Art masking fluid use: Using masking fluid – Jackson’s Art Blog

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Using masking fluid – Jackson’s Art Blog

In watercolour painting, unlike other media, the whites are not added as paint but are reserved areas of the paper that are not painted on, so the white is the colour of the paper. Masking fluid is a liquid latex-based product that is very effective at keeping small areas and thin lines white when painting on watercolour paper. The rubber prevents the paint from reaching the paper and is peeled off to expose the white paper left untouched.

The masking fluid can be applied in many ways, almost any tool will work. You may use a brush, a ruling pen, a dental pick, a Colourshaper applicator or a special Masquepen or Super Nib which is a needle that gives extremely fine lines. (The Super Nib comes with an empty bottle that is for filling with water, attaching the needle to the end and squirting the water through the needle tip to clean it when finished. Do this straight away or the needle will be very difficult to clean. ) If you need splattered white dots you can flick the masking fluid from an old toothbrush.

Jackson’s Masking Fluid

If using a brush you might want to keep one inexpensive brush to use exclusively for masking fluid because the latex might not come out completely when you are finished. One trick to make it easier to clean your brush is to wet the brush thoroughly and wipe the hairs over a bar of soap or dip it into washing up liquid, making sure that the hairs are thoroughly coated right up to the ferrule and then use it to apply the masking fluid. Wash the brush thoroughly immediately after use.

Masking fluids come in different tints so you can see where you have painted it. The places that masking are most useful are small white areas or lines within a large even wash of colour, like sailboat rigging against the sky, where you don’t want to paint around areas and interrupt a smooth wash.

The paper must be dry when you apply the masking fluid. If it is wet the masking fluid will soak deeply into the paper rather than sitting on the surface. The paper will usually tear off with the masking fluid when you attempt to remove it when you are finished. The same problem occurs if you dilute the masking fluid when you use it. Shaking the bottle will introduce air bubbles and if applied the bubbles will pop during drying and leave unprotected spotty areas.

Wait until the masking fluid is completely dry, at least five minutes, before you paint the watercolour. After you have finished your painting and it is completely dry you can then remove the masking fluid. Some artists rub with their finger or a putty rubber to get it started. The artist Kory Fluckiger shows in his book Watercolour for the First Time how he paints a patch of masking fluid the size of a penny on a corner of his palette when he starts painting and later when it is dry he rubs it into a little stump and uses this, as the masking fluid sticks best to itself. Get a corner to pull away and then lift this away from the paper and it should pull away in thin stretchy strips or sheets.

Remove the masking fluid as soon as possible after the painting is dry. The longer the mask is left on the paper the more likely it will be to adhere and be harder to remove. Also, the colouring in the tinted fluids can stain the paper if left on for a long time.

After you have mastered using masking fluid you will be rewarded with those lovely sparkling whites in your watercolour paintings.

Watercolor For the First Time by Kory Fluckiger

Note: All of the underlined words in the articles are links to those items on the Jackson’s website.


How To Use Masking Fluid, Masquepen & Ruling Pen by Jackson’s Art Supplies

Julie Caves

Julie was the editor of the Jackson’s Art Blog for 10 years and now writes for the blog part time. With an encyclopaedic knowledge of art materials (majoring in oils and acrylics), she loves researching and writing pieces for the blog as she learns something new each time. Julie is also a professional artist who studied on the Turps Studio Painting Programme and Camberwell College of Art.

Masking Fluid: Your Watercolor Secret Weapon!

Watercolor painting isn’t just about where you put your paint, but also where you don’t. Leaving some white space on your paper gives your paintings contrast, creates highlights and puts the snow on those mountaintops.


Of course keeping watery paints from wading into those white spaces can be tricky, especially if the spots are small or intricately shaped. That’s where masking fluid comes in. Essentially liquid latex, masking fluid can take on any shape, repels both paint and water, and peels off without leaving a trace. No wonder some artists call it liquid magic!


To use masking fluid effectively, there’s definitely some technique involved. Here’s what you need to know to become a masking master.


How to Use Masking Fluid


Plan Out Your Painting


Before picking up your brush, you need to have your painting pretty well mapped out so you know exactly where the highlights and areas you want to preserve will be located. It’s always good to have a game plan.


Make That Stirred, Not Shaken


Sorry 007, but you don’t want to shake this concoction. You’ll end up with a lumpy mess that’s impossible to apply with any accuracy. So before dipping your brush in masking fluid, just stir the fluid gently with a wooden skewer (or even the handle of a paint brush).


Add Water — But Sparingly


If your fluid becomes too thick, you can add a drop or two of water to thin it out and make it easier to spread. Just don’t go crazy. Adding too much alters the masking fluid’s resistant properties. If you thin the fluid too much, it’ll end up adhering to the paper and become a real pain to peel off later.


Keep Your Best Brushes Far, Far Away


Masking fluid is where brushes go to die, so always use an old brush or a cheap plastic one. To help your brush hold up a little better, wet it and then coat it with some soap before you dip it into the medium. This will protect the bristles and make the brush much easier to clean off later. And speaking of cleaning, do it right away, before the gunk dries.


Consider Silicone


If you start using masking fluid on the reg, you might want to pick up some silicone brushes. These are great for getting into smaller areas, and all you need to do to clean them is let them dry and the masking fluid magically peels right off!


Think Beyond the Brush


Using different applicators for masking fluid can yield a range of amazing effects. Try a toothpick for thin lines or tiny dots, a squeeze bottle for larger areas, or an old toothbrush to create a splatter effect (a great way to mimic the random effect of light sparkling on water).


Use It on Painted Areas, Too!


You can also use masking fluid to preserve an area that’s already been painted so the colors don’t become muddy as you paint nearby. Just keep in mind: the fluid may pick up some of the color and make that area a little bit lighter after it’s removed.


Toss That Water


After cleaning your brush, immediately change the water or use a different glass altogether. Even the tiniest bit of masking fluid in your paint water can make your watercolors appear dull.


Be Patient


Wait for the masking fluid to dry completely before starting to paint; otherwise, it might mix and mingle with your paint, which is the opposite of what you want! And resist the urge to hasten the process with a hair dryer, as the heat will make the fluid bond with the paper — for good.


Be Patient (Again)


Once you’ve completed your painting, wait until it’s completely dry before coming back to the masking fluid. Then use a soft eraser, rubber pick-up tool, or your even just your fingers to gently peel the masking fluid off the paper . When you think you’ve got it all, slowly pass your hand over the painting to see if you can detect any areas you may have missed.


Add a Soft Touch


Masking fluid works very well to preserve white areas on your paper. So well, in fact, that you can end up with hard, unnatural edges around these shapes. If that happens, just use a stiff brush and some water to soften the edges up a bit. Now you’ve got a masterpiece on your hands!

Best Masking Fluids and Liquid Friskets for Watercolors – ARTnews.com

Masking fluid, also referred to as liquid frisket, is a latex-based medium used to block out small areas and fine lines where you want to prevent pigment absorption. A mask can be applied with a ruling pen or fine-point stick. It can also be applied with a brush—but use an inexpensive one, since this sticky medium can clog up the bristles. Masking fluid works best on thick paper with a smooth finish, and the surface must be completely dry before starting. It is also best to remove the masking fluid as soon as possible to limit its absorption into the paper; you do this by gently rubbing it off with clean fingers or a putty eraser. Our top picks below will help you find the best masking fluid for your project needs.

1. Grafix White Mask Liquid Frisket

Made of a water-based suspension of latex, this Grafix liquid frisket goes on clear and won’t stain paper. With a thin consistency, it spreads easily and can be sprayed without dilution. It’s suitable for use on artist papers, board, wood, leather, glass, metal, ceramics, and rubber stamps.

Buy:
Grafix White Mask Liquid Frisket

$9.60

2. Fineline Masking Fluid Pen

Skip brushes and get clear, precise lines with this masking fluid pen. This pale blue, easy-to-spot fluid comes in a 1.25-ounce bottle with a 20 gauge (0.5 millimeter) applicator tip for blocking out crisp lines and curves. It peels off easily without damaging paper, keeping sharp edges and avoiding bleed-through. It is suitable for use blocking out watercolor as well as ink, acrylic, oil, and dyes. 

Buy:
Fineline Masking Fluid Pen

$9. 47

3. Grumbacher Miskit Liquid Frisket

Grumbacher Miskit Liquid Frisket is an orange-tinted medium that is easy to spot when it comes time to remove it. With its smooth, thin consistency, it spreads evenly and holds a sharp edge. The maker says it washes out of brushes with soap and water, but it may be best to coat brushes with soap first to prevent this fluid from clogging the bristles. It is also advisable to remove the frisket as soon as possible, as the orange tint could stain paper if left on for too long. 

Buy:
Grumbacher Miskit Liquid Frisket

$10.97

4. Winsor & Newton Art Masking Fluid

Winsor & Newton’s masking fluid dries clear and won’t stain paper. It must be applied to dry paper and removed as soon as possible. With a runny consistency, it works well when applied in dots or small flecks, but it may rip paper if applied too thickly. 

