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All about the various PC power supply cables and connectors


Last updated: July 15, 2008

All about the various PC power supply cables and connectors

The various power supply cables
General info

If you’d like more technical data about ATX power connectors then you can
find the current specifications and more at
formfactors.org

Wires and connectors are not perfect conductors. They have resistance. When
current passes through wires and connectors there is a voltage drop and that
energy is lost
as heat. As long as you don’t overload them the voltage drop and extra heat
don’t matter. But the losses get worse as the current rises. That’s why you
see some power cables with more that one wire for the same voltage. Having
multiple wires reduces the losses. If you seriously overload a line, the wire
can get fairly warm. The resistance of connectors tends to increase as they
are plugged and unplugged so after enough uses they can overheat and even
melt when passing a large current. So a lot of changes in connectors over
time has to do with adding more wires and connectors to make sure that none
of these problems occur.

Some of the tables below provide the maximum wattage supported by a power
cable and its associated power connector. Some specifications clearly spell
out the maximum allowed wattage. Other
specifications just provide the suggested connector and wire gauge and never
specify a maximum wattage. And there’s never really an absolute value to the
maximum wattage anyway. If you draw a little more wattage then the maximum,
the hardware doesn’t immediately burst into flames. The
voltage drop and power dissipation increase as you increase the
current so there isn’t a clear maximum wattage at which it stops working.
Most of the specifications which spell out the maximum wattage
provide a wide safety margin by defining a value
which is far below the maximums supported by the connector and wire. If the table below provides an “Official
cable/connector maximum wattage” then that specification has spelled out the
maximum wattage. In most cases that wattage will be significantly below what
can actually be handled by the suggested connector and wire. If the table
provides an “Unofficial cable/connector maximum wattage” then that
specification doesn’t provide the maximum and the value in the table is a
practical maximum wattage defined by the maximums for the connector and the
suggested wire. An unofficial wattage doesn’t have a wide safety margin
built in because people differ on how much margin to provide. Some people
happily use connector and wire maximums and other people like to have a wide
safety margin.

Original PC main power cables

The original PC debuted in 1981 and used two cables to connect the
PSU (power supply) to the motherboard. The two cables plug
side by side into the motherboard connectors. Sometimes they are keyed so
they only plug in one way and sometimes they aren’t. Even if they’re keyed
you can insert them the wrong way if you put a little effort into it. You
always have to remember to plug them in so the black wires are next to each
other. It’s either “black to black” or smoke and a shower of sparks.

Pinout
Pin number Wire color Description
1 orange power good
2 red +5 volts or connector key
3 yellow +12 volts
4 blue -12 volts
5 black ground
6 black ground
1 black ground
2 black ground
3 white -5 volts
4 red +5 volts
5 red +5 volts
6 red +5 volts
Connector part numbers
Motherboard connector Cable connector Terminals Maximum current per circuit
Molex 15-48-0106 Molex 90331 Molex 08-50-0276 5 amps
Unofficial cable/connector maximum wattage delivery for main rails
Voltage rail Number of lines Maximum current Maximum wattage
+5 volts 3 or 4 15 or 20 amps 75 or 100 watts
+12 volts 1 5 amps 60 watts

In old PCs, almost all of the chips ran directly off of the 5 volt rail.
As a result the PSU delivers most of its wattage at 5 volts. There
are three or four lines dedicated to the 5 volt rail. The other
main rail is 12 volts. That was used primarily to run disk drives, motors, and
fans. The two negative rails are “bias” supplies which only have to provide
small amounts of current. Just for interest’s sake, here’s the specification
for the PSU which came with the original IBM PC. It provides a
maximum of 63.5 watts. Boy, those were the days.

Original IBM PC power supply
Voltage Maximum current Maximum wattage
+5 volts 7.0 amps 35 watts
-5 volts 0. 3 amps 1.5 watts
+12 volts 2.0 amps 24 watts
-12 volts 0.25 amps 3 watts
4 pin peripheral power cable

The four pin peripheral power cable dates back to the original PC. It was
used for floppy drives and hard disks. It’s still around and is now also used
for all kinds of things including add-on fans, extra video card power,
supplemental motherboard power, and case lighting. It’s as old as the hills
but is still very widely used. The connector is shaped so
that it only fits in one way. You don’t have to worry about inserting it
the wrong way. People often use the term “4 pin Molex power cable” or “4 pin
Molex” to refer
to a four pin peripheral power cable. It’s not a technically useful term
because the 4 pin 12 volt
cable is also a 4 pin Molex cable (Molex makes lots of
connectors) but “4 pin Molex” is commonly used to refer to peripheral
cables anyway.

Pinout
Pin number Wire color Description
1 yellow +12 volts
2 black ground
3 black ground
4 red +5 volts
Connector part numbers
Socket housing Socket Pin housing Pin Maximum current per circuit
AMP 1-480424-0 AMP 60619-1 AMP 1-480426-0 AMP 60620-1 13 amps

I don’t know of any official definition of the maximum current allowed in a
peripheral cable. The connector can handle 13 amps according to the
manufacturer. But you normally find 18 awg wire in the peripheral cables. If
you have an 18 inch cable (about a half a meter) and are running 13 amps
through 18 gauge wire then you get a voltage drop of about 0.25 volts counting
both the power wire and the ground (it’s got to go both ways) and the
dissipation is about 3.3 watts. That’s not good. I’ve just played it safe and
listed the maximum current as 5 amps.

Unofficial cable/connector maximum wattage delivery
Voltage rail Number of lines Maximum current Maximum wattage
+5 volts 1 5 amps 25 watts
+12 volts 1 5 amps 60 watts

Current power supplies usually have at least two separate peripheral
power cables, each of which has two or more peripheral connectors. When
you’re plugging in multiple high powered devices it’s a good idea to spread
the load between all of your cables. Don’t just plug all your devices into
one cable unless they’re relatively low load devices. Spreading the current
between the cables reduces the voltage drops and power loss. If they’re
relatively low current devices like fans or it’s just a disk drive or two
then it doesn’t really matter. But if you’re putting lots of hard disks into
a computer (some can draw almost 3 amps at 12 volts when doing some
operations) or connecting a video card’s auxiliary power, then spread the
loads between the peripheral power cables. It’s also helpful if you use a
connector as close to the PSU as possible rather than sticking things at the
end of the cable. Extra wire just means more voltage drop. And if you’re
using a peripheral connector to
PCI Express adapter then be sure to plug each of the adapter’s peripheral
connectors into a separate PSU cable. They gave you two peripheral connectors
for a reason. Plugging them both into the same PSU cable forces your video
card to draw its 12 volt power through one 18 gauge wire. That increases your
voltage drop and power dissipation in the cable. Some current high-end video
cards can suck up more than 10 amps at 12 volts with most of it coming
through the PCI Express connector so it pays to be careful. It will probably
work if you don’t spread the load but
there’s no excuse for not doing it properly. They gave you multiple cables.
You might as well use them. Plus there’s just something creepy about having
warm wires even if they’re not melting.

You will occasionally run into peripheral connectors which don’t have all
four wires. They are usually 12 volt only cables intended for fans. Never
plug one of those into a disk drive. Drives expect both 5 and 12 volts to be
provided. Some of the two-wire peripheral connectors are for speed-controlled
fans. That means that the voltage changes depending on the desired fan speed.
The connector will only provide 12 volts when the fan is going full speed and
the voltage decreases to slow the fan down. Definitely don’t plug that one
into anything but a fan! Normally this kind of peripheral connector has “fan”
printed on it to warn you. As long as a peripheral connector has four wires:
one yellow, two black, and one red and it doesn’t have some kind of printed
warning attached then it’s a standard peripheral cable and you can plug it
into anything.

Floppy drive power cable

The four pin floppy drive cable showed up when PCs started including 3.5 inch
floppy drives. This kind of cable is also sometimes used as an auxiliary
power cable for AGP video cards which use more power than can be drawn from
the motherboard slot. The connector is shaped so that it only fits in one
way so you don’t have to worry about inserting it the wrong way. Floppy
cables are built with small connectors and 20 awg wire so they are limited to
relatively low current uses.

Pinout
Pin number Wire color Description
1 red +5 volts
2 black ground
3 black ground
4 yellow +12 volts
Connector part numbers
Socket housing Socket Maximum current per circuit
AMP 171822-4 AMP 170262-1 3 amps
Unofficial cable/connector maximum wattage delivery
Voltage rail Number of lines Maximum current Maximum wattage
+5 volts 1 3 amps 15 watts
+12 volts 1 3 amps 36 watts
6 pin auxiliary power cable

The aux power cable was added to provide extra wattage to motherboards
for 3. 3 and 5 volts. This connector is rarely used anymore. It’s most
commonly found on older dual CPU AMD motherboards. You’re more
likely to sight Bigfoot than a motherboard which uses this connector. It
plugs into the 6 pin version of the motherboard connector used by the
original PC main power
cables.

Pinout
Pin number Wire color Description
1 black ground
2 black ground
3 black ground
4 orange +3. 3 volts
5 orange +3.3 volts
6 red +5 volts
Connector part numbers
Motherboard connector Cable connector Terminals Maximum current per circuit
Molex 15-48-0106 Molex 90331-0010 Molex 08-50-0276 5 amps
Unofficial cable/connector maximum wattage delivery
Voltage rail Number of lines Maximum current Maximum wattage
+3. 3 volts 2 10 amps 33 watts
+5 volts 1 5 amps 25 watts
SATA power cable

SATA was introduced to upgrade the ATA interface (also called IDE) to a
more advanced design. SATA includes both a data cable and a power cable.
The power cable replaces the old
4 pin peripheral
cable and adds support for 3.3 volts (if fully implemented). The
connector is shaped so it can only be plugged in the correct way.

