Asian youtubers beauty: Asian Beauty Bloggers You Should Already Be Following

Содержание

Asian Beauty Bloggers You Should Already Be Following

In the expansive world of beauty bloggers and vloggers, one thing is certain—there are some seriously talented AAPI artists out there. From the maverick Michelle Phan to newer faces, Instagram and TikTok audiences are seeing more and more Asian representation, and it is amazing and much needed. As the seasons are shifting, look to these Asian beauty bloggers for when you need to know which moisturizer will save dry skin and what dark lip techniques will make your lips stand out the most.

It not just OG bloggers, of course. We’ve got new TikTokers, entrepreneurs, CEOs, estheticians, brand founders and more you need to check out STAT. They’ll teach you all there is to know about acne and wrinkles, but also make you laugh at the same time. Some of these bloggers feel like your BFF because that’s their power. Get ready to press follow on every single one.

Michelle Phan

The original beauty vlogger, Phan got her start on YouTube in 2008 when her Lady Gaga makeup tutorials went viral, and she has since paved the way for beauty influencers. The Vietnamese-American beauty powerhouse has shied away from social media to pursue more of the business side of the industry, but she still has 8M+ YouTube subscribers and 2M+ Instagram followers. She founded the popular boxed subscription service Ipsy and her own cosmetics line, Em Cosmetics.

Patrick Starrr

Born Patrick Simondac, the beauty content creator is from Orlando and is Filipino-American. Starr was one of the first “makeup men” on YouTube and has been filming since 2013. He has done multiple collections with MAC Cosmetics, amassed 4.4 M+ followers on Instagram, sings, and started his own cosmetics brand One/Size. What can’t he do?

Vi Lai

Vi took what it meant to be a beauty blogger and turned it on its head. The “SPF Mom” and skincare queen took TikTok by storm in 2020, joining other skinfluencers as the next big thing in beauty vlogging. Not only does she let you in on all her dewy-skin secrets, but she’ll make you LOL at the same time.

Joanna Vongphuomy

Vongphuomy, who found fame on Instagram through viral one-minute makeup tutorials, is Laotian-American and from Providence, RI, but she now resides in California. She has more than 100K YouTube subscribers and more than 110K Instagram followers. Her videos feature everything from natural makeup how-tos to fantasy-inspired full-glam looks.

Bretman Rock

The Filipino YouTuber, and former Viner, gained notoriety for his beauty looks as well as his comedy style. His hilarious videos have gained him a massively impressive 10.5M+ Instagram followers and 4.2M+ subscribers on YouTube. He also recently collaborated with Morphe on a highlighter palette and frequently works with MAC Cosmetics.

Charlotte Cho

The esthetician (and new mom!) brought Korean skincare secrets stateside with her website, Soko Glam. Since its launch, she’s rolled out two successful skincare brands of her own: Then I Met You and Good (Skin) Days. Follow her for skincare advice, buzzy new products and cute baby photos. What else do you need?

Susan Yara

After being an on-camera reporter in NYC, Yara launched her Mixed Media YouTube channel in 2014. The half-Korean, half-Hispanic beauty guru became known as one of the “grownups” in the gossip-heavy online beauty space, giving real advice and reporting. She came into controversy in 2020 when she pushed products from the brand Naturium without mentioning she’s a co-founder. Still, she’s a respected voice in the industry and the brand is great.

Heart Defensor Telagaarta

Born and raised in the Philippines, Telegaarta rose to fame on YouTube and is best known for her hair videos, although she does cover other subjects like shopping hauls, lifestyle and makeup reviews. She currently lives in LA (most beauty bloggers make this move) and has more than 2.2M subscribers on YouTube.

Deepica Mutyala

The South Asian beauty is a beauty entrepreneur, businesswoman and founder and CEO of Live Tinted, her makeup company. In 2015, she went viral on YouTube video when she covered her dark undereye circles with red lipstick. Since then, she’s been the go-to for good reason. Girl knows her stuff in both beauty and business.

Nabela Noor

If you’re looking for a dose of positivity, then Bangladeshi-American Noor is the girl for you. She consistently talks about skin and body positivity and inspires her almost two million Instagram followers.  She recently started her Zeba self-care community complete with merch.

Underrated Asian beauty gurus on YouTube that you need to follow

 
 

  • joycebean

    A San Diego based Korean American beauty guru, Joyce recently hit 100k followers on her growing YouTube channel. She had recently graduated from high school and will be attending NYU this coming August. Her straightforward and genuine personality is clear through the way she presents herself in her videos. Her channel has a great mix of makeup tutorials, fashion hauls, fun challenges, and more—if you are looking to follow a well-rounded beauty guru, put Joycebean on your list! Follow her channel here.

    Photo Credit: @joycebean on Instagram

    Picture 1/10

  • jessica vu

    Don’t be fooled by Jessica’s eye colour—she is 100% Vietnamese. She depends on her favorite Solotica coloured contacts for her everyday look. Despite being just 17 and a senior in high school, her makeup skills say otherwise. Her videos feature makeup looks that are crisp, clean and include an assorted range of vibrant eyeshadow colours. She is not only drop dead gorgeous but her voice is soothing to listen to as well. If you are into more dramatic makeup looks, Jessica is for you! Follow her channel here.

    Photo Credit: @jessyluxe on Instagarm

    Picture 2/10

  • vinnagracia

    Here is a rising Indonesian beauty and fashion YouTube star, Vinna Gracia. She uploads videos in both Indonesian and in English, allowing Indonesian viewers to get a glimpse of makeup videos in their native language. Vinna has been a pro makeup artist for 6 years and goes back and forth between LA and Indonesia. She has her own makeup studio called Vinna Gracia Make up studio based in LA. She enjoys creating makeup looks for special occasions alongside vlogs of her life. Follow her channel here.

    Photo Credit: @vinnagracia on Instagram

    Picture 3/10

  • sarah nade

    First known as an Instagram star, Sarah Nade is a new YouTube beauty guru with just three videos. She had previously uploaded videos in 2016 but those have been deleted since. She is Vietnamese American and is popular for her drop-dead gorgeous appearance that most of her fans obsess over in her comments. Her makeup looks lean more towards the natural and effortless side and her videos give off a less staged impression. If you are looking to follow a YouTube star who is goofy and natural, Sarah Nade is for you! Follow her channel here.

    Photo Credit: @ssarahnade on Instagram

    Picture 4/10

  • Jenny Crush

    Jenny is full Korean—many of her subscribers frequently ask her if she is mixed, Chinese, or Japanese. She speaks Korean in her videos but provides them with English subtitles too. She is seen throughout her YouTube journey with bold hair colours like blonde, blue, and pink. She loves sporting looks that are considered more outgoing. If you are into intense and smokey makeup looks, we would recommend Jenny Crush for your YouTube subscription box! Follow her channel here.

    Photo Credit: @jennycrushhh on Instagram

    Picture 5/10

  • Yoo’s Beauty

    Hee Joo is a Korean beauty guru who started just 10 months ago but has already gotten up to 67,000 subscribers. She is a 23-year-old college student. Hee Joo enjoys posting a range of makeup looks, hauls, and vlogs. As a lookalike of Sung-Kyung Lee, her natural beauty shines through all of her videos. If you are looking to follow a bubbly Korean beauty guru, Yoo’s Beauty is for you! Follow her channel here.

