “One Chŏn”
Test Coins

Test coins with the inscription chosŏn t’ong bo
(朝鮮通寶) in denominations of “Value Ten” (sip 十) and “One Chŏn” (il chŏn
一錢) were cast
in or about the year 1881.

These coins are very rare and were not released for
circulation.

Unfortunately, there exists very little reliable
information regarding the coins.

According to this
Chinese article, the Value Ten test coins can have
either a plain reverse (光背) or have the character 十
(sip),
meaning “ten”, above the square hole on the reverse side.

Also, the plain reverse coins can be found in two
varieties depending on whether the characters on the
obverse side are “small” (小字) or “large” (大字).
There is also
a chosŏn t’ong bo denomination
“One Chŏn” (il
chon 一錢) test coin,
displayed at the left, which on the reverse side has the
character 户 (ho)
above and the characters 一錢 (il
chŏn)
to the right of the square hole.

Ho (户)
is the mint mark of the Treasury Department (Hojo
户曹) and il chŏn
(一
錢) represents the denomination “one chŏn”.

At the time, 400 small cash coins were the equivalent in
value to one tael
(一两) of silver.  One of these il chŏn
(一
錢) test coins would have been worth the equivalent of 40
of the Value 10 test coins.

Some varieties of this coin have a line (一) above the 户,
as in this specimen.  Other coins lack this top bar.

There can also be slight differences in the way the “head”
or upper part of the t’ong
(通) is written.

Regarding the sŏn (鮮)
character, there are slight differences in the
way the four “dots” at the bottom of the 魚 are
written as well as the way the “head” of the 羊
is written.

No diameter or weight is given in the article for the chosŏn t’ong bo “One
Chŏn” coin
displayed above.

The other Chinese article, however, does provide
information on the specimens it discusses.  The plain
reverse “Value Ten” test coin has a diameter of 48.2 mm
and a weight of 29 grams.  The “One Chŏn”
test coin has a
diameter of 47.6 mm and a weight of 31 grams.

As already mentioned, these test coins are very rare and
not well documented.  As a result, there is some
dispute among Korean coin experts as to which specimens
are authentic and which are later reproductions. 

“Sang Pyong Tong Bo” (常平通寶) Coins

Beginning in the year 1633 AD during the reign of King Injo
(仁 祖) of the Yi
Dynasty (Choson, Chosun, Joseon Dynasty 李紀), the
“Stabilization Office” (Sangpyongchong
常平廳),
which was a famine relief office, began to cast coins
utilizing the first two characters of the office name 常
平 (sang
pyong, sang
p’yŏng
)
in the coin inscription 常 平通寶
(sang pyong tong bo,
sang p’yŏng t’ong bo,
sangpyungtongbo
상 평통보; Chinese pinyin: chang ping tong bao).

The inscription can be translated as “always even
currency”.

The reverse side of these first coins was blank.

The coin at the left is an example of a sang pyong tong bo
(常
平通寶
) coin.

In 1651, King Hyojong (孝宗) issued a decree ordering the
people to use the coin and prohibiting them from using
cloth as money.


Also, private mintage was permitted at this time.

The inscription on the
coin at the left is sip jun tong bo (sip chŏn t’ong bo
十钱通宝; Chinese shi qian
tong bao) which translates as “ten cash
currency”.

There is some controversy as to when these “Value Ten”
cash coins were actually cast.  Some experts believe
that they were privately cast around 1651 during the reign
of King Hyojong.

Others believe that these coins were cast beginning in the
year 1793 during the reign of King Chŏngjo (Jeongjo 正祖).

These “ten cash currency” coins exist in sizes ranging
from 28 mm to 40 mm and in different calligraphic styles
which seems to support the belief that they were privately
cast.
The use of coins and the implementation of an economy
based on money, instead of cloth or rice, was further
strengthened when King Sukjong (肅宗) in 1678 ordered that
additional mints be established to produce the sang pyong
tong bo coins.

Sang pyong tong
bo
coins were cast from 1633 to 1891 and continued to
circulate for over 300 years.  In addition to the
large number of government and military mints that made
these coins, many sang
pyong tong bo coins were also privately cast.

As mentioned above, there
are estimated to be more than 5,000 varieties of sang pyong tong
bo
coins with many varieties still undocumented.  The
authoritative Korean coin catalog 高丽朝鲜时代货币
documents
3,078 varieties of the One Mun, Two Mun and Five Mun coins, and 48 varieties of the One
Hundred Mun
coin.

Denominations of Sang Pyong Tong Bo Coins

Sang pyong tong bo
coins were cast in four denominations: One Mun (Value One), Two
Mun (Value Two),
Five Mun (Value
Five) and One Hundred Mun
(Value One Hundred).

The mun was the
Korean equivalent of the wen (文) or “cash” coin (“leaf money”,
“leaf coin” yŏpchŏn,
yupjun 葉錢) of China and the mon
(文)
of Japan.

This is an example of a One Mun (“Value One” dangiljun 當一錢)
sang pyong tong bo coin.

The image at the far left is the obverse side with the
inscription read (top, bottom, right, left) as sang pyong tong bo
(常
平通寶).

The one mun
coins have a diameter of 24-25 mm.

This is a Two Mun
(“Value Two” dangijun
當二錢) sang
pyong tong bo coin.

Two mun coins
began being cast in 1679.

The two mun
coins have a diameter of 27-29 mm.

This is a Five
Mun (“Value Five”
tangojon or
dangohjun 當五錢) sang pyong tong bo
coin.

Casting of five mun
coins began in 1883.

The five mun
coins have a diameter of 31-33 mm.

This is a One Hundred
Mun (“Value Hundred”
tangbaekchon
or dangbaekjun 當
百錢) sang
pyong tong bo coin.

The One Hundred Mun
is the only denomination of sang pyong tong bo coinage for which
accurate mint records exist.  These coins were first
cast by the Treasury Department on December 12, 1866 and
put into circulation beginning January 15, 1867.  The
last coin was produced on June 16, 1867 which means these
coins were cast for only 172 days.  A total of
1,784,038 “One Hundred Mun”
coins were cast by the government.
 
The One Hundred Mun coins minted by the government have
a diameter of 40.6 mm, a thickness of 2.8 mm and a weight
of 25.1 grams.

With so many mints producing the smaller denomination
coins over such a long period of time, it is inevitable
that the diameter and weight of the coins would vary.

In general, coins that are well-cast with clear
inscriptions and a yellowish color were produced during an
early period at a government mint.

Coins that are less refined were cast at a later period.

Most privately cast coins tend to have a crude appearance
with indistinct characters and a blackish tint.

At the
left is a sang pyong
tong bo coin made of iron (铁).

I am not aware of any historical records indicating Korean
coins of this period having been made of iron. 
However, this iron coin was, according to reports,
recently found in a hoard of coins in Dongbei (东北
“Manchuria”) which is the area of northeast China that
borders on Korea.

The cache included coins from the Tang (618-907) to the
Qing (1644-1911) dynasties.  The earliest coins were
kai yuan tong
bao
(开元通宝 621-907) and the latest were qian long tong bao
(乾隆通宝 1736-1795).  Coins from Korea, Annam (Vietnam)
and Japan were also found in the hoard which is believed
to have originally come from “traders”.

The reverse side is blank with no indication of the mint
or any other symbol.  It is, therefore, unknown when
or where the coin was made.

The owner states that the coin is modeled after the
Northern Song Dynasty tai ping tong
bao
(太平通宝) coin with the tai
(太) being changed to a sang (“chang” 常). 
He
also
thinks
the
coin
may
have
been
cast
in
the early years of the sang
pyong
tong bo series.

This coin was the only iron sang pyong tong bo coin in the hoard and
may be unique.

The coin has a diameter of 24.13 mm and a weight of 4.2
grams.

I am grateful to lindascoin,
the present owner, for providing the information on this
rare coin.

Many sang pyong tong bo
coins eventually made their way to China where they
circulated together with Chinese cash coins.

Sang pyong tong bo
coins were also popularly used to embellish old Korean
charms.

Characteristics
of the Sang Pyong Tong Bo Inscription

On all the coins, the
Chinese characters sang
pyong tong bo (常平通寶)
are written in “Regular”
(“Orthodox”) Script” (楷書).  The calligraphy on
the earlier minted coins, however, deviates slightly
from a pure “Regular Script” in that the
(tong)
character has only one “dot” instead of two which
is actually a

characteristic of the “Official” or “Clerkly” Script
(隸書).  This is good way to distinguish an earlier
cast coin from one that was cast at a later period.

All the characters on the reverse side are also
written in “Regular Script” with the sole exception of the
character 經
(kyong),
indicating the “Government Office of Pukhan Mountain
Fortress, which is written in “Running Script” (行
書).

Another characteristic of the inscription on sang pyong tong
bo
coins is that there is only the tong bo
(
) or “universal
currency” version.  “Original
currency” (元寶) and “heavy currency” (重寶) are not
used in the inscriptions to indicate larger
denominations of the coins as is common with Chinese
cash coins.  Therefore, even the “One Hundred Mun” coin is a
通寶“. 
If it had been cast in China at an earlier time, it
could very well have been a 重寶 or “heavy
currency”.

The reason why only tong bo
(
) was used in the
inscription, despite differences in denominations, has
to do with the very close ties that existed between
the Yi (Choson) Dynasty (1392-1897) and the Ming
Dynasty (1368-1644) of China.

All the cash coins of the Ming Dynasty are also
designated as 通寶
(tong bao).

The 元寶 (yuan
bao) designation was not used on the coinage
of the Ming Dynasty because it was prohibited to use
the Emperor’s name.  The founder and first
emperor of the Ming Dynasty was the Hongwu Emperor
(洪武帝), also known as Emperor Tai
Zu. 
Emperor Tai Zu’s real name was Zhu Yuanzhang (朱元璋).  You
will note that there is a “元” character in
his name.  For this reason, it was prohibited to
use the designation “元寶” on Ming
Dynasty coins and the Koreans respected this
prohibition on their own coinage.

Mints Casting Sang
Pyong Tong Bo Coins

In 1633, the “Stabilization Office” (Sangpyongchong 常平廳) became
the first mint to cast sang
pyong tong bo coins.  Over the next 250
years, other government offices and military units also
established mints to cast these coins.

The following chart identifies these major government and
military mints as well as the year they first began to
cast sang pyong tong bo
coins.

Sang
Pyong Tong Bo Mint Marks
Mint
mark
Agency English

First Year Cast

户曹 
Hojo
Treasury Department 1678
工曹  Kongjo Ministry of
Industry
1685
均役廳  Kyunyokchong Government Tithe
Office
1807
司仆寺  Kyong Saboksi Bureau of Royal
Transportation
1678
賑恤廳  Chinhyulchong Charity Office in
Seoul
1742
粮餉廳  Yanghyang chong Food Supply Office 1742
宣惠廳  Sonhyechong Rice and Cloth
Department
1742
宣惠廳  Sonhyechong Rice and Cloth
Department
1806
典圜局  Chonhwanguk Central Government
Mint
1833
兵曹  Pyongjo Ministry of Defense 1742
備邊司  Pibyon sa National Defense
Bureau
1742
捻戎廳  Chongyung chong General Military
Office
1692

or 營
御营廳  Oyongchong Special Army Unit 1678

武備司  Mubisa
武衛營  Muwiyong
Armaments Bureau
Guard Office at the Palace
1742
禁衛營  Kumwiyong Court Guard
Military Unit
1742
訓練都監  Hullyondogam Military Training
Command
1678
精抄廳  Chongchochong Commando Military
Unit
1678

統營  Tongyong
統衛營  Tongwiyong
Tongyong Naval
Office
Military Office in Seoul
1727
經理廳  Kyongnichong Government Office
of Pukhan Mountain Fortress
1830
守御廳  Suochong Seoul Defense Fort 1742
沁華管理營  Sim Kanghwa
Kwalliyong
Kanghwa Township
Military Office
1883
開城管理營  Kaesong Kwalliyong Kaesong Township
Military Office
1678
開城管理營  Kaesong Kwalliyong (Song) Kaesong
Township Military Office
1882
利原管理營  Iwon Kwalliyong Iwon Township
Military Office
1882
水原管理營  Suwon Kalliyong Suwon Township
Military Office
1727
原州管理營  Wonju Kwalliyong Wonju Township
Military Office
1678
海州管理營  Haeju Kwalli yong Haeju Township
Military Office
1742
春川管理營  Ch’unch’on
Kwalliyong
Ch’unch’on Township
Military Office
1888
端川管理營  Tanch’on Kwalliyong Tanch’on Township
Military Office
1883
昌德宮  Ch’angdok Kung
昌原管理營  Ch’angwon
Kwalliyong
Ch’angdok Palace
Mint
Ch’angwon Township Military Office
1864
廣州管理營  Kwangju Kwalliyong Kwangju Township
Military Office in Kyonggi Province
1742
京畿監營  Kyonggi Kamyong Kyonggi Provincial
Office
1742

京畿水營  Kyonggi Suyong Kyonggi Naval
Station
1742
黃海監營  Hwanghae Kamyong Hwanghae Provincial
Office
1742
平安監營  P’yongan Kamyong P’yongan Provincial
Office
1678

平安兵營  P’yongan Pyongyong P’yongan Military
Fort
1678
咸鏡監營  Hamgyong Kamyong Hamgyong Provincial
Office
1742

咸鏡北營  Hamgyong Pugyong North Hamgyong
Provincial Office
1742

咸鏡南營  Hamgyong Namyong South Hamgyong
Provincial Office
1742
江原監營  Kangwon Kamyong Kangwon Provincial
Office
1742
慶尚監營  Kyongsang Kamyong Kyongsang
Provincial Office
1695

慶尚水營  Kyongsang Suyong Kyongsang Naval
Station
1695

慶尚右營  Kyongsang Uyong Kyongsang Right
Naval Base
1695

慶尚左營  Kyongsang Chwayong Kyongsang Left
Naval Base
1695
全羅監營  Cholla Kamyong Cholla Provincial
Office
1682

全羅兵營  Cholla Pyongyong Cholla Military
Fort
1678

全羅右營  Cholla Uyong Cholla Right Naval
Base
1678

全羅左營  Cholla Chwayong Cholla Left Naval
Base
1678
忠清監營  Ch’ungch’ong Kamyong Ch’ungch’ong
Provincial Office
1742

The “mint mark” (first column in above table) on
the sang pyong tong
bo coins can be found at the top (above the
square hole) on the reverse side of the coin.

The table below shows examples of sang pyong tong
bo
coins from some of
these mints.

 

Examples of Sang Pyong Tong Bo Coins with Different Mint Marks

Symbols, Numbers
and Special Characters

In addition to the
mint mark which was placed at the top (above the
square hole) of the coin’s reverse side, many sang pyong tong
bo
coins display other symbols as well.

These markings began to appear in the year 1742 and
are believed to indicate “furnace” or “series”
numbers.

Many of the coins simply show a Chinese number.

But the sang pyong
tong bo coins are unique in that they also
use several other methods to express “numbers”.

For example, some coins have dots, circles, crescents,
horizontal lines, and vertical lines.  “Dots”
represent “stars”.  “Circles” represent the
“sun”.  “Crescents” represent the “moon”. 
The “horizontal lines” represent the “earth” and the
“vertical lines” represent “man”.

These are very old symbols that first appeared on ancient Chinese
coins.

Examples of sang
pyong tong bo coins with Chinese numbers as
well as dots, circles, crescents and lines may be seen
below.

Numbers, Stars, Suns, and Man

“Star” (dot)
Number “2” (二)

“Sun” (circle)
Number “3” (三)

“Moon”
(crescent)
Number “8” (八)

“Man” (vertical line)
Number “2” (二)

Other “special” symbols were also used to indicate
furnace or series numbers on sang pyong tong bo coins.  These
include characters from “The Thousand
Character Classic”, “The
Five Elements”, “The
Ten Celestial Stems”, “The Twelve
Terrestrial Branches”, “The Eight Trigrams”, and “Miscellaneous
Characters”.

These special symbols are discussed in the sections below.

The
Thousand Character Classic

Korea invented its own
writing system, called Hangul (한 글), in 1443
during the reign of King Sejong (“Sejong the Great”
世宗).  However, Hangul
did not come into common use until centuries later.

Up until the early 20th Century, Korea instead relied
on the use of Chinese characters for its written
language which is why all the inscriptions on old
Korean coins are written with Chinese characters.

For many centuries one of the principal books for
learning Chinese in both China and Korea was the 千字文
or “Thousand Character Classic” (Chinese: qian zi
wen 
Korean: cheonjamun,
ch’ŏn ja mun). 
The “Thousand Character Classic” was written in China
by Zhou Xingxi (周兴嗣) at the request of Emperor Wu
(武梁帝) who reigned during the years 502-549 AD of the
Liang Dynasty.

The primer is actually a poem structured as 250
phrases with each phrase composed of only 4 Chinese
characters.  The entire poem is thus 1000
characters and no character is used more than once.

Since it was written as a poem, it could be fairly
easily memorized and therefore served as an excellent
tool to teach Chinese.

As an example, the following are the first 44
characters of the Thousand Character Classic:

天地玄黄
宇宙洪荒
日月盈昃 辰宿列張
寒来暑往 秋收冬藏
閏餘成歲 律吕調陽
雲騰致雨 露結為霜
金生麗水

“Heaven is dark, the earth is yellow; the
universe is vast and barren
The setting sun, the full moon, and the stars,
arranged in order
  Cold comes and heat departs; autumn harvests
provide winter hoards
The intercalary surplus completes the year; music
harmonizes the two principles of nature
Clouds ascend and bring rain; dew congeals and forms
frost
Gold is found in the Li River; …”

Since no character is repeated, the “Thousand
Character Classic” was frequently used as a numbering
system for the numbers 1 to 1,000.

Starting in the year 1742, some sang pyong tong bo
coins began to display furnace or series numbers on
their reverse sides.  Chinese numbers were
commonly used but other symbols were sometimes used as
well.

For example, the first 44 characters of the Thousand
Character Classic displayed above were used on some sang
pyong tong bo
coins for this purpose.

These characters are usually placed at the bottom
(below the square hole) on the reverse side of the
coins.

Examples of sang
pyong tong bo coins with characters from the
“Thousand Character Classic” are shown below.

 

Sang
pyong tong bo coins with characters from
“The Thousand Character Classic”

The Five Elements

In addition to the
Chinese characters from the “Thousand Character
Classic”, the characters of the “Five Elements”
(Chinese: wu
xing 五行) were also used to indicate
furnace or series numbers on certain sang pyong tong bo
coins.

The “Five
Elements” refer to the ancient Chinese
belief that the entire universe is composed of
these five basic essences or “elements”: 
metal (kum 金), wood
(mok 木),
water (su
水), fire (hwa
火) and earth (to
土).

A complete set of sang pyong tong bo coins
displaying the “Five Elements” cast at the Special
Army Unit mint may be seen below.

“Five Element” characters on sang pyong
tong bo coins

The
Ten Celestial Stems

Another
“numbering” system used on the sang pyong tong
bo coins is the “Ten Celestial Stems”
also known as the “Ten Heavenly Stems”.

The traditional Chinese calendar is based on
pairing one of the “Ten Celestial Stems” with
one of the “Twelve Terrestial Branches”. 
These pairings result in 60 combinations which
form the sixty-year cycle of the
calendar.  When one cycle is completed,
another begins.

Ten Celestial Stems
Celestial Stem Korean Chinese
gap jia
eul yi
byeong bing
jeong ding
mu wu
gi ji
gyeong geng
sin sin
im ren
gye gui

Examples of sang
pyong tong bo
coins with “Celestial
Stems” may be seen below.