Pinout
Pin number Wire number Wire color Description
1 5 orange +3. 3 volts
2 5 orange +3.3 volts
3 5 orange +3.3 volts
4 4 black ground
5 4 black ground
6 4 black ground
7 3 red +5 volts
8 3 red +5 volts
9 3 red +5 volts
10 2 black ground
11 2 black ground
12 2 black ground
13 1 yellow +12 volts
14 1 yellow +12 volts
15 1 yellow +12 volts
Connector part numbers
Cable connector Terminals Maximum current per circuit
Molex 67582-0000 Molex 67581-0000 1. 5 amps
Official cable/connector maximum wattage delivery
Voltage rail Number of lines Maximum current Maximum wattage
+3.3 volts 3 4.5 amps 14.85 watts
+5 volts 3 4.5 amps 22.5 watts
+12 volts 3 4.5 amps 54 watts

You have to be careful about SATA power cables. Some of them are missing
the 3. 3 volt wire. People with older power supplies often use adapters which
convert from
4 pin peripheral
cables to SATA power cables. But since 4 pin peripheral connectors only
supply 5 and 12 volts, the SATA connector is missing 3.3 volts (there’s no
orange wire). There are also a few older power supplies which inexplicably
have SATA power cables which are missing the 3.3 volt wire. Currently, SATA
drives rarely use
3.3 volts. That may be because there are too many people using adapters so
the drive makers don’t want the headaches which come with using 3.3 volts.
But in the future, 3.3 volt drives may become common so you need to be
careful when using SATA power cables which don’t implement 3.3 volts.

ATX 20 pin main power cable

In 1996 PC makers started switching to the ATX standard which defined a new
20 pin motherboard power connector. It includes a 3.3 volt rail which is used
to power newer chips which require a lower voltage than 5 volts. It also has
a standby 5 volt rail which is always on even when the power supply is turned
off to provide standby power to the motherboard when the machine is sleeping.
The new connector also allows the motherboard to turn the power supply on and
off rather than depend on the user to flip a power switch. This connector is
polarized so it can only be plugged in pointing in the correct direction.

Pinout
Pins 1 through 10 Pins 11 through 20
Description Wire color Pin number Pin number Wire color Description
+3. 3 volts orange 1 11 orange +3.3 volts
+3.3 volts orange 2 12 blue -12 volts
ground black 3 13 black ground
+5 volts red 4 14 green PS_ON#
ground black 5 15 black ground
+5 volts red 6 16 black ground
ground black 7 17 black ground
PWR_OK gray 8 18 white -5 volts (optional)
VSB +5 volts purple 9 19 red +5 volts
+12 volts yellow 10 20 red +5 volts

Some of the voltage lines on the connector may have smaller sense wires which
allow the power supply to sense what voltage is actually seen by the
motherboard. These are pretty common on the 3.3 volt line in pin 11 but are
sometimes used for other voltages too. The -5 volt line on pin 18 was made
optional in ATX12V 1.3 (introduced in 2003) because -5 had been rarely used
for years. Newer motherboards virtually never require -5 volts but many older
motherboards do. Most newer power supplies don’t provide -5 volts in which
case the white wire is missing.

Connector part numbers
Motherboard connector Cable connector Terminals Maximum current per circuit
Molex 39-28-1203 Molex 39-01-2200 Molex 39-00-0168,
Molex 44476-1111
6 amps
Unofficial cable/connector maximum wattage delivery for main rails
Voltage rail Number of lines Maximum current Maximum wattage
+3. 3 volts 3 18 amps 59 watts
+5 volts 4 24 amps 120 watts
+12 volts 1 6 amps 72 watts

Dell used to ship many computers which used motherboards and power supplies
which looked like plain old ATX but were not really ATX at all. If you
plugged a real ATX power supply into the motherboard then things went
kaboom (or frzzzzzap or …). Sadly, some large computer vendors like to lock
customers into buying upgrades from them rather from a third party. That’s
nasty enough but Dell built their non-standard computers and motherboards
with what looked like standard ATX components. You only found out otherwise
once sparks started flying. The Dell PCs which were carrying this ticking
time-bomb were made between 1996 and 2000. If you’re replacing a Dell power
supply from this era then you should call Dell and make sure it’s not a
proprietary design. And if they say yes then be sure to voice your
displeasure. This is an evil business practice which should stop.

You can plug a 20 pin ATX power cable into a motherboard with a
24 pin ATX connector.
The image above shows the 20 pin power cable plugged into a
24 pin motherboard. A 20 pin power cable only
fits into one end of a 24 pin motherboard connector so you can’t insert it
incorrectly. The 24 pin motherboard connector is actually just the 20 pin
connector with 4 extra pins added on the end. The original 20 pins were
unchanged. The extra 4 pins are not separate rails. They’re just extra lines
to provide more current to the same rails. On every 24 pin motherboard I’ve
seen, the extra lines for ground, 3.3,
5, and 12 are just connected to the other lines on the same rail from the 20
pin connector. I’ve never heard of exceptions and it doesn’t make sense for
motherboard makers to create any. As a result, you can plug a 20 pin cable
into a 24 pin motherboard and it will work just fine. At least, it will for a
while. They added those extra 4 pins for a reason. When you plug a 20 pin
cable into a 24 pin connector you’re not providing the extra current carrying
capacity which may be needed by the motherboard. If your motherboard’s
current requirements are low enough then it will work properly with only a 20
pin power cabled plugged in. But if the motherboard draws enough current,
then you can overheat the 20 pins you’re using on the 24 pin connector. I’ve
seen enough pictures of burned ATX main connectors to assure you that this
happens. In adding the extra four pins, 3.3 volts went from 3 to 4 lines. 5
volts when from 4 to 5 lines. 12 volts went from 1 to 2 lines so its capacity
doubled. Connectors really do get hot if you overload them so the safest
thing to do is use a real 24 pin power supply on a motherboard with a 24 pin
connector. Note that your 24 pin machine may work fine with a 20 pin power
supply until you add a PCI Express card later on down the road. PCI Express
cards can draw up to 75 watts through the motherboard connector so
adding an expansion card can substantially increase power draw through the
main power cable. Many PCI Express
video cards which have the
6 pin or
8 pin PCI Express
power cable still draw a
substantial
portion of their 12 volt load through the PCI Express slot. The extra 4
pins doubled the current capacity of the 12 volt rail so that one is easy to
overload when only using a 20 pin main power cable.

The picture above shows an adapter which allows you to plug a 20 pin
power supply into a 24 pin motherboard. These do not solve the problems
mentioned above. In
fact, they usually make things worse. You still have only the same old 20
wires and pin&socket connectors that you would have if you plugged it
directly into the motherboard. But with the adapter you also have longer
wires and another set of pins&sockets so you have a higher voltage drop and
more things which can go wrong. All the adapter does is remove the problem
from the 24 pin motherboard connector and move it to the 20 pin connector on
the adapter. About the only good thing it does is to make sure the 20 pin
connector on the adapter melts rather than the 24 pin connector on the
motherboard. You shouldn’t underestimate the potential problems which come
from adding another connector between the power supply and the motherboard.
The resistance of connectors can increase due to being plugged and unplugged.
Increasing the resistance makes the connector drop more voltage and dissipate
more heat. Any number of physical changes can also cause higher connector
resistance which causes more problems. You shouldn’t put an extra connector
in a high current path unless you’ve got a good reason. That’s a good rule
for power cables in general but it goes doubly for the high current draws you
sometimes find through motherboard main power cables. The best practice is to
avoid these 20 to 24 pin adapters and get a real 24 pin power supply.

ATX 24 pin main power cable

The 24 pin main power
connector was added in ATX12V 2.0 to provide extra power needed by
PCI Express slots. The older
20 pin main power
cable only has one 12 volt line. The new 24 pin connector added one
line apiece for ground, 3.3, 5, and 12 volts. The extra pins made the
auxiliary power cable
unnecessary so most ATX12V 2.x power supplies don’t have them. The 24 pin
connector
is polarized so it can only be plugged in pointing in the correct direction.

Pinout
Pins 1 through 12 Pins 13 through 24
Description Wire color Pin number Pin number Wire color Description
+3. 3 volts orange 1 13 orange +3.3 volts
+3.3 volts orange 2 14 blue -12 volts
ground black 3 15 black ground
+5 volts red 4 16 green PS_ON#
ground black 5 17 black ground
+5 volts red 6 18 black ground
ground black 7 19 black ground
PWR_OK gray 8 20 white -5 volts (optional)
VSB +5 volts purple 9 21 red +5 volts
+12 volts yellow 10 22 red +5 volts
+12 volts yellow 11 23 red +5 volts
+3. 3 volts orange 12 24 black ground

Some of the voltage lines on the connector may have smaller sense wires which
allow the power supply to sense what voltage is actually seen by the
motherboard. These are pretty common on the 3.3 volt line in pin 13 but are
sometimes used for other voltages too. The -5 volt line on pin 20 was made
optional in ATX12V 1.3 (introduced in 2003) because -5 had been rarely used
for years. Newer motherboards virtually never require -5 volts but many older
motherboards do. Most newer power supplies don’t provide -5 volts in which
case the white wire is missing.