    Photo Credit: @yoo.xx on Instagram

    Picture 6/10

  • Hana Lee

    Do you have monolids and struggle to find the right makeup look to accentuate your eye shape? Look no further: Hana Lee is here for you. All of her makeup tutorials are dedicated to all you monolid owners out there. With her effortless vibe that is apparent on her YouTube channel, she enjoys posting “Get Ready With Me” videos where she is seen putting on her face while getting real with her subscribers. Follow her channel here.

    Photo Credit: @hanaylee on Instagram

    Picture 7/10

  • sarah cheung

    Sarah Cheung is a university student who’s also a beauty guru on YouTube. She is seen bouncing around Hong Kong, the U.K., and the U.S. She is half-British and is most known for her “I’m Not Beautiful Because I’m White” video which sheds light on the multiracial culture that exists in our world today. She is fluent in both Cantonese and English as seen through her content which include a range of DIY, beauty and fashion videos. Follow her channel here.

    Photo credit: @sacheu on Instagarm

    Picture 8/10

  • leean

    Leean opened up her channel 3 months ago and is currently boasts an astounding subscriber count of 81,000. With her pale complexion and luscious black hair, she is in no doubt a representation of Korean beauty standards. She speaks Korean in her videos but provides all of them with English subtitles. If you are looking to follow makeup looks that are natural and based on Korean makeup trends, this is a channel for you. Follow her channel here.

    Photo Credit: @suzulun on Instagram

    Picture 9/10

  • Dasha Kim

    Dasha Kim is about to be one of the hottest Korean Australian beauty gurus on YouTube. She used to be a flight attendant for Korean Airlines, which gave her the inspiration to make one of her most viral videos called “Stewardess Hair and Makeup” on her channel. She is fluent in both English and Korean, but she mostly speaks English in her videos and provides Korean subtitles. Dasha’s makeup looks have gone back and forth between western and Korean styles—she is now focused on rocking mostly western makeup looks. Follow her channel here. Photo Credit: @dahyeshka on Instagram

    Picture 10/10

  • Published on Jun 27, 2017 4:11 PM
  • 8 shares

By Stella You

When we hear the phrase “Asian beauty gurus”, we immediately
think of
Pony,
Michelle Phan, Promise Phan, and other big name YouTube stars.
But what about underrated Asian beauty gurus who create solid
content?

YouTube is a platform for creative individuals who want to
showcase their particular talents—it is important to notice some of
these hidden but brilliant content creators who we believe deserve
some more love.

Here are 10 different underrated Asian beauty gurus who are
about to be big. They are all not only beautiful on the outside but
their personalities make them unique in their own ways. If you are
on a search for more beauty gurus to follow on YouTube, you will be
happy to find some talented
makeup artists right here!

Stella You

Photo Credit: @yoo.xx on
Instagram 

Be Asia: fashion, beauty, lifestyle & celebrity news

South Asian Beauty Bloggers To Follow: Afghanistan, India, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka

So much of our identity plays out in the way we choose to present ourselves to the world. Beauty rituals, passed down between generations, are one of the richest sources of heritage, but the distinct spin we put on things, is what makes it so individual.

Notions of beauty continue to evolve depending on what’s being prescribed by our culture at the time, but also – crucially – by the tastemakers taking the reigns and dictating what’s beautiful to them. With social media opening the world up exponentially, we’re more able than ever to be inspired by what we see across the globe. New generations of women are able to pick and blend elements of tradition with other facets of their personal style and the Insta grids of South Asian influencers are alive and kicking with creativity.

Both in South Asia and across the continents – where first, second and third gen trend-setters are mixing different facets of their identity – a beauty revolution is at play, showcasing and celebrating individuality.

“I was born in Bangladesh and moved to the states at the age of 10,” explains beauty influencer Nusrat Ali.

“It took me a while to love my skin and feel comfortable in it. I started my Instagram account, @iiroshnii, two years ago to celebrate how powerful I felt within my skin. Unfortunately, colourism still exists in South Asia and companies like Fair & Lovely are still promoting their skin bleaching creams.”

“When I was young, I fell into the skin bleaching trap, avoided the sun and only wore certain colours because society told me that I wasn’t beautiful enough. I spent too many years disliking the skin that protects me and represents my heritage, obsessing over how to lighten it. When I finally learned to accept myself, I discovered the skincare community on Instagram and how welcoming everyone is within the community.”

Nowadays, desi women are playing by their own rules (or ditching them altogether). “Fast forward to now, my account is full of colours and I do colourful makeup looks because I get messages from South Asian girls that look like me telling me that they didn’t know colourful eyeshadows can look good on our skin,” says Nusrat. Blended in, of course, are touch points that link her back to the heritage she’s intensely proud of. Nusrat oils her hair in coconut or amla oil to promote growth, mixes up home skincare concoctions like turmeric and yoghurt masks to fight pigmentation and reps the jewellery and bindi that are innately part of who she is.

“Ultimately, I created my Instagram as a space to celebrate the skin that I am in. My main goal is to increase South Asian representation within the beauty space because there is definitely not enough.”

We’re giving a shout-out to all the South Asian beauty influencers killing (and changing) the game…

(PDF) Why do female Asian-American fashion and beauty YouTubers go blond?

2020 Proceedings Virtual Conference

Page 2 of 3

© 2020 The author(s). Published under a Creative Commons Attribution License

(https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction

in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

ITAA Proceedings, #77 – https://itaaonline.org

the woman I want to be, we can envision that having blond hair for female Asian-American fashion and

beauty YouTubers is to achieve a desired image that they are dreaming about. They think the image could

be achieved, so they dyed their hair.

I’ve been wanting to go blond for a good six years.

(Jenn Im)

I feel good about this decision, I have no regrets I love this hair. It’s so much fun already…. This is the

change I wanted it.

(Sandy Lin)

The change I worried about. All of the selected female Asian-American fashion and beauty YouTubers

have mentioned their concerns about bleaching their hair which damages their hair, cause pain, and

requires a lot of maintenance. The pain and permanence of the procedure cause their anxiety. They are

also worried about whether or not the dying procedure will produce the same blond hair as they desired.

Following the idea of the women I fear I could be from Guy and Banim’s (2000) study to interpret here,

the female Asian-American fashion and beauty YouTubers have the current and future anxieties about

their hair condition which leads them to feel out of control in the image that they want to produce or

create.

I would dye my hair color still not quite sure what’s gonna be most likely blonde and then I have

nervous.

(ToThe9s – Cassie Masangkay)

Beyond the ideas from Guy and Banim’s (2000) work, the female Asian-American fashion and beauty

YouTubers demonstrate another character: the change I could never have made. The female Asian-

American fashion and beauty YouTubers have strong aspirations in relating to getting blond hair.

Majority of them search a lot of blond images as the reference to their hair stylist. But there is no

guarantee to have the same level of blondness based on the individual’s hair condition. Majority of the

female Asian-American fashion and beauty YouTubers mention they could not get the same level of

blondness due to some leftover color in their hair. Implicit here is the assumption that the female Asian-

American fashion and beauty YouTubers have confidence about their decisions of being blond. But they

do not know what it would look like in the end, for example, how the lightness level of blondness would

be turned out at end. The hair stylists create a blond color that matches their skin tone which leads some

unexpected effects eventually. The female Asian-American fashion and beauty YouTubers were surprised

with the final blondness they received and created a brand new image about themselves.