Buy:
Winsor & Newton Art Masking Fluid

$12. 62

5. Peel-Tek Crafters Masking Fluid

Peel-Tek is a brand known for making masking products used in construction and commercial painting, but this Crafters Edition masking fluid is designed with small art and craft projects in mind. The green-tinted medium is easy to spot, and with its thick, rubbery consistency, it paints on in durable layers and cleanly peels off without leaving a residue. This special formula is suitable for use on both porous and nonporous surfaces, making it a great choice for nontraditional materials such as rocks, eggs, ceramics, and metal. 

Buy:
Peel-Tek Crafters Masking Fluid

$14.99

How to use Masking Fluid for Watercolor Painting

Ever tried painting a big wash of color around a complex shape ?

There are many occasions when you want to preserve the white paper and conserve key features in a composition. This watercolor technique is usually referred to as “reserving whites”. Of course, you can paint around shapes with some intricate brushwork, but often I find that the best solution is to protect parts of the paper by masking them. There are a few different methods you can use for masking, but for complicated forms most artists use masking fluid
(also known as liquid frisket).

So how do you use watercolor masking fluid?

Before you start, stir the masking fluid thoroughly. Don’t shake the bottle or you will get bubbles in the mixture. Use a masking fluid applicator to paint the shapes you want to mask. Various techniques can be used. Only apply masking fluid to dry paper, and make sure the fluid is dry before you apply a wash of watercolor. Once the fluid is completely dry washes can be applied quickly and freely. Clean any brushes or applicators immediately after use. When you’ve finished painting, wait for the paint to dry entirely before removing the masking fluid.

The are a lot of great techniques that can be used to apply masking fluid, and you can produce some really impressive effects. I use a variety of tools with this method and I’ll go over them in detail below. I’ll also explain all the tips and tricks that I’ve learned about using watercolor masking!

What is Watercolor Masking Fluid?

Masking fluid creates a protective barrier on your watercolor paper to prevent the paper from being colored by paint. The main ingredient in masking fluid is liquid latex. Most products you can find are tinted with coloring to provide a better contrast on white paper, making it easier to see where you are painting the mask.

This liquid is applied to paper using various application techniques where it dries to form a watertight coating.

The conventional way to achieve white with watercolor is to use the white of the paper, and not by painting with white paint as you do with other media such as oil or acrylics. Some artists do use white gouache for example, but to get the purest whites and highest contrast you need to preserve the white of the paper.

When you want a large number of complicated white shapes with a darker background the easiest way to accomplish this is by masking your paper.

This is where masking fluid comes in very handy. It can be used to shield any white or light toned shapes beforehand. You can then paint a continuous background wash as if the white shapes were not there, making brush strokes free and easy.

The advantage of masking fluid is that you can preserve numerous complicated shapes without having to paint around them. You can use any other watercolor techniques in conjunction with masking. The downside is that masking fluid produces hard edged shapes, so if you want soft blended edges to any white shapes this may not be the best solution.

Watercolor masking fluid is especially good for negative painting techniques where you establish a subject by painting around it rather than painting just the subject itself.

How to use Watercolor Masking Fluid

The first step is to plan your artwork. Most of the time I begin a new painting with a pencil sketch. I then think about any zones which need to remain white and whether masking fluid is the appropriate way to conserve them. I can then use my pencil outline as a guide for locating highlights and applying the frisket (Try to think of it as painting the whites rather than masking shapes).

There are a few important tips to keep in mind before using masking fluid on your watercolor project.

Masking Fluid Tips

  • Don’t use the masking fluid on damp paper. There’s a risk that the masking fluid will seep into the paper and you can damage the paper when you remove it.
  • Don’t leave the masking fluid on the surface of your paper for a long period before removal. Over time it becomes harder to remove, and because masks usually contain a pigment to color them, you run the risk of staining the white paper, which kind of defeats the purpose ! I tend to remove the masking three or four hours after the painting is finished. If you leave the masking a day or two, removal becomes more tricky !
  • Similarly you should be sure that your watercolor paint is thoroughly dry before attempting to remove the mask. If you paint is still moist during removal then it’s easy to smear the paint and contaminate the white paper.
  • Keep in mind that you can also use masking fluid on a previously painted area. If you have some light toned shapes you want to preserve then you can mask them with fluid. However this will almost always lift off a small amount of paint when you remove the masking fluid. The amount of lifting off generally depends on the staining properties of your watercolors. I don’t advise using student grade watercolors for this kind of thing because they seem to lift off too easily.
  • Don’t try to speed up the drying process for masking fluid. Because it’s composed mostly of latex rubber, any heat can cook the rubber and make it very difficult to lift off the paper afterwards. So don’t use a hair dryer and no direct sunlight.
  • Good quality watercolor paper seems to work better in conjunction with masking fluid. This is probably because watercolor paper has a coating of protective sizing which prevents too much moisture from being absorbed by the paper. If you use soft velvety paper you will probably rip it when the masking fluid is removed.
  • Almost all masking fluids contain
    ammonia so they smell quite strongly, and if you’re sensitive to this kind of thing then try to use it in a ventilated space (if you’re susceptible to odors the only product I know of without ammonia is made by Schmincke). Personally I’ve never found the smell overwhelming.

How to Thin Watercolor Masking Fluid

Masking liquid is soluble with water. This is useful to know because it dries quickly and can become lumpy over time. If your masking liquid is too thick to flow properly you can thin it with a couple of drops of water. I find the thinner consistency really helps for masking fine details.

To prevent the contents of the bottle from drying I usually pour a small amount of masking fluid into a ceramic dish and cap the bottle immediately.

How to Remove Masking Fluid

There are a few good methods for removing dried liquid mask and I’ll go over them in more detail here. Masking fluid can be removed as soon as your painting is sufficiently dry. Don’t attempt to remove it when your artwork is still damp or you could spoil the painting with smudges. Don’t forget to remove the masking quickly after your artwork is finished or it will become more and more difficult to remove as time goes on.

How do you Remove Masking Fluid from Paper?

To make sure your painting is completely dry, touch the painting gently with the back of your fingers, and if the paper feels cool then it probably needs more drying time.

Dried masking usually peels off quite easily, but whichever method you choose for removing the mask, do this slowly and gently so you don’t damage the paper.

You can of course use your fingers, but I would keep this to a minimum. You run the risk of leaving traces of oil from your fingertips which can stain the paper and effect the way watercolors are absorbed by the paper when you come back to paint.

The best method I have found for removing masking fluid is with a kneadable eraser
(also called a putty rubber). These things are great because you can mold them to the shape you want for more precise erasing and they don’t leave any residue on the paper. Rub the edges of the dried masking with the eraser to start lifting off the mask then peel off with your fingers.

To finish off you can try using low tack masking tape wrapped around your finger which you can dab on the surface to pick off any remaining mask.

You can also get a specialized remover known as a rubber cement pickup. This is also a reliable way to remove dried masking and is used just like an eraser.

How do you Remove Masking Fluid from a Brush?

Brushes can simply be cleaned using water because masking fluid mixes with water. Be sure to clean your brush immediately after use, otherwise you have to pick the dried latex off the brush.

A bit of advice – don’t use your best brushes for applying masking liquid. This stuff can ruin them. The best brushes I’ve found for this purpose are synthetic brushes. They have the advantage of keeping a nice pointed head and they clean up more easily than other types of hair (some artists recommend using old brushes, but if they can’t form a good point then they’re no good for precision work).

As mentioned previously, to make cleaning easier, I recommend you dip the brush head in washing up liquid or rub it on a bar of soap to protect the brush hairs before dipping in your masking fluid every few brush strokes.

If you do find yourself with a gummed up brush that you have difficulty cleaning, I’ve heard that some artists use lighter fluid to help soften the latex for cleaning.

Watercolor Masking Fluid Techniques

Masking fluid techniques mostly depend on the type of tool you use to apply the liquid mask to paper. You’re only limited by your imagination !

To work with masking fluid I use the following setup:

  • Masking fluid.
  • A small ceramic dish into which you pour some masking fluid.
  • A small bowl with some soapy water
    (this is if you’re using a brush to apply the masking).
  • A masking fluid applicator, brush, or whatever you want to try.
  • A kneadable eraser for removing the mask.

You can use just about anything you like to apply masking fluid to paper, and each tool will help to create different effects. Apart from brushes, I use things like a ruling pen, toothbrushes for splatter effects, sponges, bamboo quills, and “color shapers” which are silicone tools traditionally used for painting, blending and sculpting.

Masking Fluid with a Brush

The most obvious and direct technique for using masking fluid is with a brush. Masking fluid flows off a brush well and you can get a long flowing brush stroke. I have a set of synthetic brushes in different sizes by Frisk which I’m really happy with. They clean up fine so long as you do this quickly after use.

To use brushes I dip them first into soapy water which to a certain extent will protect the fibers of the brush. A good technique is to fill up a small container with water mixed with a small amount of washing up liquid. After every few applications of mask, dip the brush head in the soapy water again. This helps prevent the latex drying out on the brush which can become gummy after a while. When the brush gums up you also lose precision because the tip will no longer have a sharp point.

Masking Fluid with a Ruling Pen

A ruling pen is a drawing instrument which can be filled with fluid for drawing lines. Most of the time you dip the tip into some ink, but you can also use this tool with masking fluid.

The advantage with a ruling pen is that you can drag out precise thin lines so it’s an excellent way to mask grass, hair, whiskers, wires or anything that needs representing with fine lines.