Connector part numbers
Motherboard connector Cable connector Terminals Maximum current per circuit
Molex 39-28-1243 Molex 39-01-2240 Molex 39-00-0168,
Molex 44476-1111
6 amps
Unofficial cable/connector maximum wattage delivery for main rails
Voltage rail Number of lines Maximum current Maximum wattage
+3.3 volts 4 24 amps 79.2 watts
+5 volts 5 30 amps 150 watts
+12 volts 2 12 amps 144 watts

If you have an ATX power supply with a 24 pin main cable, it’s okay to plug
it into a motherboard with a 20 pin connector. It was designed to work that
way. You can see an example in the picture above. The extra 4 pins on
the cable just hang over the end of the motherboard connector. The 24 pin
cable only fits
into a 20 pin socket at one end so you can’t plug it in incorrectly. The
extra 4 pins were added to the 24 pin version of the cable to provide one
extra wire for ground, 3.3, 5, and 12 volts. But it’s okay to leave those 4
pins disconnected because a motherboard with a 20 pin connector doesn’t need
them. The only problem you can bump into (literally) is if there is something
blocking the spot where the 24 pin cable hangs over the end. Or sometimes the
end of the 20 pin motherboard connector is too thick to fit between the pins
of the 24 pin cable. You can solve that problem by carefully shaving down
one end of the 20 pin motherboard connector. It’s just plastic. You won’t
miss it. If you can’t get them to fit together then you can get an adapter
cable which will make it work. The 24 pin cable plugs into one end of the
adapter and then the adapter plugs into the 20 pin motherboard. But you
should avoid using that kind of adapter if you can because the extra wire and
connector are just more things which can go wrong. Adapters also slightly
increase the voltage drop which is something worth avoiding. It’s better to
first see if you can get a 24 pin cable to fit into a 20 pin motherboard
before resorting to an adapter.

ATX 20+4 pin main power cable

Motherboards can come with either a
20 pin main power connector
or a
24 pin main power connector.
Many power supplies come with a 20+4 cable which is compatible with both 20
and 24 pin motherboards. A 20+4 power cable has two pieces: a 20 pin piece,
and a 4 pin piece. If you leave the two pieces separate then you can plug the 20 pin
piece into a 20 pin motherboard and leave the 4 pin piece unplugged. Be sure
to leave the 4 pin piece unplugged even if it fits into another connector.
The 4 pin piece is not compatible with any other connectors. If you plug the
two pieces of a 20+4 power cable together then you have a 24 pin power cable
which can be plugged into a 24 pin motherboard.

4 pin ATX +12 volt power cable

Older computers put most of their load on 3.3 and 5 volts. As time passed,
computers drew more and more of their load from 12 volts (see
here). Before this power cable
was introduced there was just one
12 volt line provided to the motherboard. This cable added two more 12
volt lines so more of the load could be shifted to 12 volts. The power coming
from this connector is usually used to power the CPU but some motherboards
use it for other things as well. The presense of this connector on a
motherboard means it’s an ATX12V motherboard. For dual 12 volt rail power
supplies, this connector provides the voltage refered to as 12V2. The power
cable which plugs into the 4 pin connector has two black wires and two yellow
wires. This cable is sometimes called an “ATX12V” cable or “P4” cable
although neither of those are technically accurate descriptions.

If you have one of these connectors on a motherboard then you must plug a
power cable into it or your CPU won’t get any power. The one exception is
that when this connector was new, some motherboards shipped with a socket
into which you could plug a 4
pin peripheral power cable as an alternative. That helped people who had
older power supplies which didn’t have the 4 pin 12 volt cable.

The 4 pin 12 volt cable is polarized so it can only be plugged into the 4
pin motherboard connector correctly. If you look carefully at the picture
above you can see that two of the pins are square and the other two have
rounded corners. The motherboard connectors also have the same square and
rounded arrangement so the power cable only fits in one way. At least that’s
true unless you try really hard to force it into the connector. With enough
force you can sometimes get a cable with a small number of pins into a
connector which doesn’t match. If you look carefully you can also see that
the square and rounded pattern matches various positions on other motherboard
connectors like the
20 pin main power connector
and
24 pin main power connector.
Do yourself a favor and only plug the 4 pin 12 volt cable into the motherboard
connector where it belongs (unless you enjoy smoke and fried components).

If your
power supply doesn’t have a 4 pin 12 V cable then you can provide one with the
adapter shown above. It converts a
4 pin peripheral cable
into a 4 pin 12 V cable.

Pinout
Pins 1, 2 Pins 3, 4
Description Wire color Pin number Pin number Wire color Description
ground black 1 3 yellow +12 volts
ground black 2 4 yellow +12 volts
Connector part numbers
Motherboard connector Cable connector Terminals Maximum current per circuit
Molex 39-28-1043 Molex 39-01-2040 Molex 39-00-0168,
Molex 44476-1111
8 amps
Unofficial cable/connector maximum wattage delivery
Voltage rail Number of lines Maximum current Maximum wattage
+12 volts 2 16 amps 192 watts

You can plug a
4 pin 12 volt power cable
into an
8 pin EPS motherboard connector
but there’s no guarantee that it will work. If
the motherboard expects only one 12 volt rail then a
4 pin 12 volt cable
may work. If the motherboard expects two 12 volt rails (many dual CPU
motherboards require one 12 volt rail per CPU) then it won’t work.
Even if the motherboard works with a
4 pin 12 volt cable,
you are still only providing half of the current carrying capacity which
would be provided by an 8 pin EPS cable. That can overheat both the motherboard
connector and 4 pin cable. Scorched or melted connectors can be a result.
A motherboard which has the 8 pin EPS connector expects a lot of current and
you are taking a serious risk by plugging in a 4 pin cable. The 4 pin cable only fits
at one end of the 8 pin EPS motherboard connector so you can’t plug it in
improperly. That is, it only fits into one end of the motherboard connector
unless you force it. If the cable doesn’t go into the socket easily then
you’re probably trying to plug it into the wrong end. But then again, it’s
not a good idea to try to run with a 4 pin cable in an 8 pin motherboard
anyway.

8 pin EPS +12 volt power cable

This cable was originally created for workstations to provide 12 volts to
power multiple CPUs. But as time has passed many CPUs require more 12 volt
power and the
8 pin 12 volt cable is
often used instead of a
4 pin 12 volt cable.
Depending on the power supply, the connector may contain one 12 volt rail in
all 8 pins or two 12 volt rails taking up 4 pins apiece. It is often refered
to as an “EPS12V” cable.

The 8 pin 12 volt cable is polarized so it can only be plugged into the 8
pin motherboard connector correctly. If you look carefully at the picture
above you can see that four of the pins are square and the other four have
rounded corners. The motherboard connectors also have the same square and
rounded arrangement so the power cable only fits in one way. At least that’s
true unless you try really hard to force it into the connector. With enough
force you can sometimes get a cable with a small number of pins into a
connector which doesn’t match. The 8 pin cable has enough pins that it’s
pretty hard to insert it in the wrong direction but determined people might
be able to do it. If you look carefully you
can also see that the square and rounded pattern matches various positions on
other motherboard connectors like the
20 pin main power connector
and
24 pin main power connector.
You should only plug the 8 pin 12 volt cable into the motherboard
connector where it belongs unless you enjoy the smell of fried electronics.

You can also plug an
8 pin 12 volt cable into a
4 pin 12 volt motherboard connector.
I don’t have a picture of this one but it looks similar to
this. Four of the
pins on the 8 pin cable fit
into the motherboard connector and the other four pins hang off the end.
The 8 pin cable only fits into one end of the 4 pin motherboard connector
unless you try hard to force it into the wrong position. The 8 pin
cable is electrically compatible but it may not fit into a 4 pin motherboard.
There is often a component which blocks the area where the 4 pins would hang
off the end. And sometimes the plastic end of the 4 pin connector is too
thick to fit between the pins of the 8 pin cable.

Make sure that you don’t try to plug an
8 pin 12 volt cable into
the
8 Pin PCI Express power
connector on a video card. The two cables look very similar so it’s easy
to get the two confused.
8 Pin PCI Express power
cables are usually labeled to distinguish them from
8 pin 12 volt cables.
The PCI Express cable usually has “PCI-E” printed on the connector. If there
are no labels then you can usually use wire colors to tell the two kinds of cables
apart. An
8 pin 12 volt cable
has yellow wires on the same side as the connector clip. An
8 Pin PCI Express cable
has black wires on the clip side.
The two power cables are also keyed differently so you can’t plug one kind of
power cable into the other kind of connector. But as with this kind of
connector, you can sometimes force the wrong kind of cable into a connector
if you push hard enough. Make sure you have the right kind of cable before
plugging it in. The two are definitely not compatible with each other.

Pinout
Pins 1 through 4 Pins 5 through 8
Description Wire color Pin number Pin number Wire color Description
ground black 1 5 yellow +12 volts (12V1)
ground black 2 6 yellow +12 volts (12V1)
ground black 3 7 yellow +12 volts (12V1 or 12V2)
ground black 4 8 yellow +12 volts (12V1 or 12V2)
Connector part numbers
Motherboard connector Cable connector Terminals Maximum current per circuit
Molex 39-28-1083 Molex 39-01-2080 Molex 39-00-0168,
Molex 44476-1111
7 amps
Unofficial cable/connector maximum wattage delivery
Voltage rail Number of lines Maximum current Maximum wattage
+12 volts 4 28 amps 336 watts

If you don’t have an 8
pin 12 volt cable then you can use the adapter shown above. It converts a
couple of 4 pin peripheral
power cables into an 8 pin 12 volt cable. If you use one of these adapters
then be sure
to plug the 4 pin peripheral connectors into separate cables coming from the
power supply. If you plug them both into the same power supply cable then you
are drawing all the power of the 8 pin 12 volt connector through a single 18 gauge
wire. You can often get away with that but there’s no reason to do it.

4+4 pin +12 volt power cable

Motherboards can come with either a
4 pin 12 volt connector
or an
8 pin 12 volt connector.
Many power supplies come with a 4+4 pin 12 volt cable which is compatible with both 4
and 8 pin motherboards. A 4+4 power cable has two separate 4 pin pieces.
If you plug the
two pieces of a 4+4 power cable together then you have a 8 pin power cable
which can be plugged into an
8 pin 12 volt connector.
If you leave the two pieces separate then you can plug one of the 4 pin
pieces into a
4 pin 12 volt connector
and leave the other 4 pin piece unplugged.