Discussion and Implications. The transformations of the hair belong to the change of body surface,

which is sub-unit under Hillestad’s appearance taxonomy model (Hillestad, 1980). The body surface

modifications can make a statement about the individual’s identity (Hillestad, 1980). The female Asian-

Americans are considered as one of the marginalized people in the society (Atkinson, Lowe, & Matthews,

1995). Female Asian-American fashion and beauty YouTuber is one group of people under the

marginalized population. Through the interpretation about how female Asian-American fashion and

18 Iconic Asian Beauty Moments That Deserve Celebration

Over the last year, the conversation about Asian American representation and proper portrayal has become more nuanced and widespread. The #StopAAPIHate movement has gathered steam and the Asian American experience can no longer get swept under the rug. And though there is a lot that still needs to be done, there is also a lot to be celebrated. In honor of AAPI Heritage Month, we’re taking a look at some of important, awe-inspiring beauty looks from modern-day Asian American icons.

Awkwafina

Getty Images/Design by Tiana Crispino

Awkwafina went all-out in 2019. Her stand-out golden-glittery eyeshadow was swept up through her brows and adorned with dozens of Swarovski crystals from inner-corner to crease. There was classic glamour and a whole lot of modern glitz.

Sandra Oh

Getty Images/Design by Tiana Crispino

Sandra Oh has continuously broken barriers for Asian women in Hollywood, and this Golden Globes night was no exception. She broke not one, not two, but three Golden Globes records that night: She was the first Asian woman to host the show, the first Asian woman to win Best Actress in a Drama TV Series, and the first Asian woman to win two Golden Globes. Oh, and that hair.

Chrissy Teigen

Getty Images/Design by Tiana Crispino

Chrissy Teigen is known for glowing skin and bended waves, but this red carpet look was a full-on tangerine dream. Think: a sorbet-colored Yanina Couture dress, coral blush, and a bronze smoky eye.

Gemma Chan

Getty Images/Design by Tiana Crispino

Gemma Chan seemed to float down this red carpet as heads turned and jaws dropped. She wore a bejeweled pin (it said “love”) in her textured, low chignon with petal-pink lipstick and shadow to match. It was absolutely etherial.

Constance Lau

Getty Images/Design by Tiana Crispino

The Crazy Rich Asians premiere was a memorable red carpet, with one standout look in particular. Constance Lau’s gave us blinging glow, with a berry red lip, and a structural topknot. Fastened with a dramatic twist (and faux bangs), this hair will go down in red carpet history. 

Patrick Starrr

MAC/Design by Tiana Crispino

Patrick Starrr one of the most beloved beauty gurus on YouTube—he headed up MAC’s largest-ever male-fronted global campaign (with five consecutive collaboration campaigns between 2017 and 2018). Watching a plus-size, first-generation Filipino-American man front a massive campaign for one of the largest makeup brands in the world was simply iconic.

Lana Condor

Getty Images/Design by Tiana Crispino

Lana Condor’s Met Gala debut made us feel weak at the knees: an undone updo, fresh dewy makeup with dimension and flush, pink tulle—it’s pure magic.

Priyanka Chopra

Getty Images/Design by Tiana Crispino

Priyanka Chopra is something of a beauty chameleon when it comes to her red carpet appearances and magazine covers. Though her staples usually include a berry lipstick and blush, she’s not afraid of a vamp lips or dramatic eyes. Here, her white eyeliner, Swarovski crystal beauty marks, and curls left us speechless.

Bretman Rock

Wet n Wild/Design by Tiana Crispino

Bretman Rock is no stranger to the collaboration, but his collection with Wet n Wild was especially significant. It marked the brand’s first-ever collaboration collection with anyone—celebs and influencers alike—and Rock specifically created products to embrace and celebrate his Filipino heritage and Hawaiian roots. The end result? Glowy, vibrant shades at a drugstore price point.

Ian Alexander

Getty Images/Design by Tiana Crispino

Ian Alexander got our attention with this deep red graphic shadow and sharp brow look at The OA Part II premiere. He believes makeup and jewelry are genderless (we couldn’t agree more), so we love watching that sentiment play out with a killer beauty look (and jewelry to match).

Michelle Phan

YouTube/Design by Tiana Crispino

Michelle Phan is the original beauty influencer, and she has definitely created memorable looks over the years. One tutorial that stands out was one of her earliest: a 2008 tutorial on how to achieve a smoky eye. This look wasn’t iconic because it was daring, but rather because watching an Asian woman do an eye look (especially one as ubiquitous as the smoky eye) was helpful and empowering.

Kelsey Merritt

Getty Images/Design by Tiana Crispino

Regardless of our feelings on the show now, the Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show was a huge, globally-recognized stepping stone for models in the industry for decades. As such, watching Kelsey Merritt, the first-ever Filipino model to walk in the show, move down the runway was nothing short of magical.

Darren Criss

Getty Images/Design by Tiana Crispino

His dramatic, soft-blended eyeshadow, graphic lip, and cascading curls. Chefs kiss.

Jhene Aiko

Getty Images/Design by Cristina Cianci

As a mixed woman, Jhene always honors her heritage through her red carpet looks. Here, she wears protective box braids, lilac liner below her lower lash-line, and wispy false lashes.

Nabela Noor

elf/Design by Tiana Crispino

Nabela Noor said it best when she announced the launch of her campaign with e.l.f.: “A Bangladeshi-American, plus sized, Muslim girl has her very own makeup collection with @elfcosmetics. A collection celebrating her South Asian heritage and individual beauty.” This collection celebrated Noor’s consistent message of self-love above all else and honored her heritage the whole way through (the packaging even had henna-inspired designs on it).

Kim Chi

Getty Images/Tiana Crispino

Kim Chi, a Korean American drag queen named after traditional pickled cabbage, has had a massive impact on modern popular culture—as well as the beauty industry. Now regarded as Drag Race royalty, Kim Chi delivered look after look, week after week on Drag Race in a way that highlighted heritage and challenged fans’ preconceived notions of what drag is “supposed to look like.”

Naomi Scott

Byrdie/Design by Tiana Crispino

A tight top knot, bronze smoky eye, and deep vampy lip is everything we needed and more.

Mindy Kaling

Getting Images/Design by Tiana Crispino

We’re used to seeing Mindy Kaling serve her beautiful dark brunette hair on the red carpet, but she surprised us all when she arrived as an icy-platinum blonde. We haven’t been the same since.

The Best K-Beauty YouTubers to Follow in 2021

With K-beauty having become a global sensation in recent years, skincare and makeup influencers like Risabae and Pony have also garnered a huge following on their social media platforms. At the center of the Korean beauty world is YouTube, where thousands of content creators share their secret tips and start new trends. For those looking for new YouTubers to follow, we’ve gathered a list of beauty creators you should pay attention to in 2021.

One of our favorites is Yoo’s Beauty, a channel featuring influencer Heejoo Yoo who introduces unique glam looks with a bright, bold color palette. Our list follows with Suesasha, who has amassed about 139,000 subscribers in just a year. We’re also highlighting Leean, a content creator known for her K-pop dance covers and soothing vlogs, as well as Dasha Kim, who shares bits of her Jeju life through her aesthetic, low-fi vlogs. You can also look to kinda cool for home decor inspiration, or INGHWA for beauty and fashion looks boasting vibrant shades.

Scroll down for some of the best K-beauty YouTube channels to subscribe to.

During her career as a YouTuber, Dawn was diagnosed with lymphoma, a type of blood cancer. Instead of taking a break, the beauty guru decided to share her cancer and chemotherapy story on her channel, spreading positivity and delivering an empowering message about breaking beauty standards. The creator is loved for her down-to-earth honesty on her daily life.