Masking fluid Silicone Applicator

These things are usually called color shapers – not sure why, but they do make a handy instrument for laying down masking frisket. You can get a variety of shapes and sizes of heads. The silicone rubber head is quite elastic and pleasant to use and you can create a variety of marks including quite fine detail. 

They need to be dipped often in the masking fluid. The advantage of these things is that cleaning is obviously simple because there are no fibres to get gummed up with dry frisket. But personally i prefer using a brush because the flow of the marks is easier.

Masking Fluid with a Bamboo Quill

These are the kind of things used for calligraphy and they’re pretty inexpensive. I find these work quite well and have a good level of precision. Really simple to use and easy to clean because you just pull the latex off when dry.

I have a set with a variety of nibs which lets me apply broad strokes or very small detail. So they’re good for drawing a variety of marks on the paper.

The only downside is that they don’t hold a lot of liquid so you have to repeatedly dip the nib in the masking fluid.

Masking Fluid with a Sponge

This is a fun way to apply masking fluid and creates some interesting texture effects. I use natural sponges since they have a good variety of surface texture. This is a great technique for creating beautiful sporadic patterns.

To use this method your sponge needs to be damp before dipping it in masking fluid.

Clean the sponge directly after use to remove the masking fluid. I keep a couple of sponges specifically for using frisket because over time you can get a build up of latex which is difficult to clean, but it doesn’t much effect their usability.

Masking with Toothbrush Splatters

You’re probably familiar with this technique for applying colored splatters to your paintings. But a toothbrush is just as effective for creating speckled white dots for adding texture to watercolor paintings. Again, you might want to keep a toothbrush specifically for use with masking fluid.

Masking Fluid Pen

This is any kind of bottle with a nozzle at the tip for squeezing out the frisket. It sounds like a good idea for applying the liquid with precision but I have not had great experience with this method. I much prefer having one of the above tools which I feel gives me much more control.

Above all these pens are an expensive way to buy masking fluid ! The “pens” are small – about half the size of a standard bottle for the same price ! So basically twice as expensive…

Watercolor Masking Fluid Alternatives

There are a few other ways to reserve the white paper or to create white with watercolor painting.

  • White gouache is a handy way to paint in some highlights when needed, but even though this kind of paint is fairly opaque, it does not have the same brightness and contrast as preserving the white paper. It’s good for small specks of white but not very effective over large areas.
  • Wax resist is a technique you may remember from your childhood ? Wax repels water so you can use it in a similar way to masking fluid to protect parts of the paper. You can find white wax crayons specifically for applying wax resist. This technique produces some interesting textures, but the downside is that it is not very good for precise details or sharp edges. Also, the wax normally remains in place on the paper, because removal is difficult.
  • Lifting Off & Scraping are well known techniques for recovering highlights and small zones of white paper, or for creating marks of a lighter tone. Scraping is achieved with a razor or a similar sharp tool. It’s a good technique for making small linear marks of white by removing the surface layers of paint, but it does damage the surface of the paper, and is really only good for small areas. Lifting off involves brushing the paint with a damp brush (or a a damp clean cloth, sponge, tissue, etc. ). This technique has its limits because it depends mostly on the staining properties of your watercolor paints
  • Frisket film is a low tack transparent film mostly used by airbrush artists. I have found this tricky to use on watercolor paper because of the textured surface, but it is a handy solution for large areas that need masking. Just be sure to press the film down firmly to get a good seal. Masking tape is also a good solution to have to hand for masking larger surfaces and prevent you from wasting large amounts of frisket. Make sure it’s a low tack version of masking tape ! I use Frog tape which in my experience leaves crisp edges and doesn’t ruin the paper or paint when you remove it.

Best Watercolor Masking Fluid

My favorite masking fluid is a product by Pebeo known as “drawing gum”. This is a liquid latex frisket like many other brands but it has the advantage of being tinted with a blue color which I find makes it easier to apply precisely. On top of that it’s one of the few brands that come in a big 250 ml bottle which makes it great value. Also it doesn’t smell as bad as some of the other products I’ve tried !

Phew !

Liquid masking is only a small part of all the watercolor supplies you’ll need – click the link for an on-depth overview of other painting materials…

Using Masking Fluid (without ruining your paper) | by Fia Sutton

What is Masking Fluid?

Hi world! Today I am going to show you a couple of ways I use masking fluid in my watercolor works. Masking fluid is a removable liquid latex mask with ammonia that resists paint and can be used on unsized papers. It is usually a slightly pigmented off-white that yellows as it dries and is a very sticky, brush destroyer.

I use Winsor & Newton’s ‘Water Colour Art masking Fluid.’

Why Masking Fluid is Amazing

Masking fluid is an incredibly useful material once you learn how to use it. It is perfect for creating clean highlights, avoiding or protecting small areas too delicate to avoid with your brush, and for creating sharp lines and color separations.

It is pretty safe to say that at this point I use masking fluid in all of my watercolor works. I love it. I do not have a very clean or delicate hand, and this medium really helps me create a sharper look in my illustrations.

But Beware, Masking Fluid can be Evil

So the first time I bought masking fluid must have been about five years ago and it took me forever to try it. When I did it ruined everything. I destroyed my brushes, tore my paper, smudged my colors and did not touch the stuff again for months.

So, word for the wise — use cheap brushes intended for destruction. I have two brushes I trim regularly to use only for masking fluid.

Timing is important. The first time I used masking fluid I laid it out then tried to use watercolors right after. The masking fluid HAS to dry first. Let it. Then, I tried to remove the masking fluid when the watercolors and therefore paper was still wet. This tore the paper. Let the PAPER dry. (Are you starting to see my lack of patience kills me?)

Then, I acted like the masking fluid could be treated as paint. I left my work alone to dry with the mask still on and did not return to it for probably a week. Bad idea. If left on too long the mask basically melts partially into the paper and cannot be removed, ever. Sometimes I still make this mistake. Try to avoid working in unbearably hot temperatures as it speeds up this permanent adhesion.

What I Use

Watercolor paper

Watercolor paints

Brushes both for watercolors and the masking fluid

Pencil

Ruler for the edges (I do not like using tape on my paper)

An eraser

Water

The Steps I Take:

1.Start with your pencil outline. You need to plan ahead with masking fluid so you know where everything goes and in which layers.

2. Don’t shake the masking fluid bottle and pour about a half-tablespoon into a shallow cup. You can work straight from the bottle but I do not like working from such a large container, I prefer to use the cap. If you do use the cap be sure to wipe it out before placing it back on the bottle or it will glue itself shut. Also be sure not to leave the lid off for too long to reduce drying in the bottle.

3. Using a toothpick, sharp edge or your cheap brush, mark your outline edges and any areas you want to remain white or create a clean line with the masking fluid. In this example I have outline my main form because I intend on creating a high color contrast with black and I do not want the paint to spread on the paper.

4. Let dry, dry, dry. (About 20 minutes)

5. Now go ahead and lay down your first watercolor wash and let dry.

6. Repeat as need. You can leave the first layer of masking fluid on until the end or you can take some off, and add more on. You can put the mask on already painted sections but be sure the paper is completely dry and be aware that the mask will lift off a little of the color in the removal process.

7. When you are ready to take of the mask, you can use your finger, eraser, or the dried masking fluid. Be gentle and try not to erase the paper, as it will weaken the page. I like using the dried masking fluid as my eraser as it sticks to itself easily and lifts all the little pieces off the paper in one motion.

I hope you enjoyed this entry and give masking fluid a try sometime; it can be such a fantastic tool once you get past the growing pains.

Working with masking fluid — Charlene Collins Freeman Art

My favorites masking materials and tools include:

Masking fluid is by Pébéo and the Incredible White Mask

I also really like these masking fluid markers: the Molotow GRAFX Masking Fluid Pump Marker, 2mm and the Pebeo Drawing Gum Marker .7mm-Natural Latex, 0,7 mm

As for tools for applying masking fluid I prefer these COMIART Double Head Clay Shapers  and these FASHIONROAD Art Ruling Pens in addition to a few cheap brushes.

Rubber Cement Pick-up (handy for removing mask)

When do you use masking fluid?

You use masking fluid in two ways: to preserve the pure white of your watercolor paper for light highlights or to preserve a shape that has already painted in an area where you want to darken around that shape, such as a light blue highlight in a dark blue marble for example.

When you mask on top of colors, just know that there’s always a chance that the painted color might lift off a bit when you remove the masking. 

Masking fluid dries out quickly. It will start gumming up even as you are using it which makes applying it tricky. 

Tips for working with masking fluid:

Never ever apply masking fluid to paper or paint that is wet or even slightly damp. If you do, you will not be able to get that masking fluid off of your paper. The latex, water and paper bond and the masking will end up sticking to your paper, looking like gummy bumps, and will continue to yellow in time. Apply masking fluid only to paper and painted areas that are 100% dry.

Try out different tools for applying the masking fluid, especially if crisp edges and precise shapes are important for your subject. Artists use ruling pens, skewers, embossing stylus and anything else they can think of to apply masking fluid. And of course brushes. Don’t be casual about applying the masking fluid. It creates very visible hard edges against your paint and softening edges or mistakes is difficult at best.

Always use a cheap brush if you are masking with a brush. Once that latex gets into the bristles of a brush, it will definitely be ruined. 