If
you look carefully at the image above then you can see the polarization of
the pins which prevents you from plugging the cable in improperly. Some of
the pins are square and some of them have rounded off corners. The motherboard
connectors have matching square and rounded off corners to prevent the cable
from being plugged in the wrong way. But if you look really carefully
at the right half of this particular cable and then look at the
8 pin 12 volt cable
pictured above you’ll notice that they don’t match. A regular 8 pin cable
has four square pins and four rounded ones but the 4+4 cable shown above has
two square pins and 6 rounded ones. The left half of the 4+4 matches the left
half of an 8 pin cable but the right half is different. Hmmmm… And this isn’t some bizarre cable
either. I’ve seen plenty of 4+4s which look like this one. And then there are
other 4+4 cables which look just like an 8 pin cable split in two (which
makes sense). Since rounded pins fit into square holes
in motherboard connectors, this particular cable will fit just fine into an
8 pin 12 volt motherboard
connector. But both halves of this 4+4 will fit into a
4 pin 12 volt motherboard connector.
You’re supposed to use the left half of the cable shown above when plugging
it into a 4 pin motherboard connector but the right half will also fit. As it happens,
either half will work fine in a 4 pin motherboard because both halves of the
4+4 just provide 12 volts. The pinouts are the same for both halves so either
one will work. I’m not sure why they make cables like this one because
you’d figure a 4+4 cable would just be an 8 pin cable which splits in two.
And you only need one half of a 4+4 cable to plug into a 4 pin motherboard.
The other half is unused. But the kind of 4+4 cable shown above is pretty
common so don’t let it throw you.

6 pin PCI Express power cable

This cable is used to provide extra 12 volt power to PCI Express expansion
cards. PCI Express motherboard slots can provide a maximum of 75 watts.
Many video cards draw significantly more than 75 watts so the 6 pin PCI
Express power cable was created. These high-power cards draw most of their
power from the 12 volt rail so this cable provides only 12 volts. These are
sometimes called “PCI Express cables”. They are
also occasionally called “PEG cables” where “PEG” stands for PCI Express
Graphics. If your power supply
doesn’t have a 6 pin PCI Express cable then you can use the adapter shown above on
the right to convert two
4 pin peripheral cables
into a PCI Express cable. If you use an adapter then be sure to plug
the 4 pin peripheral
connectors into separate cables coming from the power supply. If you plug
them both into the same power supply cable then you are drawing all the power
of the PCI Express connector through a single 18 gauge wire. You can usually
get away with that but there’s no reason to do it. The PCI Express 6 pin
connector is polarized so it can only be plugged in pointing in the correct
direction. But as with connectors of this type, you can sometimes force them
into the wrong kind of socket if you try hard enough. If it doesn’t slide in
easily then you’re probably plugging it into the wrong place.

Some video cards come with the
8 pin PCI Express power connector
to support higher wattage than the 6 pin PCI Express connectors. It’s okay to
plug a 6 pin PCI Express power cable into an 8 pin PCI Express connector.
It’s designed to work that way but will be limited to the lower wattage
provided by the 6 pin version of the cable. The 6 pin cable only fits into
one end of the 8 pin connector so you can’t insert it incorrectly but
you can sometimes force the 6 pin cable in the wrong way if you try hard
enough. Video cards can sense whether you have plugged a 6 pin or 8
pin cable into an 8 pin connector so the video card can impose some kind of
restriction when running with only a 6 pin power cable. Some cards will
refuse to run with only a 6 pin cable in an 8 pin socket. Others will work
with a 6 pin cable
at normal speeds but will not allow overclocking. Check the video card
documentation to get the rules. But if you don’t have any other information
then just assume that if your video card has an 8 pin connector then you
must plug in an 8 pin cable.

Pinout
Pins 1 through 3 Pins 4 through 6
Description Wire color Pin number Pin number Wire color Description
+12 volts yellow 1 4 black ground
+12 volts or not connected yellow or not connected 2 5 black ground
+12 volts yellow 3 6 black ground
Connector part numbers
Video card connector Cable connector Terminals Maximum current per circuit
Molex 45558-0002 Molex 45559-0002 Molex 39-00-0168,
Molex 44476-1111
8 amps
Official cable/connector maximum wattage delivery
Voltage rail Number of lines Maximum current Maximum wattage
+12 volts 3 2.083 amps 75 watts

The PCI Express specification is, unfortunately, not a free, public
specification. So most people have never seen it. Including me. ATX
specification: freely available to all. PCI Express specification: expensive
so hardly anyone has seen it. ATX: good. PCI Express: bad. It’s a shame when a
widely used standard isn’t freely available to the public. Nonetheless,
information leaks out from the specification and the 6 pin PCI Express power
cable is actually rated at an extremely conservative 75 watts. I have no idea
why the wattage is rated so low because the specifications from Molex clearly
allow substantially more power. Part of the reason may be that pin 2 (listed
above as a 12 volt line) may be listed as not connected in the specification.
I’ve never seen a 6 pin PCI Express power cable with pin 2 not
connected. They’ve all had a 12 volt line connected to pin 2.
I’ve also seen claims that there may be unimplemented sense lines in the
specification. Welcome to the uncertainty which happens when you don’t have
freely available specifications.
Even with only two 12 volt lines the
standard implementation of PCI Express power cables use large enough gauge
wire and a good enough connector to provide much more than the three amps per wire required to provide 75
watts. Nonetheless, the 6 pin PCI Express power cable officially provides
only 75 watts. In all likelihood, however, real implementations of this power
cable can provide far more than 75 watts.

8 pin PCI Express power cable

The PCI Express 2.0 specification released in January 2007 added an 8 pin
PCI Express power cable. It’s just an 8 pin version of the
6 Pin PCI Express power
cable. Both are primarily used to provide supplemental power to video
cards. The older 6 pin version officially provides a maximum of 75 watts
(although unofficially it can usually provide much more) whereas the new
8 pin version provides a maximum of 150 watts. It is very easy to confuse the
8 pin version with the very similar-looking
EPS 8 pin 12 volt cable.

The 8 pin PCI Express and the
EPS 8 pin 12 volt
connectors are polarized differently so
you won’t be able to plug one kind of cable into the other kind of connector.
That is, you won’t be able to plug the wrong kind of cable in unless you try
really hard. Unfortunately, the Molex Mini-fit Jr. connectors used by both
kinds of power cables can sometimes be forced into a differently-polarized
connector if they only have a few pins and you push hard enough. If the cable
won’t slide in easily then you’re
probably trying to insert the wrong kind of cable. The 8 pin PCI Express
connector does have a small plastic bridge which prevents it from being
plugged into an
EPS 8 pin 12 volt
motherboard connector. You can see the bridge in the image above between the
rightmost two pins in the top row of the connector. But there’s no such protection to prevent
EPS 8 pin 12 volt cables
from being plugged into an 8 pin PCI Express connector on a video card. That
combination may fit if you shove hard enough. And if you plug in the
wrong kind of cable then expect fireworks. Some of the grounds and 12 volts
wires for an
EPS 8 pin 12 volt are
reversed compared to an 8 pin PCI Express. Fortunately, most 8 pin
PCI Express connectors are labeled “PCI-E” so people won’t confuse them with
EPS 8 pin 12 volt cables.
If the connectors aren’t labeled then you can tell an
8 pin PCI Express power cable from an EPS 8 pin 12 volt cable by checking the
color of the wires which plug into the clip side of the connector. On the
EPS 8 pin cable, the yellow wires (the 12 volt
wires) go into the clip side of the connector. On the 8 pin PCI Express
cable, the wires on the clip side are all black (grounds). That’s the same as it is with the
6 Pin PCI Express power
cable. Of course, none of this helps you if your cable uses the trendy
all-the-same-color-wires design which is popular with high-fashion power
supplies. In that case you’ll just have to be very careful or hope the
connectors are labeled.

Pinout
Pins 1 through 3 Pins 4 through 6
Description Wire color Pin number Pin number Wire color Description
+12 volts yellow 1 5 black ground
+12 volts yellow 2 6 black ground
+12 volts yellow 3 7 black ground
ground black 4 8 black ground
Connector part numbers
Video card connector Cable connector Terminals Maximum current per circuit
? ? ? ?
Official cable/connector maximum wattage delivery
Voltage rail Number of lines Maximum current Maximum wattage
+12 volts 3 4.167 150 watts
6+2 pin PCI Express power cable

Some video cards have
6 Pin PCI Express power connectors
and others have
8 Pin PCI Express power connectors.
Many power supplies come with a 6+2 PCI Express power cable which is
compatible with both kinds of video cards.
The 6+2 PCI Express power cable is made up of two pieces: a 6
pin piece, and a 2 pin piece. If you put the two
pieces together then you have a full 8 pin PCI Express power cable. But if
you split the connector into two parts then you can plug the 6 pin part into
the older 6 pin PCI Express connector and leave the 2 pin part unplugged.
That way, your power supply only needs to have one 6+2 cable to be compatible
with both 6 pin and 8 pin PCI Express connectors.


Internal PC Components – Motherboard P4 to Molex Power


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Internal PC Components – Motherboard P4 to Molex Power Supply

This Motherboard P4 12V 4-Pin to Molex 4-Pin Power Adapter Cable is used when you want to upgrade your system to a Pentium 4 (P4) system. Using this cable allows you to upgrade without having to buy a new power supply. This cable is designed with high-quality materials that allow for the best electrical conductivity.

Features:

  • Connector 1: Motherboard 12V 4-Pin Female
  • Connector 2: Molex Male
  • Upgrade to a P4 System
  • Optimal Electrical Conductivity
  • Length: 12 Inches
  • RoHS Compliant

Q: What is an internal connector?