A veteran in the world of YouTube, Dasha Kim made her breakthrough online with vlogs during her time in Australia and guides on how to prep for a flight attendant interview. Now residing in Jeju with her husband, the YouTuber shares tips on skincare and beauty through tutorials and showcases stylish yet comfy everyday looks. On top of managing her channel and recording the NoDap Podcast with her husband, she also works as the founder of the jewelry brand Kira and Misha.

Having created videos for several years now, INGHWA understands what her viewers want to see from her. The creator, whose feed boasts a colorful palette of vibrant and pastel tones, is loved for her fashion, beauty and lifestyle content including hauls, room tours and more. More recently, she has revealed her very own nail lacquers created in partnership with LAKA.

If you’ve been looking for the most soothing at-home vlogs or tips for decorating your room, kinda cool is the channel to check out. In addition to her online shopping guides and makeup tutorials, Kaya uploads beautiful video diaries of her (pre-pandemic) travels and staycation vlogs.

Racking up views with some of her earliest makeup and hair tutorials in 2017, Leean has become one of the most exciting Korea-based YouTubers in recent years. In addition to posting her college life vlogs, travel videos and beauty tutorials, the influencer also shares some of her hobbies including drumming and dancing on her channel.

Suesasha captivated YouTube viewers with her incomparable taste and aesthetic in a series of videos released just about a year ago. In addition to her stylish outfits and effortlessly chic makeup looks, the creative also shares wholesome moments with her newborn baby, Etna.

Having spent her childhood in Colombia with her sister Jeongmin Yoo whom she runs her YouTube channel Yoo’s Beauty with, Heejoo is known for her unique makeup tutorials featuring bold colors and unconventional styles. You can often find the makeup guru shooting videos in Spanish, as well as vlogs with fellow YouTubers.

A look back at YouTube’s original Asian creators

In 2020, YouTube’s presence is hard to deny. There’s seemingly a YouTube channel for every niche and a subscriber for every channel.

With $15.1 billion in ad revenue last year, YouTube has increasingly become a viable career path. It’s so popular that even children in the U.S., U.K., and China aspire to become professional YouTubers one day.

But back in its infancy 15 years ago, YouTube was an unknown place. The site originally hosted cat videos, music videos, and viral comedy clips. No one knew the impact it would have.

However, YouTube quickly became a platform to create. There were few barriers of entry—it only took a camera and an idea. People took risks. They created videos that were entertaining, bold, and inspiring.

Some of these creators became popular, amassing huge followings of dedicated fans. And for the first time in Western media, Asian faces became prevalent.

Although the YouTube landscape continues to
change, the enduring impact of these original Asian YouTubers has not.

1.    

NIGAHIGA

Ryan Higa originally went viral back in 2007 for his comedic “How to be” videos and film parodies made with his friends. Until the summer of 2011, Higa was originally hailed as the “Most Subscribed-to-Youtuber” on the platform.

He currently remains active on his channels and hosts his own podcast, Off The Pill. Higa has also branched out into various film, music, and business ventures.

2.    

MICHELLE PHAN

Michelle Phan rose to prominence in 2007 with her bold make-up tutorials and beauty tips.

In the past decade, Phan has created two cosmetics companies. After a legal dispute over music and copyright infringement, Phan went on intermittent hiatuses from YouTube. In 2019, Phan returned to launch Thematic, a platform that provides copyright-free music for video creators.

3.    

FREDDIEW / ROCKETJUMP

Back in 2007, Freddie Wong became famous due to his action-packed comedy skits and competitive Guitar Hero skills.

Wong has since formed a production company,
RocketJump, which continues to produce various comedy and gaming-related
content on YouTube, including Video Game High School and Anime Crimes Division.
Wong has also branched out into television.

4.     JUSTKIDDINGFILMS

JustKiddingFilms, made up of duo Bart Kwan and Joe Jitsukawa, originally posted comedic videos that poked fun at over-the-top Asian stereotypes back in 2007.

The duo has since expanded their production company with Just Kidding News, a comedy news channel. In addition, the two have their own channels, podcasts, and joint business ventures in the fitness and restaurant industries.

5.    

COMMUNITY CHANNEL

The Australian-born YouTuber Natalie Tran originally posted vlogs back in 2006, but she rose to prominence through her comedic skits around everyday situations.

Since 2016, Tran has remained off YouTube due to medical reasons. Outside of the platform, she has acted on television and remains
active on social media, including Twitter and Instagram.

6.     KEVJUMBA

Kevin Wu grew popular in 2007 with his comedic vlogs around provocative subjects. His father, known as PapaJumba, later became a recurring feature on the channel (and later his teammate on The Amazing Race).

The KevJumba channel has been inactive since
2017. After a severe car accident two years previously, Wu decided to focus on his spirituality and
education.

7.     

BLOGILATES

Cassey Ho posted her first Pilates workout videos in 2009, which quickly grew in popularity.

Since then, Ho has continued to create workout
videos. She has also created her own certified, live fitness class called POP
Pilates and branched out into her own activewear clothing line.

8.    

TIMOTHY DELAGHETTO

Tim Chantarangsu’s original channel was deleted for its provocative content, but he bounced back in 2007 with Timothy DeLaGhetto, a popular channel that promoted his hip-hop freestyles and comedic content.

As of 2020, Chantarangsu remains active on YouTube and hosts his own podcast. Outside of the platform, he has continued to perform both in music and film/TV, including the MTV series Wild ‘n Out.

9.

WONG FU PRODUCTIONS

The trio behind Wong Fu Productions — Wesley Chan, Ted Fu, and Philip Wang — had already made shorts and a feature film prior to YouTube, but in 2007, the three brought scripted content featuring Asian leads to the platform.

Wong Fu Productions has continued to produce sketches on YouTube featuring actors like Randall Park and Simu Liu. Off YouTube, the team has produced feature-length movie projects and pursued separate business ventures in the dining and toy industries.

10. TVFilthyFrank

In 2008, George Miller posted his first comedy video on YouTube. Miller rose to prominence thanks to the vulgar, provocative comedy on his second channel, TVFilthyFrank.

After amassing nearly seven million subscribers, Miller left YouTube to pursue a music career. Through his musical act, Joji, Miller became the first Asian artist to reach number one on Billboard‘s Top R&B/Hip-Hop chart. He also collaborates frequently with the music company 88rising.

11. IISuperwomanII

In 2010, Canadian-born YouTuber Lilly Singh went viral for her turban-tying tutorial. However, Singh’s channel skyrocketed thanks to her comedic skits and music videos that often explored Punjabi culture.

Since then, Singh’s comedy career has grown both on YouTube and off. As of 2019, Singh is the host of her own NBC late night talk show, A Little Late with Lilly Singh.


Be sure to check out Cold Tea Collective’s interview with rising YouTuber, Linda Dong.