No matter which tool you use to apply the masking fluid, keep it clean as the masking will start to gum up on the tip of your brush or other tool quickly, making precise work difficult if not impossible. Keep a cup of water with some dish soap in it and dip your tool into that water between masking strokes as needed. When I use a brush,I work a bit of dish soap into the bristles and dip straight into masking without rinsing out the soap. This seems to keep the masking from gumming up as quickly and buys me more time in applying the fluid evenly.

Do not shake your bottle of masking fluid. Even though some bottles direct you to shake it, don’t. Shaking it makes all the little particles of latex latch onto each other and the masking fluid will quickly become one big ball of gummy unusable latex. Instead, tilt your bottle gently upside down just one or two times before using.

Masking Fluid (Aka Frisket or Misket )

 

Masking out areas of a painting can offer interesting options and help create unusual styles. One of the popular methods for masking an area of a painting is by using a product referred to as masking fluid or sometimes called frisket or even sometimes misket. 

 

The masking fluid is most commonly used by water colour painters and it’s basic function is to mask areas of the paper that the water colour painter wanted to maintain as white. They would paint an area with the fluid and it would protect that area of the paper from any subsequent colour applications that were applied once the masking fluid has dried. Once the painting is complete the artist would remove the masking fluid – and voila ! nice crisp white paper below. But you can take the idea and run with it!

Above is Pebeo masking fluid – I’ve used it frequently with great success! I find that some of the masking fluid dry up on the shelf at the art supply shop but this one always seems to stay fluid. Make sure to tilt the bottle before you buy it to make sure that you aren’t buying a dud! I’ve seen these turn into a bottle of solid rubber on more than one occasion

 

And lo & behold it’s not just for water colour painters! Acrylic painters can enjoy masking paintings with masking fluid as well and it removes quite well from acrylic – some say better than it removes from paper. Please do a test to ensure it will work well no matter what surface and paints you are using. 

 

Masking fluid is often tinted so that you can better see where it has been applied. A strange disadvatage of this is that this can effect the way you instinctively choose and use colour on thr rest of your painting. As a result there are some artists who remove the dried fluid once the painting is complete only to discover that white of the paper now looks way too white. You can always paint over these areas with a colour similar to the tinted fluid if thats the case. 

 

Above is one of my favourite masking products – The MasquePen – because it’s got the fluid and the applicator all-in-one and it applies the fluid in super fine lines when you need detail. Don’t use your best brushes to apply masking fluid – if it dries on the brush at all it can become impossible to wash out. Masking fluid is a rubber-latex formula and can really gum up your brushes once it begins to dry. Some artists dip their brush in soapy water to help form a barrier between the brush and the masking fluid to further aid in protecting the brush.

 

The way to remove dried masking fluid is by peeling it off or using a rubber cement pick-up that looks like this: 

 

*Another note about removal: you’ll need to remove the masking fluid as soon as possible other wise it can become impossible to remove.

 

Image source [1]

Image source [2]

Image source [3]

Image source [4]

 

How to use masking fluid and masking tape in watercolor painting

For most watercolor artists, retaining light remains essential to creating a successful painting. The first way is to protect the right places on the paper from getting paint. This can be achieved by carefully brushing them around with a brush, but many artists prefer a more relaxed manner of writing. In this case, masking can be a good solution.

Any material that protects the paper from ink ingress is called a “mask”.Wax or oil pastels can serve the same purpose, but they cannot be removed from the finished drawing, so you need to weigh everything carefully before deciding to use them in your work.

Masking Fluid can be applied to the area with a brush or fountain pen to create finer lines

Masking Fluid

Aquarellists often use masking fluid. There are tons of tools to apply it, from brushes and feathers to fountain pens (as shown above) and cocktail sticks.After the masking liquid has dried, the paint can be safely applied to the paper, the protected areas will remain intact. When the painting is complete and the paint is dry, the mask is gently removed with your finger or a soft eraser, revealing the white areas of the paper.

In Spring, Luxland Farm (top illustration), I used a mask to create a subtle pattern of sun-drenched branches, rooftops, and young tree trunks in the foreground. It was applied to the branches with a fountain pen, to everything else with a thin nylon masking brush.

Having closed the rest of the drawing, you can safely apply a thin layer of masking liquid.

Now, knowing that the white areas of the paper are under reliable protection, I could freely apply layers of paint, achieving the desired image. After removing the mask from the tree trunks, I started working on their details and structure. I left the branches unpainted, allowing the whiteness of the paper itself to convey the brightness of the sunlight on a spring day.

Before lowering the masking brush into the mask, it is helpful to dip it a little in a solution of water and rinsing fluid.This prevents the mask from clumping to the brush, the lines will remain thinner, and the brush will be easier to clean. And it is better not to use your favorite sable brush for this, unless you are ready to shed bitter tears over a spoiled brush.

Paper masks

Paper masks are also very useful for the watercolorist – they are cheap, easy to use and practical. Old envelopes, carbon paper and even unnecessary letters can act as a paper mask. Paper towels will work as well, but they absorb well, so be careful not to get too wet with the paint.

Paper mask (stencil) and spray paint for a speckled effect

A paper mask can be used to protect areas of the design when splashing paint. In one of my landscapes, “In a strange land”, I created the structure of grass and trees, spraying paint in several layers. I used the same technique with Spring at Luxland Farm to work out the details of the trees. As I already mentioned, you need to carefully monitor how wet the mask is from the paint; if it gets too wet, the paint from it can get onto the area that you cover with it.

In the same place, a paper mask was also used in the process of working on the foliage, which made it possible to freely apply layers. After the paint dried and the masking fluid was removed, the remaining white blotches created the effect of sunlit leaves.

The effect is created by using a paper napkin as a stencil.

Paper masks can also be used as a stencil. So, a paper napkin can help convey the texture of a veil or tulle.Press the napkin firmly against the paper and gently apply paint over it. You can use a stencil brush or spray paint with a toothbrush. When you’ve applied enough paint, gently peel off the napkin. To do this, it is better to use a palette knife, because any careless movement can smear the paint and stain the protected area.

Masking tape

As its name suggests, masking tape can be successfully used as a mask. However, this must be done with great care.Too sticky tape can damage and even tear the paper at the time of removal, which greatly complicates further work.

It is imperative to remove the masking tape before the masking liquid dries, otherwise it may partly come off along with the tape.

I always buy the least adhesive tape and test it before use. Pay particular attention to how the edges of the tape interact with the paper. Smooth paper allows for tighter contact, but on rough paper, tape can smear paint even with light pressure.

To reproduce the effect of sun glare on the noisy sea waves, take pieces of tape and cut off the edges along the entire length. This will make them uneven and allow for more natural color borders in the drawing. Glue them in the places you want. Apply masking fluid around and over the tapes with a feather or brush. It is extremely important to remove the tape before the masking liquid dries, otherwise part of the frozen liquid will be removed along with the tape.

After the masking fluid is completely dry, paint can be applied to the exposed areas of the paper.When, in turn, the paint dries, you can remove the mask, and the remaining white areas of the paper will give the impression of sunlight on the waves.

Masking tape is also great for protecting areas of paper that are too large to be completely coated with masking fluid.

Rob Dudley, Sparkling Sea, unfinished watercolor, 23×30 cm. The combination of masking tape and masking fluid can create an interesting effect

Drawing paper

Drawing paper can also be a useful tool when a more precise and accurate mask is required.The area to be protected is visible through the thin paper, so it is easier to position such a mask in the right place. Draw the desired outline with a soft pencil on paper, cut it out and superimpose it on the appropriate area of ​​the drawing. To hold the mask in place, you can press it against the paper with a couple of small coins.

Water and dry masks

If we understand by a mask something that protects areas of the paper from paint and that can be removed at the end of the work, then, in certain cases (if the drawing assumes a free manner), water can be considered as a kind of mask.Artists know very well that watercolors “go” for water. This feature can be used by directing paint along a water path or even a grid of roads printed on paper. And protected, in this case, are those areas of the paper that remain dry. This technique can be especially useful in landscapes when painting intertwined branches and herbs.

Source: Ref.

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How to Apply Masking Fluid on Watercolor

I love playing with watercolor, I’m ready to admit it right now.I love the way the colors combine, the little pigment spots and basically everything else. I am not an expert in watercolors, which means that whenever paint behaves unexpectedly, I feel dizzy, as if I discovered something amazing.

My high school philosophy teacher was used to amazing things in watercolors, and I always tried to sneak a look at his paintings before and after class. I once noticed that he was using something to hide some of the paper in the process, 15 years later, and I finally decided to buy myself a bottle of concealer to play with.(I bought Winsor & Newton Colorless Art Masking Fluid)

Still eager, ready to jump, I watched the introductory video and ventured into a pilot project; gathered his brushes, paints and spirit of research.

Note : When I first used this liquid I messed up my brush. It was a cheap brush, but after that I took a closer look and dipped the next brush in dishwashing detergent before immersing it in the concealer. I covered it completely with dish soap and then squeezed out the excess.

I drew the basic outline of the words that I wanted to mask with a pencil. After covering the brush with soap and carefully opening the bottle of concealer, I dipped the brush into it and soaked it.

Step by step I covered the entire lettering with masking fluid.

All lines are now covered with masking fluid. I will have the option to remove the pencil when I’m done.

I waited for the mask to dry completely before painting with watercolors. (Dry masking is like rubber glue.You’ll know it’s dry when it shines slightly and your finger will not stick to it.) The watercolor will not stick to it, so you can see what you are working with.