A: Internal connectors are what is found on the inside of your computer. There are socket connectors and power connectors. Socket connectors are used with flat ribbon cables and are used to transfer data between devices. Power connectors are used to power devices that are inside the computer. Both types stay in place by the friction between the connector body and where you plug it in to.

Q: What do the different colors of the wires mean?

A: Generally there are four wires in your internal power cable. There are two back ones one red one and one yellow one. In internal power cables both of the black wires are grounded the red wire is +5 volts and the yellow wire is +12 volts.

Q: I am about to buy a cable and want to make sure I get the right length. How is the 12 inch cable measured?

A: The cables listed as 12 inches are measured from the mounting plate or bracket to the motherboard connectors. The same goes for all of the lengths.

power supply – Is the 4-pin PSU connector required? (Trying to connect a PSU to a mini case.)

Okay, now that we have more information, the question is completely different. What you are asking is if you can put this motherboard in a case like this, with a PSU like this.

If you look at section 1.7.2 (page 1-10) of the manual where it discusses the EATXPWR and ATX12V power connectors, it explicitly states:

  • For a fully configured system, we recommend that you use a power supply unit (PSU) that complies with ATX 12 V Specification 2.0 (or later version) and provides a minimum power of 350 W.

  • DO NOT forget to connect the 4-pin ATX +12V power plug. Otherwise, the system will not boot up.

  • We recommend that you use a PSU with higher power output when configuring a system with more power-consuming devices. The system may become unstable or may not boot up if the power is inadequate.

What this means is that the PSUs you are looking at are not going to work. They are unlikely to conform to ATX 2.0, and not only do they not have the ATX12V connector, but they max out at around 160W which is almost half of the minimum needed for a board (and CPU) like this.

You are going to have to either contact the manufacturer of the case to ask them about compatible PSUs (I notice a conspicuous lack of power information on the site), or else perform a case mod to find a way to fit in or connect to a typical desktop PSU.

Also, a word of warning: a case that small is almost certain to have heat-dissipation issues (there is also an equally conspicuous lack of cooling information on the site). You will want to ask them about cooling and airflow while you are at it, otherwise you will need to find a way to make sure it does not overheat (cut more holes in the case?)


Technical details about the actual connectors.

The extra 4-pin (sometimes eight) connector is for the CPU. It provides a dedicated 12V supply to the CPU for when it needs it. That way, the CPU does not draw from the same source as the rest of the components in the system. It is usually called the P4 power connector because when the P4 was introduced it was so power-hungry that it needed more power, so the ATX standard had to be updated to accommodate it.

In fact, because video-cards became more powerful and more power-hungry as well, many modern PSUs (especially the fancy, high-end, modular kinds) even supply even more than the minimum of two 12V rails that the ATX specification calls for (though some don’t actually provide two completely separate rails).

There is also a 6-pin connector that can provide extra power to the PCI-e bus.

As standards loosen and PSU manufacturers start diverging and adding new features to accommodate increasing power-demands, the number of different PSU connectors continues to increase.

(You can find out the specs by looking at he sticker on the side of the PSU. It will indicate the maximum current that each of the rails can handle.)

Internal Power, SATA and Socket Connector Guide

What are internal connectors?

Internal connectors are found inside a computer case. There are two primary types of connectors found internally: socket connectors and power connectors. Socket connectors are designed for use with flat ribbon cable, and are generally used to transfer data among devices. A socket connector mates with pins arranged into a header. Usually a header is built onto a piece of circuit board, or integrated into an electronic device. Socket connections are held in place by the friction of the pins. Most socket/header interfaces are built to similar dimensions; header pins are 0.025 inches in width, and spaced 0.10 inches apart. Power connectors are used to supply and distribute power to internal devices inside the computer. They normally use the friction of the connector bodies to stay in place.

Select the internal connector that you want to learn more about:

More connectors available:


10-pin socket

Female:

 image to expand

This connector has two rows of five pins and is normally used to connect an external port to header pins on a motherboard. This connector is typically used for USB, or Serial (DB9) ports.

Shop 10-pin socket


26-pin socket

Female:

 image to expand

This connector is typically used to add a DB25 Parallel Port interface. Most of today’s motherboards do not have this type of connection.

Shop 26-pin socket


40-pin socket

Female:

 image to expand

This interface is still in wide use. It is found on IDE/ATA hard drives, optical drives, and tape drives. Many motherboards come with a pair of 40-pin controllers (described as primary and secondary). Each controller can handle one or two drives, so most standard PCs can have a maximum of four IDE drives. A few years ago, the IDE/ATA standard for hard drives was improved, and a new cable was specified. This new standard is referenced by many names—Ultra ATA, Ultra-DMA, Ultra-66/100/133, etc. Ultra ATA hard drive cables use an 80-conductor ribbon cable, although the same 40-pin socket/header interface is still used.

Shop 40-pin socket


50-pin socket

Male:

Female:

 image to expand

50-pin socket connectors are used for basic internal SCSI buses. The connector looks identical to a 40-pin IDE interface, only with more pins. The 50-pin interface is used for older, narrow SCSI buses.

Shop 50-pin socket


68-pin socket

Male:

 image to expand

The 68-pin socket internal connection is the same size and shape as the external MD68 pin interface used for SCSI devices and cables. However, the internal flat ribbon version does not use any thumbscrews or latch clips to hold the connector in place; it is held in solely by the friction of the connector and pins. The 68-pin flat ribbon connector is unique in that the connectors on the cable are male, and the interfaces on SCSI drives and host controllers are female. This connector is very commonly used for wide SCSI buses.

Shop 68-pin socket


4-pin power (5.25 inch)

Male:

Female:

 image to expand

The common 5.25 inch 4-pin power connector is impossible to miss inside a PC case. A computer’s power supply normally provides several of these connectors, which mate to male interfaces on hard drives, CD/DVD drives, and other internal devices. Because these drives often have a 5.25 inch form factor, the power connector itself became known as a “5.25” connector. The plug is also commonly referenced as a “Molex” connection, after the well-known connector manufacturer. The connector is typically white in color, and made from hard nylon or similar plastic material.

Shop 4-pin power


Serial ATA (SATA) Power

Female:

 image to expand

The Serial ATA (SATA) Power connector has 15 pins and is slightly larger than the SATA data connector. One main advantage the SATA power connector provides over the 4 pin power connector is a pin that provides 3.3 V of power. Certain SATA drives have specific power requirements.

Shop Products


Serial ATA (SATA)

Female:

 image to expand

The Serial ATA or SATA connector is used as an interface for connecting a host bus adapter to a mass storage device or optical drive. This connector was designed to replace the older connectors, 34-pin, 40-pin, etc. This connection type is designed to communicate at much higher speeds than what were possible with the older connection styles. This connection is sometimes referred to as the SATA “L” due to the shape of the connector.

Shop SATA


External Serial ATA (eSATA)

Female:

 image to expand

Similar to the standard SATA connector, the eSATA connector is shielded and designed to connect external mass storage devices or optical drives to an eSATA port. This connector is sometime referred to as the SATA “I” connector due to the shape of the connector.

Shop eSATA


4-pin power (3.5 inch)

A less common 4-pin power connector is the 3.5 inch plug. This connector is smaller in size than the 5.25 inch, and it is not as widely used. It can be found mainly on 3.5-inch floppy disk drives.

Shop 4-pin power (3.5 inch)


ATX 20-pin power

This is a 20-pin interface that supplies power to a computer’s motherboard. It has two rows of 10 pins, with a locking tab that holds it firmly in place after connection.

Shop ATX 20-pin


3-pin Fan

The 3-pin Fan power connector is found on power supplies within a computer case. This connector provides power to cooling fans.

Shop 3-pin Fan


4-pin Fan

The 4-pin Fan power connector is found on motherboards within a computer case. This connector provides power to cooling fans and is typically used on the fan that cools the CPU. This connector uses the same power arrangement as the 3-pin connector, therefore, a 3-pin connector can be used on a 4-pin fan. The 4th pin is a sensor that allows the fan to be controlled for speed and may give the ability to turn the fan on or off. If you use a 3-pin connector in a 4-pin slot, you will not be able to control the fan as it will always be powered on.

Shop 4-pin Fan


6-pin PCI Express

The 6-pin PCI Express connector is found on some PCI Express graphics cards. This connector is used for auxiliary power.

Shop 6-pin PCI Express


4-pin Pentium

® 4 power

The 4-pin Pentium 4 power connector is found on Pentium 4 motherboards. This connector delivers dedicated power to the CPU.

Shop 4-pin Pentium® 4


32-pin Serial Attached SCSI (SAS)

Female:

 image to expand

The 32-pin SAS connector is typically found on SAS controller cards. SAS technology is a replacement for SCSI and is typically used to connect hard disk drives in data center applications. However, this connector can be used to connect a SAS expander. This connector is also referred to as the SFF-8484 connector. In many cases the 32-pin connector is being replaced by the mini-SAS connectors due to mini-SAS’ smaller form factor.


34-pin socket

Female:

 image to expand

34-pin sockets are used for floppy drive cables. The floppy controller on a motherboard is a 34-pin header, as are the connections on 3.5 inch floppy drives. “Antique” 5.25 inch floppy drives used a card-edge connection to interface to the floppy cable, so many floppy cables will come with both socket and card-edge connectors. For many of today’s computers, floppy drives are no longer standard equipment.


29-pin Serial Attached SCSI (SAS)

Female:

 image to expand

The 29-pin SAS connector is typically found on SAS drives. This connector does appear similar to the SATA data and power connection. However, this connector has 4 additional pins. This connector is also referred to as the SFF-8482 connector.


ATX 24-pin power

Newer computers with ATX-form factor motherboards use a 24-pin power connector. The newer, larger connector eliminates the -5V rail, and adds additional +3.3V and +12V rails.