90,000 Idols, fandoms, BTS and world records: what is the phenomenon of K-pop music

https://ria.ru/20200727/1574819483.html

Idols, fandoms, BTS and world records: what is the phenomenon of K-pop music

Idols, fandoms, BTS and world records: what is the phenomenon of K-pop music – Russia news today puppet-like singing, dancing, gathering tens of thousands of spectators in stadiums and hundreds of millions of views on YouTube – all this… RIA Novosti, 27.07.2020

2020-07-27T08: 00

2020-07-27T08: 00

2020-07-27T08: 00

culture

South Korea

youtube

bts

show business

/ html / head / meta [@ name = ‘og: title’] / @ content

/ html / head / meta [@ name = ‘og: description’] / @ content

https: / /cdn23.img.ria.ru/images/07e4/07/17/1574807979_0:8:2500:1414_1920x0_80_0_0_aeb53880d295d4bf323f18c90be57fee.jpg

MOSCOW, July 27 – RIA Novosti, GalinaDoll-looking girls and young people sing, dance, gathering tens of thousands of spectators in stadiums and hundreds of millions of views on YouTube – all this is K-pop, a direction that many have probably heard about, but know little about. Who are the idols, bias and maknae and why the Army should not be confused with the army – in the material of RIA Novosti. How does K-pop relate to dramas and Korean cosmetics? K-pop is a musical genre originally from South Korea. It all started after singer Park Jae Sang, better known as PSY, released the viral track Gangnam Style and a music video for it in the summer of 2012.A joke video for a hilarious song about luxurious living in a prestigious area of ​​Seoul was the first in history to gain a billion views (now 3.7 billion). The hit topped the UK Singles Chart and peaked at number two on the Billboard Hot 100. As a result, Korean music gained worldwide interest. But it’s not just about Gangnam Style; many K-pop listeners who are now actively learning Korean admit that they became addicted to the trend after seeing enough dramas (Asian TV series, mostly romantic) and using Korean makeup.K-pop is not much different from American or European pop. There, too, different directions are combined, for example, electropop and hip-hop. But if you call K-pop pop with experts, you will be corrected and, possibly, even offended. Therefore, if you want to keep up the conversation about contemporary music in South Korea, say “K-pop” – you can’t go wrong. Who do K-pop fans listen to? Group members are usually called not soloists or vocalists (although this option is appropriate), but the sublime word idol (from the English idol – idol, ideal, deity).This means that musicians in the eyes of viewers and listeners are perfect artists: with clean vocals, polished choreography and an appearance that meets all the standards of South Korean beauty: thinness (sometimes excessive), snow-white skin, narrow nose and chin (for girls) and big eyes. On stage and in life, they also behave perfectly – they smile sweetly, never scandal and always know what, when and how to say. But to become such, future K-pop stars overcome a difficult path and sacrifice a lot.First, they undergo strict casting, where they have to prove themselves in front of the producers and bypass hundreds, if not thousands of the same young people. Then they become trainees. In a special training center, exhausting workouts and intense vocal and acting classes await them, which not everyone can withstand – only the most persistent and purposeful. Finally, the record companies enter into a rather tough contract with the musicians. For example, soloists have no right to privacy. In K-pop, this is strict: idols belong to fans – who will like it if bias (the young man or girl from K-pop who likes the most) is dating someone or, horror, decides to join into marriage.There are usually four to eight “members” in a group. There are more: for example, in the boy bands of EXO or Super Junior there are 12 people each. This is due to the fact that the producers strive to satisfy the needs of every listener: here are blondes and blondes, but with dark hair and even pink. The same applies to musical directions: someone prefers hip-hop – here’s an idol rapper for you, and someone – ballads – the producers have artists for this case, BTS, Blackpink, and who else? When it comes to K -pop, the first thing that comes to mind is, of course, BTS’s boy band (BangTan – from the English “bulletproof” and S – the last letter in the English word boys – “guys”) and the Blackpink girlband (from English black – “black” and pink – “pink”).The first was created in 2013, the second – in 2016. Both bands are popular not only in their home country, but also in the world. BTS are the only South Korean winners of the Billboard music awards in the category “Best Artist on Social Networks” (and twice, in 2017 and 2018) and the American music awards in the category “Favorite Artist. in social networks “(2018). The idols recently set a world record for the number of viewers watching an online concert with 756,000 people from over 100 countries. Fans attribute BTS’s phenomenal success to the fact that the musicians put their whole soul and energy into what they love: they themselves compose music and lyrics, sit in the studio until late to perfect the track, and even produce videos.Blackpink, which consists of four members of different nature and temperament, is also at the height of success now. In 2016, their tracks Boombayah and Whistle from their debut single Square One took the first and third places on the Billboard charts. In 2019, they became the first South Korean girl band to perform at the Coachella festival (USA, California) – one of the largest and most profitable in the world. At the end of June, Blackpink broke the record for views on YouTube. During the day, the clip How You Like That scored 82.4 million views (the previous record was held by BTS – the clip of the boy band Boy With Luv was clicked 74.6 million times in the first day).Other groups are also popular. For example, Mamamoo, formed in 2014, or Girls’ Generation, formed in 2007 – long before PSY and BTS. In South Korea – and not only – they love Red Velvet’s girl band. The songs and albums of these girls have repeatedly topped the prestigious national Gaon chart, and journalists from Billboard recognized them as the best K-pop group in the world. The most popular K-pop groups on the list include boy bands GOT7 (formed in 2014), Monsta X (since 2015) and Stray Kids (appeared in 2017 after the release of the reality show of the same name).Why wouldn’t there be K-pop without fans? All celebrities have fans and fan clubs where they discuss idols and exchange news. In the case of K-pop, these communities are called fandoms. This is a prerequisite for the success of any group. Without fan support, K-pop would hardly have become a phenomenon in modern music culture. They spread information about idols on different platforms, arrange all kinds of votes for their favorite artists and help them reach new heights (for example, thanks to the support of fans who massively urged each other on Twitter to purchase the track BTS Black Swan, the group topped the iTunes chart in 103 countries and broke the record of Adele, whose hit Hello was in first place in this ranking in 102 countries).The largest and most influential fandom is BTS Army (A.R.M.Y. or Adorable representative MC for youth) – it unites several million people. It is easy to confuse it with the “army”, especially since the fans are sometimes really belligerent and even aggressive. Singer Charlie Puth even called BTS fans toxic after they baited him on Tik-Tok for allegedly using the group’s name for publicity and fame. In fact, the acronym Adorable representative MC for youth translates as “Adorable MC for youth.”In general, most Armies behave this way: friendly and positive. It’s not for nothing that they talk about themselves as family and claim that there is a deep emotional connection between them and BTS. Like all fans, Armies are also guarding idols near emergency exits, buying up merch and dreaming of someday starting to date their bias.

https://ria.ru/20200628/1573444616.html

South Korea

RIA Novosti

[email protected]

7 495 645-6601

FSUE MIA “Russia Today”

https : // xn – c1acbl2abdlkab1og.xn – p1ai / awards /

2020

RIA Novosti

[email protected]

7 495 645-6601

FSUE MIA “Russia Today”

https: //xn--c1acbl2abdlkab1og.xn –p1ai / awards /

News

ru-RU

https://ria.ru/docs/about/copyright.html

https: //xn--c1acbl2abdlkab1og.xn--p1ai/

RIA News

[email protected]

7 495 645-6601

FSUE MIA “Russia Today”

https: // xn – c1acbl2abdlkab1og.xn – p1ai / awards /

https://cdn24.img.ria.ru/images/07e4/07/17/1574807979_0rian:2221:1665_1920x0_80_0_0_05c893dfea88b60b517c21facb73e929.jpg

internet news

internet news2

7 495 645-6601

FSUE MIA “Russia Today”

https: //xn--c1acbl2abdlkab1og.xn--p1ai/awards/

RIA Novosti

[email protected]

7 495 645 -6601

FSUE MIA “Russia Today”

https: // xn – c1acbl2abdlkab1og.xn – p1ai / awards /

South Korea, youtube, bts, show business

MOSCOW, July 27 – RIA Novosti, Galina Sokolova. Puppet-looking girls and young people sing, dance, gathering tens of thousands of spectators in stadiums and hundreds of millions of views on YouTube – all this is K-pop, a direction that many have probably heard about, but know little about. Who are the idols, bias and maknae and why the Army should not be confused with the army – in the material of RIA Novosti.