When I finish my first coat of paint, I let it dry COMPLETELY and then add a little more masking to what would be the little abstract windows in buildings.

Then I let it dry COMPLETELY (can you see the writing here?) Before filling in all the fields with color.

When I finished working around the masked areas and everything was dry, I slightly faked the masking with my fingertips.(this is fun in itself and I like to peel the glue off the paper)

When the masking is removed and the lines are erased, I get clean, crisp white lines.

The masked areas were pretty pale, so I decided to add some light yellow watercolor. I love how the white letters stand out.

Helpful Hints:

  • Test the watercolor paper you are going to use before starting your artwork. Some of the papers I’ve tried stuck to the masking liquid and had to tear the paper to remove the dried masking.
  • Apply soap to the brush, otherwise you will ruin the brush, and most likely the sheet of paper you are working on. The first brush started peeling the dried mask back off the paper and it completely ruined one of my projects.
  • Allow liquid to dry completely before changing from liquid to paint or paint to liquid. The liquid will stick to damp paper, or damp paint and become a wet mess.
  • Don’t forget to have fun! Let this feeling take over.

Author: ALISON

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Masking liquid for watercolor | Blog 2d artist (aka Artibelka)

Hello everyone! Today is the fourth article on the topic of all sorts of tricks in watercolor. This time it is watercolor masking liquid :

Masking fluid is a latex solution that dries to a film. This film protects the paper from watercolors.Thus, you can easily draw light little things on a dark background. Birds in the sky, white dandelions, glare on the glass – everything is drawn at once!

I had a really funny story with this liquid 🙂 I have wanted to buy it for a very long time and I constantly asked it in the store with art supplies. They answered me: “The last time the liquid was a year ago, when we will re-order, we don’t know, ask sometimes.” Well, I asked, ten times!

Here we decided with a friend to order a “disguise” via the Internet, and only decided – I accidentally found it in another store.

To celebrate, I began to test the masking fluid 🙂 I drew a small picture with blades of grass.

1. First, I applied it to those places where light or white places are planned (for me these are blades of grass). I didn’t shoot this process, since white on white is not visible.

2. Now draw the background right across the entire surface:

As you can see, no paint got on the blades of grass.

3. When the paint has dried, remove the disguise:

Straight spider-man’s web!

4.Modifying the white areas as desired.

This picture was made in 5 minutes, for the sake of a test – we do not pay attention to aesthetics 🙂

5. After that, I decided to find out one more point:

With a white background, it’s clear, but if you apply liquid to the painted areas?

I applied the stripes crosswise directly to the background behind the blades of grass, then removed it:

It turned out that concealment liquid has another cool property – it decently brightens the paint, almost to a white sheet!

See for yourself:

before applying after

This means that things that did not work out the first time can be corrected 😉 Apply liquid and remove it directly with paint! (only valid on soft paper).

Let’s summarize:

  • Masking fluid makes it much faster and easier to paint fine light details on a dark background
  • She will help to correct the failed moments

And a couple more tricks from me:

  1. If the masking liquid is thick, it is difficult to apply it thinly – it can be slightly diluted with water (not the whole bottle, but only a drop before use)
  2. Masking spoils the brushes very much – use only old ones
  3. Do not remove the liquid until the paint is dry, otherwise it will not work
  4. It can be removed very easily – with the help of an eraser!

I hope now you know how to draw a white dandelion, seagulls, a lace napkin … Masking liquid for watercolor is a good solution!

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For most watercolors, the preservation of light remains essential to a successful painting. The first way is to protect the right places on the paper from getting paint. This can be achieved by carefully brushing them around with a brush, but many artists prefer a more relaxed manner of writing.In this case, masking can be a good solution.

Any material that protects the paper from ink ingress is called a “mask”. Wax or oil pastels can serve the same purpose, but they cannot be removed from the finished drawing, so you need to weigh everything carefully before deciding to use them in your work.

Masking fluid can be applied to the area with a brush or fountain pen to create finer lines.

Masking liquid

Aquarellists often use masking fluid.There are tons of tools to apply it, from brushes and feathers to fountain pens (as shown above) and cocktail sticks. After the masking liquid has dried, the paint can be safely applied to the paper, the protected areas will remain intact. When the painting is complete and the paint is dry, the mask is gently removed with your finger or a soft eraser, revealing the white areas of the paper.

In Spring, Luxland Farm (top illustration), I used a mask to create a subtle pattern of sun-drenched branches, rooftops, and young tree trunks in the foreground.It was applied to the branches with a fountain pen, to everything else with a thin nylon masking brush.

Covering other areas of the picture, you can safely apply a thin layer of masking fluid

Now, knowing that the white areas of the paper were well protected, I could freely apply layers of ink to achieve the desired image. After removing the mask from the tree trunks, I started working on their details and structure. I left the branches unpainted, allowing the whiteness of the paper itself to convey the brightness of the sunlight on a spring day.

Before lowering the masking brush into the mask, it is helpful to dip it a little in a solution of water and rinsing fluid. This prevents the mask from clumping to the brush, the lines will remain thinner, and the brush will be easier to clean. And it is better not to use your favorite sable brush for this, unless you are ready to shed bitter tears over a spoiled brush.

Paper masks

Paper masks are also very useful for the watercolorist – they are cheap, easy to use and practical.Old envelopes, carbon paper and even unnecessary letters can act as a paper mask. Paper towels will work as well, but they absorb well, so be careful not to get too wet with the paint.

A paper mask can be used to protect areas of the design from splashing paint. In one of my landscapes, “In a strange land”, I created the structure of grass and trees, spraying paint in several layers. I used the same technique with Spring at Luxland Farm to work out the details of the trees.As I already mentioned, you need to carefully monitor how wet the mask is from the paint; if it gets too wet, the paint from it can get onto the area that you cover with it.

In the same place, a paper mask was also used in the process of working on the foliage, which made it possible to freely apply layers. After the paint dried and the masking fluid was removed, the remaining white blotches created the effect of sunlit leaves.

Effect created by using a paper napkin as a stencil

Paper masks can also be used as stencils.So, a paper napkin can help convey the texture of a veil or tulle. Press the napkin firmly against the paper and gently apply paint over it. You can use a stencil brush or spray paint with a toothbrush. When you’ve applied enough paint, gently peel off the napkin. To do this, it is better to use a palette knife, because any careless movement can smear the paint and stain the protected area.

Masking tape

As its name suggests, masking tape can be successfully used as a mask.However, this must be done with great care. Too sticky tape can damage and even tear the paper at the time of removal, which greatly complicates further work.

It is imperative to remove the masking tape before the masking liquid dries, otherwise it may partially come off along with the tape.

I always buy the least sticky tape and test it before using it. Pay particular attention to how the edges of the tape interact with the paper. Smooth paper allows for tighter contact, but on rough paper, tape can smear paint even with light pressure.

To reproduce the effect of sun glare on the noisy sea waves, take pieces of tape and cut off the edges along the entire length. This will make them uneven and allow for more natural color borders in the drawing. Glue them in the places you want. Apply masking fluid around and over the tapes with a feather or brush. It is extremely important to remove the tape before the masking liquid dries, otherwise part of the frozen liquid will be removed along with the tape.

After the masking fluid is completely dry, paint can be applied to the exposed areas of the paper.When, in turn, the paint dries, you can remove the mask, and the remaining white areas of the paper will give the impression of sunlight on the waves.

Masking tape is also great for protecting areas of paper that are too large to be completely coated with masking fluid.

Rob Dudley, Sparkling Sea, unfinished watercolor, 23×30 cm. The combination of masking tape and masking fluid can create an interesting effect

Drawing paper

Drawing paper can also be a useful tool when a more precise and accurate mask is required.The area to be protected is visible through the thin paper, so it is easier to position such a mask in the right place. Draw the desired outline with a soft pencil on paper, cut it out and superimpose it on the appropriate area of ​​the drawing. To hold the mask in place, you can press it against the paper with a couple of small coins.

Water and dry masks

If we understand by a mask something that protects areas of the paper from paint and that can be removed at the end of the work, then, in certain cases (if the drawing assumes a free manner), water can be considered as a kind of mask.Artists know very well that watercolors “go” for water. This feature can be used by directing paint along a water path or even a grid of roads printed on paper. And protected, in this case, are those areas of the paper that remain dry. This technique can be especially useful in landscapes when painting intertwined branches and herbs.

There are many different techniques in watercolor painting. Sometimes it is simply impossible to do without masking individual areas of the drawing, so that paint does not accidentally flow onto them.Watercolor masking fluid can help artists with this.

What is it?

Masking liquid is made of rubber or latex, which, after drying, can be easily removed from the surface. This solution is usually sold in jars and applied to the drawing with a brush. It is not necessary to dilute it with water additionally. Masking liquid for watercolor is very useful in cases where there are numerous highlights or places in the drawing that the artist wants to work out separately after applying the background.For example, in drawing water.

One of the best on the art market is Sennelier Water Color Concealer. Available in cans of 37 and 75 milliliters. This is a very high quality material, but also quite expensive.

How to Use

The best way to apply the masking fluid for watercolor painting is with a brush. It should be borne in mind that this is still rubber, and it hardens when it dries so that later it will not be possible to wash it off with a brush. And if you do not rinse the brush with soap and water immediately after application, then it will have to be thrown away.Therefore, use old brushes for such purposes, which you do not mind, or apply liquid with a pen.