Still not sure?
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4 Pin AC Power cord ? [Archive] – Videokarma.org TV – Video



View Full Version : 4 Pin AC Power cord ?


Anyone know where I can get one of these 4 pin AC Power cords ?
Need it for an old 1978 Sanyo Portable TV (TV is Sears and Simpsons made by Sanyo in Japan Model # ctp 1401.)
The tv is like this

Heres the pins

http://i46.tinypic.com/33e51y8.jpg
http://i50.tinypic.com/ji2n84.jpg


mstaton

03-16-2013, 10:09 PM

You might make this work, not exact but close

http://www.ebay.com/itm/SONY-4-PIN-AC-POWER-CORD-CRF-5100-CRF-5090-CRF-5080-CRF-RARE-/171007764628?pt=US_Ham_Radio_Receivers&hash=item27d0db6894


You might make this work, not exact but close

http://www.ebay.com/itm/SONY-4-PIN-AC-POWER-CORD-CRF-5100-CRF-5090-CRF-5080-CRF-RARE-/171007764628?pt=US_Ham_Radio_Receivers&hash=item27d0db6894

damn, 54 bucks ! :sigh:


mstaton

03-16-2013, 10:17 PM

did not look at the price but you can search for a Sony cord on the internet. Probably a better chance to find a Sony than Sanyo cord


Not so fast ! 2 pins are for AC , other 2 are +- 12v

Wrong cord & you may see fireworks.

A TV belching sparks & smoke is fun IF its what you want !

good luck


crtfool

03-17-2013, 11:01 AM

That cable is 2 pins in with 4 pins out – so you have 2 pairs of ac going into the TV. Do a continuity test on the 4 pins on the TV – 1 set of 2 pins should be connected together, and the other set of 2 pins should also be connected together – now you can just connect a standard 2 pin AC cord to the proper pair and the TV will work properly.


Not so fast ! 2 pins are for AC , other 2 are +- 12v

Wrong cord & you may see fireworks.

A TV belching sparks & smoke is fun IF its what you want !

good luck

Good to know. Thanks.

I have no idea how to find this proper cord !

You think Sanyo would have old stock ? :scratch3:


dieseljeep

03-17-2013, 02:11 PM

That cable is 2 pins in with 4 pins out – so you have 2 pairs of ac going into the TV. Do a continuity test on the 4 pins on the TV – 1 set of 2 pins should be connected together, and the other set of 2 pins should also be connected together – now you can just connect a standard 2 pin AC cord to the proper pair and the TV will work properly.

First of all, the cord shown in post #1, is from an RCA or an RCA built GE.

The cord has four pins on the connector end. Two are used for 120 VAC. Another pair are used for 12 VDC. The DC cord is simular but has the cigarette lighter plug on it and using a different set of pins on the connector end.


crtfool

03-17-2013, 02:16 PM

OK – very unusual that it is wired that way.

You should be able to identify the 2 pins that are for the AC circuit, and still use a standard 2 pin AC cord to power the TV.


Heres the pins

http://i46.tinypic.com/33e51y8.jpg
http://i50.tinypic.com/ji2n84.jpg


dieseljeep

03-19-2013, 06:17 PM

Heres the pins

http://i46.tinypic.com/33e51y8.jpg

http://i50.tinypic.com/ji2n84.jpg

Please include the model # of the set. The pictures in post #1 show a different set.

If we have the proper model number, maybe there is a Sams folder on it, so the pin out can be traced.


TV is Sears and Simpsons made by Sanyo in Japan Model #14062.


dieseljeep

03-20-2013, 08:26 AM

TV is Sears and Simpsons made by Sanyo in Japan Model #14062.

I don’t see anything listed in Sams under that number.

They never had much on Canadian products, unless it was an item that was sold here.

I don’t know if Sears still has stores in Canada. They closed down a lot of stores in the states. :sigh:


Just look up 1978 sanyo portable tv. Im sure they use the same plugs.


Zenith36kc20

03-20-2013, 10:12 AM

I can’t really see from the pictures but some of these sets have a switch inside the receptacle to switch to 12 volts or AC. If it does, be careful as the wrong setting can also fry the set.


Reece

03-20-2013, 07:28 PM

This guy has all kinds of cords. Might be able to help by sending him your pictures with dimensions pin to pin.

http://www.kenselectronics.com/lists/pwrcord.htm


This guy has all kinds of cords. Might be able to help by sending him your pictures with dimensions pin to pin.

http://www.kenselectronics.com/lists/pwrcord.htm

Is there an email address on that site ?


Reece

03-21-2013, 07:56 AM

Not the easiest site to navigate! I guess if I had to do it I’d call and ask how I could email him some pictures.


Anyone can help me with this ?


Hi guys,
do you think this sony cord will work ?

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Original-SONY-4-PIN-FEMALE-POWER-CORD-Hirakawa-7A-125V-AC-Adapter-/380627724572?pt=Vintage_Electronics_R2&hash=item589f2e291c


Hi guys, you think this Sony cord will work ?
see pic

http://s23.postimg.org/hzbfkr7iz/14266.jpg


twbranch

04-30-2013, 01:46 PM

Couldn’t you just make one?


You should be able to identify the 2 pins that are for the AC circuit, and still use a standard 2 pin AC cord to power the TV.

You think the bottom pins are for AC since they are spaced out more ?


Dangler

04-30-2013, 06:28 PM

Use an ohmeter to check for continuity from the plug to each of the four holes. The two that have continuity are the AC connections.


The tv schematic shows the top 2 pins are 120v AC and bottom pins are 12v DC. (SEE ATTACHMENT)


twbranch

05-01-2013, 10:15 PM

I believe the DC pins are used to charge a battery using the 120Vac coming in from the wall. You just need to make a cable with four pins that fit the socket on the television. I could do it but will cost as much as the one you found! Best to make your own!


Eric H

05-01-2013, 10:18 PM

Okay, now that I see the whole set from your post at A.R.F. I realize which set this is and I can at least offer you a picture of the cord and the part number.

Also it appears the AC goes to the narrow set of pins, the wide set must be for DC and are empty on this AC only cord.

It’s made by Kawasaki! and the part number is KS-23, that may help in your search.


Great thanks !

Do you recognise the TV at 24 seconds of this youtube clip ?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uWNVbFArFDQ

It’s the “Titanic” set, that is, it’s the same model Old Rose is watching at the beginning of the 1997 Movie.


Eric H

05-01-2013, 10:30 PM

That’s where I got that picture I just posted!
Did you get my PM about the cord?


That’s where I got that picture I just posted!
Did you get my PM about the cord?

Yes. Thanks so much ! :banana::thmbsp:


4 Pin Mini-Din Kycon Snap and Lock DC Power Connector

$8.49

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Telco Electronics 4 Pin Power Cord with 4-way Screw Terminal

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18cm 8 Pin Dual 4 Pin Graphics Card Power Cord Y Shaped 8 Pin PCI Express to Dual 4 Pin Power Cable for Molex Graphics Card # 280903 | Computer Cables & Connectors |

Product Description

Features:

  • 100% brand new and high quality.
  • This is IDE 4PINx2 to PCI-E 8pin Power Cable,
  • It can be used on many AMD video cars and nVidia
  • Connector A: Two LP4 4 4 Pin connections (5V pin is not required to not connect)
  • Connector B: 8 Pin Male PCI Express
  • Length: about 18 cm

Package includes:

  • 1 x 8-pin Dual 4-pin Molex
  • Power Cable

Without retail packaging.Packed Safely in Bubble Bag.

  • All items will be shipped within 2 business days after payment is verified.
  • Note: China Post Air Mail / Package just belonged to Universal Postal System, which is much slower than Special Delivery. Items usually arrive in 7-25 business days worldwide. And delivery time also depends on some factors including different delivery regions.The general arrival time table is below for your inference:

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  • If the item is defective in 12 months, we may also offer you a replacement, but you should pay for the additional shipping costs.
  • Our goal is to provide the highest level of customer service, and our customer service specialists are always ready to solve any problem you may have.Your 5-star positive feedback is greatly appreciated and please do not leave negative feedback without asking us for help

PSU of the computer – wire colors, voltage at connectors

A thick bundle of wires of different colors comes out of the computer’s power supply unit, and at first glance, it seems that it is impossible to figure out the pinout of the connectors.

But if you know the rules for the color coding of the wires coming out of the power supply, it will become clear what the color of each wire means, what voltage is present on it and to which nodes of the computer the wires are connected.

Color pinout of computer power supply connectors

In modern computers, ATX power supplies are used, and a 20 or 24 pin connector is used to supply voltage to the motherboard. The 20-pin power connector was used in the transition from AT to ATX standard.With the advent of the PCI-Express bus on motherboards, 24-pin connectors began to be installed on power supplies.

The 20-pin connector differs from the 24-pin connector by the absence of contacts with numbers 11, 12, 23 and 24. These contacts in the 24-pin connector are supplied with duplicated voltage already present on the other contacts.

Pin 20 (white wire) was previously used to supply −5 V in power supplies for ATX computers prior to 1.2. Currently, this voltage is not required for the motherboard to work, therefore, in modern power supplies, it is not formed and pin 20 is usually free.

Sometimes power supplies are equipped with a universal connector for connection to the motherboard. The connector consists of two. One is twenty-pin, and the second is four-pin (with pin numbers 11, 12, 23 and 24), which can be fastened to a twenty-pin connector and you will get 24 pin.

So if you change the motherboard, for the connection of which you need not 20, but a 24-pin connector, then you should pay attention, it is quite possible that the old power supply will work, if its set of connectors has a universal 20 + 4-pin connector.

In modern ATX power supplies, there are also auxiliary 4, 6 and 8-pin connectors for supplying +12 V voltage. They serve to supply additional supply voltage to the processor and video card.

As you can see in the photo, the +12 V supply conductor is yellow with a black stripe.

A Serial ATA connector is currently used to power hard and SSD drives. The voltages and pin numbers are shown in the photo.

Outdated connectors BP

This 4-pin connector was previously installed in a PSU to power a floppy drive designed to read and write from 3.5 ”floppy disks.Currently, it can only be found in older computer models.

Floppy disk drives are not installed in modern computers, as they are obsolete.

The four-pin connector in the photo is the longest used, but is already obsolete. It served to supply the supply voltage +5 and +12 V to removable devices, hard drives, disk drives. Currently, a Serial ATA connector is installed in the PSU instead.

System blocks of the first personal computers were equipped with AT type power supplies.One connector, consisting of two halves, was suitable for the motherboard. It had to be inserted in such a way that the black wires were next to each other. The supply voltage to these power supplies was supplied through a switch that was installed on the front panel of the system unit. Nevertheless, according to the PG pin, a signal from the motherboard had the ability to turn the Power Supply on and off.

At present, AT power supplies are practically out of service, but they can be successfully used to power any other devices, for example, to power a laptop from the network, in the event of a failure of its standard power supply, power a 12 V soldering iron, or low-voltage light bulbs, LED strips and much more.The main thing is not to forget that the AT power supply, like any switching power supply, is not allowed to be connected to the network without an external load.

Reference table for color coding,

voltage and peak-to-peak ripple values ​​at PSU connectors

Wires of the same color coming out of the computer’s power supply are internally soldered to one track of the printed circuit board, that is, they are connected in parallel. Therefore, the voltage across all wires of the same color is the same value.

Voltage +5 V SB (Stand-by) – (purple wire) is generated by an independent low-power power supply built into the power supply unit, made on one field-effect transistor and a transformer.This voltage ensures that the computer operates in standby mode and serves only to start the power supply unit. When the computer is running, the presence or absence of +5 V SB does not matter. Thanks to +5 V SB, the computer can be started by pressing the “Start” button on the system unit or remotely, for example, from an uninterruptible power supply unit in the event of a prolonged absence of the 220 V supply voltage.

Voltage +5 V PG (Power Good) – appears on the gray wire of the power supply unit in 0.1-0.5 seconds if it is working properly after self-testing and serves as an enabling signal for the operation of the motherboard.

When measuring voltages, the “minus” end of the probe is connected to the black wire (common), and the “plus” – to the contacts in the connector. You can measure output voltages directly in a running computer.

Voltage minus 12 V (blue wire) is only needed to power the RS-232 interface, which is not installed in modern computers. Therefore, power supplies of the latest models may not have this voltage.

Deviation of supply voltages from rated values ​​should not exceed the values ​​given in the table.

When measuring the voltage on the wires of the power supply, it must be connected to a load, for example, to a motherboard or a homemade load block.

Installing an additional connector for a video card in the computer’s power supply

Sometimes there are seemingly hopeless situations. For example, you bought a modern video card, decided to install it in your computer. There is a necessary slot on the motherboard for installing a video card, but there is no suitable connector on the wires for additional power supply to the video card coming from the power supply.You can buy an adapter, replace the entire power supply, or you can independently install an additional connector on the power supply for powering the video card. This is a simple task, the main thing is to have a suitable connector, you can take it from a faulty power supply.

First you need to prepare the wires coming from the connectors for the offset connection, as shown in the photo. An additional connector for powering the video card can be connected to wires going, for example, from the power supply to drive A.You can also connect to any other wires of the desired color, but in such a way that there is enough length to connect a video card, and it is desirable that nothing else be connected to them. The black wires (common) of the additional connector for powering the video card are connected to the black wire, and the yellow (+12 V) wires, respectively, to the yellow wire.

The wires coming from the additional connector for powering the video card are tightly twisted with at least three turns around the wire to which they are connected.If possible, it is better to solder the connections with a soldering iron. But even without soldering, in this case, the contact will be quite reliable.

The work on installing an additional connector for powering the video card is being completed by isolating the connection point, several turns, and you can connect the video card to the power supply. Due to the fact that the places of the twists are made at a distance from each other, there is no need to isolate each twist separately. It is enough to cover only the area where the wires are exposed with insulation.

Modification of the BP

connector for connecting the motherboard

In the event of a failure of the motherboard or the upgrade (upgrade) of a computer associated with replacing the motherboard, we repeatedly had to deal with the lack of a 24-pin power supply connector for the power supply unit.

The existing 20-pin connector was well inserted into the motherboard, but the computer could not work with this connection. A special adapter or replacement of the power supply was required, which was an expensive pleasure.

But you can save some money if you do it yourself a little. The power supply usually has a lot of unused connectors, among them there may be four, six or eight-pin. The four-pin connector, as in the photo above, fits perfectly into the mating connector on the motherboard, which was left unoccupied when the 20-pin connector was installed.

Please note that both in the connector coming from the computer’s power supply and in the counterpart on the motherboard, each contact has its own key, which excludes incorrect connection.Some contact insulators have right-angled shapes, while others have cut corners. You need to orient the connector so that it fits. If you cannot find the position, then cut off the interfering corner.

Separately, both the 20-pin and the 4-pin connectors fit well, but they do not fit together, they interfere with each other. But if you grind off the contacting sides of both connectors a little with a file or sandpaper, they will fit well.

After adjusting the connector housings, you can start connecting the wires of the 4-pin connector to the wires of the 20-pin connector.The color of the wires of the additional 4-pin connector is different from the standard one, so you do not need to pay attention to them and connect them as shown in the photo.

Be extremely careful, mistakes are inadmissible, the motherboard will burn! Near left, contact # 23, black in the photo, is connected to the red wire (+5 V). Middle right # 24, yellow in the photo, is connected to the black wire (GND). The far left, pin 11, black in the photo, is connected to the yellow wire (+12 V).The far right, contact number 12, yellow in the photo, is connected to the orange wire (+3.3 V).

It remains to cover the joints with several turns of insulating tape and the new connector will be ready for use.

In order not to think about how to correctly install the assembled connector into the motherboard connector, you should apply a mark using a marker.

As the power supply of the computer

is supplied with power from the mains

In order for constant voltages to appear on the colored wires of the power supply, a supply voltage must be applied to its input.For this, there is a three-pin connector on the wall where the cooler is usually installed. In the photo, this connector is on the upper right. It has three pins. The power supply voltage is supplied to the outer ones with the help of the power cord, and the middle one is grounding, and it is connected through the power cord when connected to the grounding pin of the electrical outlet. Below on some Power Supplies, for example, this one has a power switch.

In old buildings, the wiring is made without a ground loop, in this case the ground conductor of the computer remains unconnected.The experience of operating computers has shown that if the grounding conductor is not connected, then this does not affect the operation of the computer as a whole.

The power cord for connecting the Power Supply to the mains is a three-core cable with a three-pin connector at one end for connecting directly to the Power Supply. At the other end of the cable, there is a C6 plug with round pins 4.8 mm in diameter with a grounding contact in the form of metal strips on the sides of its housing.

If you open the plastic sheath of the cable, you can see three colored wires. Yellow – green – is grounding, and for brown and blue (may be of a different color), a supply voltage of 220V is supplied.

Yellow – green wire in C6 plug connects to side grounding strips. So if you have to replace the plug, don’t forget about it. All about electrical plugs and the rules for their connection can be found in the article on the site “Electric plug”.

About the cross-section of wires leaving the power supply unit of the computer

Although the currents that the power supply can deliver to the load are tens of amperes, the cross-section of the outgoing conductors is usually only 0.5 mm 2 , which allows the transfer of current through one conductor up to 3 A. More information about the load capacity wires you can learn from the article “On the choice of wire cross-section for electrical wiring.” However, all wires of the same color are soldered to one point on the printed circuit board, and if a block or module in a computer consumes more than 3 A of current, voltage is supplied through the connector through several wires connected in parallel.For example, the voltage of +3.3 V and +5 V is supplied to the motherboard via four wires. Thus, the supply of current to the motherboard is provided up to 12 A.

Customized 8 Pin PCI Express to Two 4-Pin Molex Power Cables Suppliers & Manufacturers & Factory

Starte 8 Pin PCI Express to Two 4-Pin Molex Power Adapters, this two-piece 4-pin connector to connect to a PCI slot e 8-pin cable has two LP4 with 3 pins on the first side, connects to the power supply.And one 8-pin PCI-E connector on the second side connects to the PCIe Video Card.

Product Parameters PCI-E Plug 8pin for IDE Power Plug 4pin Molex Cable:

3

Item

8-pin PCI Express to two 4-pin Molex power cables

Brand

Model no.

PICA018

Cable type

Internal PC power cable

Connector 1

ATX 12V 4-pin 903 906

9000 9000

8-pin motherboard connector EPS x 1

Plating plate

Nickel plated

Gender

UL 18AWG

Conductor

BC

Pin Arrangement

Standard

Jacket

PVC Jacket

9000

Sample

Allowed

MOQ

500 pcs.

bag

PE bags

Warranty

Two years

OEM

  • OEM

  • 3

    Specification 2 x 4 Pin Molex To 6 + 2 Pin PCI-E Male VGA power cable:

    1) Adapter cable with Molex connector 2pcs x 5.25 “with 8-pin PCI Express connector for video cards

    2) Plug in your new motherboard using your existing ATX

    power supply 3) Combines two 4-pin Molex LP4 PC power supply connectors into one 8-pin connector for an optional PCI Express graphics card

    Application Dual 4 Pin Molex IDE for 8- Pin PCI Express Power Cable:

    This 8-pin PCI Express to two 4-pin Molex Power Cables converts 2 standard Molex 4-pin connectors to 1 P8 8-pin connectors, allowing you to use your current power supply without PCI Express 2.0 (8-pin) with this new motherboard supporting PCI Express 2.0 graphics cards.

    Payment:

    Shipment:

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    Can I safely use an ATX 12v 4-pin power supply for a board with EPS 12v 8-pin?

    Information:

    Page 16 of manual The motherboard says that the 8-pin connector is for supplying power to the processor.

    Method 1:

    If you look at the pinouts for the 8-pin connector and the 4-pin cable (Figures 1 and 2 below, respectively), you will notice that it should be physically compatible.I found a page (Figure 3) that indicates that it is You can make , but I strongly advise you to use the correct 8-pin cable. This makes sense, since the connector is usually designed for additional power (as opposed to any power), so while it can work, the system may suddenly shut down if the CPU load rises to 100% (for example, during time of scanning for viruses, watching videos on YouTube, etc.etc.)

    Method 2:

    Another option I found is some discussion (like this one) about using an adapter (Figure 4) to connect a 4-pin cable to both halves of the 8-pin connector. There are actually enough adapters like this on eBay for just $ 1 (and free shipping). Nuegg also has steam, Of course, the problem with this method is the same as the previous one, in that there is no additional power supplied; this method simply distributes the power from one source to the two halves of the connector.

    As you said, the Molex-to-8pin adapter is also a good option. There are different ones available that either split one cable into two halves of an 8-pin connector (which usually won’t be a problem, as this is what happens when you plug three or four connectors on one cable to multiple drives, etc. in any case). Others (Figure 5) have two separate Molex connectors (one for each half of the 8-pin connector) that you can connect to the Molex connectors from different cables from the PSU for added peace of mind.It’s pretty cheap too (~ $ 2 shipping). It also has similarly good reviews,

    Actually, there are also 6-pin PCI-E to 8-pin ATX12V adapters and maybe others (although you pointed out the PSU doesn’t have this).

    Recommendation:

    The difference between these two methods becomes a little more complicated if you are not familiar with electronic engineering, but suffice it to say that method two is better in most cases. Using a power supply with a real dedicated 8-pin cable The best solution is of course, but if you look at the reviews on Newegg for adapters, you will see that all from the reviews are positive, indicating that the adapter is likely to be a good way to solve this problem for next to nothing.


    Figure 1 : 8-pin EPS ATX_12v

    motherboard connector

    Figure 2 : 4-pin ATX 12V auxiliary connector

    Figure 3 : Using a 4-pin cable in an 8-pin connector

    Figure 4 : ATX 12V adapter from 4 to 8 pins

    Figure 5 : Molex to 8-pin adapter

    Cables and power connectors in the system unit

    Computer power cable

    The power cord that connects your computer to an AC power source is the only one on your computer that has remained relatively unchanged since the early days of the PC.A power cable from a 20 year old computer will probably work for what you are assembling today. By the way, the power cable has an official name. It is officially called NEMA 5-15P – IEC-320-C13 cable.

    So go have some fun. Go to a computer store and tell them you want to order a NEMA 5-15P to IEC-320-C13 cable. Don’t blame me if people think you’re a nerd.

    SATA Power Connector

    SATA drives use a power connector that is specifically designed for hot swapping drives, which would be difficult if old Molex connectors were used.This was somewhat of a design because the old PATA drives did not have to be hot-swapped.

    In addition to the standard SATA power connector shown here, there are also “thin” and “micro” SATA power connectors for use in some tablets and other small form factor devices.

    In addition to SATA drives, SATA power connectors have become the de facto standard for powering all other devices using Molex connectors. Since it has become the new standard, virtually all new power supplies come with a variety of SATA connectors, but with few or no Molex connectors.

    If for any reason you need to connect a device that Molex requires from a SATA connector, you can purchase a SATA-to-Molex adapter that makes this possible. The voltages are the same.

    Main ATX Power Connector for Computer

    The main connection to the motherboard is via the so-called P1 connector. It can have 20 or 24 contacts. Many of them have a 20-pin connector plugged into a removable 4-pin connector.

    The P1 connector is keyed to prevent incorrect installation and is held firmly to the motherboard by a small plastic clip. If it doesn’t fit, don’t force it. You are probably trying to attach it backwards. If, according to rough estimates, you manage to insert it, you will immediately burn all parts of your computer as soon as you turn it on. So don’t do it.

    Never connect an ATX power supply to an AC power source unless the P1 connector is connected to the motherboard, test load, or power supply tester.Plugging an ATX power supply into AC power while the P1 connector is not connected to a load will damage the power supply.

    Video card power connectors

    This is a 6- or 8-pin power connector that powers high-performance GPUs whose power requirements are too high to be fed through the motherboard slot. Some graphics cards themselves can consume 125 watts or more.

    As with the ATX power connector, these connectors can very often be used for both 6-pin and 8-pin power inputs, as two wires are disconnected from the other six.Dome motherboards with integrated video also require one of them to be connected to the motherboard, usually next to the GPU.

    These connectors have keys to prevent incorrect attachment, but being made of plastic, they can be plugged back in if you pushed hard enough. So don’t try to force them. If the power cord is not plugged into the input with a little force, the plug may be upside down.

    Four-wire P4 power connector for computer

    This socket was based on the Intel Pentium 4 processor, which required an additional socket called the P4 socket.It was plugged into a socket on the motherboard, which was usually very close to the processor. Some AMD Athlon processors also required P4.

    Many motherboards designed for newer Intel and AMD processors also require P4. Generally, if the motherboard has a P4 connector, it should be plugged in. If in doubt, check your motherboard manual.

    For a while, some other devices (especially powerful video cards) also used the P4 connector to supply additional current beyond what they could get from the expansion slots.Newer devices usually use either a SATA power connector (since power supplies usually come in abundance) or the 6- or 8-pin GPU connector described earlier on this page.

    As with any unused adapters, if your power supply has one or more P4 pins that you don’t need, secure them away from fans, other components, and metal parts.

    Computer Power Connector Molex

    PATA hard drives, most other IDE and EIDE devices, and sometimes some older cards that needed extra power beyond what is available in the expansion slot used a standard 4-wire power connector like the one shown here.This is called a Molex or P5 connector (P stands for Power).

    Molex connectors are quickly becoming little more than memory as SATA dwarfs PATA as the standard for internal storage. But this is an educational site, so consider this a history lesson.

    Molex connectors are shaped to prevent accidental re-attachment, so do not use excessive force. If you succeed in energizing a component with an inverted power plug, you will immediately destroy the device permanently.

    Three-core CPU fan connector for computer

    All motherboards have processor fan pin headers and at least one chassis fan. They provide both power and, in most cases, temperature-based RPM and speed monitoring.

    The title for a CPU fan is usually labeled CPU FAN, which is good enough. The header for the chassis fan can be labeled CHASSIS, SYS FAN, or CASE FAN.Most modern motherboards also have a header for a chipset cooler.

    Some people turn on the fans to keep them running at full speed. If you don’t like making noise, burning fans or wasting energy, I don’t think this is a good idea. Fan speed control is one of those things that computers usually do very well. If you want to adjust the fan speed, there is probably a setting in the CMOS setting.

    Front Panel Terminals

    Each computer case ships with a set of wires, commonly referred to as “front panel wires,” that connect the motherboard to the LEDs and switches on the front panel.Connectors typically include sockets for power and reset switches, power LEDs and hard drive activity indicators, and in some cases a system speaker. If the case has front USB ports or
    card reader.

    The pins on the front panel connect to a bus on the motherboard that is labeled with tiny text and polarity markings when needed because the headers don’t have any key. This means that it is possible to connect the wires in the wrong polarity.This is why all connectors where polarity is important (mainly LEDs) are labeled with a tiny “+” sign or arrow to indicate positive wire.

    Unfortunately, there is no standardization regarding the exact location of the panel titles. They are usually located on the edge of the board, which will be closer to the front of the computer when you install the motherboard. But there are also exceptions.

    Floppy drive power connectors

    Floppy drives, old optical drives, and some other IDE and EIDE devices connected using an even smaller power connector called the P7, which is shown in this figure.You are unlikely to need this in our time.

    Although the P7 connectors were keyboards, they were also fragile; so it was very easy to insert them incorrectly. Consequently, many brand new discs were immediately burned when the computers on which they were installed were turned on for the first time.

    Apple USB 30-pin Cable

    • Product information

      Review

      This cable is USB 2.0 is designed to connect your iPod, iPhone or iPad (directly or via the docking station) to a USB port on your computer for efficient syncing and charging, or to the Apple USB Power Adapter for convenient direct charging from a wall outlet.

      Features

      Access to all controls and the docking connector

      Convenient compact shape

      Allows you to charge your device in a case

      Specifications

      Connectivity

      Cable type: Dock to USB cable

    • Compatibility

      iPhone

      Models

      • iPhone 4s
      • iPhone 4
      • iPhone 3Gs
      • iPhone 3G

      Mac models

      • MacBook Air (13-inch, Early 2015 to 2017)
      • MacBook Air (11-inch, Early 2015)
      • MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Late 2012 through 2015)
      • MacBook Pro (Retina display, 15-inch, Mid 2012 through 2015)
      • iMac (Retina 4K display, 21.5-inch, 2017 model)
      • iMac (Retina 5K, 27-inch, 2017 model)
      • iMac (Retina 4K display, 21.5-inch, Late 2015 model)
      • iMac (Retina 5K, 27-inch, Late 2014 to 2015 models)
      • iMac Pro (2017))
      • Mac Pro (Late 2013 Model)
      • Mac mini (2018)
      • Mac mini (Late 2014 Model)

      iPod models

      • iPod touch 4th generation
      • iPod touch 3rd generation
      • iPod touch 2nd generation
      • iPod nano 6th generation
      • iPod nano 5th generation
      • iPod nano 4th generation
      • iPod classic 160GB (2009))
      • iPod classic 120GB (2008)

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