How does K-pop relate to dramas and Korean cosmetics?

K-pop is a music genre originally from South Korea.It all started after singer Park Jae Sang, better known as PSY, released the viral track Gangnam Style and a music video for it in the summer of 2012.

A comic video for a funny song about luxurious living in a prestigious area of ​​Seoul, the first in history to gain a billion views (now 3.7 billion). The hit topped the UK Singles Chart and peaked at number two on the Billboard Hot 100. As a result, Korean music gained worldwide interest. But it’s not just about Gangnam Style.

Still from the drama “Miss Panda and Mr. Hedgehog”

1 of 4

Still from the drama “Miss Panda and Mr. Hedgehog”

Still from the drama “Can’t Hug You”

2 of 4

Still from the drama “I Can’t Hug You”

Shot from the drama “My Little Princess”

3 of 4

Shot from the drama “My Little Princess”

Shot from the drama “My Girl is an Alien”

4 of 4

Shot from the drama “My Girlfriend is an Alien”

1 of 4

Still from the drama Miss Panda and Mr. Hedgehog

2 of 4

Still from the drama I Can’t Hug You

3 of 4

Still from drama “My Little Princess”

4 of 4

Still from drama “My Girlfriend is an Alien”

Asian TV series, mostly romantic) and started using Korean cosmetics.

K-pop is not much different from American or European pop. There, too, different directions are combined, for example, electropop and hip-hop. But if you call K-pop pop with experts, you will be corrected and, possibly, even offended. Therefore, if you want to keep up the conversation about contemporary music in South Korea, say “K-pop” – you can’t go wrong.

Who do K-pop fans listen to?

Group members, as a rule, are not called soloists or vocalists (although this option is also appropriate), but the sublime word idol (from the English idol – idol, ideal, deity).This means that musicians in the eyes of viewers and listeners are perfect artists: with clean vocals, polished choreography and an appearance that meets all the standards of South Korean beauty: thinness (sometimes excessive), snow-white skin, narrow nose and chin (for girls) and big eyes.

On stage and in life they also behave perfectly – they smile sweetly, never scandal and always know what, when and how to say.

But to become such, future K-pop stars overcome a difficult path and sacrifice a lot.First, a strict casting takes place, where they have to prove themselves in front of the producers and bypass hundreds, if not thousands of the same young people.

Then they become trainees. In a special training center, exhausting workouts and intense vocal and acting classes await them, which not everyone can withstand – only the most persistent and purposeful.

Finally, the record companies sign a rather tough contract with the musicians. For example, soloists have no right to privacy.In K-pop, this is strict: idols belong to fans – who will like it if bias (the young man or girl from K-pop who likes the most) is dating someone or, horror, decides to join into marriage.

1 of 2

EXO members.

2 of 2

Super Junior members

1 of 2

EXO members.

2 of 2

Super Junior members

There are usually four to eight “members” in a group.There are more: for example, in the boy bands of EXO or Super Junior there are 12 people each. This is due to the fact that the producers strive to satisfy the needs of every listener: here are blondes and blondes, but with dark hair and even pink. The same applies to musical directions: someone prefers hip-hop – here’s an idol rapper, and someone plays ballads – the producers have artists for this case too.

BTS, Blackpink, who else?

When it comes to K-pop, the first thing that comes to mind is, of course, BTS’s boyband (BangTan – from English for “bulletproof” and S – the last letter in the English word boys – “boys”) and the Blackpink girlband (from English black – “black” and pink – “pink”).

The first was created in 2013, the second – in 2016. Both bands are popular not only in their native country, but also in the world.

1 of 7

RM (Kim Namjoon), leader of BTS and main rapper

2 of 7

Chin (Kim Sokchin) – visual (considered the cutest of all the members) and vocalist

3 of 7

Suga (Min Yoongi), rapper

4 of 7

Jimin (Park Jimin), main dancer and vocalist

5 of 7

J-Hope (Jung Hoseok), rapper and main dancer

6 of 7

V (Kim Taehyung), vocalist

© AFP 2021 / Getty Images / Dia Dipasupil

Jongguk (Jeon Jongguk), main dancer, vocalist and maknae (as the youngest member of the group is called.- Approx.

7 of 7

Jongguk (Jung Jongguk), main dancer, vocalist and maknae (this is the name of the youngest member in the group. – Ed.)

1 of 7

RM (Kim Namjoon), BTS group leader and main rapper

2 of 7

Chin (Kim Sokchin) – visual (considered the cutest of all the members) and vocalist

3 of 7

Suga (Min Yoongi), rapper

4 of 7

Jimin (Park Jimin), main dancer and vocalist

5 of 7

J-Hope (Jung Hoseok), rapper and main dancer

6 of 7

V (Kim Taehyung), vocalist

7 of 7

Jongguk (Jung Jongguk), main dancer, vocalist and maknae (this is the name of the youngest member of the group.- Approx.

BTS are the only South Korean winners of the Billboard Music Awards for Best Social Media Artist (twice, in 2017 and 2018) and the American Music Awards for Favorite Social Media Artist (2018).

Recently, idols set the world record for the number of viewers who watched an online concert: 756,000 people from over 100 countries.

Fans attribute the phenomenal success of BTS to the fact that the musicians put their whole soul and energy into what they love: they themselves compose music and lyrics, sit late in the studio to bring the track to perfection, and even produce videos.

Blackpink, consisting of four members of different characters and temperaments, is also now at the pinnacle of success.

1 of 4

Jisoo (Kim Ji Soo), face of Blackpink and vocalist

2 of 4

Jennie (Kim Jennie), main rapper and vocalist

3 of 4

Roze (Park Chae Young), lead dancer and vocalist

4 of 4

Lisa (Lisa Manoban), rapper, vocalist and maknae

1 of 4

Jisoo (Kim Ji Soo), face of Blackpink and vocalist

2 of 4 Jennie (

Kim Jennie), main rapper and vocalist

3 of 4

Rose (Park Chae Young), lead dancer and vocalist

4 of 4

Lisa (Lisa Manoban), rapper, vocalist and maknae In 2016 there were

the tracks Boombayah and Whistle from the debut single Square One took the first and third places on the Billboard charts.In 2019, they became the first South Korean girl band to perform at the Coachella festival (USA, California) – one of the largest and most profitable in the world.

Blackpink broke the record for YouTube views at the end of June. During the day, the clip How You Like That scored 82.4 million views (the previous record was held by BTS – the clip of the boy band Boy With Luv was clicked 74.6 million times in the first day).

Other groups are also popular. For example, Mamamoo, formed in 2014, or Girls’ Generation, formed in 2007 – long before PSY and BTS.