After application, wait until the liquid dries and hardens. After that, it can be easily removed from the surface with your fingers or erased with an eraser.

Do not apply watercolor masking fluid to wet surfaces. Since after drying, the desired effect may not be achieved. After using on the desired areas of the design, leave the masking fluid to dry for as long as possible.

Coarse-textured watercolor paper is not suitable, as removing the mask may damage the surface of the paper. After removing the liquid, paint can be applied to the place, or it can be left completely unpainted. Close the lid of the jar tightly so that as little air as possible gets there.

How to replace?

Since factory-made masking fluid is quite expensive, not everyone can afford to buy it just to try one or two jobs.How to replace masking liquid for watercolors for someone who does not have a special need for it, but would like to diversify his painting technique? There are several proven materials for this.

The closest in composition to masking fluid is grade A. It is made of rubber. This glue is good because it does not absorb into the paper and does not stick to it, and after drying it is well removed.

Wax or white crayon can be used for areas not to be painted after masking.This material is repellent.It is especially good for glare or splashing water.

For small-format work or for small highlights, a gel pen with white paste is suitable.

If you need to depict some large objects with a clear and not complex shape, you can cut out stencils for them from paper or paper tape.

The use of scotch tape should be considered in more detail. Masking tape has an advantage over masking liquid.It is very handy when you need to keep clean, straight lines in your drawing. For example, in architectural elements. But drawing straight lines with a brush with liquid is quite difficult.

Using tape is very simple. You need to cut the strips to the required length and glue them to the paper. In this case, it is better not to press down the adhesive tape too hard, because when removing it, it can peel off along with the top layer of paper. Remove the tape from the drawing only after it dries, otherwise the glue will ruin the paper.

As with masking fluid, do not use a textured surface. This masking method is suitable not only for watercolors or other liquid paints. It is used in and when working with colored pencils.

The use of each of the above materials gives its own interesting and unique effect, whether it is a factory liquid or a hand-made masking liquid for watercolor. Experimenting can determine what works best for your goals.Fortunately, watercolor disposes to this like no other paint.

Using masking fluid
My Google searches yielded nothing and I still don’t know what to call it correctly in Russian – but let it be “masking fluid”. It is something like liquid rubber – in a jar it is a liquid, rather viscous, which dries in air and becomes like dried glue “moment”. A jar is visible in the picture. Those interested in particular may even find out how much it costs here.
The principle of operation is very simple – we reliably cover those areas of the paper that should remain white and work freely with the rest of the surface.

I will also use watercolor pencils here, which are also in the photo. Why watercolors – simply because I don’t like how a simple pencil drawing shines through the paint in the final picture. Drawing with a watercolor pencil partially dissolves in the process of drawing, and at the same time gives a little of its color to the picture.
The plot will be floral for simplicity. Take the flower
and make a line drawing with a watercolor pencil:
Now we dilute the liquid a little with water.I only do this because the masking fluid from Windsor & Newton is quite thick and it is difficult for her to draw fine lines; some of these liquids do not require dilution, whether it is established to be diluted or not solely experimentally. We take an old paintbrush, which we do not mind (!) And a few matches. We quickly paint over the entire flower, “pulling” thin lines from ponds with liquid with matches, as needed. If you accidentally dripped onto the paper outside the drawing – it doesn’t matter, all this can be removed, but THEN! Do not panic and wash while the liquid is still wet, do not try.We get this (a drop to demonstrate that there is no need to panic):
My brush (otherwise you will have to throw away a brush at a time, even the old, unnecessary ones will not be enough). We go about our business, for a long time (at least an hour). All this dries up, stops shimmering wet – it’s time to proceed to the next stage, but first remove the extra drop (how to remove – shown below).
Now we generously wet the paper with water, dilute the paint and boldly draw it right on top of our flower:
You can stop preparing the background at this stage, but I really liked how this paper takes salt, so let’s sprinkle the salt.
We go about our business. We return, make sure that everything is dry, shake off the salt. Further, the actual removal of the mask – the mask can be removed with a clean eraser (erase, as the pencil is erased) or directly with a clean finger. When the mask begins to lag behind the paper with one piece, you can grab it with your fingers and pull it off, just be careful not to damage the surface of the paper.
After removing the mask, the white silhouette of the flower remains against our wonderful salty background. In this case, all I have to do is darken some areas with very heavily diluted paint, at the same time dissolving and partially erasing the drawing with watercolor pencils.In addition, if in the process of applying the mask in some places the flower has a very uneven contour, it’s time to fix it.
Done.

© Tamara Kulikova, 2006.
The article is also published on the website “Hieroglyph” (hiero.ru)

Other watercolor works of the artist, performed using the techniques described in the article:

The art masking fluid can be used to create multi-layer watercolor. Its principle is very simple, it covers those areas that should remain white.

Masking liquid for watercolor, 175 ml or 75 ml, latex based. It is used to cover areas that are not intended to be coated with paint, as well as to cover complex, intricate or clear and defined shapes. Creates a waterproof film that dries quickly on watercolor paper. Masking fluid can be applied at almost any stage of the painting’s development. Usually one coat is sufficient, but two coats of this compound provide additional protection to the site.After completing the painting process, the masking fluid is easily removed from the surface with an elastic band, soft cloth or cotton ball, thus revealing the white color of the paper. Do not use new brushes to apply the product, it is very difficult to remove it from the brush.

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Art masking fluid is sold in specialist stores for artists, as well as in children’s departments or stationery, in 75 ml or 175 ml bottles. has a rather pungent smell and looks like pva glue.

When working with masking liquid, there are some points to keep in mind:

  • apply liquid only to dry paper;
  • paint with paints after the liquid has dried;
  • Wash brushes immediately with soap and water after use;
  • do not leave on paper for a long time.

Since there is no white paint in watercolors, you have to work so that the white areas of the paper remain white and do not get the watercolor on them. For this, a masking fluid was created, although many artists do without it.

When you need to sketch the entire background, and then focus on the details, you can not do without masking fluid. K, I applied the liquid to the area where the butterflies will be, and I painted the rest with paint.

When necessary, remove the dried layer with an elastic band, it can easily be separated from the paper.In my example, on a white area, I draw butterflies. In addition, I also used the liquid when drawing the wings of butterflies and grass. Here you can try and experiment to achieve different effects. And the masking liquid helps a lot with this!

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Art masking fluid | Creativity

Posted by TworiSmelo.com Read 3 min. Published on

The art masking fluid can be used to create multi-layer watercolor. Its principle is very simple, it covers those areas that should remain white.

Masking liquid for watercolor, 175 ml or 75 ml, latex based. It is used to cover areas that are not intended to be coated with paint, as well as to cover complex, intricate or clear and defined shapes.Creates a waterproof film that dries quickly on watercolor paper. Masking fluid can be applied at almost any stage of the painting’s development. Usually one coat is sufficient, but two coats of this compound provide additional protection to the site. After completing the painting process, the masking fluid is easily removed from the surface with an elastic band, soft cloth or cotton ball, thus revealing the white color of the paper. Do not use new brushes to apply the product, it is very difficult to remove it from the brush.

Helpful! To be accurate and always be first at the right time, in the right place, is not enough luck. You will need a reliable, accurate watch from http://fashionwatches.com.ua/guess.html . Excellent quality and stylish design of wristwatches is not a luxury, but a stylish accessory for a modern man and woman.

Art masking fluid is sold in specialist stores for artists, as well as in children’s departments or stationery, in 75 ml or 175 ml bottles.has a rather pungent smell and looks like pva glue.

When working with masking liquid, there are some points to keep in mind:

  • apply liquid only to dry paper;
  • paint with paints after the liquid has dried;
  • Wash brushes immediately with soap and water after use;
  • do not leave on paper for a long time.

Since there is no white paint in watercolors, you have to work so that the white areas of the paper remain white and do not get the watercolor on them.For this, a masking fluid was created, although many artists do without it.

When you need to sketch the entire background, and then focus on the details, you can not do without masking fluid. For example , I applied liquid to the area where the butterflies will be, and I painted the rest with paint.

When necessary, remove the dried layer with an elastic band, it can easily be separated from the paper. In my example, on a white area, I draw butterflies. In addition, I also used the liquid when drawing the wings of butterflies and grass.Here you can try and experiment to achieve different effects. And the masking liquid helps a lot with this!

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concealing liquid reviews. Art masking fluid

Using masking fluid
My Google searches yielded nothing and I still don’t know what to call it correctly in Russian – but let it be “masking fluid”.It is something like liquid rubber – in a jar it is a liquid, rather viscous, which dries in air and becomes like dried glue “moment”. A jar is visible in the picture. Those interested in particular may even find out how much it costs here.
The principle of operation is very simple – we reliably cover those areas of the paper that should remain white and work freely with the rest of the surface.

I will also use watercolor pencils here, which are also in the photo. Why watercolors – simply because I don’t like how a simple pencil drawing shines through the paint in the final picture.Drawing with a watercolor pencil partially dissolves in the process of drawing, and at the same time gives a little of its color to the picture.
The plot will be floral for simplicity. Take the flower
and make a line drawing with a watercolor pencil:
Now we dilute the liquid a little with water. I only do this because the masking fluid from Windsor & Newton is quite thick and it is difficult for her to draw fine lines; some of these liquids do not require dilution, whether it is established to be diluted or not solely experimentally.We take an old paintbrush, which we do not mind (!) And a few matches. We quickly paint over the entire flower, “pulling” thin lines from ponds with liquid with matches, as needed. If you accidentally dripped onto the paper outside the drawing – it doesn’t matter, all this can be removed, but THEN! Do not panic and wash while the liquid is still wet, do not try. We get this (a drop to demonstrate that there is no need to panic):
My brush (otherwise you will have to throw away a brush at a time, even the old, unnecessary ones will not be enough).We go about our business, for a long time (at least an hour). All this dries up, stops shimmering wet – it’s time to proceed to the next stage, but first remove the extra drop (how to remove – shown below).
Now we generously wet the paper with water, dilute the paint and boldly draw it right on top of our flower:
You can stop preparing the background at this stage, but I really liked how this paper takes salt, so let’s sprinkle the salt.
We go about our business. We return, make sure that everything is dry, shake off the salt.Further, the actual removal of the mask – the mask can be removed with a clean eraser (erase, as the pencil is erased) or directly with a clean finger. When the mask begins to lag behind the paper with one piece, you can grab it with your fingers and pull it off, just be careful not to damage the surface of the paper.
After removing the mask, the white silhouette of the flower remains against our wonderful salty background. In this case, all I have to do is darken some areas with very heavily diluted paint, at the same time dissolving and partially erasing the drawing with watercolor pencils.In addition, if in the process of applying the mask in some places the flower has a very uneven contour, it’s time to fix it.
Done.

© Tamara Kulikova, 2006.
The article is also published on the website “Hieroglyph” (hiero.ru)

Other watercolor works of the artist, performed using the techniques described in the article:

The art masking fluid can be used to create multi-layer watercolor. Its principle is very simple, it covers those areas that should remain white.

Masking liquid for watercolor, 175 ml or 75 ml, latex based. It is used to cover areas that are not intended to be coated with paint, as well as to cover complex, intricate or clear and defined shapes. Creates a waterproof film that dries quickly on watercolor paper. Masking fluid can be applied at almost any stage of the painting’s development. Usually one coat is sufficient, but two coats of this compound provide additional protection to the site.After completing the painting process, the masking fluid is easily removed from the surface with an elastic band, soft cloth or cotton ball, thus revealing the white color of the paper. Do not use new brushes to apply the product, it is very difficult to remove it from the brush.

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Art masking fluid is sold in specialist stores for artists, as well as in children’s departments or stationery, in 75 ml or 175 ml bottles. has a rather pungent smell and looks like pva glue.

When working with masking liquid, there are some points to keep in mind:

  • apply liquid only to dry paper;
  • paint with paints after the liquid has dried;
  • Wash brushes immediately with soap and water after use;
  • do not leave on paper for a long time.

Since there is no white paint in watercolors, you have to work so that the white areas of the paper remain white and do not get the watercolor on them. For this, a masking fluid was created, although many artists do without it.

When you need to sketch the entire background, and then focus on the details, you can not do without masking fluid. K, I applied the liquid to the area where the butterflies will be, and I painted the rest with paint.

When necessary, remove the dried layer with an elastic band, it can easily be separated from the paper.In my example, on a white area, I draw butterflies. In addition, I also used the liquid when drawing the wings of butterflies and grass. Here you can try and experiment to achieve different effects. And the masking liquid helps a lot with this!

Subscribe to updates and be the first to receive news and records from the TworiSmelo website!

This is not the first time I have heard that Russian-speaking watercolorists, especially beginners, use such auxiliary materials as masking liquid, whitewash, structural pastes and primers as almost cheating (from the English.to cheat – cheat).

It is difficult for me to understand this position, because all my adult life I have lived in Germany, and almost no Western textbook on watercolor can do without a story about masking fluid or drawing gum. In addition, I believe that if there is any device that makes life easier for an artist, you should try and use it. For some reason, no one bothers that the quality of modern brushes, paper and paints is simply an order of magnitude higher than those that were used 100 years ago.However, the use of other modern aids is just the OS-guard. Professional watercolors use everything they can, and do not ask anyone for permission, in what technique they should do their work. They especially loved and love to work with whitewash – the same Zbukvich, and a number of other famous contemporary watercolorists.

Today I would like to tell you about my experience with masking fluid. If you do not know what it is, we are talking about a liquid latex solution, which forms a protective film when dried on the surface of the paper without spoiling it, paper, structure after removal.What is such a liquid for? In order not to meticulously go around with a brush light places, for example, glare or small villi. Covered them with a layer of masks
, protected against paint penetration, and work yourself more freely and sweepingly using planar fills and stretch marks. Moreover, you can mask it on a white background, or you can fill it and go through a well-dried layer of paint in the right places with a masking liquid so that they remain much lighter at the end of the rest of the picture.

Basically, masking fluid is used to keep the glare on objects in the color of untouched paper, or to keep it lighter than the rest of the layers.But in general the possibilities of using the mask
are wide enough. For example, in the work below, I covered the entire flatness of the inflorescence of a plant with it, which is called the romantically beautiful female name Veronica.

I generally wanted to try working with the mask for a long time
, but, I must admit, I was confused by two things in working with her. Firstly, it is difficult to apply it neatly with a brush – you need to work with something rubber or metal, because it dries quickly enough. And secondly, the fact that the rubber hardens somewhat unnaturally, and the images get sloppy, torn edges.But when I tried to work myself with the mask
– I quickly realized that this was just a matter of honed technique. You can apply liquid with a brush and touch up the image after removing the layer of dried liquid. By the way, the masking liquid can be easily removed with an eraser or gently by hand. Although I would not advise doing this with your hand, because there are always traces of grease on your fingers – you can ruin the work, and the next layer of watercolor will not fall on it. I just come to me when people grab hold of my finished works.These are always traces of grease and a damaged surface of the drawing.

I have two types of concealer liquid – neutral (transparent – Schmincke Rubbelkrepp) and blue (Schmincke Rubbelkrepp blue).

Here again the bubbles from a different angle.

And these are the brushes with which I apply the liquid. One rubber – it is easier to clean after it, the other is regular – the cheapest for a hobby. By the way, I like to apply the mask more with a brush. It only needs to be washed more often in the process so that the rubber does not have time to settle on the hairs.Well, we must not regret it later – over time, it still clogs up, however, like acrylic brushes. By the way, the mask can be diluted with water if it is very thick. She behaves in this regard like acrylic. But usually it is already the correct consistency in the jar.

At first it seemed to me that a tinted masking fluid is more convenient. After all, you immediately see in the work, where you have already applied it and protected the surface from subsequent layers of paint. However, when I created the work below, I quickly realized that the blue color strongly interferes with perception.I covered all the highlights on the corn kernels with a blue liquid, and the blue dots began to flicker in my eyes so that I could not really figure out the tonality of the work. I drew in the literal sense of the word by touch. Instead of making the work easier, there was a full load and even some annoyance.

And then I bought myself a transparent mask and realized that it is much more comfortable with it, because it simply does not confuse in terms of color schemes.

There are flowers here, so that you can see that in fact there is a white background and only the indentations are worked out in a different color to create volume.

Both works were done using the same technique

For most watercolors, the preservation of light remains essential to a successful painting. The first way is to protect the right places on the paper from getting paint. This can be achieved by carefully brushing them around with a brush, but many artists prefer a more relaxed manner of writing. In this case, masking can be a good solution.

Any material that protects the paper from ink ingress is called a “mask”.Wax or oil pastels can serve the same purpose, but they cannot be removed from the finished drawing, so you need to weigh everything carefully before deciding to use them in your work.

Masking fluid can be applied to the area with a brush or fountain pen to create finer lines.

Masking liquid

Aquarellists often use masking fluid. There are tons of tools to apply it, from brushes and feathers to fountain pens (as shown above) and cocktail sticks.After the masking liquid has dried, the paint can be safely applied to the paper, the protected areas will remain intact. When the painting is complete and the paint is dry, the mask is gently removed with your finger or a soft eraser, revealing the white areas of the paper.

In Spring, Luxland Farm (top illustration), I used a mask to create a subtle pattern of sun-drenched branches, rooftops, and young tree trunks in the foreground. It was applied to the branches with a fountain pen, to everything else with a thin nylon masking brush.

Covering other areas of the picture, you can safely apply a thin layer of masking fluid

Now, knowing that the white areas of the paper were well protected, I could freely apply layers of ink to achieve the desired image. After removing the mask from the tree trunks, I started working on their details and structure. I left the branches unpainted, allowing the whiteness of the paper itself to convey the brightness of the sunlight on a spring day.

Before lowering the masking brush into the mask, it is helpful to dip it a little in a solution of water and rinsing fluid.This prevents the mask from clumping to the brush, the lines will remain thinner, and the brush will be easier to clean. And it is better not to use your favorite sable brush for this, unless you are ready to shed bitter tears over a spoiled brush.

Paper masks

Paper masks are also very useful for the watercolorist – they are cheap, easy to use and practical. Old envelopes, carbon paper and even unnecessary letters can act as a paper mask. Paper towels will work as well, but they absorb well, so be careful not to get too wet with the paint.

A paper mask can be used to protect areas of the design from splashing paint. In one of my landscapes, “In a strange land”, I created the structure of grass and trees, spraying paint in several layers. I used the same technique with Spring at Luxland Farm to work out the details of the trees. As I already mentioned, you need to carefully monitor how wet the mask is from the paint; if it gets too wet, the paint from it can get onto the area that you cover with it.

In the same place, a paper mask was also used in the process of working on the foliage, which made it possible to freely apply layers. After the paint dried and the masking fluid was removed, the remaining white blotches created the effect of sunlit leaves.

Effect created by using a paper napkin as a stencil

Paper masks can also be used as stencils. So, a paper napkin can help convey the texture of a veil or tulle.Press the napkin firmly against the paper and gently apply paint over it. You can use a stencil brush or spray paint with a toothbrush. When you’ve applied enough paint, gently peel off the napkin. To do this, it is better to use a palette knife, because any careless movement can smear the paint and stain the protected area.

Masking tape

As its name suggests, masking tape can be successfully used as a mask. However, this must be done with great care.Too sticky tape can damage and even tear the paper at the time of removal, which greatly complicates further work.

It is imperative to remove the masking tape before the masking liquid dries, otherwise it may partially come off along with the tape.

I always buy the least sticky tape and test it before using it. Pay particular attention to how the edges of the tape interact with the paper. Smooth paper allows for tighter contact, but on rough paper, tape can smear paint even with light pressure.

To reproduce the effect of sun glare on the noisy sea waves, take pieces of tape and cut off the edges along the entire length. This will make them uneven and allow for more natural color borders in the drawing. Glue them in the places you want. Apply masking fluid around and over the tapes with a feather or brush. It is extremely important to remove the tape before the masking liquid dries, otherwise part of the frozen liquid will be removed along with the tape.

After the masking fluid is completely dry, paint can be applied to the exposed areas of the paper.When, in turn, the paint dries, you can remove the mask, and the remaining white areas of the paper will give the impression of sunlight on the waves.

Masking tape is also great for protecting areas of paper that are too large to be completely coated with masking fluid.

Rob Dudley, Sparkling Sea, unfinished watercolor, 23×30 cm. The combination of masking tape and masking fluid can create an interesting effect

Drawing paper

Drawing paper can also be a useful tool when a more precise and accurate mask is required.The area to be protected is visible through the thin paper, so it is easier to position such a mask in the right place. Draw the desired outline with a soft pencil on paper, cut it out and superimpose it on the appropriate area of ​​the drawing. To hold the mask in place, you can press it against the paper with a couple of small coins.

Water and dry masks

If we understand by a mask something that protects areas of the paper from paint and that can be removed at the end of the work, then, in certain cases (if the drawing assumes a free manner), water can be considered as a kind of mask.Artists know very well that watercolors “go” for water. This feature can be used by directing paint along a water path or even a grid of roads printed on paper. And protected, in this case, are those areas of the paper that remain dry. This technique can be especially useful in landscapes when painting intertwined branches and herbs.

I have always been tormented by how you can draw a white dandelion in watercolor. And now Veronika Kalacheva revealed a secret to me. In order to leave areas of
white paper (if required by the artist’s intention), they must be masked.

Further text by the author

The use of a mask is actually quite commonplace. Bright leaves against a dark sky, delicate balconies against a background of variegated greenery, sparkling stars and snowflakes … but you never know plots!

Many beginners begin to “bypass” problem areas with a brush, but often they are not too happy with the result. I wanted free divorces in the sky, but it turns out that the canvas is worn out and mottled with strokes. I will tell you about my experience and show you how to use masks correctly.

And, of course, masking fluid will help us with this

Most often comes across in stores as a liquid in a glass bottle (1)

There is also a more convenient form: there is a liquid version (2), with a thin nose nozzle (3,4)
Here is an example of using a mask with a tiny nozzle:

Applying the mask with a brush is a bit problematic. First, the brush deteriorates. After use, it must be washed immediately with soap; secondly, it is not always possible to apply the mask as precisely and evenly as we would like.
For this purpose, bottles with a nozzle are good, but you can also try unconventional methods, for example, thin lines can be obtained with a pen.
So, the masking liquid can be applied:
with a synthetic brush,
with a bamboo stick
with a nib
with a rubber brush
with a toothbrush (natural splashes)

In what order should you use the mask?
It’s very simple.
At the preliminary drawing stage, you determine which areas of the sheet should remain white;
then apply the mask;
wait until it dries well;
further from above, paint with paints (traditionally watercolors, but possibly also with gouache, acrylic) and again wait for the paints to dry completely;
hook the mask film and peel it off the sheet.
In this example, a mask was used for flowers on a tree. After I removed the layer of masking fluid, I worked on the branches on top.

Masking fluids are available in clear, white or other pastel colors.

It is convenient to apply a mask of transparent consistency not only to mask white paper, but also an already drawn layer.
You can apply it directly to the dried piece of painting and keep it intact. A transparent layer will be handy: you will be able to clearly see what you have already painted under it, and the mask layer will not irritate the eyes and distract from the overall composition.
To be fair, I would like to point out. Masking fluid is a wonderful and useful thing. But you shouldn’t abuse it. Remember that naturalness is sometimes much better)
In this work, for example, I did not use any “lotions”. Just water and watercolor. And the pattern, nevertheless, turned out to be quite openwork.
This becomes obvious if you look closely: the white patterns on the saucer do not look like strokes, but the blue ones are the opposite. They are worked out with a thin kolinsky brush.

source –

90,000 Experience with masking liquid for watercolor: conjure – LiveJournal

It’s not the first time I’ve heard that Russian-speaking watercolorists, especially beginners, use such auxiliary materials as masking liquid, whitewash, structural pastes and primers almost as cheating (from Englishto cheat – cheat).

It is difficult for me to understand this position, because all my adult life I have lived in Germany, and almost no Western textbook on watercolor can do without a story about masking fluid or drawing gum. In addition, I believe that if there is any device that makes life easier for an artist, you should try and use it. For some reason, no one bothers that the quality of modern brushes, paper and paints is simply an order of magnitude higher than those that were used 100 years ago.However, the use of other modern aids is just the OS-guard. Professional watercolors use everything they can, and do not ask anyone for permission, in what technique they should do their work. They especially loved and love to work with whitewash – the same Zbukvich, and a number of other famous contemporary watercolorists.

Today I would like to tell you about my experience with masking fluid. If you do not know what it is, we are talking about a liquid latex solution, which forms a protective film when dried on the surface of the paper without spoiling it, paper, structure after removal.What is such a liquid for? In order not to meticulously go around with a brush light places, for example, glare or small villi. I covered them with a layer of mask , protected from paint penetration, and work yourself more freely and sweepingly using planar fills and stretch marks. Moreover, you can mask it on a white background, or you can fill it and go through a well-dried layer of paint in the right places with a masking liquid so that they remain much lighter at the end of the rest of the picture.

Basically, masking fluid is used to keep the glare on objects in the color of untouched paper, or to keep it lighter than the rest of the layers.But in general, the possibilities of using the mask are quite wide. For example, in the work below, I covered the entire flatness of the inflorescence of a plant with it, which is called the romantically beautiful female name Veronica.

I generally wanted to try working with the mask for a long time, but, I must confess, I was confused by two things in working with it. Firstly, it is difficult to apply it neatly with a brush – you need to work with something rubber or metal, because it dries quickly enough. And secondly, the fact that the rubber hardens somewhat unnaturally, and the images get sloppy, torn edges.But when I tried to work with the mask myself, I quickly realized that it was just a matter of honed technique. You can apply liquid with a brush and touch up the image after removing the layer of dried liquid. By the way, the masking liquid can be easily removed with an eraser or gently by hand. Although I would not advise doing this with your hand, because there are always traces of grease on your fingers – you can ruin the work, and the next layer of watercolor will not fall on it. I just come to me when people grab hold of my finished works.These are always traces of grease and a damaged surface of the drawing.

I have two types of concealment liquid – neutral (transparent – Schmincke Rubbelkrepp) and blue (Schmincke Rubbelkrepp blue).

Here again the bubbles from a different angle.

And these are the brushes with which I apply the liquid. One rubber – it is easier to clean after it, the other is regular – the cheapest for a hobby. By the way, I like to apply the mask more with a brush. It only needs to be washed more often in the process so that the rubber does not have time to settle on the hairs.Well, we must not regret it later – over time, it still clogs up, however, like acrylic brushes. By the way, the mask can be diluted with water if it is very thick. She behaves in this regard like acrylic. But usually it is already the correct consistency in the jar.

At first it seemed to me that a tinted masking fluid is more convenient. After all, you immediately see in the work, where you have already applied it and protected the surface from subsequent layers of paint. However, when I created the work below, I quickly realized that the blue color strongly interferes with perception.I covered all the highlights on the corn kernels with a blue liquid, and the blue dots began to flicker in my eyes so that I could not really figure out the tonality of the work. I drew in the literal sense of the word by touch. Instead of making the work easier, there was a full load and even some annoyance.

And then I bought myself a transparent mask and realized that it is much more comfortable with it, because it simply does not confuse in terms of color schemes.

There are flowers here, so that you can see that in fact there is a white background and only the indentations are worked out in a different color to create volume.

Both works were done in the same technique

Take a closer look to see the details

Well, what can I say, I liked the neutral masking fluid.

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