Sang pyong tong bo coins
with one of the Ten Celestial Stems


“jeong”
1832


im
1752

The
Twelve Terrestrial Branches

As
mentioned above, the traditional Chinese
calendar is based on the pairing of a
“Celestial Stem” with a “Terrestrial
Branch”.

Some sang
pyong tong bo coins have one of
the “Twelve Terrestrial Branches” on the
reverse side to indicate a series or
furnace number.

The “Twelve Terrestrial Branches”, also
known as the “Twelve Earthly Branches”,
are identified in the following table.

Twelve Terrestrial Branches
Terrestrial
Branch
Korean Chinese
cha zi
ch’uk chou
in yin
myo mao
ch’en chen
sa si
o wu
mi wei
sin shen
yu you
sul xu
hae hai

The
Eight Trigrams

A trigram
is a three-line symbol.  Each of the
three lines in a trigram can be either
continuous or broken.

A solid line represents the yang
(阳),
or “male”, while

a broken line represents the um
(阴), or
“female”. 

Yin Yang (
阳 Korean: um yang)
is
the Chinese term for the basic polarities
of the universe, e.g. male/female,
light/dark, strong/weak, etc.

There are eight possible combinations of
trigram components and these combinations
are known as the “eight trigrams” (八
卦).

The “eight trigrams” have been used in
divination since very ancient times.

A very few of the two mun
(“Value Two” dangijun

二錢)
sang
pyong tong bo coins cast at the
“T’ongyong Naval Office” (統 營)
mint display symbols
of the “eight trigrams” on the reverse
side.

For a better understanding of the “Eight
Trigrams”, please see “Trigrams and
Bagua”.

Sang pyong tong bo
coins with Eight Trigrams character
“Chin”
meaning “Thunder”

Miscellaneous Characters

One final set of Chinese characters can
sometimes be found below the square hole on the
reverse side of sang
pyong tong bo coins.

These characters appear to be yet another system
to refer to a specific furnace or series, but
their exact meaning and purpose remains unknown.

Miscellaneous Characters
Symbol Meaning Korea China
enter ip ru
big tae da
work kong gong
thousand chon qian
cash mun wen
the first won yuan
heaven chon tian
middle chung chong
upright chong zheng
produce saeng sheng
light kwang guang
complete chon quan
auspicious kil ji
finish wan wan

Examples of sang
pyong tong bo coins with “miscellaneous
characters” located on the reverse side below the
square hole may be seen below.

Sang
pyong tong bo coins with
“Miscellaneous Characters”

Korea’s First Modern Milled Coinage

In 1892, after more than 250 years, casting of the sang
pyong tong bo coins in
copper and bronze finally ended.

But prior
to that time, in the year 1882 which was the 19th
year of the reign of King Gojong (Kojong 高宗 고종), Korea began to
cast a new type of coin.

Unlike the copper sang pyong tong bo
coins, these
coins were made of silver and no longer had a square hole
in the center.

The inscription on these new coins begins with dae dong
(大
東) and includes a number from one through
three.

Dae dong (大
東) means “Great East” (Great Eastern Kingdom)
and is another name for Korea.

The denomination was chon
(錢) which was “1/10 of an
ounce”.  A Korean “ounce” was 37.5 grams.  The
numbers “one” (一), “two” (二)
and “three” (三) represented 0.1
ounce, 0.2 ounce and 0.3 ounce, respectively.

For example, the coin shown here is a number “one” (1 Chon
一錢, 20 mm,
3.4-3.7 grams) and the inscription is 大東一錢.  The
inscription for the 2 Chon
coin (28 mm, 7.1-7.7 grams) is 大東二錢 and that for the 3 Chon coin (33 mm,
10.6 grams) is 大東三錢.

There are several varieties of the 3 Chon coin including
large character, medium character and small character.

These new silver coins also have a distinctive reverse
side.  All the coins were made by the same Treasury
Department Mint (戶曹 Hojo)
that had been casting the sang pyong tong bo coins. 
However, the mint mark (戶 Ho)
on the
new coins was placed in a circle in the middle of the
reverse side and was surrounded by colored enamel (blue,
green or black).

Unfortunately, these new coins, which imitated Western
coins, failed to achieve their goal of stabilizing the
monetary system.  The price of silver was rising as
was the cost of production.  The coins were hoarded
by the yangban (양반 兩
班), who were the nobles and ruling class, and taken out of
the country for their intrinsic metal content.  As a
result, minting of these coins ceased in June 1883.

In 1883, Korea purchased from Germany the equipment to
produce milled (machine-struck) coins.

In 1888 (開國497), a
very small number of milled (machine-struck) coins
denominated in mun
(文) and hwan (“warn”, “whan”
圜) were minted. 
The “warn” was
equivalent to 1,000 mun.

The design of the coins was very similar to that of
Japanese yen coins.

These coins were produced by the government mint in Seoul
(gyeongseong
京成典圜局) in three denominations: 5 mun (5 文), 10 mun (10文)
and 1 warn (1圜).

The 5 mun and 10
mun coins are
composed of 98% copper, 1% tin and 1% zinc.  The 5 mun
coin has a
diameter of 21.7 mm and a weight of 2.8 grams.  The
10 mun coin has a diameter is 27.5 mm and a weight of 6.5
grams.

The 1 warn coin,
which is displayed here, is particularly rare since only
1,300 coins were struck.  It is composed of 90%
silver and 10% copper.  The diameter is 38 mm and the
weight is 26.95 grams.

Korean Fun,
Yang and Whan Coins
(1892-1902)

The currency of Korea
began to be based on the yang (兩) beginning in the year 1892 with
the implementation of the silver standard currency
reform.  The yang
was further divided into fun (分) which was equal to 1/100th
of a yang. 
The coin denominations and their compositions were 1 fun (brass),
5 fun (copper),
&frac14 yang (initially
cupronickel and later copper around silver), 1
yang (80% silver)
and 5 yang (90%
silver).

An example of a 5 yang
(五兩) coin minted in 1892 (開國501) is
displayed at the left.  Only 19,923 of these coins
were produced.

There was also a 1 whan
(1圜) coin minted in 1893 (開
國502) composed of 90% silver but this coin is
extremely rare since only 77 coins were produced.

Some denominations in this series continued to be minted
until 1902.  All the coins were produced at the mint
in Incheon (仁川典局).
 
The dates on the coins discussed above reflected the
number of years since the founding (gaeguk 開國)
of the Choson (Joseon) or Yi Dynasty in 1392 (“year 1”)
by General Yi Seong-gye.  The Choson Dynasty
(including the short-lived Korean Empire (1897-1910))
ended in 1910 when Korea became a colony of Japan.

As a result of
the Sino-Japanese War (1894-1895), Korea found itself free
of Chinese hegemony.  In 1897, the Yi (Choson,
Josean) Dynasty ended with King Gojong proclaiming the
establishment of the “Empire of Korea”.  In so doing,
King Gojong became Emperor Gwangmu.

A portrait of King Gojong, who became Korea’s first
emperor, is shown at the left.

Beginning in 1897, the regnal year of the monarch began to
be used on coins to denote the year instead of calculating
the year since the founding of the Choson Dynasty.

Coins minted 1897-1907 are dated from the year Emperor
Gwangmu (Kuang Mu, Kwangmu 光武 광무제),
formerly King Gojong (Kojong 高宗 고종)
of the Choson (Yi) Dynasty, ascended the throne of
the “Great Korean Empire” (大
韓帝國 대한제국
1897-1910)
with the year 1897 being “year 1” (元年).

Coins minted 1907-1910 are dated from the year Emperor
Yunghui (Yung Hi 隆熙 융희제),
formerly known as Sunjong (純宗 순종),
ascended the throne with 1907 being year 1″ (元年).

The name of the country was variously displayed on the
coins as “Great Korea” (大朝鮮), “Korea” (朝鮮) or “Daehan” (大韓).

Coins denominated in fun
and yang
continued to be minted from 1892-1902.

Examples of 1 fun, 5 fun
and &frac14 yang coins are
shown below.

1 Fun (一分) Coins

Korea minted 1 fun
(一分) coins
during the years 1892-1896 except for the year 1894
when no 1 fun
coins were struck.

The coins are composed of brass (95% copper and 5%
aluminum).

In 1895, some coins were produced with the country
name “Great Korea” (大朝鮮) while others were minted
using the name “Korea” (朝鮮).

These coins have a diameter of 23.4 mm and a weight of
3.3 grams.

All 1 fun
coins were made at the mint in Incheon (仁川典局).

Examples of 1 fun coins may be seen below.

1 Fun Coins

5 Fun

(五分) Coins 

The 5 fun
(五分) coins
were produced from 1892 to 1902 except during the
years 1897, 1900 and 1901.

These copper coins are composed of 98% copper, 1% tin
and 1% zinc.

The coin has a diameter of 27 mm, a thickness of 1.5
mm and a weight of 6.9 grams.

All 5 fun
coins were made in Incheon (仁川典局) except for those
produced in 1902 which were minted at Yongsan (龍山典局).

There are varieties with small (小子), medium (中子) and
large (大字) characters or letters as well as ones
displaying the country name as “Great Korea” (大朝鮮)
, “Korea” (朝鮮) and “Daehan” (大韓).

These is an interesting story associated with these 5
fun coins
involving Japanese samurai.

Japanese “Ronins” (“wave men” 浪人), who were
samurai without masters, used Korean “5 fun” coins as
the
copper blanks or planchets to counterfeit Chinese “10
cash” (十文铜元) coins which then circulated in
China’s eastern provinces.  For a detailed
discussion of these counterfeit coins (han gai ban
韩改版)
please see Chinese
“10 Cash” Coins Overstruck on Korean “5 Fun” Coins.

Examples of Korean 5 fun coins may be seen below.

5 Fun Coins

&frac14 Yang (二錢五分) Coins

The &frac14 yang
(二錢五分) coins
were minted during the years 1892-1901.

Their composition is 75% copper and 25% nickel.

These coins have a diameter of 20.7 mm and a weight of
4.8 grams.

Varieties of this coin were produced in certain years
and can include differences in the country name
(“Great Korea” 大朝鮮, “Korea” 朝鮮, “Daehan” 大韓)
and the size of the letters or characters (large
characters 大字, small characters 小字).

From 1892-1897, the &frac14 yang coins were struck at the mint
in Incheon (仁川典局).  The Yongsan mint
(龍山典局)
produced these coins from 1998-1901.

Examples of &frac14 yang
coins are shown below.

&frac14 Yang Coins

Reverse side
二錢五分

開國502年
1893

光武2年
1898

Korean Gold Standard Coins (1906-1909)

In response to the adoption by other countries of the
gold standard for their currencies, Korea decided to
follow suit and implemented a similar monetary reform on
May 22, 1901.

Gold coins were
minted in the three denominations of 5 won
(五園), 10 won (十園) and 20 won (二十園). 
The won (園)
was equivalent to 20 chon
(錢).

An example of a 20 won
gold coin dated 1906 (光武10年) is shown at the
left.

All of the coins are composed of 90% gold and 10% copper.

The 5 won (五
園) coin has a diameter of 17 mm and a weight
of 4.2 grams.  The 10 won (十園) coin has
a diameter of 21.2 mm and a weight of 8.3 grams.  The
20 won (二
十园) coin has a diameter of 28.8 mm and a
weight of 16.7 grams.

A distinctive feature of these coins is that there is no
English inscription.  The coins only have Chinese and
Hangul (한
글) inscriptions.

The 5 won gold
coins are dated 1908 (隆熙2年) and 1909 (隆
熙3 年).  Only two pieces of the 1909 coin are known to
exist with one piece selling at auction for $460,000 in
September 2011.

The 10 won
gold coins are dated 1906 (光武10年)
and 1909 (隆熙3年).  Only two
examples of the 1909 coin are known to exist with one
specimen selling at auction for $299,000 in September
2011.

The 20 won gold
coins are dated 1906 (光武10年), 1908 (隆
熙2年) and 1909 (隆熙3年). 
Only two specimens of the 1909 coin are known to exist
with one piece selling at auction for $632,500 in
September 2011.

Because the Korean Mint Bureau, which had been striking
coins for 20 years, was pressured to close by the Japanese
in 1904, all of these gold coins were produced at the mint
in Osaka, Japan (日本大阪造幣局).

Korean Chon
and Won
Coins (1902-1910)

During the years
1902-1910, the coins of Korea were denominated in won
(圜)
and chon (錢). 
The chon was
equal to  1/100th of a won.

The coin
denominations consisted of
&frac12 chon (半
錢), 1
chon (一
錢), 5 chon (五
錢), 10 chon (十
錢), 20 chon
(二十錢), and half won
(半
園).

The half won
(半園) coins were only minted
during the years 1905-1908.

At the left is an example of a half won
(半園)
coin struck during the 10th year (1906) of
the reign of Emperor Gwangmu.

The half won
coins made in 1905 and 1906 are composed of 80% silver
and 20% copper.  The diameter is 31 mm and the
weight is 13.5 grams.

The half won
coins struck in 1907 and 1908 are also 80% silver and
20% copper but are slightly smaller with a diameter of
27.5 mm and a weight of 10.0 grams.

The dragon symbol was replaced by the phoenix on the &frac12
chon, 1 chon
and 5 chon coins.

All of the coins from this period were made
at the mint in Osaka, Japan (日本大阪造幣局).

Examples of these coins are shown below.

&frac12 Chon (半
錢) Coins

The &frac12 chon
(半錢) coin was only produced during the period
1906-1910.

For the first year (1906 “gwangmu 10”), the &frac12 chon coin
had a
diameter of 21.9 mm, thickness of 1.5 mm, and weight
of 3.4 grams.

The coin was slightly smaller in all of the following
years with a diameter of 19.1 mm, thickness of 1 mm,
and weight of 2.1 grams.

The composition of all the &frac12 chon coins are the same:  95%
copper, 4% tin and 1% zinc

There is some question as to whether or not a &frac12 chon coin was
minted in the 11th year of the reign of Gwangmu (Kuang
Mu).

Also, the &frac12 chon
coins minted in 1907 (yunghui, yung hi first year) and 1910 (yunghui,
yung hi year 4)
are very scarce.

Examples of Korean &frac12 chon coins are shown below.

&frac12 Chon Coins

Reverse side
半錢

光武10年
1906

隆熙2年
1908

隆熙3年
1909

1 Chon (一錢) Coins

The Korean 1 chon
(一錢) coins
were produced during the period 1905-1910.  All
the coins were made at the mint in Osaka, Japan
(日本大阪造幣局).

For the first two years (1905-1906), the coins had a
diameter of 28 mm, a thickness of 1.5 mm, and a weight
of 7.1 grams.

The coins produced during the following years
(1907-1910) were smaller with a diameter of 22.5 mm, a
thickness of 1 mm, and a weight of 4.1 grams.

All the 1 chon
coins, however, had the same composition:  98%
copper, 1% tin, and 1% zinc

Shown below is a complete set of Korean 1 chon
coins.

1 Chon Coins

5 Chon (五錢) Coins

The 5 chon
(五錢) coins
were only produced in the years 1905, 1907 and 1909
with the 1909 (yunghui,
yung hi 3)
coin being very rare.

One 1909 5 chon coin sold at
auction for $138,000 in September 2011.

All the coins were made at the mint in Osaka, Japan
(日本大阪造幣局) and have a diameter of 20.8 mm, a
thickness
of 2 mm, and a weight of 4 grams.

The composition of the coins are 75% copper and 25%
nickel.

Examples of the 5 chon
coins may be seen below.

5 Chon Coins

Reverse side
五錢

光武9年
1905

光武11年
1907

10 Chon (十錢) Coins

The 10 chon (十
錢) coins were minted during the years 1906-1910
although there is some question as to whether or not any
10 chon coins
were actually made in 1909.

All the 10 chon
coins are silver with a composition of 80% silver and 20%
copper.

The coins have a diameter of 17.6 mm and a thickness of
1.5 mm.  All the coins weigh 2.5 grams with the
exception of those dated 1907 (gwangmu 11) which weigh 2.25 grams.

Also, all the coins were produced at the mint in Osaka,
Japan (日本大 阪造幣局).

Examples of the 10 chon
coins are shown below.

10 Chon Coins

20 Chon (二十錢) Coins 

The 20 chon (二
十錢) silver coins were produced during the years
1905-1910 at the mint in Osaka, Japan
(日本大阪造幣局).

During the years 1905 (gwangmu
9) and 1906 (gwangmu
10), the 20 chon
coins had a diameter of 22.8 mm, a thickness of 1.5 mm and
a weight of 5.4 grams.

The coin was slightly smaller in the following years with
a diameter of 20.3 mm, a thickness of 1.5 mm and a weight
of 4 grams.

The composition of all the coins, however, was the
same:  80% silver and 20% copper

Examples of 20 chon
coins are shown below.

20 Chon Coins

Reverse side
二十錢

光武10年
1906

隆熙3年
1909

隆熙4年
1910

Korean “Eagle” Coins Issued by the Russo-Korean Bank

As a result of the First Sino-Japanese War (1894-1895),
China’s influence in Korea was replaced by that of the
victorious Japanese.  China’s weakened position also
allowed for Russian interests in the Far East to expand
greatly.

Under the leadership of Mr. Alexiev, who was the financial
advisor to Korea sent by Russia, the first Asian branch of
the Russo-Korean Bank was established on March 1, 1898.

In 1901, Alexiev
authorized the minting of a new set of three coins. 
The denominations were 1 chon (一錢 28 mm, 8 grams),
5 chon (五
錢 20.5 mm, 5.4 grams) and half won
(半園
30.9 mm, 13.5 grams).

An example of the half won coin is shown at the left.

The half won
coins are dated 1901 (Gwangmu year 5 光武5年)
while the 1 chon
and 5 chon coins
are dated 1902 (Gwangmu year 6 光武6年).

The composition of the half won coin is 90% silver and 10% copper.

The composition of the 1 chon coin is 98%
copper, 1% tin and 1% zinc while that of the
5 chon coin
is 75% copper and 25% nickel.

A major characteristic of these coins is that the image
of the Crowned Russian Imperial Eagle replaced the
traditional dragon or phoenix. 
For this reason, these coins are referred to as “eagle”
coins or the Eagle Series.

There was also a set of experimental or trial coins
produced but never circulated.  This coin series
included a copper 10 won,
copper 20 won
and silver “half dollar” (half won).  All these trial coins were
reportedly minted in 1901 although the coins display dates
of 1899, 1901, 1902 or 1903.

All of the “eagle” coins were produced at the mint at
Yongsan, Korea (龍 山典局).

Japan was the victor in the Russo-Japanese War
(1904-1905) and, as a consequence, confiscated and
destroyed almost all of the “eagle” coins.  For this
reason, these coins are very rare.

One example of a 1 chon coin dated 1902
sold at auction for $149,500 in September 2011.  A 20
won coin dated
1902 sold at the same auction for $115,000.

Korea became a Japanese protectorate under the Eulsa
Treaty of 1905 and was annexed by Japan in 1910.

The “Japanese Imperial Period” in Korea ended in 1945
with Japan’s defeat in World War II.

Modern Korean Coins

With the end of
Japan’s occupation of Korea at the close of World War
II and the cessation of active fighting following the
Korean War, Korea was finally able to return to using
its own currency.

The new coins were denominated as won
(원). 
The first
of Korea’s modern coinage was a series of coins with
denominations of 10 won,
50 won and
100 won.

These first coins were issued in 1959 and minted at
the Philadelphia Mint in the United States.

The 10 won
coin has an image of the mugunghwa (Rose of Sharon 무궁화) flower which is
the national flower of Korea.  The coin’s
composition is 95% copper and 5% zinc.  The coin
has a diameter of 19.1 mm and a weight of 2.46 grams.

The 50 won
coin shows an image of the famous “Turtle Ship” (kobukson 거북선 龜船) designed by
Admiral Yi Sunsin
(李舜臣). This warship had a curved ironclad
deck which was covered with iron spikes. 
These ships proved successful in battles against the
Japanese who tried to conquer Korea during the years
1592-1598.

The 50 won
coin has a composition of 70% copper, 18% zinc and 12%
nickel.  The coin has a diameter of 22.86 mm and
a weight of 3.69 grams.

The final coin in this series is the 100 won
coin. 
The coin displays the portrait of Syngman Rhee (
승만

李承晩)
who was the first president of the Republic of
Korea.  The coin has a composition of 75% copper
and 25% nickel.  The diameter is 26 mm and the
weight is 6.74 grams.

All three coins in the series were minted in 1959 but
the date on the coins is “4292”.

Up until the year 1961, Korea used the traditional
Korean calendar which calculates the year from the
time when the first Korean kingdom was
established.  According to ancient Chinese and
Korean texts, Dangun
Wanggeom (단군왕검 檀
君王檢) established the kingdom of Gojoseon (고
조선 古朝鮮) in the year 2333
BC.  The year “4292” in the Korean calendar is
therefore equivalent to the year “1959” in the
Gregorian or Western calendar.

The 10 won
and 50 won
coins, but not the 100 won coin, were again minted in the
year “4294” (1961).  Korean coins after 1961 show
the year according to the Western calendar.

The 100 won
coin was withdrawn from circulation in 1962 but the 10
won and 50 won
coins
circulated until 1975.

This complete series of coins is shown below.

Korea’s first modern series of 10 won, 50
won and 100 won coins

Return to Ancient
Chinese Charms and Coins

Ancient Chinese Horse Coins

 

Originating in the Song Dynasty (960-1279 AD), the “horse
coin” was not actual currency. Although Chinese literary
figures have made mention of horse coins throughout the
centuries, few have made it clear exactly how the coins were
used. Collectors today believe horse coins were either
pieces used on game boards or counters for gambling.

Images of horses also appear on old Chinese chess pieces and
examples can be seen at Ancient Chinese Chess
(Xiangqi) Pieces.

Horse
coins
are usually made of bronze or copper although, in some
rare cases, ivory and horn were used.  Most common
horse coins measure around 3 centimeters in diameter with
a square or circular central hole.

The horses depicted on the coins vary in
position.  Some are lying on the ground
sleeping.  Others are turning their head and
neighing.  Or, as in the example shown here, the
horse is shown galloping forward with its tail raised
high.  Unfortunately, the horse’s saddle
always seems to be at the central hole of the coin which
prevents us from learning more about this aspect of
ancient Chinese culture.

Among all the horse coins, those made in the Song
Dynasty (960-1279 AD) are considered to be the finest.
They were made from high-quality metal and with fine
detail.  The coin shown at left is representative of
the Song horse coins although it would be difficult to
confirm that this particular piece dates from that period.

Horse coins display many of the most famous
horses in Chinese history. For instance, in the early
Western Zhou Dynasty (c. 11th century-771 BC), King Mu
(穆王) once rode on a chariot with eight outstanding
steeds.  The names of the eight horses can be found
on horse coins although there is some disagreement as to
which set of eight names passed down through history is
correct.  The names of King Mu’s horses described
their outstanding characteristics and included “Beyond
Earth”, “Rush by Night”, “Windswept Plumes”,  “Finer
than Flashing Light”, “Faster than Shadow”, “Wing Bearer”,
“Faster than Light” and “Rising Mist”.  Other
historical texts list King Mu’s horses as “Bay Steed”,
“Smoked Ebony”, “Skewbald Chestnut”, “Great Yellow” and
“Green Ear”.

There are also horse coins depicting the victorious,
yet ruthless, General Bai Qi of the ancient Kingdom of Qin
during the Warring States Period (475-221 BC).

When Qin Shi Huang put an end to the Warring States
Period and united China into the first empire (221-207
BC), he chose the seven best horses from the thousands of
military horses who had fought in the battles.

In order to improve the quality of his stable, Emperor
Wudi of the Western Han Dynasty (206 BC – 24 AD) searched
for the best stallions outside his empire. To get the
mysterious hanxue
(sweating blood) horse which he believed were the divine
“Horses of Heaven” that could be ridden to immortality, he
fought a three-year war beginning in 101 BCE against a
small kingdom (Ferghana) located in today’s
Uzbekistan.  While the emperor’s army captured some
3,000 hanxue
horses, only about 1,000 survived the long trip home. Many
legends and historical records state that when such horses
galloped, their sweat was the color of blood.  Some
modern scientists now attribute the “blood” sweat to the
parasites which infested the tissues beneath the skin of
the horses.  After strenuous movement, the blood
would flow out with the sweat.  (Please see “Sweating
Blood Horse” Coin for a detailed discussion.)

Another set of famous horses depicted on horse coins
is associated with Emperor Taizong (Li Shimin) of the Tang
Dynasty (618-907 AD).  These horses are also
celebrated in a famous relief sculpture outside his tomb
and are known as the “Six Chargers of Emperor Taizong”.

Finally, a very few horse coins will display a rider
on the horse in order to commemorate famous battles from
ancient Chinese history.  Please see the “Battle
of
Jimo”
Horse
Coin as an example.


The Chinese characters on the obverse side of this old horse
coin read da song jin
qian (大宋金钱) which means “Great Song (dynasty) metal
money”.

The reverse side shows a galloping horse with the
inscription song qi
(宋骑) which means “a rider of the Song (dynasty)”. 

The coin is 37.7mm in diameter and weighs 18.1 grams.


The inscription on
this horse coin is qin
jiang san qi (秦将散骑).

Qin jiang (秦
将) refers to a general from the ancient state of
Qin during the Warring States period (475-221 BC).

The general referred to is General Bai Qi (白起), a ruthless
military leader, who won more than 70 battles. 
Following each victory, he would order his men to slaughter
the defeated soldiers.  Historical records credit him
with the slaughter of hundreds of thousands of enemy
soldiers.

General Bai Qi was forced to commit suicide by the King of
Qin in the year 257 BC.

San qi (散
骑) in ancient Chinese has the meaning of shi cong (侍从) which
means “followers”.

The inscription therefore refers to the attendants or
followers of General Bai Qi who would advise or counsel him.

The reverse side of the coin depicts a galloping horse.

The coin has a diameter of 27.5 mm and a weight of 9 grams.


This horse coin depicts Qu Huang (渠黄), meaning “Great Yellow”,
which was one of the eight great horses mentioned above of
King Mu of the Western Zhou Dynasty.

This particular specimen is 35 mm in diameter and weighs
11.9 grams.


This is
another horse coin honoring one of King Mu’s famous horses.

The obverse side of the coin, at the far left, displays a
galloping horse.

The two character inscription, with one Chinese character
above and one character below the square hole, reads lu er (绿耳).

The heavy green patina on the coin is appropriate because lu er translates as
“Green Ear”.

The reverse side of the coin is blank.

The coin has a diameter of 28 mm and weighs 7.4 grams.


The inscription on the obverse side of this horse coin
reads piao niao
(骠袅) which translates as “fast and slender”.

The reverse side is blank.

The coin is 27 mm in diameter and weighs 6 grams.



This “double obverse” horse coin has the inscription wu zhui (乌骓) which
means a “black spotted horse”.

The diameter of the coin is 30mm and the weight is 9
grams.


The obverse of this coin reads tang jiang qian li (唐将千里) which literally
means “Tang General 1,000 li
“.

The coin is 27mm in diameter and weighs 5.5 grams.


The inscription on the obverse side of this horse coin is
read top to bottom and right to left as zhen guan shi ji (贞观十骥)
which means “ten thoroughbreds of Zhen Guan”.  Zhen Guan refers to the
era during which Emperor Taizong (Li Shimin) of
the Tang Dynasty (618-907 AD) ruled.

The Chinese characters on the reverse side are jue bo (诀波) which was
the name of one of these horses.  Jue Bo would roughly
translate as “bursting as a wave”.

The coin is 30mm in diameter and weighs 9.7 grams.


This horse coin commemorates Quanmaogua (拳
毛騧) which was the famous war horse that Li
Shimin (李
世民), who later became Emperor
Taizong (唐太宗 626-649 AD) of the Tang
dynasty, rode in the battle defeating Liu Heita
(刘
黑闼) in 622 AD.

Quanmaogua
died on the battlefield after being hit by 9 arrows,
6 in the chest and 3 in the back.

The inscription, which is read in a clockwise manner
beginning with the character at the top, is quan mao gua
ma
(拳毛騧马).

The literal translation is “fist hair piebald horse”. 
Actually, the name is believed to be a transliteration of
Turkic into Chinese.  Turkic
is a language from Central Asia where the horse may have
originally come.

“Fist hair” (

拳毛)
refers to circular hair.  “Piebald” (騧) translates as a yellow horse (马) with a black mouth.Scholars now believe
that the name Quanmaogua was probably meant to describe a
horse that had curly yellow hair.

During the time of the Sui and Tang dynasties, people
would have considered a horse with these characteristics
to be rather ugly (丑).

  General Li Shimin,
however, had the ability
to identify a horse that had the qualities needed to help
him succeed in battle even though the animal may have
been physically unattractive.According to the Penn Museum, the name
Quanmaogua indicates a “saffron-yellow
horse with a wavy coat of hair”.

Quanmaogua is one of the six horses
immortalized in stone reliefs at the Zhao
Mausoleum (昭
陵), Emperor Taizong’s mausoleum, located at Xi’an (西
安). These white marble stone reliefs are known as the
Six
Steeds of the Zhao Mausoleum (唐
昭陵六骏石刻) and are 2.5 meters tall and 3 meters wide.

Four of the six stone reliefs are in China and displayed at
the Stele
Forest (Beilin Museum 碑
林) in Xi’an.  The stone
relief of Quanmaogua, as well as the one for Saluzi
(“Autumn Dew” 飒
露紫), were stolen in 1914 and sold

by C.T. Loo
(Ching Tsai Loo 卢
芹斋) in 1918 to the Penn
Museum at the University of Pennsylvania (宾夕法尼亚大学)
where they are on display.

The coin is 31mm in diameter and weighs 9.5 grams.


The Chinese characters qian li (千里) on this
horse coin mean “1,000 li
“.  The li (里)
was a measure of distance in ancient China which
varied over history.  One li was equal to roughly 300 – 400 meters.

The term qian li
or “1,000 li”
refers to the ancient accomplishment of Zhaofu who was the
carriage driver of King Mu of the Western Zhou Dynasty.
Zhaofu was able to cover a distance of 1,000 li in a single day in
order to return King Mu from a hunting trip in time to put
down a rebellion in the capital.

The coin is 28mm in diameter and weighs 6.4 grams.


This old horse coin shows considerable wear.

The inscription is similar to the above coin and reads qian li zhi ma (千里之马)
which translates as “1,000 li horse”.

The coin has a diameter of 27mm and a weight of 5.2 grams.



The inscription on the obverse side of this
old Chinese horse coin is long
ju (龙驹) which translates as “Dragon’s Colt”.

The reverse side depicts a “dragon colt” horse.

Dragon colt usually refers to a horse that is white and
tall.

The term long
ju (龙驹) can be traced back to the ancient Chinese
text the “Rites of Zhou” (zhou
li 周礼) which dates to the second century BC and is
considered one of the classics of Confucianism. 
This ancient ritual text describes a “dragon colt” as a
horse which is “more than eight chi (尺) tall” measured from the front hoof
to the shoulder.  One chi, during the time of the Zhou, was
about 16.5 centimeters.

The coin has a diameter of 23 mm and a weight of 3.4 grams.


Horse coins typically
honor only famous horses but a few of these coins display a
rider on the horse in order to commemorate famous battles
from ancient Chinese history.

The horse coin at the left has the inscription yan jiang yue yi (燕將樂毅)
which translates as General Yue Yi of the State of Yan. 
(Sometimes the name is translated as General Le Yi.)

The reverse side of the coin shows General Yue Yi carrying a
weapon while on horseback.

General Yue Yi played a major role in one of the most famous
battles of ancient China.

This coin and the “Battle of Jimo” which it commemorates is
discussed in detail at “Battle
of Jimo” Horse Coin.


This
horse coin commemorates one of the most famous generals in
Chinese history.

The inscription reads wu jiang sun wu (吴将孙武) which
translates as “Sun Wu (孙武) the General (将) of the State
of Wu (吴)”.

Sun Wu is better known nowadays as Sun Tzu or Sunzi.

Sun Tzu
(544-496 BC) is the famous general and military strategist
who wrote the book “The
Art of War” (孙
子兵法) during the Spring
and Autumn period (春
秋时代 770-476/403 BC).

The reverse side of the horse coin portrays Sun Tzu carrying
a sword over his shoulder while riding his horse.

This horse coin was sold at China
Guardian Auction in 2013.

Rare horse coins from the Song and Yuan dynasties
displaying horses in battle armor are discussed at Horse
in Armour Horse Coins.

A rare horse coin depicting a blood-sweating “heavenly
horse” is discussed at “Sweating
Blood Horse” Coin.
 
  Return to Ancient Chinese Charms
and Coins

Ancient Chinese Coins with Charm Features

Ancient Chinese coins first started displaying “charm” and
“amulet” features more than 2,000 years ago and many examples
of these ban liang (半 两) and
wu zhu (五 铢) coins
can be seen at Emergence of Chinese
Charms — Symbols Begin to Appear on Chinese Coins.

While the first
“true” charms appeared during the Han Dynasty (206 BC –
220 AD), many of the coins of this period also have charm
characteristics.  For example, some coins have stars,
moons, auspicious clouds, etc. on their reverse side. 
Others have stars on their obverse side.  Several
examples are displayed below.

There were also regularly issued government coins which did
not have any special charm symbols but, nevertheless, were
considered to have the same powers as a true charm. 
Please see the Wang Mang knife
money and the kang xi tong bao (康
熙通宝) coins as examples.

Additionally, there are Chinese charms which closely resemble
actual Chinese coins.  Many examples of these coin-like
charms can be seen at Chinese
Charms with Coin Inscriptions.

For detailed discussions of the meaning of charm symbols,
please visit Ancient
Chinese Charm Symbols:  Star, Moon, Cloud and Dragon
and also Chinese Charms —
Hidden Meaning of Symbols.

Wang Mang Coins

(7-23 AD)

This is
considered to be one of the most beautiful coins of
ancient China.

It was cast in the years 7-9 AD during the reign of Wang Mang of the
short-lived Xin Dynasty (7 – 23 AD).

This knife money is popularly known as jin cuo dao (金错刀) or
gold inlaid knife.
The top portion, which is round with a square hole,
resembles the other coins of the time.

The Chinese character above the hole is yi (一) meaning
“one”.  The character below the hole is dao (刀) which is
“knife.”  The translation is “one knife” and the
characters are inlaid with real gold.

The lower blade portion of the coin has the characters ping wu qian (平五千)
which translates as “worth five thousand”.

During the years of Wang Mang’s reign, this coin had a
token value equal to 5,000 bronze coins!

Besides its monetary worth, this knife money was also
desired for its value as a charm.

The way the very bottom character 千 (qian meaning
“thousand”) is written resembles very closely the
character 子 (zi) which means
“son”.

The inscription on the coin could therefore be read as
“worth five sons” which was considered very auspicious
during ancient times.

Male children were traditionally favored by Chinese
parents for several reasons.  Sons were
responsible for continuing the ancestral lineage and
performing ancestor worship.  When they grew up, they
were responsible for taking care of their parents.

Parents also hoped that their sons would be successful in
achieving a high government office and thereby bring honor
and wealth to the family.

Daughters, on the other hand, were traditionally less
desired because when they grew up, they would marry, leave
the home and have the responsibility of taking care of
their in-laws.

The ideal family during ancient times was considered to be
five sons and two daughters.

This knife coin was, therefore, treasured as a charm that,
hopefully, would bring the family many male offspring.

The coin is 73.5 mm in length.  The upper ring has a
diameter of 28 mm and the lower blade has a maximum
diameter of 15 mm.  The weight is 32.5 grams.

This coin was cast during the reign of Wang Mang
beginning in 14 AD.

The inscription (legend) is read right to left as bu quan (布泉) which
means “spade coin”.

The reason this coin has “charm” features is because women
of that time believed that wearing this coin on their sash
would mean that they would give birth to a boy. 
Chinese society has traditionally placed a great emphasis
on having children, and males in particular, to perform
Confucian filial piety responsibilities and rituals.

For this reason, this coin is also known as the Male Cash
Coin (nan qian
男钱).

Please see Confucian Charms
for more on Confucianism.

As can be seen, the reverse side of the coin
is blank.

This coin has a diameter of 24 mm and a weight of 2.4
grams.

Eastern Han Coins

(25-220 AD)

This coin has another unusual feature.  The upper
and lower parts of the wu
(五) character to the right of the
hole are separated from each other.  The Chinese
refer to this as a “detached wu” although the significance of
this feature is unknown.

This coin has a diameter of 22.6 mm and a weight of
1.5 grams.

Coins of the Three
Kingdoms

(220-280 AD)

The several
centuries from the end of the Han (220 AD) to the
unification of China under the Sui Dynasty (581 AD)
was a period of recurring civil wars and social
upheaval.

At the beginning of this period were the Three
Kingdoms consisting of the State of Wei (220-265
AD), the State of Shu (221-263 AD) and the State of Wu
(222-280 AD).

The State of Shu, also known as Shu Han (),
was
ruled
by
Liu
Bei (刘备).

Liu Bei was forever immortalized as a hero in one of
China’s greatest historical novels entitled the
Romance of the Three
Kingdoms written in the 14th
Century by Luo Guanzhong.

During times of war in ancient China, it was
common for rulers to issue coins of large
denominations. 

The coin at the left has the inscription zhi bai wu zhu
(直百五铢) and was issued in 214 AD by Liu Bei.  Even
though the coin is approximately the same size and
weight of the wu zhu (五铢) coins of the Han
Dynasty, the inscription translates as “Value
One Hundred Wu Zhu” coins.

What
is particularly fascinating about this specimen is the
reverse side.

To make viewing more convenient, I have rotated the
coin 90 degrees clockwise.

At the top of the coin one can clearly see a fish with
the head on the left and the tail on the right. 
(With the coin properly oriented, the fish would be to
the left of the square hole and pointing downward.)

The fish
symbolizes “abundance” and “perseverance”.  It is
a very ancient and powerful Chinese symbol which
expresses the wish for prosperity year after year.
(Please see Fish Charms for
additional information.)

While symbols are sometimes found on ancient Chinese
coins, such as those from the Qin and Han Dynasties,
they are usually incused (carved) into the coin after
casting.  On this particular coin, the fish
protrudes above the surface, which means that the fish
symbol had to have been a design element of the mold
itself.

This coin, with the cast fish on the reverse side, may
be unique.

The coin has a diameter of 25.7 mm and a weight of 2.8
grams.

This Chinese coin was cast during the years 221-265
AD in the Kingdom of Shu.

The inscription (legend) is tai ping bai qian (太平百钱) which
translates as Taiping
(Great Peace) One Hundred Cash.

The coin was worth the equivalent of 100 cash coins of
the day.

The reverse side is filled with wavy lines and
dots.

The wavy lines represent water waves.

The dot at the very top and the one at the very bottom
represent stars.

Even though this was a legal circulating coin during
the period of the Three
Kingdoms, it was frequently used in later
dynasties as a charm because of its inscription
referring to “peace” and the symbols on its reverse
side.

For more information concerning the symbolism please
see Ancient
Chinese Charm Symbols:  Star, Moon, Cloud and
Dragon.

The diameter of the coin is 26 mm and the weight is
6.0 grams.

Jin Dynasty Coins

(265-420 AD)

This coin was cast in the year 319 during the reign
of King She Le of the Later Zhao
Kingdom (319-352) of the Eastern Jin Dynasty
(317-420).

The inscription, written in seal script, reads feng huo (丰货)
which translates as “coin of abundance”.

It was believed at the time that having this coin
would result in great wealth which, as a result,
earned it the nickname “cash of riches”.

The diameter of the coin is 25 mm and the weight is
2.4 grams.

Tang Dynasty Coins

(618-907 AD)

This is the reverse side of a coin from the Tang Dynasty
(618 – 907 AD).

It was cast in 759 AD during the reign of Emperor Su Zong.

To the right of the square hole is what is called an “auspicious cloud”.

Below the square hole is what is know as a “moon”.

Again, this was a normally circulated coin that has charm
features.

This is the obverse side of the coin.  The inscription
is qian yuan zhong bao
(乾元重宝) read top to bottom and right to left.

The coin is 24 mm in diameter and weighs 3.6 grams.

This coin is also from the Tang Dynasty.  It was cast
beginning in the year 621 AD during the reign of Emperor Gao
Zu.

The inscription reads kai yuan tong bao (开
元通宝).

The notable feature of this particular coin has to do with the
character yuan (元)
which is located below the square hole.  If you
compare it to the same character yuan (元) on the coin
just above, you will see that on this coin there has been a “star” added on the right
side of the character.

Stars are found less often on the obverse of coins than on the
reverse.

This coin is 24 mm in diameter and weighs 3.5 grams.

This is another kai yuan
tong bao (开元通宝) coin from my
collection.

It has a normal (no star or other special feature) obverse
side but has a “moon”
below the central hole on the reverse side.

The coin has a diameter of 25 mm and a weight of 3.2 grams.

This is yet another kai
yuan tong bao (开元通宝).

The obverse side has no special characteristics but the
reverse side has a moon above the hole and a star below the
hole.

This coin is 24 mm in diameter and weighs 3.9 grams.

To the left is a final example of a Tang Dynasty coin with
a charm-like feature.

This is the obverse side of a fairly large coin cast during
the reign of Shi Siming (758-761 AD).

The inscription is shun
tian yuan bao (顺天元宝).

As you can clearly seen, the reverse side of the coin has a
moon above the square hole.

The coin is 37 mm in diameter and has a weight of 19.8 grams.

(See Shun
Tian Yuan Bao Charm for a large, gilt and engraved coin
with bat, fish and lotus symbols.)

Coins of the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms

(907-960 AD)

The Later Han was one of the Five
Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms that existed 907 – 979 AD.

This is the obverse side of a coin cast in 948 AD by Emperor
Yin of the Later Han Dynasty (948-951 AD).

The inscription is han
yuan
tong bao (汉元通宝) which
translates as “Han First currency”.

If you look closely at the reverse side of the coin you will
see a crescent moon to the left of the square hole.

This coin has a diameter of 24 mm and weighs 3.1 grams.

The Southern Tang Kingdom existed during the years 937-975 AD.

The coin shown here has the inscription da tang tong bao (大唐通
宝) and was cast beginning in 959 AD
during the reign of Li
Jing.

The reverse side of the coin has a large crescent moon above
the square hole.

The coin has a diameter of 21 mm and a weight of 2 grams.

The obverse side of the coin at the left has the same
inscription as the Tang Dynasty kai yuan tong bao (开
元通宝) seen above.

However, this coin is made of lead and was actually cast
during the Ten
Kingdoms (907-960 AD).

It is believed to have been cast during the Southern Han
period in the area of Canton (Guangzhou), in Southern China,
which was then known as Xingwangfu.

The reverse side has the Chinese character for “south” (nan 南) above the square
hole.

The character for “one” (yi
一) is below the hole.

This coin is unusual in that it has two additional symbols.

To the left of the hole is a crescent (moon) with a dot
(star).

To the right of the hole is a “lucky” or “auspicious” cloud.

This lead coin has a diameter of 20 mm and a weight of 2.3
grams.

Northern Song Dynasty Coins

(960-1127 AD)

This is the obverse side of a large “10 Cash” coin from
the Northern
Song Dynasty.

The inscription (legend), which is read top to bottom and
right to left, is chong
ning zhong bao (崇宁重宝).

Chong (崇)
has the meaning of “sublime” and “worship”.  Ning (宁) can
translate as “tranquil” and “peaceful”.

It was cast in the years 1102 – 1106 during the reign of Emperor Hui Zong
(1101 – 1125).

What
is most interesting about this coin is the hand engraved
picture on the reverse side.

Someone, during the past 900 years, took this coin with its
inscription conveying the sense of “sublime”, “worship” and
“tranquil”, and engraved a picture on the back.

In so doing, they converted a circulating coin into a charm.

To the left of the square hole is what appears to be a mother
embracing a small child.

To the right of the square hole is exactly the same hand
engraved picture but upside down.

While we can only speculate on the meaning, this particular
scene was certainly considered precious to the unknown artist
who did the engraving so long ago.

This coin has a diameter of 34.5 mm and a weight of 10.6
grams.

Southern Song Dynasty Coins

(1127-1279 AD)


This is the obverse of a Southern Song
Dynasty (1127 -1279 AD) coin.

The inscription is read clockwise beginning at the top as shao xing yuan bao (绍兴元
宝).

It was cast in the
years 1131-1162 AD during the reign of Emperor Gao Zong.

You will note that the reverse has a moon above and a star
below the square hole.

The coin has a diameter of 29 mm and weighs 5.6 grams.

Jin Dynasty Coins

(1115-1234 AD)

The
Jin Dynasty
was established by the Nuzhen (Jurched) (女贞) nationality
in northern China during the late Northern Song Dynasty.

At first, the new dynasty relied on coinage from the Liao and Song
Dynasties.

Beginning in the year 1157, however, they began to cast
their own coins.

Modeled after the da guan tong bao (大
观通宝) coins with the personal
calligraphy of Northern Song Dynasty Emperor Hui Zong,
the Jin coins display a high degree of workmanship with
beautiful calligraphy.

The nicely made coin at the left was cast in the year 1189
AD during the reign of Emperor Shi Zong of the Jin
Dynasty.

The inscription reads da
ding tong bao (大定通宝).

The
Chinese character above the square hole on the reverse
side is you (酉)
which is the tenth of the Twelve Earthly
Branches.

The traditional Chinese calendar system, purportedly
originating in the year 2697 BC by the legendary Yellow
Emperor (Huangdi), identifies dates by pairing one
of the ten Heavenly Stems with one of the twelve Earthly
Branches.  The cycle repeats every sixty years.

This coin can be dated to 1189 AD because Emperor Shi Zong
ruled during a 60 year period of the Heavenly Stem ji (己).  Paired
with the you
(酉) on the coin establishes the date as 1189 AD.

(Incidentally, the character you (酉) has an
interesting derivation.  It originally referred to
alcohol made from newly-ripe millet in the
eighth month.)

The distinguishing feature of this coin, however, is
the prominent dot or “star”
located at the 10 o’clock position. 

The coin has a diameter of 25 mm and a weight of 4.3
grams.

Ming Dynasty Coins

(1368-1644 AD)

This coin was cast in the years 1368-1398 AD during the reign
of Emperor Tai
Zu of the Ming
Dynasty.

The inscription (legend) is hong
wu tong bao (洪武通宝).

Please note that this coin has a star to the right of the
character wu (武)
below the square hole.

This particular coin also has a moon on its reverse side
above the square hole.

The coin has a diameter of 23 mm and weighs 4.2 grams.

Qing (Ch’ing) Dynasty Coins

(1644-1911 AD)

This Chinese coin was only cast in the years 1727-1729 during
the reign of Emperor Shi
Zong (1723-1735) of the Qing Dynasty.

The inscription is yong
zheng tong bao (雍正通宝).

The reverse side has
the two Manchu characters “boo
gung” indicating that the coin was cast at the mint in
Lanzhou, Gansu Province.

These yong zheng
tong bao (雍正通宝) cash coins cast in Gansu Province
quickly became popular as an amulet capable of preventing
mutilation from evil spirits.  This is because the Manchu
character “gung” (gong), at the right of the square hole,
resembles the broadsword used by Emperor Guan (guan di 关帝).

Emperor Guan, also known as Emperor Kuan, was a popular
general of the Kingdom of Shu (221-265 AD).  He became
famous for his use of the broadsword.

He was so revered by later dynasties that he was proclaimed
the God of War
and many temples and shrines were built in his honor.

Nowadays, he is also worshipped as the “God of Commerce” by
Chinese businessmen particularly in Hong Kong.

This coin is 26.2 mm in diameter and weighs 4.4 grams.

This is the obverse side of a Qing (Ch’ing) Dynasty coin
which was cast in the years 1796-1820 AD during the reign of Emperor Ren Zong.

The inscription is jia qing
tong bao (嘉庆通宝).

This is the reverse side of the above coin showing a star
below the square hole.

The Manchu character to the right of the square hole indicates
that the coin was cast at the Board of Works mint.

The coin measures 25 mm in diameter and weighs 3.6
grams.

This is the reverse side of another jia qing tong bao (嘉
庆通宝) coin
in my collection.

In this example, a star is above the square hole, and the
Manchu character on the right means that this cash coin was
cast at the Board of Revenue mint.

The coin measures 24 mm in diameter and weighs 4.3 grams.

A
Chinese Coin with the Powers of a Charm

This is an example of an official Qing (Ch’ing)
Dynasty minted coin, meant for general circulation, but
which was immediately considered to have the powers of a
charm.  In the year 1713 AD, to celebrate the 60th
birthday of Emperor
Sheng Zu (Kang Xi), this special issue kang xi tong bao (康熙通宝)
coin was cast with a bronze of a golden color.  A 60th
birthday is considered a major event in China.  In honor
of this milestone, the Chinese character xi (熙), which is located
below the square hole, was written slightly differently. 
The character would normally have a vertical line at its
left.  Also, the part of the character normally written
as (臣) has the center written as a (口) instead.  Finally,
the upper left part of the tong
(通) character, located to the right of the square
hole, has only one dot instead of the usual two.

There are several stories connected with this coin that have
been passed down for the last 300 years which have given this
coin the power of a charm.  The stories have turned out
to be historically false but continue to be believed. 
The different versions of the story basically state that the
bronze used in the casting of this coin came from the melting
down of gold statues of the eighteen disciples of the
Buddha.  These disciples were called lohan (luohan 罗汉) in Chinese.
Because the metal used to cast the coins was believed to be
directly associated with these disciples of Buddha, the coin
is believed to have special powers and is usually referred to
as the lohan coin or
arhat money.

Because of its special charm qualities, these coins were given
to children in olden times as lunar New Year money (yasuiqian 压岁钱).

These coins were also considered to represent good luck
because they commemorated a reign lasting for sixty years
which is a complete cycle of the traditional Chinese calendar
and thus symbolic of a long life.

Traditionally, these coins also acted as a keepsake or pledge
of love between a man and a woman.  Some women would even
wear one of these coins tied to their hand in lieu of a “gold”
engagement ring.

Up until about the 1940’s, there was a tradition in the rural
villages of Shanxi Province where stylish young men liked to
carry a lohan coin
between their teeth.  This was an attempt to mimic the
tradition of stylish young men in the cities who liked to show
off a gold tooth.

If you examine this particular coin carefully, you will notice
what seem to be gold specks on the surface. My guess is that
sometime in the (distant?) past someone put gold leaf on the
coin.  Then, again, maybe the stories are true and the
coin does contain real gold!

This is the reverse side of the coin.  Since the Qing
(Ch’ing) Dynasty was ruled by the Manchu, the characters on
the reverse are in the Manchu script and not Chinese. 
The script indicates that this coin was cast by the Board of
Revenue in Peking.

The coin is slightly larger than 26 mm and weighs 4.8 grams.

Other coins cast during the reign of Emperor Kangxi are
also considered to have charm and amulet properties. 
Please see Chinese Poem Coins.

Pictured below is another example of the special kang xi tong bao (康
熙通宝) coin cast to commemorate the 60th birthday of
Emperor Sheng Zu (Kang Xi) in 1713.  As discussed above,
this coin was considered to have charm characteristics.

Moreover, the Chinese characters kang xi (康熙) can be translated as
“health and prosperity” which makes the coin even more
auspicious.

For these various reasons, these special kang xi coins were
frequently selected to be charms which could be further
enhanced with hand engravings.

This coin is an example
of a coin with hand engraved rims.  I have enlarged the
image to make viewing more convenient.

The upper right, upper left, lower right and lower left
sections of the rim all have a series of dots connected by
zigzag lines.

If you examine the rim closely, however, you will discover
that the number of “dots” differs.

The lower right and lower left
sections of the rim have a series of seven dots each. 
The dots actually represent stars.  The series of seven
stars connected together by a zigzag line represents the Big Dipper
(beidou 北斗)
constellation.

From the beginning in the Shang Dynasty, the Chinese
considered the Big Dipper to be a deity.  In Daoism
(Taoism) the Big Dipper was believed to be where the
celestial gods dwelled.

However, the rim engraving on the upper left portion of the
rim has “nine
stars” connected by a zigzag line.  This can be explained
by the fact that the ancient Chinese believed that the
constellation actually consisted of seven visible stars along
with two invisible “attendant” or “companion” stars.

To make matters even more interesting, the upper right section
of the rim has “eight
stars” connected by a zigzag line.  I believe the “eight
stars” actually refer to the Eight Daoist
Immortals (baxian
八仙) described below:

1) Han Zhongli (汉钟离) was
a Han Dynasty general who carries a feather fan used to revive
the dead.

2) Lu Dongbin (吕洞宾), known for his drinking and
fighting, carries a demon-slaying sword and a fly whisk which he
uses to walk on clouds or fly to the heavens.

3) Zhang Guolao (张果老),
who rides a donkey, sometimes seated backwards, carries a
tube-shaped bamboo musical instrument called a yugu (鱼鼓).

4) Li Tieguai (
铁拐), also known as “Li with the iron crutch”, carries a gourd filled with
magic elixir.

5) He Xiangu (何仙姑), the only female in the group, carries
a lotus or peach, or a fly whisk.

6) Han Xiangzi (韩湘子), who carries a flute, can predict the
future and also make fruits and flowers grow out of
season.

7) Cao Guojiu (曹国舅) carries a ruyi sceptre or castanets.

8) Lan Caihe (蓝采和), depicted as either a male or female,
usually holds a fruit/flower basket, a bowl or a flute.

Located between each of these four groupings of star constellations is a
design consisting of a semicircle with a dot in the
middle.  This symbolizes the “sun” and also the
Emperor’s “light” and wisdom.  The representation of
the sun rising from the edge of the rim can also symbolize
hope for being successful in the imperial
examination system and thus becoming a government
official together with the honor and wealth which
accompanied such a position.

The reverse side of the coin has a more limited number of
engravings.

At the top and bottom are the same semicircular “sun”
symbols as on the obverse side.

The other areas (most clearly seen on the left part of the
rim) have a meandering wave-like design.

Unfortunately, the engravings suffer from wear which
further indicates that they were made sometime in the
distant past.

This coin has a diameter of 27 mm and a weight of 4.2
grams.

Other coins cast during the reign
of Emperor Kangxi are also considered to have charm and amulet
properties.  Please see Chinese
Poem Coins.

         Return to
Ancient Chinese Charms and
Coins

The Language and Iconography of Chinese Charms

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Keep Chinese coins to boost your wealth | Lifestyle Astro

Feng shui is a 5,000-year-old Chinese branch of astrology that helps people improve their lives and achieve great things. According to this ancient science, while humanity’s power of life is transmitted through water (feng), the energy surrounding various organisms is distributed through air (shui).

Laughing Buddha and lucky bamboo are the common lucky charms under feng shui. Along with them, Chinese coins have an equal importance. These coins are considered to be the source of wealth and if they are placed in homes according to feng shui principles, the residents are certain to enjoy prosperity.

Chinese coins have a unique feature – they have a square hole in the centre. Moreover, each side of the coin has a distinct significance.

While the square hole of the coin represents the conductive powers of the earth, the side with four Chinese figures is termed ‘Yang’, which symbolizes energy and the other side with two figures is called ‘Yin’. The Chinese coins are stacked with the ‘Yang’ side in front. This is based on the belief that prosperity will flow smoothly into the house when the sun’s rays fall directly on the Yang side.

Coins made of copper, bronze and brass are utilized to increase wealth. The coins have to be tied with red ribbon in bunches of three, six or nine and kept in the money chest, locker or purse. The three coins represent the prosperity of the three heavens, according to Chinese astrology. Six coins are the symbols of heavenly blessings and nine coins connect nature’s wealth with man.

Feng shui suggests that when these coins are offered as gifts on special occasions, both the giver and receiver will turn lucky. The coins can be kept as single pieces, but when they are tied together with a red ribbon and stored in bunches, the benefits would double.

According to feng shui, when Chinese coins are placed in commercial establishments, they help attract more customers. As a result, business booms and the entrepreneurs become wealthy.

If ancient Chinese coins can be procured, the results will be manifold, as per the belief.

90,000 to attract money, the value of 6 coins on a red thread in Feng Shui, choose talismans for happiness

In the East, as you know, ancient practices and teachings are held sacred, the basis of which is energy balance and the direction of energy in a favorable flow. The most famous of them is feng shui, which is distinguished by its symbolism.

Chinese feng shui coins are a way to attract desired benefits into your life. Combining the energy of Heaven and Earth, they are a powerful concentrate of the “correct” energy.

She brings abundance, happiness and love to the house.

About coins

Similar Chinese coins first appeared in the 11th century BC.NS. Then they were used as ordinary money. Over time, they were replaced by other financial objects, but their importance did not diminish.

They began to be used as amulets. And today, Chinese coins are one of the strongest talismans of well-being.

Nowadays, it is difficult to find a genuine, ancient Chinese coin. But it doesn’t matter for the fulfillment of her mission. For this, non-original copies produced in sufficient quantities are quite suitable.

The coin is made of copper. Its rounded shape symbolizes the energy of Heaven, and the center with a square hole symbolizes the energy of the Earth. An uninitiated person will certainly consider it unimportant what is applied to the surface of this amulet.

In fact, everything in it is thought out to the smallest detail. And every detail counts. All coins have 2 sides: active and passive. The active side is Yang, the masculine. It depicts 4 hieroglyphs.They indicate a dynasty that ruled at one time or another.

Since China reached its greatest prosperity during the reign of the Qin dynasty, banknotes of their era are the most popular. Such objects are especially effective for attracting wealth.

The passive side is Yin, which symbolizes the feminine principle. It depicts 2 hieroglyphs representing the ruler’s utterance.Combining 2 opposite energies, Yang and Yin, such a talisman is designed to actively attract harmony and happiness into life.

Dragons, a phoenix, swords, etc. are also depicted as a symbolic object on the coin. All of them carry their own meaning and are designed to protect their wearer from misfortune. They are also used to attract good luck.

In ancient times, these symbols were called Quan, which translates as “integrity” or “source”. Their special number in the correct arrangement symbolizes integrity and well-being.

How to Use Coins for Good

These talismans must be used correctly to obtain health and well-being. Coins must be placed upwards with the surface on which 4 hieroglyphs are depicted. This is the only way to get what you want.

If you put the coins incorrectly, then you will not get luck.And, perhaps, you will get bad luck and disappointment instead.

Amulets are placed in certain places. For example, they are hung around the neck to get health. Or put it under a pillow for happiness in family life. But still, they are most often used to attract money. Therefore, they can be put in those places where financial savings are stored: in a wallet, a safe with securities, a cash register. Or in those of them that are directly or indirectly related to financial flows: above the front door of the office, under the rug, near the money tree, at the entrance to the dwelling.

Usually there is a “hidden” place for each coin.

Basically, such money talismans are used in a bundle, for example, 3 or 6 coins. But there are also those that carry a magical effect and alone.

Lucky coin will help attract love and family harmony. It is suitable for those who are looking for their other half. And also for those who are trying to harmonize their family relationships.Her symbols are a dragon with a phoenix or 2 dragons with a pearl. Such a coin is placed in a bag or in a pocket on the bottom of the bed.

The indispensable Nanbu coin got its name because it was never in monetary use, but was used to attract fortune. In ancient times, traders used it in China, joining documents with it. This gave them confidence that the agreement would bring good luck.

It is believed that such a sign would be good for those who are fond of gambling, betting, who are willing to take risks.They carry the money with them, keeping this fact a secret. Also, a coin is hung on door handles or stored in documents.

Large coin grants its owner protection from evil forces and adversity. But for this, a person must always have it with him.

On one side there is a portrait of Taoist Zhongli Quan, on the other – his name and various feng shui symbols.

Even if the money is used alone, it is advisable that it be braided with a red ribbon with a tassel.

Rare Feng Shui Currency Symbols

Among the Chinese coin amulets there are also those that are very difficult to find.

Health coin promises its owner health for many years of life.It depicts Shou-sin – an old man, an image of longevity. In his hands is a ginseng staff, and around it are other signs of health: deer, peaches, storks. Also, the coin depicts a phoenix and a dragon – the image of the marriage of two people. This suggests that the talisman is capable of bringing physical well-being to the entire family.

The coin is presented as a gift to parents and older relatives. And also for families with children and the elderly. It reveals 5 main benefits:

  • longevity; 90,080 90,079 health;
  • happiness;
  • financial abundance;
  • easy and painless death.

5 bats – a very rare coin, but it will bring great luck to anyone who finds it. Everything is tied to a play on words. In Chinese, the bat sounds like Bian Fu. And this is very consonant with the word happiness. Therefore, for the Chinese, meeting this animal is incredible luck. They even specially acquire their figures and place them in the house.

Meihua is a 5-petal Chinese coin symbol similar to a plum blossom.Therefore, most often it is called that. This coin has never been cash either. In its middle is a pentagon-shaped hole.

5 is a non-random number. This talisman also brings 5 ​​benefits of life:

  • well-being;
  • longevity;
  • purity of the soul;
  • nobility;
  • wealth.

Such an amulet protects from the wrath of ill-wishers, predisposes to a happy future. Its owner is lucky.

Combinations of coins

But all the same, the aggregate of banknotes has the greatest power. As a rule, coins are tied with thread, rope, braid, ribbon. Either red or gold thread is used. But more often money is collected on a red ribbon.

Red tones stimulate the disclosure of the energy of coins, enhance their effect. Scarlet or gold threads are used to activate male energy.

Coins are tied with tape using different methods. This is a whole art, having mastered it, you can combine them yourself. The main thing is to correctly position the signs in order to release the beneficial energy of Chi.

Coins are collected on a tape in certain quantities. The symbolism of the product depends on this.

  • 2 signs contribute to money savings , increase the fortune of 2 generations and protect against negativity.And they are also recommended to be put under the mattress for a couple dreaming of a child.
  • 3 coins tied with ribbon bring financial wealth from three sources. This can be earned income (for example, work), the receipt of funds from the outside (inheritance) and sudden fortune (gain). The product symbolizes the union of man with Heaven and Earth. Usually it is put in the foundation of a house under construction, which is owned by this person. And he lives in it.
  • 5 coins are favorable for those who want to start their own business or start trading.They attract the flow of funds from four sides and their concentration in one place.
  • Coins in the amount of six pieces promise help and patronage. With them, a person is under protection, and good luck is favorable to him.
  • 8 Coin Pendants attract income from all sides of the compass and symbolize wealth. With a ninth coin in the center, their strength increases.
  • Nine signs on one ribbon have the greatest power. They radiate the energy of the Universe with its power and integrity.They bestow upon their owner life wisdom, power and prosperity in all areas.

Combinations of 4 and 7 coins are considered dysfunctional and are not used as talismans. The 7 is associated with metal. And a combination of 7 coin signs is used to activate the metal element and suppress the negative stars of the earth element.

Coins are tied with a thread not only in a row, but also create figures from them. One of the most common is the sword. The number of characters in it is different. But it should not be 100. Their ideal number is 108. This amulet is intended for businessmen to protect them from the intrigues of opposing persons. He is hung in the office, with the handle up and always behind him. Better in the west or northwest. The amulet has powerful force, and it is not recommended to hang it in everyday life.

Chinese feng shui coins carry positive energy and are able to bring many benefits and gifts into the life of their guardian.The activator of their action is the person’s belief in their great power.

Coins are designed to act only for the good. And in no case are they used for the purpose of revenge or harm.

For information on how to use coins in feng shui, see the following video.

90,000 how to make a strong talisman for money

Even the smallest details play an important role in the home furnishings according to ancient traditions.

Chinese feng shui coins are used today not only as a room decoration, but also as a powerful talisman for wealth and prosperity.

The form of such amulets is identified with the unity of Heaven and Earth, therefore they are filled with special energy.

General Description of Chinese Coins

Feng Shui coins usually look like small rounds with a square hole in the middle. It is a geometric figure with angles that means Yin energy, i.e. The earth, while the circle is associated with the celestial flow of Yang.

At the same time, according to Feng Shui, on each side there are references to one of two types of energy. Thanks to this balance of power, Feng Shui coins, photos of which are so often found on the Web, bring financial success to people’s lives and harmonize the entire space around them.

Inscriptions and pictures

The active side of the coins – Yang – according to Feng Shui should always contain 4 hieroglyphs located on the cardinal points. These symbols represent the era in which the currency was made.In this way, you can easily find out during the heyday of which dynasty specific coins were issued.

As for the passive side, it contains only 2 symbols – the motto of the corresponding ruler. Coins for feng shui are made, as a rule, of ordinary copper, and they were actually used in China for exchange since the 11th century. BC.

Some feng shui coins have special meanings, different from ordinary money. In this case, we are talking about talismans with specific images or trigrams that give the coin specific meanings.So, lucky coins, which are the basis for creating neck amulets, are remembered for the images of phoenixes, dragons, as well as swords, the appearance of which should protect a person from evil.

Coins feng shui with red ribbon and thread

Coins, important in Feng Shui and tied with a red ribbon or rope, have a great effect as a home talisman or amulet for business development. This is because the bright color activates Yang energy, and the ordering of coins and tying them in knots enhances the assistance in achieving the desired.

In addition, the scarlet hue helps to destroy the perception of coins as physical bodies. You can also use gold ropes and ribbons, the main thing is to pay attention to their strength.

How to tie Feng Shui coins with red thread

In this case, it is mainly the number of coins that matters. It should be remembered that according to feng shui a bunch of metallic money consists of 5 main elements. First of all, it is the material of their creation and the symbolic wealth with which they are identified.The rest of the details are determined precisely by the connecting tape (rope): fire, strength and naturalness. The last two factors are especially active in attracting wealth to a person’s home.

Of course, there are several methods for tying Feng Shui money coins with a special knot. It symbolizes the endlessness of the resources received and lifelong abundance. Such a combination of coins helps to release Qi, but it can be problematic to create such a talisman on your own.

However, Feng Shui allows simple tying of money, since they are saturated with the energy of the owner, which means they begin to attract positive waves.It should only be borne in mind that Chinese feng shui coins need to be positioned so that the images of the dragon, tiger and other patrons are on top.

Varieties of coins in Feng Shui

Coin Mascot

The so-called fixed coin was never used as a currency in China. She has always been just an object to attract fortune. This talisman is needed by risky people who bet on the races and love the lottery.

Store a Feng Shui coin in the southeast of the apartment, near the door.It can also be worn around the neck.

Chinese coin of happiness Feng Shui

Coin of happiness in Feng Shui is used to find the second half. If there is already love in life, the talisman is suitable for maintaining a happy marriage. Depict on such a coin two dragons with a pearl or one, but with a phoenix.
It is better to carry the amulet in your pocket or purse. The Chinese Feng Shui coin of happiness can also be kept in the bedroom under the mattress.

Coin of Health

A coin for good health is quite rare and features the image of a star elder – Shou Sin.Sometimes he is painted surrounded by deer, storks, peach fruits and other symbols of great well-being.

The second side of such a talisman depicts the hieroglyph of long life and the symbol of the family – a phoenix with a dragon. The latter means that the action of the feng shui coin applies to all the close people of the owner.

Chinese currency coins

An ordinary Chinese coin is a symbol of financial luck. A feng shui currency is especially valued if it was issued from the 17th to the 20th centuries.since this is the period of the Qin dynasty.

Only coins made during the 10th emperor from this dynasty are not considered lucky. Conversely, the most popular coins as talismans are from Kang Xi and Qian Lung. You can keep these Chinese coins in a wallet, a red envelope, on a money tree. It is allowed to put them in the refrigerator and on the computer.

Talisman coins

A coin with five bats around is considered very rare. This symbol allows you to provide a person with maximum protection and support in any difficult situation.

Also interesting are the coins in the shape of a plum blossom. They have 5 petals and the same number of hieroglyphs. Accordingly, the talisman brings several factors to life at once: purity, fame, well-being, happiness, peace of mind and longevity. It is worth keeping such a Chinese coin in a safe or on your desktop.

Large Chinese Coin

A large Feng Shui coin carries the power of an immortal Taoist, if it depicts the face of Zhong Li Quan, as well as the name of one of his 8 Taoists.

In this case, the talisman provides the owner with very strong protection if carried with him or hung in an apartment in the sector of assistants.

How to use money coins

  • The so-called blade or sword of 108 Chinese coins protects its owner from unfavorable soaring stars. If a person needs harmonization of relations, it is better to hide 2 ancient coins under a pillow for the appearance of positive family energy in the house.
  • As a talisman of wealth, it is enough to use one coin in a red circle with brushes.It should be hung on the handle of the front door, but before that, you should independently tie the Chinese coin with a red thread or ribbon. Also, to attract monetary luck, you can place coins under the rug, in folders with documentation. The Yang side should always be directed upwards. But scattering coins around the house in a chaotic manner in Feng Shui is not very useful.
  • For a fundamental improvement in the material well-being of the whole family, you should lay three Chinese coins even in the foundation of the house.They can be installed in the path to the building, hidden in the walls behind a layer of plaster of the wall, or cemented in the floor. It is best to place the talisman in the north or west area of ​​the house, especially if the door is facing in that direction. Feng Shui coins work only if the building is in the personal property of a person.
  • Many are wondering where the Feng Shui jade coins should be. The traditional talisman for health, consisting of 8 monetary units and red knots, is usually placed at the head of the bedroom.You can put coins over the door to the break room or kitchen. One jade coin is allowed to be added to important documents or hidden in a notebook.

Number of coins: three or more?

Two coins

A pair of coins from China in the teachings of Feng Shui means the accumulation and preservation of money. Such a talisman will also save the owner from negative energy. It is believed that two coins symbolize the money of a mother and a son, i.e. contribute to the growth of the state.

Three coins

Feng Shui considers three coins as three parts of prosperity. This means that the owner will get finances from work, and additional sources of income, and even spontaneous monetary wealth in the form of gifts or inheritance.

The addition of a red knot in this case will emphasize the unity of heaven, earth and humanity. It is also effective to associate coins with images of emperors ruling one after another.

Five Chinese coins

Five Chinese Feng Shui coins are useful for the arrival of prosperity from all over the world at once.A disc with such monetary units is used to attract good luck in the work of various companies.

Six coins

A bundle of six coins is capable of attracting helpers. This number is associated with luck sent from above.
It is especially good to keep the amulet in the northwest sector of the house.

Eight coins

If the traditional Feng Shuitri understands coins as different sides of income, then 8 coins are perceived as talismans for the flow of wealth from all compass sides.It is good if the money is connected in a straight ribbon or forms a circle with the ninth coin in the center.

Nine coins

Nine coins in feng shui represent the entirety of the universe. At the same time, the maximum power is possessed by a bunch of coins made during the reign of all representatives of the Qin dynasty.

At the same time, even ordinary monetary units from China in such quantities are used for protection and well-being. According to Feng Shui, one should put such a talisman in the wealth sector or wear coins around the neck.It is also useful to hang money in feng shui behind the back of a work chair.

Chinese coins, as a rule, Feng Shui does not allow binding in quantities of 4 and 7 pieces. This is not an effective talisman, moreover, the number 7 is identified with metal, so it is not suitable for attracting wealth. A bunch of seven coins is needed to strengthen the active stars of the metal element or neutralize negative stars from the earth element.

Regardless of how you want to knit Chinese coins, how many of them there will be and what place will be their home, try to endow the talisman with your energy.Like any powerful helper, a lucky coin or a coin approves only sincere and positive thoughts of a person.
Chinese feng shui coins will surely give riches to those who really want and deserve it.

chinese feng shui coins

As you probably already know, in Feng Shui there are many different talismans, symbols, amulets to attract wealth. We have considered such on our website. The article touched on the topic a little – Feng Shui coins. Here I would like to tell you more about what feng shui coins are, and what their meanings are.Once these coins were in use as money (they were cast from copper), but later they went out of circulation and they began to be used as talismans to attract all kinds of benefits. First of all, of course, to attract money luck.

Chinese Feng Shui Coins and Their Meanings

three coins tied differently

First, their shape and sides

… They are made in the form of a circle with a square hole in the middle. Which means – the unity of Heaven and Earth.In this case, the square symbolizes the Earth (Yin energy), the circle – Heaven (Yang energy). In addition, each side of the coin belongs to its own type of energy. So on the Yang side (active), 4 hieroglyphs are depicted (to the cardinal points). Two of them indicate in the era of which ruling dynasty the coin was issued. On the Yin side (passive) there are 2 symbols that could represent the motto of the ruler of that time. Combining two types of energy, and symbolizing the balance between them, Feng Shui coins harmonize space and bring good luck and financial well-being to people’s lives.

Second, hieroglyphs or images

… The power of the talisman of the Feng Shui coin is also given by the hieroglyphs, images or trigrams depicted on them, which carry a semantic load. For example, there are coins that act as amulets and are worn around the neck. They can depict a dragon and a phoenix, crossed swords, the Bagua symbol and other symbols that will save their master from evil and attract good luck. However, most often there are coins with hieroglyphs denoting various goods.

Lucky (or large) Feng Shui coin

Third, the number of Feng Shui coins

… Whether you use coins one at a time or tie multiple coins together depends on your desire. But it is believed that in a bunch of coins “work” more efficiently than one coin.

Chinese coins can be used singly or tied together in varying amounts. They are tied with a strong thread, either red or gold. But the red color of the thread is most often used.Since in feng shui the color is red
– it’s good luck. The threads in this case act as activators of the energy of the coins.

Lucky Coin
Feng Shui. Meanings: This coin is used to attract love into your life. Or if you already have love in your life, then this Feng Shui coin is used to ensure that your relationship ends in a strong and happy marriage. It usually depicts the Dragon and Phoenix, symbolizing the marriage union. Or two Dragons playing with a pearl. It is recommended to carry it with you in your pocket, bag or purse.You can put such a coin to your chosen one in a purse or put it in the bedroom under the mattress.

Feng Shui unchangeable coin

Unchanging
feng shui coin. The values
: It is called so because it was not originally intended as a monetary unit, but served only as an amplifier of “unexpected luck”. An unchangeable coin brings money to those people who invest in risky business (running, stock exchange, lottery). It can be worn around the neck, as a talisman of good luck, or placed in places where you need its help.It can be a folder with investment papers, lotteries; southeast of the house; handle of any room or front door.

Simple
Chinese Feng Shui coin. The values
: Attracts financial luck. They put it in different places in the house. Read more below.

Chinese coin for good health
… Meanings: This coin is quite rare and one might say unique. Her stay in the house promises one person or the whole family good health and long life. On one side of it, Shou Xing is depicted – an old man of stars, symbolizing a measured long life, as well as a happy old age surrounded by children and grandchildren.It happens that he is depicted surrounded by other equally powerful symbols of health: a stork, a deer of peach fruits. The other side depicts the hieroglyph “long life”, on the sides of which the Dragon and Phoenix (as we already know the symbol of a married couple). This means that a coin for good health can be extended to the entire family.

Feng Shui coin in the form of a plum blossom

Chinese coin in the form of a plum blossom
… Meanings: An interesting coin, made in the shape of five petals, with five on one and symbols on the other.It is believed that it brings five benefits to its owner: prosperity, nobility, long life, happy destiny, peace of mind and purity. It is recommended to carry such a coin with you or you can put it in a desk drawer or a safe with documents. A coin in the shape of a plum blossom will bring good luck in business and help in your career.

Five bats around the coin.
Values: a very rare coin. Brings protection and support to its owner.

five bats around the coin

Two coins

feng shui, connected by a red thread.Meanings: the symbol of the accumulation of money. Nowadays they are used by business people and businessmen. It is also recommended to carry them with you as an amulet, so they will protect you from negative energy. Two more feng shui coins can bring harmony to family relationships. To do this, they are placed under the pillows of the matrimonial bed.

Three
feng shui coins. The values
: it is a symbol of the unity of Man, Heaven and Earth. The best option for attracting wealth. Also, three coins mean three sources of attracting wealth: earned wealth that came from outside and earned wealth in an unconventional way, unexpected wealth.

Four
It is forbidden to tie coins in Feng Shui. Such an amulet will not bring any benefit.

Five
Feng Shui coins tied with a red thread. Meanings: a symbol of the arrival of money from four directions and accumulated at one point. Recommended for those who are trading.

six feng shui coins

Six
Feng Shui coins. The values
: Attract heavenly luck. They promise a quick meeting with assistants and patrons. It is recommended to place them in the northwest (sector of helpers and patrons).

Seven
coins tied together as a talisman are not used in feng shui. As well as four coins.

Eight
Feng Shui coins or nine
(if one coin is in the center). Meanings: are a symbol that wealth will come from everywhere, from all compass directions. If there is a ninth coin, then in this case it is considered the accumulation point.

eight linked Feng Shui coins

Nine
Feng Shui coins (tied in a line).Meanings: act as a symbol of the integrity and completeness of the universe. This amulet is very strong, but only if all coins are genuine, minted during the Qin dynasty. If you can find these, you can hang them behind the back of your work chair. In general, this talisman can be placed in the sector where you want to activate the energy, it will work equally well.

Linked coins in the form of a decorative sword.
Meanings: the number of coins in a sword can be different, but the best and most effective is the sword of 108 Chinese coins.Such swords are used to protect their business from the intrigues of competitors. To activate its energy, you need to hang it in the north-west or west part of the office behind your workstation with the “edge” down. It is not recommended to hang a sword made of coins in front of you – so its power can be directed against you. If you do not belong to the world of commerce or politics, do not use this amulet! The coins listed above are quite suitable for everyday life. The sword is needed only where there is a tough struggle for spheres of influence.

How to properly activate Chinese feng shui coins

decorative sword from feng shui coins

In order to attract good luck with Chinese Feng Shui coins, they can be placed in various places. For example, if you have your own company and you can hang one or two of these coins on the door of your business. If you make money with a computer, hang a bunch of coins next to it. A rug near the front door – for the well-being of the owners of the house, a refrigerator – for abundance, a wallet – to attract the energy of money, a folder with financial documents, a cash register – for good luck in business, etc.p.

One of the ways of financial well-being and prosperity with the help of Chinese coins is to brick them in the foundation when building a house.

Important! For Feng Shui coins to work correctly, place them with the Yang side up and the Yin side down.

It is quite natural for every person to strive to improve their material well-being. Materialists in this sense rely only on their own industriousness and ingenuity, while superstitious people call on various magic techniques and talismans for help.

You can buy an expensive wallet in yellow-gold or black-brown tones, put a ceramic pot with small change that attracts wealth in a secluded corner of your home, hide a few white metal coins under the threshold of the house so that they attract financial luck to households.

Connoisseurs will be sure that in addition to these tricks, there is another surest way to gain material well-being – the presence of a coin with holes in your pocket or bag.

For a long time, many peoples believe that a coin with a hole perfectly attracts the energy of wealth to its owner, but only if it fell into his hands by accident.She plays the role of a powerful talisman that allows you to benefit and profit from any, even the most adventurous project. However, these days it is almost impossible to find such a money amulet on the road. At the same time, everyone is quite capable of doing it, if you know certain rules and requirements.

  • The most important factor in making a magic talisman is the appropriate moon phase. In order for an ordinary coin with holes to acquire magical abilities, it should be drilled only during the period of a growing night luminary.
  • The second prerequisite will be the day of the week chosen for the ordinance. All manipulations with the coin should be carried out on Sunday, and the most correct time will be the so-called “hour of Jupiter”, that is, the period from 10 to 11 hours.
  • The circle of metal chosen for the talisman must first be cleaned of any negative energy that he has necessarily accumulated during his previous “life”. To do this, just hold the coin for a couple of minutes in running water.It can be a river or a stream, but for lack of something better, a stream of water from the tap will do just fine.
  • In order for the money to be guaranteed to be charged with the energy of Jupiter, patronizing lovers of easy money and material abundance, it is worth taking the ceremony seriously and thoughtfully, completely focusing on thoughts about the upcoming wealth.
  • In order for the talisman to “work” effectively, it should be worn as close to the body as possible, in a pocket or around the neck, hanging on a string. In addition, the money amulet should be “reloaded” every Sunday that coincides with the new moon.To do this, the coin is kept in running water for several minutes, washing away the accumulated negative and mentally setting the mind to increase material wealth.

– a powerful talisman that combines the two principles of Yin and Yang, characterizing the eternal unity of the Earth and Heaven. The coins are round in shape with a square hole, the circle symbolizes the Heaven, and the square symbolizes the Earth. Such a combination of energies in one talisman harmoniously affects a person’s life, attracts good luck, prosperity, wealth. On both sides of the coin, a different number of hieroglyphs are depicted.The side with 4 characters represents Yang energy, and the side with two characters represents Yin.

In China, it is believed that coins made in antiquity during the times of powerful emperors, during the period of prosperity of the people, have special power, since they keep the imprint of the ancient energy of Qi and that glorious time. The demand for such coins is very high, and their value is often enormous. But as described above, the shape of the coin matters, so you can easily get by with copies of mascot coins even from souvenir shops, you just have to pay attention to the number of coins and the hieroglyphs depicted on them.

Chinese coins as a talisman
are used in different spheres of life, they are worn in wallets to attract finances, worn as amulets around the neck, to protect against negative energy. Other Feng Shui talismans may be depicted on coins
, for example, this combination of talismans and coins enhances their effect.

It is considered favorable to use not one coin, but several. The coins are tied with red or gold braid. More often, you can find coins tied with a red braid, since red in China is the color of luck, but more appropriate from the point of view of Feng Shui is the golden color, which personifies Metal, and enhances the action of the energy of the Earth, and red, in turn, is the color Fire, fire is known to destroy metal.

To protect against the negative energy of Sha, use coins connected by a thread into a sword
. When buying such a talisman, make sure that there are 108 coins in it, this number is considered the most powerful.

To attract monetary energy, coins should be used directly where money is or is earned. At the workplace, under the rug at the entrance to the office, on the doorknob of the office or office, or even simply by hanging a bunch of coins over the door.Put and don’t take coins out of your wallet, pair them with money rugs. Coins are also put in the place where you keep money or securities or even jewelry. To provide protection for the whole house, coins are often embedded in the walls during construction. Everything related to money, its earnings, preservation and accumulation, you can use everywhere Chinese Feng Shui coins
. It is worth noting that the coins must be tied in such a way that the prominent side is the Yang side.
.

The number of Chinese coins and their meaning

Two Chinese coins
, a powerful talisman for attracting, accumulating and preserving wealth. This version of the talisman can be worn as an amulet; its action also helps in protecting against negative energy.

Three coins
, symbolize the three parts of prosperity – money earned in everyday life, spontaneous wealth (inheritance, gift) and money earned outside the box, in addition to your main job.

Five Chinese coins,
symbolize the influx of well-being from all sides and its accumulation in the center. Such a combination is often used by commercial enterprises, for which it is important to work and expand their cooperation with all parts of the world. The talisman is made in the form of a disc, with five coins, and a square hole in the middle, or an ordinary bundle in a row. Such a talisman works great if it is used in the interior design of the facade of a store or company.

Bundle of six coins
is used most often in the north-western sector, thereby attracting a strong patron or people who can help in difficult times.Six coins represent heavenly luck, help from above.

Eight coins of Feng Shui
means an influx of wealth and prosperity from absolutely all compass sides of Ba-Gua. They can be connected in a ribbon of eight coins, or eight coins in a circle with a ninth in the center.

Nine Chinese coins,
carry the meaning of the completeness of the universe. The strongest is considered to be a combination of genuine coins made during the reign of the Qin emperors. Each coin bears the name of one of the emperors.Nowadays it is very difficult to assemble such a collection; it is easier to use copies. Such a bundle of coins is widely used as a protective talisman and as a talisman for attracting wealth. In China, 9 coins can be seen as a necklace. Feng Shui masters advise placing 9 coins in the wealth sector. Bundles of coins are also very strong, in which there is at least one coin with the name of the emperor.

Chinese Feng Shui coins
, a universal talisman, carry them always with you, to important meetings or just every day, fill your daily life with auspicious Feng Shui.

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smartdestiny.ru | Chinese coins – talisman of abundance in feng shui

Chinese coins – talisman of abundance in feng shui

Chinese feng shui coins are talismans with wonderful power. Due to their unusual shape, which combines the energy of Heaven – Yang Energy (round shape) and the Earth energy – Yin Energy (square cutout in the center of the coin), they are believed to activate the energy of abundance, which awakens good luck and brings wealth.Thus, having the original meaning of the unity of Heaven and Earth, the coin is a talisman of harmonization of space, flows of energy and time.

The sides of the coin also carry the symbolism of the two energies Yang and Yin. The side that symbolizes the Yang energy is the side on which 4 hieroglyphs are depicted – this side is considered active and, according to feng shui, should be facing when using a coin, that is, facing up. The same side, which shows 2 hieroglyphs, symbolizes Yin energy and is considered passive.The correct placement of the coin is very important for activating the energy of abundance and is the unspoken rule in feng shui when using it.

The symbolism of the coins was also reflected in their name: in ancient times they were called “Quan”, which has two meanings – “source” and “integrity”, therefore, during the reign of dynasties, coins were used as a symbol of achieving 10 types of integrity. Feng Shui masters have activated the source of well-being and integrity with this symbol, i.e. happiness. A bunch of 9 coins arranged in a circle and one coin in the center was especially widely used for this.

The history of these coins dates back to China in the 11th century BC, when these coins were used as a means of payment. Usually they were minted from copper, and various symbols and hieroglyphs were displayed on their sides. So, on the Yang side, the upper and lower hieroglyphs indicated which dynasty the coin belongs to, and on the Yin side, the motto of the emperor’s reign could be minted. There are coins with the image of a dragon and a phoenix to attract good luck and protection from evil forces, there are coins with trigrams, the image of Bagua or crossed swords – symbols of protection and good luck in feng shui, coins with the image of one of the 8 immortal Taoists, giving his protection and support.

The use of Chinese feng shui coins

Nowadays, these coins have already gone out of monetary use and are used as amulets and talismans to attract wealth and protect people from negative energy, enjoying great respect among the followers of oriental teachings, and in particular feng shui. They are worn around the neck as an amulet to protect against evil and attract good luck, put under a pillow to harmonize marital relations, walled up in the foundation of a house during construction to ensure the well-being of the family.To attract monetary luck in Feng Shui, they are placed anywhere directly or indirectly related to money: they are placed in a wallet or safe, under a rug in front of the front door, under a pot with a money tree, glued to folders with financial documents, hung over the entrance to a store, an office, a restaurant or above the entrance to an apartment to attract financial well-being to its inhabitants; on the refrigerator – for abundance, on door handles, on work chairs, on cash registers, on computers – without forgetting the important rule of placing the active side up!

In the use of coins, their number also matters – it is believed that in a bundle they work more efficiently than singly, and depending on the number, such talismans have different meanings.For this, coins are sometimes tied with gold thread, but in most cases red, the color of which is a symbol of prosperity and good luck. However, some feng shui masters have a different opinion on this matter, believing that in this case, given that the amulet itself corresponds to the elements of the Earth and Metal, it is more favorable to tie it with a golden thread. The golden color is in harmony with the elements of the amulet, corresponding also to the elements of Metal, which strengthens the Earth. And the element of the color of the red thread – Fire, although it strengthens the element of the Earth, is destructive for the element of Metal, which creates disharmony with the elements of the amulet.

In Chinese culture and in feng shui, the symbolism of numbers is very important – it reflects different meanings, different symbolism and associations associated with a particular number, therefore, different numbers of coins are tied together and used for different purposes. The coin itself is already a symbol of attracting wealth and activates the energy of abundance. You can use it yourself by placing it in the right place.

Value of the number of Chinese coins

2 linked coins symbolize the accumulation of wealth, and are also used as an amulet to protect against dark forces.Nowadays, they are widely used by businessmen to attract and increase financial wealth. This bundle is also used to harmonize family relationships, placing it under the pillows in the matrimonial bed. There is an opinion that the Chinese name of the two linked coins means “money of mother and son” in translation. The connection between mother and son symbolizes the arrival of money and the growth of wealth.

3 related coins the most commonly used talisman for attracting the energy of prosperity, symbolizing three sources of wealth: ordinary, earned wealth; wealth that came from outside and earned in an unconventional way; unexpected wealth.This bundle is considered a symbol of the unity of Heaven, Earth and Man.

4 related coins according to feng shui it is impossible to use to attract wealth .

5 linked coins are a symbol of the arrival of financial flows from the four compass directions and their accumulation in the center. Feng Shui recommends using this bundle for trade workers.

6 linked coins are symbols of attracting heavenly luck. This talisman is recommended to be placed in the northwest, in the mentors’ zone, to attract good luck and necessary help.

7 linked coins , as well as 4, do not use as a talisman to attract monetary energy, but this bundle is used to strengthen the Flying Stars of the Metal element or weaken the unfavorable Flying Stars of the Earth element.

8 linked coins bear the symbolism of the flow of wealth from all eight compass directions, that is, from everywhere. The same power will be possessed by an amulet, in which the 9th coin will be located in the center of the bundle, symbolizing the center of accumulation of wealth.

9 linked coins symbolize the integrity and completeness of the universe. It is believed that the owner of such an amulet will be patronized by 9 Chinese emperors of the Qin dynasty, who will bring material prosperity to 9 generations of the family. However, it will work effectively only if you collect the originals of ancient Chinese coins in this bundle. A bunch of 9 coins is placed in different zones: to enhance the energy of wealth – in the South-East zone, to attract help and the right people – in the North-West, to receive financial support from 9 emperors, they hang it on the back of a working chair.This amulet will also work effectively to attract wealth when worn with a red thread around your neck.

Ornamental sword , knitted of coins, is considered a good defense against unfavorable Sha Qi. The most effective sword is considered to be 108 coins. It can be used in business to defend against competitors and precisely in those types of businesses where there is a fierce struggle for spheres of influence. They place it behind their backs with the tip down. In a position in front of him, he can harm the owner, directing his power against him.It is also used to neutralize the unfavorable flying stars of feng shui 2 and 5.

Feng Shui masters prefer to use authentic, ancient coins in circulation, believing that they work more efficiently, carrying the energy of prosperity and wealth. But it is almost impossible to find such coins now, so we must remember that even using modern copies, it is important exactly what forces and energies you endow these talismans with, resorting to their help.

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Chinese coins and their use.Articles of the company “ZnakMaster”

Coins were usually made of copper.
The two sides of the coins are a symbol and symbolize their specific type of energy.
From the side of the Yang energy, there is an image in the form of four hieroglyphs on a coin, in which the dynasty of the coin is indicated.
On the Yin side there is an image in the form of two characters.
Also, the motto of the ruler could be indicated on it. This depended on the emperor under whom it was minted.
By combining these energies, Chinese coins attract wealth and good fortune.
If the ancient coins are laid out in a circle, and one in the center, then you can thus activate the source of well-being and integrity.
There are many ways coins can be used, in some situations coin talismans are worn on the body. These are coins-amulets, which depict a dragon and a phoenix.
These talismans attract good luck, and are also protection from the dark forces.
It is also believed that the beginning of the history of the emergence of a talisman from Chinese coins was almost immediately, as soon as they ceased to be in circulation.
Chinese coins are useful both singly and in combination with other coins.
Linked coins are used for different purposes, In the form of a decorative sword, the linked coins will protect their owner.
The number of coins to create a sword may be different, but experts advise to create it from 108 coins.
Family harmony can be improved by putting two coins under the pillow.
Coins will protect marriage, as well as married people from misunderstandings, strife and quarrels.
Chinese coins will help to find family well-being, harmony and tranquility, attracting positive energy to the family.
Chinese coins are considered a very powerful talisman. They are capable of attracting prosperity and wealth.
If you have a business, you can place one or a couple of coins on the office door. Coins not only make people happy, but they also attract and hold money.

To attract money to your business, you need to place it in places that can bring profit.
If you make money with your computer, you need to hang some coins on the monitor. If there is no specific item with which you want to get income, then it is recommended to put coins in your wallet.
Coins can also be placed under the rug near the front door, or attached to a document folder.
It even happens that these coins are put into a mortar with cement during construction, thereby laying the welfare of the future owners of the house.
Placing a coin is also necessary in a special way, the side with the image of four hieroglyphs should be at the top.
It is believed that an amulet made from several coins is much more effective than using one coin.
Red ribbon or thread is mainly used for tying coins.
Red is considered a symbol of good luck and is therefore recommended for use in all areas.
When buying coins for yourself, you do not have to look for real coins from the imperial times.
For the amulet, the authenticity of the coins does not matter. Although there are such opinions, but without evidence.
If you tie two coins with a red ribbon or thread, it will be a symbol of the accumulation of money,
In modern times, such coins are used mainly by businessmen and business people.
It is useful to wear a couple of coins as an amulet, this will protect against evil spirits and forces.
Three coins tied with a red thread symbolize the unity of man with heaven and earth.
Three coins are tied at the same time to attract wealth. as three sources – earned, arrived and unexpected wealth.
An amulet of four linked coins will not be useful, it may even be harmful.
Three or five coins are a symbol of the flow of funds, such a talisman is recommended to be worn by people involved in trade.
Heavenly luck is symbolized by six coins tied together. Such a talisman is used to attract helpers and mentors.
Seven coins, as well as four, are not recommended for use as an amulet.
A bunch of eight coins is a symbol of wealth from all sides. A ninth coin is added to this talisman to charge financial flows in the center.
The linked nine pieces of coins are considered a symbol of the integrity and completeness of the whole world.
To create a nine-coin amulet, the coins must be genuine, otherwise the amulet will not work.
This amulet is recommended to be placed on the back of a chair at the workplace. Thus, you will be supported by all emperors. There is also an opinion that such an amulet can immediately bring wealth to nine generations of a family. Of all the amulets, this one is considered the most powerful.
When choosing an amulet for yourself, you need to use it both at home and carry it with you, so money will find you on its own.

Photos taken from the site – www.liveinternet.ru

how to choose an amulet to attract money

What kind of person does not want to be happy and rich? The question is clearly rhetorical.However, firstly, not everyone has the same prerequisites, and secondly, for some reason, the capricious Fortune adores some, and openly neglects others.

You need to learn: correctly selected and charged talismans attract money and luck, regardless of estates, religions, races, gender and other affiliation. But they work much more efficiently if their owner sincerely believes in the miraculous properties of jewelry, objects, symbols and other objects that can act as amulets.

Silver pendant-amulet “Money”. Collection CHARM Sunlight

Classification of talismans and amulets

All amulets and talismans for attracting luck and money can be roughly divided into four broad groups. Let’s consider each of them separately.

Purchased

Amulets and talismans can be bought in the store. In this case, you need to take into account both your parameters (zodiac sign, gender, age, energy, etc.), and what you expect from the talisman.It can be a piece of jewelry, a figurine, clothing or an accessory with embroidery in the form of sacred symbols, and so on.

Found

Experienced astrologers and magicians know that a person can find his talisman anywhere: it can be a sea pebble, a coin, a leaf of a four-leaf clover. It is impossible to be mistaken here: you will feel a kind of kinship with this object and the inner warmth emanating from it.

Hand-made

A person who does not even have magical abilities can make a happy amulet with his own hands: melt from wax, sew, weave from silver wire – the choice is endless.Such a talisman can be made for yourself or a loved one: the main thing is with good intentions.

Donated

Such amulets should be treated with great care. On the one hand, if a talisman or amulet is made / presented by a loved one, it is already endowed with positive sacred energy. On the other hand, a secret ill-wisher can give such a thing. And if a knowledgeable dark sorcerer has worked on it, the little thing can be charged for failure and illness.

Any thing you love, preferably worn near the body or coming into frequent contact with it, can become a powerful talisman.It is already saturated with your energy, therefore, you do not need to be especially sophisticated in cleaning and tuning. It is enough to take the little thing in your hand and say: “You protect me, you attract good luck, you help me in everything.”

Powerful talismans for good luck

Good luck is something fleeting, one-time, which must be caught by the tail at a turning point. But to some lucky ones, luck goes by itself, without much effort, while others are simply fatally unlucky.

A talisman for good luck in all matters is able to turn the tide of events and draw the attention of Fortune to its bearer.A person who owns such an amulet will pull out a lucky ticket during the exam, fill an attractive vacancy, win the lottery, and receive a tender for which other applicants are unsuccessfully fighting. Naturally, there is no 100% guarantee, but the chances of a successful coincidence of circumstances increase significantly.

Further – a description of the most powerful magical amulets for great luck and good luck.

Horseshoe

Perhaps the most famous symbol of good luck in Slavic culture is the horseshoe.Since ancient times, our ancestors hung horseshoes over doors and buried them under thresholds. Now this custom has sunk into oblivion, but the horseshoe has not lost its deep sacred meaning and powerful energy. Trinkets, earrings or pendants in the shape of horseshoes can be excellent talismans for representatives of all signs of the zodiac, especially for Sagittarius.

Israeli thread

Externally, it is a regular red woolen thread that is tied around the left wrist. Even newborns can do this.Real Threads of Fortune, charged at Rachel’s tomb, are sold in Israel, near the Western Wall. However, a knowledgeable esotericist can charge any thread in this way.

Hand of Luck, Hamsa, Hand of Miriam or Hand of Fatima

Hand of Fatima is the most ancient and strong amulet for good luck, known in many cultures, up to the ancient Egyptians, Phoenicians and Sumerians. A stylized palm can be decorated with the image of an eye (for Muslims) or the Star of David or the He symbol (for Jews).It can exist in the form of decoration, embroidery, or even a tattoo.

Runic symbols

Futhark runes are filled with the deepest sacred meaning, and each has its own purpose. The most powerful runes of luck are Fehu (material component), Vuno (optimism), Ansuz (success in business), Soulu (fulfillment of desires). Runes can be used both individually and combinatorially.

Slavic talismans

The ancient Slavs sacredly believed in the miraculous power of all kinds of amulets, honored their ancestors and spiritualized the forces of nature.Their sacred knowledge was truly amazing, so traditional Slavic amulets (Kolovrat, Alatyr, Velesovik, all solar symbols) still work. The greatest strength is given to them by silver, wood, natural fibers (especially wool and red flax).

Four-leaf clover

Here is another universal amulet that brings good luck in everything. Finding a four-leaf clover in nature is always a good omen. The Druids and ancestors of the modern Irish sacredly believed in this, and our ancestors revered him as a symbol of eternal and mutual love.Today, the four-leaf clover is considered a symbol of good luck all over the world and a powerful talisman against all evils.

Rabbit’s foot

We inherited this amulet of natural origin from the proud Indians, but there are also analogues in Eastern cultures. The hind leg of the rabbit has the greatest strength. In the classic version, it should be worn around the neck, but this is not very comfortable, given that it is advisable not to show the talisman to strangers. So it’s best to put your lucky paw in your pocket or bag.

Japanese amulet for good luck

The original name of this talisman is Omamori. It is a linen embroidered bag, where you should put notes with your wishes addressed to the gods. Omamori can be carried or hung at home, in the car, near the workplace.

Dreamcatcher

Another amulet we inherited from the Indians. Suspended above the bed, the Dreamcatcher drives away bad dreams and evil spirits, but does not interfere with good astral entities.

Tibetan amulet of Great Luck

This amulet is able to attract good luck to the owner in business, financial transactions and personal relationships. Concurrently, he endows him with good health and heroic fortitude.

Talismans of luck work only in a positive way. That is, you just need to wish well for yourself or the addressee of the talisman gift. If you ask him for happiness to the detriment of someone (turn away, Fortune, from my enemy, and turn to me), you can awaken formidable forces that can punish the evil one.

Money amulet: how to choose a talisman of wealth

There is never a lot of money, no matter how many there are. But one businessman gets the most hopeless deals, and the other burns out where nothing portends collapse. Hence, the second is time to acquire patronage from above.

An effective money talisman looks different, from overwhelming luxury to gray invisibility. It can be either a gold statuette with precious stones, or a simple symbol inscribed on paper.

In this case, it is important to correctly activate money amulets and talismans so that they acquire energy that is adequate to the external performance and the aspirations of the owner. Now it is difficult to find a master who can properly charge the talisman, so it is better to do it yourself: there will definitely be no harm from this. This can be done as follows:

  • Impregnate the amulet with the power of four elements. To do this, it is enough to alternately sprinkle the amulet with water, hold it over the fire, wave it in the air, sprinkle it with earth.Here you need to observe the measure so as not to damage the talisman.
  • Pronounce a conspiracy. It can be the simplest, for example: “A penny to a penny, a penny to a penny, a fifty to fifty rubles, a ruble to a ruble, a gold coin to a chervonets, all to the court.”
  • It is holy to believe in the power of a talisman. You need to hold the amulet in your hand and saturate it with thoughts of luck and material well-being.

A correctly activated money talisman helps with money and attracts material wealth, but sometimes it also has wider applications.For example, the aforementioned Tibetan amulet of Great Luck, most of the Chinese talismans or the Slavic Alatyr attract luck in all directions: from love to financial affairs.

Chinese talismans

The ancient Chinese were great traditionalists and pragmatists, who prioritized the material component of success. That is why almost all Chinese talismans and amulets are for wealth, which was inextricably associated with the inhabitants of the Celestial Empire with personal happiness and good luck.

Among the most famous are:

  • Hieroglyph Fu. It can exist as a chasing, pendant, or other decoration. But you can just draw it on paper and hang it in your home or work.
  • Golden garlic. Talismans and charms for attracting money in the form of this vegetable are very popular in the Celestial Empire. Golden Garlic helps keep you in constant cash flow while warding off the spirits of bad luck.
  • Arawana fish. A golden fish lying on coins brings wealth and good luck to the house.
  • God Hotei. The good-natured glutton god with a bag and a staff is an excellent talisman that contributes to material well-being.
  • Three-legged toad. A solid plump amphibian is depicted sitting on coins with a pearl in its mouth.

Photo of the money amulet “God Hotei”

And bamboo, mandarin ducks, carp, oranges, swallows and others like them – all this, according to the Chinese, can bring prosperity and good luck to the house. But if you furnish the living space clearly according to the recommendations of Feng Shui, no additional amulets will be required.There is no such possibility – it is enough to put a pot with a “money tree” and / or an aquarium with goldfish.

Runic symbols and combinations

Each rune carries a complex energy and several basic sacred meanings. The main money rune is Fehu. It can work effectively both independently and in tandem with Otala, which stabilizes the flow of funds and allows opening new sources of enrichment.

Runic staves also work effectively, that is, complex combinations of several runes.The simplest and most famous becoming is the Money Vortex, consisting of four Fehu.

The combinations “Cash flow” and “Fast money” are very interesting, but without deep knowledge of the futark it is problematic to compose them on your own. However, the style can be simply copied onto paper, thinking about material well-being, and then the media can be burned.

Photo of a talisman for good luck and money from runic symbols

Money

One of the most powerful amulets that attract money – they themselves, and in various forms.These can be:

  • Notes folded in a special way. Example – Lucky Dollar. It can be represented as a rare bill (for example, a two-dollar bill), or a regular one folded in a triangle. Carry a lucky dollar in a purse or wallet.
  • Single coins. The easiest way: you need to take a silver coin and put it in the water so that the moon is reflected in it. As soon as the reflection has appeared, it is necessary to say: “As the water is filled with moonlight, so my life is replenished with luck and wealth.”The coin remains in the water until the morning, and then transferred to the wallet. Coins issued in the year of birth of the owner of the amulet acquire special power.
  • Groups of coins. Coins can be drilled and tied with a red ribbon or put in a special bag. By the way, a good old piggy bank filled with trifles can become an excellent talisman.

Precious or semi-precious stone is one of the most powerful talismans for attracting income. Topaz, chrysoprase, chrysolite, carnelian, tourmaline, pomegranate and other minerals have the corresponding energy.It is extremely important to select a stone in accordance with the date of birth and energy of the owner.

An effective talisman for happiness: buy or make yourself?

What is personal happiness, everyone decides for himself: there are no universal formulas here. Therefore, it is better to make amulets of happiness yourself or accept as a gift from sincerely loving people.

The most versatile and effective are:

  • Burdock of Happiness. This is one of the most famous Slavic amulets, amulets, which visually represents a rhombus with square teeth.The value of the charm Burdock of Happiness is surprisingly multifaceted: it gives good luck, financial well-being, respect of others and the best human qualities.
  • Talisman “Knot of Happiness”. Many lucky knots are known, but the most effective of them is the Tibetan symbol of infinity, Srivatsa. It can be made from wire or simply painted and hung on the wall.
  • Charm Lucky. In the classic version, Lucky is a handmade soft doll in Russian style.It is sewn from colored patches, stuffed with cotton wool, decorated with beads, coins, braid. An obligatory element is a long light blond braid.

Silver pendant with onyx “Burdock of Happiness” (go to the SUNLIGHT catalog)

Any trinket can be saturated with cosmic energy and attract happiness to its owner exactly in the format he sees it. To do this, it is enough to believe in the power of the amulet, often hold the talisman in your hands and turn to it with clearly formulated requests.

15.12.20

Chinese coins – a talisman for the mood for wealth

Chinese coins – a talisman for the mood for wealth

Ancient Chinese coins have always served as a symbol of wealth and prosperity. The circle of the coin symbolizes the power of Heaven, and the square hole in the center represents the power of the Earth. The obverse and reverse sides of the coin indicate masculine and feminine principles. Thanks to the merger in the Chinese talisman of Earth and Heaven, masculine and feminine, the monetary energy of Qi is activated, which brings wealth and abundance.

With the help of a coin, you will lay the foundation for your future financial well-being.

1. Chinese coins are best purchased at a store. Gifts or found ones are not suitable for a talisman. You have to put in your efforts to find the right coin.

2. It is best to go shopping for a talisman on a growing moon, then all your efforts will bring good luck.

3. When buying a coin, please note that it must be made of metal – brass or bronze.Plastic counterparts will not be able to accumulate monetary energy. Therefore, it is better not to skimp on your talisman, it will pay back all your expenses hundreds of times.

4. You can limit yourself to the purchase of one coin or purchase several at once. It’s up to you to decide. But it is believed that a talisman from a bunch of coins is much more effective, since it carries more monetary energy. Usually, coins are tied with a red or gold ribbon, which also serves as a symbol of wealth. The most powerful money talisman is a bundle of nine coins.It brings together the energy of man, heaven, earth, eternity and the universe. Therefore, the owner of such a talisman will always be surrounded by the energy of wealth, misfortune and failure will bypass him.

5. After the purchase, the coins must be cleared of the accumulated energy by immersing them in a glass of salt water.

6. Then the coins should be given magical power. To do this, wait until the full moon. This is the time when you can charge the talisman with maximum power. Take a vessel with water and throw coins into it, saying: “As the vessel is full of water, so let no money be transferred in my wallet.May gold, silver, abundance, financial assistance be with me. ” Now remove the coins from the vessel and spray the water from the vessel on your wallet, in the corners of the house and on the threshold.

7. A talisman of one or two coins is best to carry with you in your wallet. It should be in a separate pocket so you don’t touch it. Bragging or showing coins to strangers is not worth it. So you uselessly waste the energy of the talisman.

A bunch of three, five, six or nine coins is best placed in the southeast corner of the house.

I’m rich!

I’m rich !!

I’m rich !!!

My thoughts are pure and clear !!!

I am responsible for my thoughts!

My thoughts lead me to wealth !!!

I can afford whatever I want !!!

The universe is looking after me.

All the best in this world is for me.

This text is an introductory fragment.

Continuation for liters

90,000 Chinese Feng Shui coins.Amulets in the form of coins. Rituals and conspiracies for the

coin

One of the most compact types of amulets are amulets and talismans in the form of coins. Such a talisman is very convenient to carry with you.

Moreover, you can make a piece of jewelry that will always accompany you, which means you will be protected all the time. In addition, amulets in the form of coins are not difficult to make yourself.

Why were coin-shaped amulets most often made?

I must say that in themselves, ancient coins made of gold and silver are talismans that attract good luck.Those who are very gambling in casinos or cards can tell about this. For a long time, professional gamblers have chosen some coin for good luck in such games. If you also want to get such a coin, then the easiest way to find it will be in the numismatic markets, they are sold by the people who collect them. If you choose a simple design for such an amulet, then you can easily cope with its manufacture at home.

You can choose a coin with an image of an eagle as a talisman, for example.The eagle has long been a symbol of good luck and prosperity, it is nothing more than a symbol of money. This is one of the reasons why such a symbol adorned Russian coins. It was believed that if you cut out the profile of an eagle with two heads from such a coin, it would be an even stronger talisman for attracting money.

People who professionally gambled put special cufflinks on antique silver or gold coins, this was also a way to enhance the effect of the talisman.

The easiest lucky charm from the

coin

The easiest way to make a lucky charm out of a coin is to drill a hole in it, or to solder a clasp into which a chain can be threaded.So the amulet will always be around your neck in the form of a necklace or in the form of a bracelet.

Professional gamblers considered it especially fashionable to pin their talisman of happiness to the lapel of the komzol, thus, the amulet served as a brooch-coin.

You can also drill two holes in a coin, so you can get a button that will simultaneously serve as an amulet for you.

Indiscriminate coin, how to make a strong talisman for money.

SHOCK! THESE AMULETS CAN DO EVERYTHING!

Amulet Coin of Happiness (The Cult)

Amulet from a coin with your own hands

Amulet Coins of Happiness (The Cult)

Amulet for luck and wealth

Coins amulets from Siberian monks

Amulet

the most irreplaceable coin

money amulet

How to make an amulet for good luck? – All will be kind – Issue 603 – 20.05.15

Coin talisman that will help you win at the races.

Ladies from high society also had a passion for gambling. And, of course, they also believed that the right talisman would also bring them good luck in this event. To do this, they specially ordered a pendant in the form of a coin from a jeweler, wore it on the neck closer to the left side, that is, to the heart.

Most often, in men, but sometimes in women, one could find a talisman in the form of a signet on a finger.The seal could look like a coin. Often, jewelers received an order for a seal with an image of the king, it was believed that this also attracts good luck in money and fate.

Unchanging coin, like an amulet

A loose bill or coin can be a very simple but effective way to attract money into your life. To do this, you just need to choose your favorite type of bill or coin, carry it in your wallet and do not change it under any circumstances.Experts say that the larger the bill that is stored in your wallet, the more money will be attracted into your life.

It is desirable that such a bill or coin carry some symbolic meaning for you. Well, for example, it can be a bill from your first patch, or the first profit from some big business, from the start of a business, or maybe this is from the first salary that your husband brought home.

But the most important rule of this talisman is not to exchange this money for everyday expenses, otherwise, in this way, you will deprive your life of a magical monetary action.

Money Rune

If you have chosen a coin because it is convenient, then a money rune can also suit you as a money talisman, this rune is called Feu. This amulet, by the way, has one more meaning. In addition to the fact that it will attract monetary energy into your life, it will also protect you from unnecessary waste. It is very good to carry such an amulet with people who know that they are able to spend money where it was possible to save it, that is, they are prone to extravagance.

If the money rune is with you all the time, then after a while you will definitely notice that your capital has begun to increase. Perhaps you will catch yourself on what you feel, where and in what places you can make more money. That is, such a talisman will help expand your monetary horizons.

In fact, in order for this banknote to start working for you, it is not at all necessary to carry the rune with you in your wallet. You can put this simple sign in the form of three Latin Fs on your wallet, or somewhere else, so that this sign will accompany you all the time.

When you put this sign on a wallet or, for example, on the back of a computer, it is not at all necessary to utter a certain conspiracy. It is enough to turn to the amulet in your own words and ask him for help, while the sign must be stroked.

Money bag with a coin

Another type of money talisman with a coin, which is very easy to make at home with your own hands. You can prepare it by following simple rules:

  • You will need a small piece of natural fabric, you need to sew a bag from it.
  • You will need coins of different denominations, different in color and size, but keep in mind that these must be coins that are currently in circulation, and that go exactly in the territory where you live. That is, it should be a currency in which it will be beneficial for you to get additional profit.
  • You will also need natural eucalyptus oil.

Cooking begins with the fact that you will need to grease each coin with eucalyptus oil, when you do this, then sentence the words: “A penny to a penny, a heel to a penny, half a ruble to a half ruble, a ruble to a ruble, a ruble to a ruble, that’s all to our house “.

Money and principles are incompatible things.

When you have finished greasing all the coins with eucalyptus oil, put them in a pouch and tie it neatly with string. Such a money bag must be removed from a secret place, where it will not be accessible to strangers. The bag should be there all the time, and you thank it from time to time for attracting material goods to your home. Such money talismans are easy to make with your own hands. Toads are also symbols of wealth; their figurines can also be placed in the house.Figurines of toads are sold with a coin in their mouths, this is also a very good money talisman.

is a powerful talisman that combines the two principles of Yin and Yang, characterizing the eternal unity of the Earth and Heaven. The coins are round in shape with a square hole, the circle symbolizes the Heaven, and the square symbolizes the Earth. Such a combination of energies in one talisman harmoniously affects a person’s life, attracts good luck, prosperity, wealth. On both sides of the coin, a different number of hieroglyphs are depicted.The side with 4 characters represents Yang energy, and the side with two characters represents Yin.

In China, it is believed that coins made in antiquity during the times of powerful emperors, during the period of prosperity of the people, have special power, since they keep the imprint of the ancient energy of Qi and that glorious time. The demand for such coins is very high, and their value is often enormous. But as described above, the shape of the coin matters, so you can easily get by with copies of mascot coins even from souvenir shops, you just have to pay attention to the number of coins and the hieroglyphs depicted on them.

Chinese coins as a talisman
are used in different spheres of life, they are worn in wallets to attract finances, worn as amulets around the neck, to protect against negative energy. Other Feng Shui talismans may be depicted on coins
, for example, this combination of talismans and coins enhances their effect.

It is considered favorable to use not one coin, but several. The coins are tied with red or gold braid. More often, you can find coins tied with a red braid, since red in China is the color of luck, but more appropriate from the point of view of Feng Shui is the golden color, which personifies Metal, and enhances the action of the energy of the Earth, and red, in turn, is the color Fire, fire is known to destroy metal.

To protect against the negative energy of Sha, use coins connected by a thread into a sword
. When buying such a talisman, make sure that there are 108 coins in it, this number is considered the most powerful.

To attract monetary energy, coins should be used directly where money is or is earned. At the workplace, under the rug at the entrance to the office, on the doorknob of the office or office, or even simply by hanging a bunch of coins over the door.Put and don’t take coins out of your wallet, pair them with money rugs. Coins are also put in the place where you keep money or securities or even jewelry. To provide protection for the whole house, coins are often embedded in the walls during construction. Everything related to money, its earnings, preservation and accumulation, you can use everywhere Chinese Feng Shui coins
. It is worth noting that the coins must be tied in such a way that the prominent side is the Yang side.
.

The number of Chinese coins and their meaning

Two Chinese coins
, a powerful talisman for attracting, accumulating and preserving wealth. This version of the talisman can be worn as an amulet; its action also helps in protecting against negative energy.

Three coins
, symbolize the three parts of prosperity – money earned in everyday life, spontaneous wealth (inheritance, gift) and money earned outside the box, in addition to your main job.

Five Chinese coins,
symbolize the influx of well-being from all sides and its accumulation in the center. Such a combination is often used by commercial enterprises, for which it is important to work and expand their cooperation with all parts of the world. The talisman is made in the form of a disc, with five coins, and a square hole in the middle, or an ordinary bundle in a row. Such a talisman works great if it is used in the interior design of the facade of a store or company.

Bundle of six coins
is used most often in the north-western sector, thereby attracting a strong patron or people who can help in difficult times.Six coins represent heavenly luck, help from above.

Eight coins of Feng Shui
means an influx of wealth and prosperity from absolutely all compass sides of Ba-Gua. They can be connected in a ribbon of eight coins, or eight coins in a circle with a ninth in the center.

Nine Chinese coins,
carry the meaning of the completeness of the universe. The strongest is considered to be a combination of genuine coins made during the reign of the Qin emperors. Each coin bears the name of one of the emperors.Nowadays it is very difficult to assemble such a collection; it is easier to use copies. Such a bundle of coins is widely used as a protective talisman and as a talisman for attracting wealth. In China, 9 coins can be seen as a necklace. Feng Shui masters advise placing 9 coins in the wealth sector. Bundles of coins are also very strong, in which there is at least one coin with the name of the emperor.

Chinese Feng Shui coins
, a universal talisman, carry them always with you, to important meetings or just every day, fill your daily life with auspicious Feng Shui.

Kiryanova Olga Viktorovna

Specialist in working with amulets and charms. A connoisseur of ancient Slavic symbols. Has extensive experience in the selection of individual amulets. He independently charges amulets and consults the readers of our resource for free.

Articles written

Russian coin with a hole is used as a talisman to attract money, increase wealth, improve financial condition. This is a powerful amulet that allows you to activate cash flows, direct them to a specific place.Acts like a magnet. A coin of any denomination is used, it is chosen independently. Such coins should be preserved and protected.

However, there are special lucky Russian coins of a certain year of issue, which open cash flows without any magical manipulation.

Below is a photo of old coins.


History

The coin has been used as a talisman since time immemorial. Amulets were held by kings, princes, nobles, representatives of the poor kept special coins.Money became talismans after a successful auction, a successful deal. Almost all the metal money that was issued first became talismans. Especially silver coins, since since ancient times silver has been considered a protection from evil forces and attracted good luck.

Talismans of the imperial category, made from real royal coins, have special power, since such amulets have a powerful energy charge. They stayed in the treasury of the ruler, the richest man in the state, absorbed the enrichment program.Once in the hands of any person, they will work to enrich him, increase his financial wealth.

Amulets made in the form of a coin with a hole appeared somewhat later. Such a talisman was hung around the neck and was always carried with you. Or thrown into a bag of money, kept for years. The hole symbolizes the open cash flow. It was believed that if you put such a coin in a separate pocket of your wallet, it will attract money that will stay in another, free section of the wallet.

An unchanging coin as an amulet should be special. So, in Russia, the strongest talisman is metal money, issued in 1923. It depicts the rising sun, the sower. With this design, money was issued later – 1975, 1982, 2001. However, in 1923 there was economic growth in the country, so any coin carries positive energy, is programmed to increase prosperity.

Different countries have their own lucky talismans.The indispensable nanbu coin is a money amulet, which is the strongest in China. The talisman is considered a coin conditionally. This amulet was created in China BC. It depicted the castle of the Ming dynasty. The attribute was used to bind manuscripts, where monetary transactions were displayed. This coin is shown on the left in the photo.

Later, another talisman appeared in China, attracting wealth, in the form of a coin with a square hole in the center.

In addition, in the USA, for example, some future millionaires leave their first earned dollar as a talisman.However, few people believe in the magic power of the dollar-coin. By the way, silver was also used to make coins earlier in the USA.

Talisman value

Money loves money! Absolutely everyone is familiar with this statement. However, rich people have large sums in their hands, the poor are content with little. Experts explain this fact by the formation of the correct attitude towards money.

Unsuccessful people do not believe in receiving a large sum, put up a barrier in advance, prevent money from being attracted.Rich people are aimed at increasing prosperity, mentally opening up a free path for the receipt of finance. Psychology of the rich – how much money you don’t give, it’s still not enough. Poor people are taught to be content with little.

Proceeding from this, the talismans themselves from coins, which everyone selects for himself, work in different ways.

Everyone can wear a coin for good luck as a talisman. But in order for the amulet to work as much as possible, certain conditions must be met:

  • Choose a special coin that is associated with a successful transaction, the first salary or has a history – it was in the royal treasury, in the hands of a rich man, was issued during a period of economic growth in the country.
  • Be mentally ready to increase financial income, drop barriers, clearly imagine how much money should be received during the month. See this process figuratively.
  • The talisman, like an unchangeable coin, should be separate from other money, not in contact with them. The irredeemable ruble is often used as a talisman.
  • It is believed that with a hole, the amulet acts faster, since the coin activates the cash flow. A deformed talisman is also suitable – an unchangeable coin with damage, distorted shape.

The monetary unit of each country has its own background associated with a particular people. Therefore, to increase wealth, you should use the currency of your country as a talisman. In this case, it is a Russian irreplaceable coin.

Mascot Secrets

A person who knows how to handle such an amulet can attract wealth with the help of a strong amulet. It should be kept secret, not shown to others, not allowed to be seen, not passed on to others.If the talisman was lost, you should immediately speak to another for luck in financial matters.

On the coin, which is sewn into the hem of the clothes, a special conspiracy is read, a ritual is performed. Magical manipulations are performed with the selected item before placing the amulet in the wallet. Periodically, you should take out the talisman, thank for the work, and energize.

Reviews of the amulet for money are ambiguous, everyone has a different effect. It is unlikely that wealth will come crashing down out of nowhere.A person must continue to work, look for new opportunities. But with the amulet, the flow of money will not stop. As a person gets used to money, income will gradually increase.

Initially, you should thank the talisman for every little thing that fell into your wallet, do not stop believing in success.

How to make a talisman with your own hands

You can make an amulet from a non-exchangeable coin of any denomination. If not special, you should choose it from a handful of little things.They throw on the table all the coins that were in the wallet, carefully look at them. Take the one on which the gaze lingered.

The coin amulet for luck can be with or without a hole of any shape. How to make an amulet out of ordinary money yourself, there are many magical rituals. If you are not confident in your abilities, it is better to entrust the case to a specialist. The right attitude, confidence in achieving the goal, visualization of the process are important.

A hole in the metal can be made with a hot nail, and so that the coin does not lose its aesthetic appearance, it is better to make a hole on the side.You can wrap the talisman for good luck, happiness in green fabric, or thread a silk thread through the hole. Green helps to activate monetary energy.

Copecks from the royal treasury are kept unchanged. To make the amulet work, you should not carry out preliminary cleaning, there is no need to carry out a magic ritual. It needs to be brought to your lips, whispering the words: “As you enriched the king, so you will be! May it be so!”

Rituals and conspiracies on the coin

Spells, money conspiracies for amulets are read during the growing moon or at full moon.There should be no other people in the room. Or choose a time when everyone will sleep. The ritual requires a strong concentration of will, attention, its interruption is not allowed.

In order for the amulet to start acting faster, it is necessary during the period of the ceremony to use other symbols to activate cash flows. The most powerful rituals for attracting money, ceremonies, are performed with church wax candles; as an amulet, you can use the coin that you received for change when buying magical attributes.

Cover the table with a green tablecloth or use a piece of cloth to fit the size of the napkin. They put a candle in the center, light it. They put the chosen coin on the fabric, lay laurel leaves around it. Candles are led over the amulet, the conspiracy is read:

As you cannot collect pebbles at the bottom of the sea,

How the water in the river cannot be stopped;

How not to forbid a fire to burn,

So you, coin, will pull gold, silver to you,

Accounts do not know, enrich me.

Money will follow you into your wallet,

They will flow like clockwork.

Money will love me, it will not go to anyone else.

So be it! ”

Put the charmed coin into the wallet, preferably a new one. Laurel leaves are allowed to flow through the water in the river, it is allowed the next day.

The effect of the talisman will begin to be felt in the coming days, significant financial changes will take place within a month.

Even working tirelessly, with full dedication, it is not always possible to achieve the desired financial well-being. After all, it is not enough to earn money, you need to properly dispose of it and be able to save and increase. How can this be achieved without delving too deeply into the study of the basics of economy?

Everything is quite simple, you can try to use magic to prepare on the energetic level the coming into your life of such a desired wealth. Then the wallet will always have a sufficient supply of funds, and its owner has unlimited possibilities.

Secrets of the irreplaceable talisman

The very first way that comes to mind when thinking about attracting money is to make an amulet that is stored in your wallet and is called “fiat coin”.

What is a non-exchangeable coin? It is a powerful talisman that:

  • charged with increasing income;
  • is constantly in the owner’s wallet, but separately from the rest of the money, without even touching them;
  • is never exchanged, transferred or given in any way

An unchangeable coin is both an iron coin and a paper note of absolutely any denomination.Esotericists warn that the higher the face value of the lucky money, the faster and more stable the enrichment will take place. However, to each his own. And, if you are irresistibly drawn to an old bent 1 ruble coin, then he will be an ideal watchdog and an increase in your income.

Moreover, coins with defects, uneven, with holes, on the contrary, are considered the most powerful amulets for money. In a word, listen to yourself, your intuition, sensations, choosing this or that money, from which you have to make an unchangeable one.There should be some connection between you, which you will definitely feel.

Interesting facts

Each nation has its own well-established beliefs about what an irredeemable coin should be. So in the United States, a 1 dollar bill, which was received by a person from his first self-earned salary, is considered a powerful money talisman. In China, these are coins with a square hole in the middle, strung on a red ribbon.

In Russia, the talisman that attracts money is a ducat issued in 1923 with a sower depicted on it against the background of the rising sun.Money with a similar design was issued in other years 1975-1976, 1982, 2001. By an interesting coincidence, it was at this time that stable economic growth was observed in the country, and such an irreplaceable coin in the wallet promises constant income.

However, if the search for the cherished chervonets did not lead to anything, an irredeemable coin will be obtained from absolutely any banknote or small coin. The main condition for this transformation will be that only a pleasant experience is associated with the money, which is to be transformed into a talisman.

It is desirable that it was money from the first salary at a new job or a reward for a new project. Such a bill or coin should be special, significant for its owner. Then the financial benefits of it will be tangible and significant, with a long-term temporary effect.

3 ways to make a non-exchangeable coin yourself

If the question of what constitutes an irreplaceable coin, how to make a talisman to attract money, you are really interested in, then read on.

Method No. 1

So, for a miraculous transformation into a magical one, an ordinary ruble is also suitable. On the growing moon, we carefully drip wax from a green candle onto the surface of the ruble, covering it with a kind of wax layer. After that, you need to hold the ruble in your hand and mentally refer to it, saying to yourself:

“I will not change you, I will not change you. Fill my pockets, bring good luck! ”

Such an irreplaceable coin is stored in the wallet.It cannot be exchanged and given away.

Method No. 2

Another rite of converting an ordinary coin or bill into an irredeemable one is performed on the full moon. For this ritual, you will need the actual money and the mirror. At midnight, a mirror is placed on the window, facing the street. The money is put in a strip of moonlight between the window glass and the mirror, so that the mirror must have a reflection of the banknote. Then a conspiracy is pronounced as follows:

“Mother Moon! Your treasury is my treasury, money for money! “

The coin must be left to lie on the windowsill until morning. Then it is stored in the wallet, bringing tangible financial benefits.

Method No. 3

In an interesting way, they discover their “personalized” bill, which can later be made irredeemable. The secret is simple – among the domestic money that falls into your hands, you need to find a bill where on the front side the first 2 letters of the number coincide with your initials. The denomination in this case does not matter.

A personalized unchangeable coin in a wallet must be placed in a separate section. This will prevent accidental waste or loss.

Talisman Bag for attracting money

In addition to the non-exchangeable coin, as well as in parallel with it, you can make other money talismans to improve your financial condition.

One of them is making a money bag with your own hands, attracting money to its owner. To do this, you need to prepare the actual bag, which can be sewn from natural dense fabric.

Then you need to collect coins of various denominations, which are in use in the place where you live, and natural eucalyptus oil. The ritual consists in oiling each individual coin and putting it in a bag. When it is full, it is tied up and put away in a secret place, preferably located on the north side of the house.

Soon the talisman will start working, and prosperity will come to the house. They periodically thank the magic bag for their care, take out and count the coins, add new ones if possible.However, this must be done in the strictest secrecy from family and friends.

Even the smallest details play an important role in the home furnishings according to ancient traditions.

Chinese feng shui coins are used today not only as a room decoration, but also as a powerful talisman for wealth and prosperity.

The form of such amulets is identified with the unity of Heaven and Earth, therefore they are filled with special energy.

General Description of Chinese Coins

Feng Shui coins usually look like small rounds with a square hole in the middle.It is a geometric figure with angles that means Yin energy, i.e. The earth, while the circle is associated with the celestial flow of Yang.

At the same time, according to Feng Shui, on each side there are references to one of two types of energy. Thanks to this balance of power, Feng Shui coins, photos of which are so often found on the Web, bring financial success to people’s lives and harmonize the entire space around them.

Inscriptions and pictures

The active side of the coins – Yang – according to Feng Shui should always contain 4 hieroglyphs located on the cardinal points.These symbols represent the era in which the currency was made. In this way, you can easily find out during the heyday of which dynasty specific coins were issued.

As for the passive side, it contains only 2 symbols – the motto of the corresponding ruler. Coins for feng shui are made, as a rule, of ordinary copper, and they were actually used in China for exchange since the 11th century. BC.

Some feng shui coins have special meanings, different from ordinary money.In this case, we are talking about talismans with specific images or trigrams that give the coin specific meanings. So, lucky coins, which are the basis for creating neck amulets, are remembered for the images of phoenixes, dragons, as well as swords, the appearance of which should protect a person from evil.

Coins feng shui with red ribbon and thread

Coins, important in Feng Shui and tied with a red ribbon or rope, have a great effect as a home talisman or amulet for business development.This is because the bright color activates Yang energy, and the ordering of coins and tying them in knots enhances the assistance in achieving the desired.

In addition, the scarlet hue helps to destroy the perception of coins as physical bodies. You can also use gold ropes and ribbons, the main thing is to pay attention to their strength.

How to tie Feng Shui coins with red thread

In this case, it is mainly the number of coins that matters. It should be remembered that according to feng shui a bunch of metallic money consists of 5 main elements.First of all, it is the material of their creation and the symbolic wealth with which they are identified. The rest of the details are determined precisely by the connecting tape (rope): fire, strength and naturalness. The last two factors are especially active in attracting wealth to a person’s home.

Of course, there are several methods for tying Feng Shui money coins with a special knot. It symbolizes the endlessness of the resources received and lifelong abundance. Such a combination of coins helps to release Qi, but it can be problematic to create such a talisman on your own.

However, Feng Shui allows simple tying of money, since they are saturated with the energy of the owner, which means they begin to attract positive waves. It should only be borne in mind that Chinese feng shui coins need to be positioned so that the images of the dragon, tiger and other patrons are on top.

Varieties of coins in Feng Shui

Coin Mascot

The so-called fixed coin was never used as a currency in China. She has always been just an object to attract fortune.This talisman is needed by risky people who bet on the races and love the lottery.

Store a Feng Shui coin in the southeast of the apartment, near the door. It can also be worn around the neck.

Chinese coin of happiness Feng Shui

Coin of happiness in Feng Shui is used to find the second half. If there is already love in life, the talisman is suitable for maintaining a happy marriage. Depict on such a coin two dragons with a pearl or one, but with a phoenix.
It is better to carry the amulet in your pocket or purse.The Chinese Feng Shui coin of happiness can also be kept in the bedroom under the mattress.

Coin of Health

A coin for good health is quite rare and features the image of a star elder – Shou Sin. Sometimes he is painted surrounded by deer, storks, peach fruits and other symbols of great well-being.

The second side of such a talisman depicts the hieroglyph of long life and the symbol of the family – a phoenix with a dragon. The latter means that the action of the feng shui coin applies to all the close people of the owner.

Chinese currency coins

An ordinary Chinese coin is a symbol of financial luck. A feng shui coin is especially valued if it was issued from the 17th to the 20th centuries, since this is the period of the Qin dynasty.

Only coins made during the 10th emperor from this dynasty are not considered lucky. Conversely, the most popular coins as talismans are from Kang Xi and Qian Lung. You can keep these Chinese coins in a wallet, a red envelope, on a money tree.It is allowed to put them in the refrigerator and on the computer.

Talisman coins

A coin with five bats around is considered very rare. This symbol allows you to provide a person with maximum protection and support in any difficult situation.

Also interesting are the coins in the shape of a plum blossom. They have 5 petals and the same number of hieroglyphs. Accordingly, the talisman brings several factors to life at once: purity, fame, well-being, happiness, peace of mind and longevity.It is worth keeping such a Chinese coin in a safe or on your desktop.

Large Chinese Coin

A large Feng Shui coin carries the power of an immortal Taoist, if it depicts the face of Zhong Li Quan, as well as the name of one of his 8 Taoists.

In this case, the talisman provides the owner with very strong protection if carried with him or hung in an apartment in the sector of assistants.

How to use money coins

  • The so-called blade or sword of 108 Chinese coins protects its owner from unfavorable soaring stars.If a person needs harmonization of relations, it is better to hide 2 ancient coins under a pillow for the appearance of positive family energy in the house.
  • As a talisman of wealth, it is enough to use one coin in a red circle with brushes. It should be hung on the handle of the front door, but before that, you should independently tie the Chinese coin with a red thread or ribbon. Also, to attract monetary luck, you can place coins under the rug, in folders with documentation. The Yang side should always be directed upwards.But scattering coins around the house in a chaotic manner in Feng Shui is not very useful.
  • For a fundamental improvement in the material well-being of the whole family, you should lay three Chinese coins even in the foundation of the house. They can be installed in the path to the building, hidden in the walls behind a layer of plaster of the wall, or cemented in the floor. It is best to place the talisman in the north or west area of ​​the house, especially if the door is facing in that direction. Feng Shui coins work only if the building is in the personal property of a person.
  • Many are wondering where the Feng Shui jade coins should be. The traditional talisman for health, consisting of 8 monetary units and red knots, is usually placed at the head of the bedroom. You can put coins over the door to the break room or kitchen. One jade coin is allowed to be added to important documents or hidden in a notebook.

Number of coins: three or more?

Two coins

A pair of coins from China in the teachings of Feng Shui means the accumulation and preservation of money.Such a talisman will also save the owner from negative energy. It is believed that two coins symbolize the money of a mother and a son, i.e. contribute to the growth of the state.

Three coins

Feng Shui considers three coins as three parts of prosperity. This means that the owner will get finances from work, and additional sources of income, and even spontaneous monetary wealth in the form of gifts or inheritance.

The addition of a red knot in this case will emphasize the unity of heaven, earth and humanity.It is also effective to associate coins with images of emperors ruling one after another.

Five Chinese coins

Five Chinese Feng Shui coins are useful for the arrival of prosperity from all over the world at once. A disc with such monetary units is used to attract good luck in the work of various companies.

Six coins

A bundle of six coins is capable of attracting helpers. This number is associated with luck sent from above.
It is especially good to keep the amulet in the northwest sector of the house.

Eight coins

If the traditional Feng Shuitri understands coins as different sides of income, then 8 coins are perceived as talismans for the flow of wealth from all compass sides. It is good if the money is connected in a straight ribbon or forms a circle with the ninth coin in the center.

Nine coins

Nine coins in feng shui represent the entirety of the universe. At the same time, the maximum power is possessed by a bunch of coins made during the reign of all representatives of the Qin dynasty.

At the same time, even ordinary monetary units from China in such quantities are used for protection and well-being. According to Feng Shui, one should put such a talisman in the wealth sector or wear coins around the neck. It is also useful to hang money in feng shui behind the back of a work chair.

Chinese coins, as a rule, Feng Shui does not allow binding in quantities of 4 and 7 pieces. This is not an effective talisman, moreover, the number 7 is identified with metal, so it is not suitable for attracting wealth.A bunch of seven coins is needed to strengthen the active stars of the metal element or neutralize negative stars from the earth element.

Regardless of how you want to knit Chinese coins, how many of them there will be and what place will be their home, try to endow the talisman with your energy. Like any powerful helper, a lucky coin or a coin approves only sincere and positive thoughts of a person.
Chinese feng shui coins will surely give riches to those who really want and deserve it.

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