© AP Photo / Lee Jin-man

Members of Mamamoo: Soola, Huiin, Moonbyul, Hwasa

1 of 6

Members of Mamamoo: Soola, Huiin, Moonbyul, Hwasa

© AFP 2021 / Jung Yeon-Je

Members Girls ‘Generation groups: Taeyeon, Sunny, Tiffany, Hyoyeon, Yuri, Sooyoung, Yuna, Seohyun, and Jessica (former vocalist)

2 of 6

Girls’ Generation members: Taeyeon, Sunny, Tiffany, Hyoyeon, Yuri, Sooyoung , Yuna, Seohyun & Jessica (Former Vocalist)

© AFP 2021 / Dong-A Ilbo

Red Velvet members Irene, Wendy, Yeri, Seulgi and Joy

3 of 6

Red Velvet members Irene, Wendy, Yeri, Seulgi and Joy

© AP Photo / Ahn Young-joon

GOT7 members: Mark, Youngjae, Yugyeom, Jinyoung, JB, Jackson and Bam-Bam

4 of 6

GOT7 members: Mark, Youngjae, Yugyeom , Jinyoung, JB, Jackson & Bam-Bam

© AFP 2021 / Angela Weiss

Monsta X members: Shownu, Hyungwon, Jooheon, Minhyuk, Wonho, I.M and Kihyun

5 of 6

Monsta X members: Shownu, Hyungwon, Jooheon, Minhyuk, Wonho, IM and Kihyun

© AFP 2021 / Jung Yeon-je

Stray Kids members: Hwang Hyunjin, Felix, Lee Minho, Yang Jongin, Seo Changbin, Han Jisung, Bang Chan, Kim Seungmin, and Kim Woojin (left the band in 2019)

6 of 6

Stray Kids members: Hwang Hyunjin, Felix, Lee Minho, Yang Jongin, Seo Changbin, Han Jisung, Bang Chan, Kim Seungmin, and Kim Woojin (left the band in 2019)

1 of 6

Mamamoo members: Sola, Huiying, Moonbyul, Hwasa

2 of 6

Girls’ Generation: Taeyeon, Sunny, Tiffany, Hyoyeon, Yuri, Sooyoung, Yuna, Seohyun, and Jessica (former vocalist)

3 of 6

Red Velvet members Irene, Wendy, Yeri, Seulgi and Joy

4 of 6

GOT7 members: Mark, Youngjae, Yugyeom, Jinyoung, JB, Jackson and Bam-Bam

5 of 6

Member and Monsta X groups: Shownu, Hyungwon, Jooheon, Minhyuk, Wonho, I.M and Kihyun

6 of 6

Stray Kids members: Hwang Hyunjin, Felix, Lee Minho, Yang Jongin, Seo Changbin, Han Jisung, Bang Chan, Kim Seungmin and Kim Woojin (left the band in 2019)

B South Korea – and beyond – loves Red Velvet’s girlfriend. The songs and albums of these girls have repeatedly topped the prestigious national Gaon chart, and journalists from Billboard recognized them as the best K-pop group in the world.

The most popular K-pop groups include boy bands GOT7 (formed in 2014), Monsta X (since 2015) and Stray Kids (appeared in 2017 after the release of the reality show of the same name).

Why wouldn’t there be K-pop without fans?

All celebrities have fans and fan clubs where they discuss idols and exchange news. In the case of K-pop, these communities are called fandoms. This is a prerequisite for the success of any group. Without fan support, K-pop would hardly have become a phenomenon in modern music culture.

© AP Photo / Lee Jin-man

BTS fans

1 of 3

BTS fans

© AP Photo / Invision / Scott Roth BTS fans

2 of 3

BTS fans

© AP Photo / Invision / Jordan Strauss BTS fans

3 of 3

BTS fans

1 of 3

BTS fans

2 of 3

BTS fans

3 of 3

They are spreading information about idols on different platforms, arrange all kinds of votes for their favorite artists and help them reach new heights (for example, thanks to the support of fans who massively urged each other on Twitter to purchase the track BTS Black Swan, the group topped the iTunes chart in 103 countries and broke Adele’s record , whose hit Hello was # 1 in this rankings in 102 countries).

The largest and most influential fandom of BTS Army (A.R.M.Y. or Adorable representative MC for youth) – it unites several million people. It is easy to confuse it with the “army”, especially since the fans are sometimes really belligerent and even aggressive. Singer Charlie Puth even called BTS fans toxic after they baited him on Tik-Tok for allegedly using the group’s name for publicity and fame.

Actually, Adorable representative MC for youth stands for Adorable Representative MC for Youth.In general, most Armies behave this way: friendly and positive. It’s not for nothing that they talk about themselves as family and claim that there is a deep emotional connection between them and BTS.

Like all fans, Armies also watch idols near emergency exits, buy up merchandise and dream of someday starting to date their bias.

28 June 2020, 08:00CultureDancing until the morning – to be! This summer’s best tracks 90,000 Popular Chinese bloggers, advertising and promotion through bloggers in China

China’s bloggers have captured the hearts of a multi-million audience interested in how they live, what they eat and where they will go on their next vacation.Influencers are very popular not only among their subscribers, but also among advertisers – companies communicate with their potential target audience through their mouths. In this article, we will introduce you to the Chinese blogging market and tell you more about some of its representatives.

Chinese bloggers are using all sorts of ways to gain even more likes and subscribers, the latest trend is short videos on Douyin (TikTok), Kwai, etc.but the most popular platform for influencers in the Middle Kingdom is Weibo. Bloggers themselves are most often referred to as KOLs (Key Opinion Leaders) in China, and they are a powerful tool in the hands of someone who understands how their market functions in China. The main difference between Chinese bloggers and Russian audiences is their attitude to advertising. Russian bloggers are often forced to make excuses for placing obviously paid posts and try to convey that, although the post is advertising, they are sincerely satisfied with the product and are not afraid to recommend it.For the Chinese audience, placing an ad on a blogger is a matter of course and even expected. In her opinion, a blogger risks his reputation by sharing product advertisements with subscribers, in addition, many bloggers are indeed professionals in their field, so such integrations should be trusted.

The interests of Chinese bloggers are very diverse – they can be travel bloggers and talk about their trips, be makeup artists and show how to do beautiful makeup, or they can cook deliciously (or rather beautifully) and share recipes with subscribers.There are also business bloggers in China – financial analysts and CEOs of companies. Below we take a closer look at the most famous and influential KOLs in China.

Zhang Mofan MOMO is one of the most famous beauty bloggers in China. In 2017, she received the Sina Weibo Award for Most Monetized Influencer. Zhang Mofan MOMO mainly publishes educational videos on makeup, various procedures and personal care, as well as live broadcasts that collect millions of users.She also created the cosmetics brand Mo Amour and says she has been involved in the manufacturing process at every stage, from initial research to packaging design. She later created another cosmetics brand called MOAMIS, with which she hoped to replicate the success of Mo Amour. Chinese consumers can purchase MOMO products on Alibaba’s e-commerce platforms. According to some reports, online sales of her cosmetics in 2016 exceeded $ 18 million. The blogger also has collaborations with such major brands as, for example, Yves Saint Laurent.

Papi is one of the most famous bloggers in China. After graduating from drama school, Papi (real name Jiang Ylei) became one of the most popular Chinese video bloggers, but her career growth did not end there. Papi became so popular that in 2016 she attracted investments in the amount of $ 2 million from several investment funds at once. She spent this money not on the development of her own blog, but opened the Papitube agency, which also attracted other video bloggers.This is a kind of analogue of a production center for bloggers: they are provided with assistance in promotion, the necessary equipment, useful contacts are shared with them, and agents working in the center help bloggers process requests from potential advertisers. Such agencies subsequently became very popular in China, and most KOLs can be attracted to cooperation through them.

Of course, food bloggers are also popular in China, where food has a special, reverent attitude. The page with the most subscribers belongs to YOYO, whose blog combines travel and food themes.She travels the world, tries various dishes, and then talks about her impressions to subscribers. Following her, according to the Weibo rating, are Junzhi and Wenyi – food bloggers in a more familiar sense. They post various recipes, tell how to feed children and friends who have come to visit, all this with beautiful photographs, which are not recommended to look at on an empty stomach.

Food, DIY and funny blog at the same time is run by Ms Yeah, whose fame has long spread outside of China.Her content is a video in which she prepares meals right in the office, using every imaginable and unimaginable means at hand. Oreo earrings, 4 types of noodles and moon cakes without leaving your workplace – it is not surprising that such original videos quickly became popular on the Internet.

Gogoboi is one of the most famous fashion bloggers in China. He reviews various fashion news, analyzes celebrity styles, fashion trends and sometimes even talks about makeup.In 2017, he opened his own store on Wechat, where he sells carefully selected luxury goods, the name of his store can be translated as “a select few”. This illustrates another interesting feature of the Chinese blogger market: often top KOLs not only advertise products and services, but also open their own stores, where they resell things related to the topic of their blog. Such approval on his part raises the cost of the thing in the eyes of subscribers and increases the price several times.

There are also humorous blogs in China, whose pages are entertaining in nature, for example, “A bell in the wind is ringing ding ding” (风吹 铃铛 响 叮叮), the number of subscribers to his channel has exceeded two million. If Western bloggers, whose content is entertaining, humorous, mostly create it themselves – shoot funny videos, take ridiculous photos, then Chinese bloggers often “produce” memes – come up with funny captions for pictures, share their findings with subscribers.Funny videos, like other video content, can now mostly be found in Douyin or Kwai – these are applications for creating short videos with a lot of special effects. It is in them that Chinese bloggers dance on camera, make up, fool around, in general, do everything so that subscribers do not get bored.

In general, the attitude towards blogging in China is rather positive, it is not something shameful, as in some other countries. Young people consider such a career to be one of the most promising, and many professionals in their field start personal blogs to cover their activities, share life hacks and little secrets of the profession.Among them are bankers, designers and even winery owners.

In order to effectively use bloggers to promote your business, it is worth paying attention to several features. The first is a large number of subscribers. Natural reasons are due to the fact that in China it is not surprising to surprise anyone with a million followers, so a major blogger or not, you need to look relative to others in his field. The second is the availability of services for boosting subscribers, likes, comments, and so on.It’s important to look at user activity. If you have a page to which more than two million people are subscribed, and there are 10 comments under each post, and those are emoji, you should think about the advisability of attracting such a blogger to your advertising campaign. There are other signs of a conscientious blogger. Weibo, for example, has created a convenient system of identification marks – checkboxes of different colors. Blue means that you have an organization page in front of you, and a red check mark is given only to the pages of truly influential bloggers.Hence their name and later designation of the whole economic system – wanghun (网 红), literally “network / internet + red”.

Knowing which bloggers to attract and how to effectively use them to promote your business, you can attract the attention of a potential target audience, increase awareness and, of course, increase sales. Asia Pacific will help you every step of the way – from selecting the best KOLs to placing promotional material with them.

90,000 TOP Korean Food YouTube Channels

Oh, how I love Korean food.And when foreigners living in Korea are asked why they like it here? I can guarantee that 99% of people mention the word “food”. Finally, following the long-awaited Korean cuisine, it is gradually gaining worldwide popularity as it deserves. However, unlike living in Korea, Korean cuisine and restaurants may not be as diverse and are not often available in your country. So what’s the best way to eat Korean food than to cook it in your own kitchen?

After watching the long rabbit hole of Korean food videos, I have compiled a list of TOP Korean food channels on YouTube.

Top Korean Food YouTube Channels

TOP Korean Food Channels

Kitchen Soldering (백종원 의 요리 비책)

Baek Jongwon is a chef and businessman in the Korean entertainment industry. He has been the star of numerous food-related TV shows and has created popular franchises such as Paik’s Coffee, Saemaul Restaurant, and Bornga.

What’s more, he recently launched a YouTube channel that has gained immense popularity for his simple approach to cooking Korean food.I love how fun it is to watch his videos and how easy it is to follow them. His videos also contain several subtitles, making them accessible to viewers from all over the world.

Wife’s Kitchen (아내 의 식탁)

In recent years, there has been a constant trend towards the proliferation of ASMR video in Korea. In fact, most of the top Korean food channels are ASMR and for good reason.

Wife’s Cuisine showcases mouth-watering visuals paired with the serene sounds of sizzling butter and boiling stew.Plus, it’s a great all-rounder that includes Korean food (+ a few other cuisines), desserts, and even kitchen guide videos. For those looking to relax and learn how to cook delicious Korean food at the same time, I highly recommend it.

Songkyong Longest

I wanted to enable the option for the English speaking Korean food channel. First, the channel is owned by Songkyung, a Korean youtuber currently based in the United States.She is a home chef with a beautiful and playful personality, sharing delicious Korean and other East Asian recipes. In addition, her channel features popular TV series such as “Asian at Home” and “Life in Korea.”

Bonus

Bored

This channel presents simple and quick recipes that are suitable for those who live alone. In particular, the kid in me is obsessed with the Cooking RPG series, where videos are edited that resemble old video games.

Korean Cooking and Healing Video Blog

I discovered this Korean food channel from her video “Levain Bakery Chocolate Chip Cookie”. This channel includes beautiful scenographic footage and focuses on the healing aspect of ASMR while also providing audiences with delicious recipes.

TOP Dessert channels

Cooking 트리

Cooking Tree was one of my first encounters with ASMR Korean Cooking Channels.I am definitely not a pastry chef and will never try to do anything on this channel. That being said, there is something about the sound of whipped cream and melting chocolate that seduces me and makes me keep watching. With nearly 3.5 million subscribers, I’m certainly not the only one addicted to how soothing and enjoyable her videos are. Plus, for those looking to follow, her videos include a wide variety of subtitles to choose from.

House Olivia

Next up is another ASMR Korean Cooking channel that I watch purely for fun.I especially love the artistry that shows up in her cake design video. The stunning, intricate details she puts into the design would make me nearly impossible to recreate. However, her cakes are really pleasing to the eye and I would definitely give her a shot.

Bonus

CafeSlave jun 카페 노예

While not really a dessert channel, if you want to watch someone spend their day working in a cafe, then this is a great choice.Watch how YouTuber Jun prepares delicious treats, accepts orders from customers, and prepares delicious drinks here. Especially in the current circumstances, this channel was a great choice when I am working and want some background noise.

TOP Channels about other cuisines

꿀키 Hanikki

Honeykki is another great Korean food channel ASMR, featuring a variety of cuisines, desserts and pastries. I especially love her TV show, which recreates famous dishes from TV shows and movies like Harry Potter and Ratatouille.(Why does cartoon food look so delicious?)

maji 마지

This channel became popular for her video “Food You Can Enjoy While On A Diet.” Plus, she showcases a variety of delicacies and fresh recipes like sandwiches, salads and pasta, which are great for a quick lunch or picnic. I love how her videos are about ASMR healing and also include beautiful scenic footage.

Gabi Cook

Finally, Gabi Cook departed from the ASMR video.Gabi is a Korean chef who was born in Argentina, grew up in Spain and the United States, and then moved to France to study to become a chef. She also competed in the Koreas Masterchef, finishing in 3rd place, and currently lives in England with her (Korean English) husband Josh.

Although there are video blogs and occasional beauty on her channel, her main focus is on her cooking videos. Moreover, due to the different cultural influences that emerged during her childhood, Gabi is able to offer a wide variety of cuisines from different countries.

Related Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *