1 clothes: Fast Fashion Definition

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Fast Fashion Definition

What Is Fast Fashion?

Fast fashion is the term used to describe clothing designs that move quickly from the catwalk to stores to take advantage of trends. The collections are often based on styles presented at Fashion Week runway shows or worn by celebrities. Fast fashion allows mainstream consumers to purchase the hot new look or the next big thing at an affordable price.

Fast fashion became common because of cheaper, speedier manufacturing and shipping methods, an increase in consumers’ appetite for up-to-the-minute styles, and the increase in consumer purchasing power—especially among young people—to indulge these instant-gratification desires. Because of all this, fast fashion is challenging the established clothing labels’ tradition of introducing new collections and lines on an orderly, seasonal basis. In fact, it’s not uncommon for fast-fashion retailers to introduce new products multiple times in one week to stay on trend.

  • Fast fashion describes low-priced but stylish clothing that moves quickly from design to retail stores to meet trends, with new collections being introduced continuously.
  • Innovations in supply chain management among retailers make fast fashion possible.
  • Zara and H&M are two giants fast fashion field.\, Others include UNIQLO, GAP, and Topshop.
  • Affordable prices and instant gratification for consumers, more profits for companies, and the democratization of stylish clothing are among fast fashion’s benefits.
  • On the downside, fast fashion is also associated with pollution, waste, the promulgation of a “disposable” mentality, low wages, and unsafe workplaces.

Understanding Fast Fashion

Shopping for clothing was once considered an event. Consumers would save up to buy new clothes at certain times of the year. The style-conscious would get a preview of the styles to come via fashion shows that displayed new collections and clothing lines several months in advance of their appearance in stores.

But that began to change in the late 1990s, as shopping became a form of entertainment and discretionary spending on clothing increased. Enter fast fashion—cheap, trendy knock-off garments, mass-produced at low cost, that allowed consumers to feel as though they were wearing the same styles that “walked the runway” or were sported by a sexy entertainer.

Fast fashion is made possible by innovations in supply chain management (SCM) among fashion retailers. Its goal is to quickly produce cost-efficient articles of clothing in response to (or anticipation of) fast-shifting consumer demands. The assumption is that consumers want high fashion at a low cost. While the garments are often carelessly made, they’re not intended to be worn for years, or even multiple times.

Fast fashion follows the concept of category management, linking the manufacturer with the consumer in a mutually beneficial relationship. The speed at which fast fashion happens requires this kind of collaboration, as the need to refine and accelerate supply chain processes is paramount.

$35.8 billion

The size of the fast fashion market in 2019, according to the “Fast Fashion Global Market Report 2020-30: COVID-19 Growth and Change.” It’s projected to reach $38.21 billion in 2023.

Fast Fashion Leaders

Major players in the fast-fashion market include Zara, H&M Group, UNIQLO, GAP, Forever 21, Topshop, Esprit, Primark, Fashion Nova, and New Look. Many companies are both retailers and manufacturers, though they often outsource the actual production of clothing (see “The Disadvantages of Fast Fashion”).

In addition, traditional mass-market department stores such as Macy’s, J. C. Penney, and Kohl’s in the U.S. have all taken a page from the fast-fashion book. For their in-house and proprietary brands, they’ve shortened design and production times to better compete in the market.

Here’s a closer look at some of the leaders in fast fashion.

Zara

Spanish retail chain Zara, the flagship brand of textile giant Inditex, is all but synonymous with fast fashion, serving as an exemplar of how to cut the time between design, production, and delivery. Zara’s designers can sketch a garment—the company sells men’s, women’s, and children’s clothing—and have the finished piece appear on store racks in as little as four weeks. It can modify existing items in as little as two weeks.

Its secret to this rapid turnover is its ownership of a relatively short supply chain. Over half its factories are closely located to its corporate headquarters in A Coruña, Spain—including countries like Portugal, Turkey, and Morocco.

Its fast turnaround time aids another key Zara strategy: to stuff the stores with more goods, offering the consumer an unparalleled amount of choice. It produces 10,000-plus pieces annually, vs. an industry average of 2,000 to 4,000 pieces.

In 2019, Zara’s annual net sales (including those of Zara Home) were €19.5 billion (about $22 billion). It has 2,138 stores in 96 countries, as of mid-2020, but a strong online operation as well.

H&M

Founded in 1947, Sweden-based H&M (short for Hennes & Mauritz ) is one of the oldest fast-fashion companies. As of 2019, H&M operates in 74 countries with over 5,000 stores under its various brands which, along with H&M, include the slightly more upscale COS, and the youth-oriented Monki.

H&M functions like a department store, selling not only clothing for men, women, and children but cosmetics and home furnishings. It is more strictly a retailer: It does not own any factories but instead relies on 800 independent suppliers for its garments. However, these suppliers are overseen by 30 H&M production offices, using state-of-the-art IT systems to track inventory and communicate with corporate HQ. In some cases, H&M buys all of their stock. The factories are based all around Europe and Asia, with many located in Cambodia and Bangladesh.

Part of H&M’s strategy has also been not to offer just knockoffs, but original creations, via its much-ballyhooed designer collaborations with elite labels like Alexander Wang and Giambattista Vali. In early 2021, for example, it launched a collection designed by Simone Rocha.

H&M’s annual net sales in 2019 came to SEK 233 billion (about $24.8 billion).

 The traditional clothing-industry model operates seasonally, with the fall fashion week displaying styles for the upcoming spring/summer, and the spring fashion week showcasing looks for the next fall/winter; in addition, there are often pre-fall and pre-spring or resort collections too. In contrast to these four seasons, fast-fashion labels produce about 52 “micro-seasons” a year—or one new “collection” a week of clothes meant to be worn immediately, instead of months later.

Advantages and Disadvantages of Fast Fashion

The Advantages of Fast Fashion

Fast fashion is a boon for business. The constant introduction of new products encourages customers to frequent stores more often, which means they end up making more purchases. The retailer does not replenish its stock—instead, it replaces items that sell out with new items. Accordingly, consumers know to purchase an item they like when they see it no matter what the price because it’s not likely to be available for long. And because the clothing is cheap (and cheaply made), it’s easy to get people back into stores or online to make fresh purchases.

Fast fashion is also responsible for big profits, especially if a manufacturer is able to jump on a trend before the competition. The speed at which fast fashion moves tends to help retailers avoid markdowns, which cut into margins. If there are any losses, fast-fashion companies are able to recover quickly by launching a new clothing line, design, or product.

As for advantages for the consumer, fast fashion has enabled people to get the clothes they want when they want them. Also, it’s made clothing more affordable—and not just any clothing, but innovative, imaginative, stylish clothing. No longer is the latest look or being “well-dressed,” or having a large wardrobe the province of the rich and famous.

For that reason, advocate argue fast fashion has had a democratizing influence on fashion—and on society. Even those of modest means can constantly buy smart new clothes, indulge in fun or impractical items, and wear something different every day.

The Disadvantages of Fast Fashion

Despite the advantages for customers, fast fashion has also been criticized because it encourages a “throw-away” attitude. That’s why it’s also called disposable fashion. Many fast fashionistas in their teens and early twenties—the age group the industry targets—admit they’re only wearing their purchases once or twice.

You could debate whether such a disposable mentality really results in the economy: If multiple purchases of fast fashion garments, cheap as they are, end up eventually costing the consumer more than buying a few pricier ones that last longer.

Certainly, it costs the planet more. Critics contend that fast fashion contributes to pollution, waste, and planned obsolescence, due to the cheap materials and manufacturing methods it uses. The poorly made garments don’t age well, but they can’t be recycled, since they’re predominantly (over 60%) made of synthetics. So when they’re discarded, they molder in landfills for years.

Most fast fashion companies outsource the production of their goods—usually to manufacturers based in developing countries—and some have been none too stringent in overseeing their sub-contractors, nor transparent about their supply chain. That’s led to critics charging that fast fashion is built on bad working conditions, poor pay, and other abusive, exploitative practices. Because the clothing is made overseas, fast fashion is also seen as contributing to a decline in the U.S. garment industry, where labor laws and workplace regulations are stronger and wages are better.

Fast fashion has also been criticized on intellectual property grounds, with some designers alleging that their designs have been illegally duplicated and mass-produced by the fast fashion companies.

Pros

  • Profitable for manufacturers and retailers

  • Offers fast, efficient delivery

  • Makes clothes affordable

  • Democratizes style and fashion

Cons

  • Uses cheap materials, poor workmanship

  • Encourages “throwaway” consumer mentality

  • Has negative environmental impact

  • Associated with exploitative, abusive labor practices

Fast Fashion FAQs

What Is Considered Fast Fashion?

Fast fashion relates to clothing and accessories that move from the designer sketchpad to the store in the shortest amount of time possible—often in a matter of a month, vs. close to a year in traditional industry practice. Fast fashion merchandise is produced cheaply and priced cheaply. The clothes don’t last, but they’re not meant to—they’re often throwaways, aimed to cash in on a trend, worn a few times, and then discarded in favor of the next big thing or celebrity sighting.

What Are Some Problems With Fast Fashion?

To keep prices low, fast fashion companies tend to use outsourced and often underpaid labor in factories located overseas. There’s frequently little oversight of working conditions or of manufacturing processes, which may be polluting the water, air, and land.

“More broadly, the blindingly fast pace at which clothes are now manufactured, worn, and discarded means that they’ve become more disposable, more commodities than keepsakes,” as a Vox columnist wrote in 2020. Fast fashion encourages a wasteful, “disposable mentality” attitude among consumers. This, in turn, creates another environmental problem: Tons of clothing clogging up landfills and garbage dumps (since they’re made largely of synthetic materials, fast fashion clothes can be recycled easily).

Is Fast Fashion Bad for the Economy?

It’s debatable whether fast fashion is bad for the economy. The apparel industry, in general, has been growing by as much as 8% annually (aside from the blip of the 2020 pandemic year)—and fast fashion leads the apparel industry. It’s estimated to grow nearly 7% to $38.21 billion in 2023. Fast fashion companies employ thousands in their offices, stores, and factories and make millions in profits each year.

But some critics argue fast fashion has ultimately negative economic results. It costs countries and their economies when workers are underpaid or become sick or injured due to poor working conditions (two charges laid at the fast fashion industry’s door). The field’s large carbon footprint can also cost a lot in terms of environmental clean-up. Finally, critics charge fast fashion encourages a wasteful, get-it-and-spend-it attitude among consumers, at the price of good savings and investing habits.

What Are Examples of Fast Fashion?

H&M (founded 1947) and Zara (founded 1975) are two of the oldest names in fast fashion. Other big companies include UNIQLO, GAP, Forever 21, and TopShop. Boohoo, Shein, and Fashion Nova are other up-and-coming, online-oriented fast fashion companies.

The Bottom Line

“The benefits of fast fashion are clear: more consumer spending, more profits, and the consumer satisfaction of being able to participate in a trend almost immediately after they see it in magazines or on their favorite celebrities,” stated a 2020 article on the GlobalEdge, a Michigan State University business reference site. “However, fast fashion creates a host of issues that make it more problematic than it is beneficial… This industry contributes to climate change, pesticide pollution, and enormous amounts of waste.” And also, the article noted, the exploitation of and danger to workers, promulgated by the need for speed and cost efficiencies that is fast fashion’s whole raison d’être.

Whether fast fashion’s downsides outweigh its upsides is a debatable question, though. And the debate is likely to continue, as long as people love being able to buy high styles at low prices.

NORDMELA Chest of drawers with clothes rail, black-blue, 46 7/8×46 1/2″

TerriblemoisesBeautiful color terrible drawers1

To much money and thatBrianTo much money and that isn’t a good product3

Sturdy & sleek designAnonymous reviewerLove the sleek design and the color. Very sturdy. Using s couple of it inside my walk-in closet gives it a very sophisticated look – great for small spaces as well…5

Does what it says it doesWine CurmudgeonProduct is typical IKEA quality. However, very disappointed in Task Rabbit, the company IKEA recommends for assembly. The company doesn’t let you delete your account or remove credit card information. I expect more from IKEA.4

Black OrchidI like the material of drawers but there is a gap so the clothes can topple over to the drawers underneath. Setting up the chest was quite on undertaking, there were so many parts. The back was cardboard and very flimsy and I fear it will get damaged quickly3

Drawers are awful to assemble- but very prettyKelTurnThis is great in so many ways. I love the color and it is a perfect height for my kids. The piece itself is gorgeous. The main part was easy to assemble but these drawers… They are VERY easy to assemble incorrectly and then they fall apart. Once I figured out what the issue was, getting some of the pieces to click was so hard I was sweating like crazy trying to push the locking pieces down. Very unpleasant. Sadly I bought 2 and still have a whole other piece to assemble… I usually love everything about IKEA but these drawers are a disaster.4

quackfloydI’ve been saving for this , and it worked great for my sons space. I can finally hang his coats and jackets , and have some more space for his clothes.5

Drawers fall apart all the time.NazeThe overall look is nice and the color too but no matter what you do the drawers will persistently fall apart at some point. Put them back together and they fall apart again. Very big design flaw. I own other IKEA products with drawers and I’m not sure why they decided to make these so inefficient. Wish I had known this before I bought it.2

kitkat6040It was for my grandson and he loves it.5

love the hanging racklalgarinI bought this about a month ago and I love it. super sturdy lots of room, and the hanging rack is super convenient. would diffently buy it again5

Worst item everBerger16I normally LOVE Ikea, have had many pieces of furniture now and over the years from Ikea and this was the worst purchase I have ever made. The chest portion came together easy enough but then came the drawers. Neither my husband, a Union Carpenter, nor I could make them work. 5 drawers would not stay together. The side portions are supposed to slide and lock into the back part but no matter what we tried, they fall apart. If they stay put long enough for the bottom section to slide in place they immediately fall off when the last/front section is put in place. There is nothing to keep them secure unless they are glued/soldered/taped together. This is when I looked at the reviews and realized that all negative comments were regarding the SAME EXACT PROBLEM. We called Ikea Customer Service and at first were told to take the ENTIRE DRESSER back to the store to have it evaluated. Meaning, we would have to disassemble the frame, box everything back up, rent a truck (we live in NYC and don’t own a car), and bring it to Ikea. Then we were told to take only the drawers back to be evaluated and schedule a Task Rabbit to assemble them for us- which would we would have to pay for- and I am still confused as to how Task Rabbit will keep them from falling apart. My husband is still on the phone with Customer Service and no one has been able to tell us how these drawers are supposed to stay together without costing us more money.1

Really Like This Piece – Great Storage and DesignShelssportyI like everything about this piece. Great unique idea for versatile storage with the side space for hanging things. The color is terrific and the assembly was reasonable. All in all, a great purchase and I plan on buying the matching low dresser/drawer unit to add to my son’s room along with this piece. 5

Juana7Bought this for my teenage daughters room & she LOVES the blue color & the sleekness it goes great with her beach themed bedroom. The drawers slide so smoothly.5

not so greatelizliz1209I bought this chest of drawer in April. I would love to give it a 5 star but ever since then the drawers continue to fall apart. It doesn’t take much space which is great. But the problem are the problems. Always scared to open them and for it to fall on my foot3

Great dresser combo!Gabdoyle77This is a great dresser for my teenage son. There’s plenty of room for his clothes and I love the extra bonus of being able to hang up his most worn shirts.5

Exactly what I was looking forAlracCTook about an hour to put together. It’s a great piece5

Nice storage unit.TinksnvrlndImproved storage in a bedroom.5

Easy to build and looks great!CPerusI bought this a month ago, and I love the design and how simple the frame and drawers are to build. My only complaint is that the plastic caps for the ends of the clothes rail are weak plastic so they were crushed in the box. I was still able to use them, but they’re definitely misshapen.4

Challenging for one… BUT WORTH ITEd2121I built this myself. The drawers were confusing at first, but after I reread the directions, it was smooth sailing. Drawers fit so many clothes, and so smooth. The adjustable feet were a surprise! Definitely increased its value for me. Very happy.5

Perfect systemMe8440Bought so my 3 to could reach her dresses, this system is perfect. It’s bigger than I had imagined, she definitely can’t reach the top drawers yet. But this is a substantial, solid, piece that will last her for many years.5

Uniform dressing: a guy who wears the same thing every day explains

Justus Kersey, who is 32 and from Eugene, Oregon, dresses like every dude in the Pacific Northwest: A slim-not-skinny stretch of Levi’s 511 denim and a gray cotton crewneck, with an occasional pair of athletic shorts or a two-tone jacket depending on the weather.

It is the de facto aesthetic for a whole genre of stubbly athleisure men, but Kersey takes it to the extremes. Swing open his closet, and you’ll see that he’s paired down everything in the wardrobe to those exact, undeviating ingredients; shirt, jeans, shoes, black socks, black underwear, on an infinite loop until the end of time. Just like how you’ll never see Marge Simpson in anything but her pearls and strapless lime-green dress, Kersey never appears in public without his uniform.

Justus Kersey and a friend.Justus Kersey

On February 18, Kersey posted a photo of his spartan, rigidly organized closet on the r/pics subreddit, with the announcement that he has been wearing the same outfit for about two years now. People were either enthralled or terrified, which made his austere style guide briefly viral for a couple of days. Some of the speculation assumed that Kersey was a weirdo reprobate who streamlined his attire in order to avoid as much human contact as possible. (“This is the behavior of a serial killer. ” “Sounds like your a real boring guy.”) But that’s not the case at all, really. Kersey runs a doggy daycare business with his brother. In other words, he’s dressing for the job he wants.

This philosophy of strict clothing regimens isn’t all that rare. Some of the most powerful men in the world cut a resolute silhouette: Steve Jobs in his turtleneck and sneakers, Zuckerberg in those mealy gray shirts, and we’re just now getting used to an Obama in anything other than that trademark dark teal suit. Personally, it’s always come off as a distinctly dad-ish attempt to remove as many fashion questions from your life as possible, but have a conversation with Kersey, and you’ll find that the reasons for his wardrobe purge are rooted in joy.

Why wear everything, when you can wear one thing that you really like? It may be radical, but it’s not wrong. We spoke about what first motivated him to take the uniform approach to style, the natural calming power of wearing something you love every day, and the occasional fringe formal cases he runs into where the jeans and shirt combo won’t cut it.

What was the impetus by narrowing your wardrobe down to the same outfit? How did that idea arrive to you?

Initially I had heard of other people going to the “uniform way,” or the “one outfit,” but ultimately, separate from that, I was going about a normal day, throwing on some clothes after laundry. I kinda realized that I had one go-to outfit. Like, once you do laundry, it’s that pair of jeans, it’s that shirt, and every single outfit after that was one I kind of liked less.

A lot of it has to do with comfort, some jeans don’t have any stretch, some are a lot more jazzy than others, and sometimes you’re not in the mood to wear a neon green shirt. So to go down to one outfit, it would allow myself to, without thinking, put on the outfit I’m most comfortable in, and most confident in, and eliminate the chore of picking an outfit.

From there I went to a few stores to try and find that magic pair of pants. I landed on a solid pair, and I found out pretty quickly that if you’re going down this journey you need to find someplace to buy online, because most stores might only have one or two pairs in your size. I found a shirt that mimicked my most favorite shirt, and bought a bunch of them online. I took all the clothes I used to have and put them in trash bags and put them in my closet for a few weeks to make sure I was truly committed. It didn’t take very long for me to be like, ‘Man, this is awesome.’ The clothes got donated, and that was a couple years ago.

What was the eureka moment for you in the trial period? When were you like, “You know what, this is the right path for me.”

“It was like a hyped-up version of having fresh laundry every day. It had no diminishing returns.”

It was like a hyped-up version of having fresh laundry every day. It had no diminishing returns. By the time I was two weeks in, I had 14 different moments of elation. Like, “Man, I’m throwing on this outfit I love.” It was awesome.

What was the conversation like with your wife when you decided to go down this rabbit hole. Did she ever think you were crazy, or was she always supportive?

Oh yeah, there was clear-as-day skepticism. “I don’t know how I feel about that.” But about half of my wardrobe she just absolutely hated, so the idea that I wasn’t going to wear this one particular shirt, or ratty shorts [appealed to her]. She helped guide the process to me finding that perfect outfit, where she’s like, “Yeah, I’ll stand next to you in that.” Since that trial period, though, it hasn’t been an issue.

Is part of this lifestyle about the removal of fashion as a concept from your day-to-day life? Do you relish that at all?

Yeah, it was a part of becoming a minimalist, where I did purge all of my souvenirs, and yearbooks, and little things that I was kinda holding onto over the years. I wanted to move into a sense where I didn’t have a lot of belongings, and could move with a backpack. That was a big contributing factor to the whole experience.

The outfit itself is the Levi’s 511s, a gray shirt, and occasionally the shorts, right?

Yeah, but a key part, that’s almost as rewarding, is having all matching black socks, and all matching underwear. Eliminating the whole cycle where you’re like, ‘Oh, I can’t wait till that pair of underwear is clean.’ That’s a key part of the system.

Is it the same pair of shoes, too?

Yeah, so I’m currently on the third pair of shoes. They’re identical. I bought two, I went through one, and that’s when I knew that was my pair of shoes. Just within the last week, I pulled down my third pair. I need to go get another spare actually, for when these go out.

Justus Kersey in his light coat.Justus Kersey

It’s funny, when I first saw your post I thought the idea was kind of weird. But hearing you talk about it, it’s a pretty sound argument that you’re making. Do you get that reaction when you lay out your case to people? Do they understand where you’re coming from?

Oh absolutely. I think your experience is a common experience. When I begin to lay into this, that I wear the same thing all the time, step one is, “That’s weird. ” But it doesn’t take much time for people to be like, “Actually that makes sense.” And that’s it. That’s the common flow of how people react to it.

And you mentioned in your post that most people don’t even notice that you’re wearing the same outfit, right? That’s something you usually need to bring up for it to be a conversation.

Yeah, out of everything I said, that’s the one that was challenged the most. People saying, “Oh they’re just being nice, they’re not saying anything to be nice.” I just don’t know man. People were posting threads of a news anchor in Australia who wore the same outfit for a whole year to protest gender inequality, and nobody said a thing.

That’s been more my experience. I’d say, “Hey, I wear the same outfit,” and people say, “Oh I didn’t even notice.” I just don’t think that it’s something people pick up on super easily. If you handle yourself, if you’re clean, and you’re fun to interact with, that’s what people are going to take away. Not, “Oh, I think he was wearing that same shirt last time.”

You mentioned earlier about how you’re into the idea of having a uniform of sorts. What is it specifically about that concept do you appreciate?

A lot of people pick out their outfit the night before for the next day. I think they do that because they don’t have to expend the energy and make the choice in the morning. When I think about going back to wearing a normal outfit, it feels like a chore like doing the dishes or something. Also the fashion industry as a whole — and I don’t want to get super tree-huggy — but it’s a significant contributor to pollution and waste. That wasn’t the reason I made the choice to do it, but I was happy to find that out.

You do have a couple white button-downs in case you have to go to a wedding or something that requires a collared shirt. Do you keep anything else on hand for some fringe cases? Do you have a winter coat or anything like that?

“When I think about going back to wearing a normal outfit, it feels like a chore like doing the dishes or something”

I mean, I have a pair swim trunks. I do keep my snowboarding onesie in my snowboarding bag. So if I need to be out in sub-freezing temperatures, I am going to throw on my snow gear. I’m not going to fight the conditions in my jeans and gray shirt. But there are very, very few occasions where I need something other than what I always wear.

Do you have a rough count of the inventory?

Yeah, I keep a minimum. I keep about six shirts, and three pairs of jeans. I have like 20 pairs of socks and 10 pairs of underwear. A little bit overkill there.

The way you talk about this whole one-outfit thing, it does seem like it’s almost a wellness or self-care thing for you. Do I have the right read there? Is this a positive for your mental health?

I would say so. Besides the convenience and the efficiency of it, the consistency of being able to wake up and have that level of comfort and confidence every day as a ground zero. I can absolutely recall those days at the end of the laundry cycle where you throw on something where you’re like, “God darn it, why do I still own this?” It’s an absolute contributor to a positive image, which translates down to a positive mental health.

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A Practical Guide to Owning Less Clothes

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“Know, first, who you are; and then adorn yourself accordingly.” – Epictetus

Have you ever asked yourself, “How many clothes do I need?” or “How many shirts should I own?”

If you’ve asked either of those questions before, consider just for a moment how your life would look if you owned a minimalist wardrobe of fewer clothes:

  • You would have more disposable income.
  • You would have more time to live your life.
  • Mornings would feature less stress.
  • Your closets would be well-organized and uncluttered.
  • Packing for trips/vacations would take less time.
  • Laundry days would be easier (not necessarily less, but definitely easier).

Unfortunately, instead of enjoying the benefits of a minimalist wardrobe, most of us buy into the lie that more is better. And because we do, we accumulate more and more clothing each season. We are convinced that new clothes will make us more joyful, more fashionable, and more popular. Unfortunately, they just end up getting in the way.

Consider going a different route with your life. Try owning fewer clothes and creating a capsule wardrobe. You may be surprised at how much you enjoy the freedom that a minimalist closet brings.

Whether you are hoping to minimize your wardrobe to the absolute minimum or just trying to pare down some of the excesses in your closet, you will find these 10 steps practical and applicable. They are the same steps that we have used in our home to create our own minimalist wardrobes.

How to Create a Minimalist Wardrobe and Closet

1. Admit that you own too much clothing. That’s all you really need to get started.

2. Wear fewer colors. Most of us already have a few favorite colors that we wear most often anyway – usually because we like the way we look in them. Choosing to intentionally wear fewer colors means fewer accessories (shoes, belts, jewelry, handbags, etc.). It also makes too much sense not to try.

3. Embrace the idea of one. When one can be enough, embrace it – one black dress, one swimsuit, one winter coat, one black belt, one pair of black shoes, one pair of sneakers, one handbag… insert your own based on your occupation, lifestyle, or climate.

4. Donate, sell, recycle, discard. Depending on the size of one’s existing wardrobe, an initial paring down won’t take long. Make a few piles – donate, sell, or recycle. Start with the clothes that you no longer wear. You’ll be surprised how much you can remove and just how close you are to owning a minimalist closet once you build momentum.

5. Donate, sell, discard some more. Removing the clothes you no longer wear is easy. Removing the clothes that you don’t really need can be a tougher choice. Turn around all the hangers in your closet. After wearing an item, return the hanger facing the normal direction. After the season, remove every article of clothing that wasn’t worn. That should help get you started on a second round of paring down. See this article for more creative tips on decluttering.

6. Impose an arbitrary moratorium on shopping. For many, clothes shopping is just a habit – and habit always takes over for inattention. To begin breaking the cycle of purchasing and discarding (the average American throws away 68 lbs. of textiles each year), set a self-imposed buying freeze. I recommend 90 days. If given enough time, this simple exercise in self-discipline will change your view of your clothing and the stores that produce, market, and sell them.

7. Set a monthly spending limit. Pick a low number and stick to it.

8. Purchase quality over quantity. Only buy minimalist clothing that you truly love – even if it costs more. If you stock your closet full of things you love, you will have less desire to add to it, which will make maintaining a minimalist closet a lot easier.

9. Avoid the sale racks. Sales can (and should) be used to help you get a better price on something you need. Unfortunately, most sale racks are designed to convince us to purchase something we don’t.

10. Impress with your character, not your clothes. Lee Mildon once said, “People seldom notice old clothes if you wear a big smile.”

With those tips above, you should have no problem creating a more minimalist wardrobe and answering “How many clothes do I need?”

To see how owning less in other areas of life can bring even more life-giving benefits, check out my book: The More of Less: Finding the Life You Want Under Everything You Own

10 Best Baby Clothes 2021

Know how sizing works. Sizing varies from company to company, just like adults. Usually the size will correspond to your baby’s age, but not always. And the number on the label isn’t an indication of how your child should be growing.

Buy small amounts. Parents typically don’t need a lot of newborn-size clothing, as babies will quickly outgrow it. You also won’t know until you meet your baby what size she’ll start at.

When in doubt… Buy larger. Babies seem to grow overnight! You can always roll up pant legs or tuck in too-long tees between growth spurts.

Look for soft fabrics. New babies have sensitive skin. Some experts recommend all cotton, although soft cotton blends also work for many babies. Organic fabric is often softer than either of them, although usually pricier. “Tagless” clothing, where size and washing information are printed on the back of the neck, sometimes causes skin irritation. If you notice your baby has redness in the area, switch to clothing with tags. You can always cut them out.

Consider how easy a garment is to put on and take off. Buttons are frustrating when you have a wriggly baby. Snaps and zippers come in handy. (Some brands have magnetic snaps.) Look for stretchy neck holes and snaps at the collar, which are great for sliding gently over a newborn’s head.

Make sure it’s simple to change a diaper, too. Steer clear of any baby clothes that don’t unfasten easily. Luckily, most baby bodysuits and sleepers have snaps at the crotch. If there’s a diaper blowout and you don’t want to pull a bodysuit up over your child’s head, you can gently pull it down over his body instead.

Go for stretchy elastic on pants. It may be tempting to get your little one a pair of blue jeans just like yours, complete with button fly. But unless they have a stretchy elastic waistband, it won’t be fun getting them on your baby.

Stock up on white snap-crotch baby bodysuits. These are an everyday essential, and after they get stained or stretched out, they make great burp cloths or household rags.

How Much Do Our Wardrobes Cost to the Environment?

How much did you pay for the clothes in your closet? If you have the receipts, you can calculate this. However, there is a cost behind each dress, pair of jeans, shirt, and sock that goes unnoticed by most people: the cost to the environment.

According to figures from the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), it takes 3,781 liters of water to make a pair of jeans, from the production of the cotton to the delivery of the final product to the store. That equates to the emission of around 33.4 kilograms of carbon equivalent.

If that is for just one pair of jeans, imagine the environmental cost for everything in our wardrobes. The following statistics, published by the UNEP and the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, give us an idea: 

  • Every year the fashion industry uses 93 billion cubic meters of water — enough to meet the consumption needs of five million people.
  • Around 20 % of wastewater worldwide comes from fabric dyeing and treatment.
  • Of the total fiber input used for clothing, 87 % is incinerated or disposed of in a landfill.
  • The fashion industry is responsible for 10 % of annual global carbon emissions, more than all international flights and maritime shipping combined. At this pace, the fashion industry’s greenhouse gas emissions will surge more than 50 % by 2030.
  • If demographic and lifestyle patterns continue as they are now, global consumption of apparel will rise from 62 million metric tons in 2019 to 102 million tons in 10 years. 
  • Every year a half a million tons of plastic microfibers are dumped into the ocean, the equivalent of 50 billion plastic bottles. The danger? Microfibers cannot be extracted from the water and they can spread throughout the food chain.

Fast fashion

The fashion industry’s operating model is exacerbating the problem by stepping up the pace of design and production. Collection launches are no longer seasonal; the replacement of clothing inventories has become much more frequent.

Many low-cost clothing stores offer new designs every week. In 2000, 50 billion new garments were made; nearly 20 years later, that figure has doubled, according to the Ellen MacArthur Foundation. The dizzying pace of apparel manufacturing has also accelerated consumption: the average person today buys 60 % more clothing than in 2000, the data show. And not only do they buy more, they also discard more as a result.

Less than 1 % of used clothing is recycled into new garments. The Ellen MacArthur Foundation estimates that every year some USD 500 billion in value is lost due to clothing that is barely worn, not donated, recycled, or ends up in a landfill. 

The industry should reinvent itself

The fashion industry is key for economic development: it is valued at some USD 2.4 billion globally and directly employees 75 million people throughout its value chain. It is the world’s third-largest manufacturing sector after the automobile and technology industries.

This makes it a challenge for clothing makers to grow without being an enemy of the environment, to become allies of the climate while also promoting better conditions for workers in the sector.

In 2017, the Boston Consulting Group took the pulse of the fashion industry. With a score of just 32 over 100, the management consulting firm found that the industry is slow to improve its sustainability. Some mid-sized and large companies have made strides, but half of the market has done little to become more sustainable in production. The study found that most fashion executives had not made environmental and social factors a part of the guiding principles of their corporate strategies. 

Foundations like Ellen MacArthur and initiatives such as the recently formed UN Alliance for Sustainable Fashion, in which the World Bank’s Connect4Climate program and other organizations participate, are calling for a new textile economy. The goal is to explore the use of new materials to make clothing more durable so it can be resold or recycled into other products, helping to reduce pollution.

Some leading brands have answered this call and are working to identify fiber alternatives and develop more eco-friendly processes.

Technology and research are playing a key role in making the industry more sustainable. Athletic shoes and attire are getting made out of materials extracted from the plastic dumped into the ocean. Fish skins and natural dyes are replacing chemicals, fruit skins are substituting furs, and backpacks and purses are getting made out of discarded canvas. Some companies have a return policy so they can recycle the consumers’ garments after they have worn out.

In Latin America, the industry’s transition to a sustainable model is gaining momentum. Designers are exploring possibilities to use the region’s biodiversity in marketing sustainable brands. Events are being organized and alliances formed to promote the purchase of eco-friendly clothing and accessories. Initiatives such as Hilo Sagrado and Evea, which received World Bank support through competitions organized by the Young Americas Business Trust, are working on this.

While a lot still needs to be done, it is encouraging that some companies are becoming involved when a decade ago there was little talk of sustainable fashion.

What can consumers do?

To make the garment industry more sustainable, all actors must get involved, from designers to manufacturers, critics, and consumers.

Without consumers making a change, the efforts are in vain. They must become aware of what they buy. How? Taking these small steps can help:

  • Before buying, ask if the manufacturers used sustainable criteria to make the clothing.
  • Be creative in combining garments and recycle them after they wear out.
  • Repair clothing.
  • Donate what you no longer use.
  • Buy only what you need. In some countries, 40 % of purchased clothing is never used.
  • Consider quality over quantity. Every additional year a garment is worn means less pollution. Cheap clothing often doesn’t survive the wash cycle, meaning that in the long run you don’t save money compared with buying better quality garments?
  • Buy second-hand clothing.
  • Be a smart laundry manager — wash full loads and use non-abrasive detergents, for example.

Clothes from 0 to 1 year old

Clothes for newborns from 0 years old

We offer you to purchase goods for your baby. This category contains products for children from 0 to 1 year old. These are only quality samples that come only from the most renowned manufacturers. In this section you can find everything you need: statement envelopes, bibs, suits, bodysuits, blouses, undershirts, caps, sliders and trousers, socks, overalls, bibs and a lot of interesting things.These children’s things, without exception, are stylish, comfortable, the child will not feel shy in them. Regardless of whether you have a boy or a girl, here you can dress them up to the fullest.

We know that parents try to take for their children only the most modern and fashionable goods today. However, in the case of walking through ordinary shops and supermarkets, this is far from always possible. And there are always many reasons for this – they are not satisfied with the prices, there is no necessary color and size.Many people just don’t like shopping and wasting time that can be better spent.

We made sure that you are no longer bothered by such problems. Our online children’s clothing store has the widest assortment for your little ones, such as baby clothes for newborns. We have a convenient search system, the ability to quickly complete an order. Opposite each product there is a high-quality photo, and you can also find out in a minute if there is a model of the size you need.It is also important that you do not need to rush to the store, drive a car, or stand in line. Instead, you can calmly sit at your favorite table near the monitor and make a choice by placing a cup of tea or any other drink next to you. Nobody will rush you to buy and tell you to do it as quickly as possible. Nobody will make the decision for you, you will do it yourself. The free time you can spend on communication with your precious child.

High-quality and inexpensive clothes for children under 1 year old

We cooperate with many manufacturers.Therefore, by contacting us, you avoid a long chain of resellers and price gouging. We value our customers, and therefore we are ready to offer them the best. You can count on discounts, bonuses, interesting promotions. The presented items are suitable for constant and periodic wear. They are of high quality, and therefore can serve you the longest. Each product is very functional – it is made of natural materials, it is safe for your child, which is very important. Fabrics used in the manufacture of clothing are highly breathable.

Important: we offer our customers several options for order payment. You can always choose the option that suits you the most. After placing an order, our representatives will definitely contact you, answer all your questions, tell you exactly when you will receive the ordered goods. Order children’s clothes from us – dress up your little dandy or fashionista!

Labeling of goods of light industry and clothing from January 1, 2021: list, terms, requirements, decoding of mandatory labeling of clothing 2020 – 2021

Application for placement of information about the customs warehouse

Select product groups

Medicines

Tobacco

Shoes

Tires and pneumatic tires

Perfume and toilet water

Light industry goods

Cameras and flash lamps

Beer

Milk

Wheelchairs

Bicycles

Fur coats

Summer clothes

Quick view

Tunic set of leggings

950₽

refund to 280₽

new

Sizes: 30 (110/5 years old) 34 (122/7 years old) 36 ( 134/9 years) 38 (140/10 years)

Quick view

Skirt 1001 DRESS

3 520 RUR

refund to 1,050 RUR

new

Sizes: 42 44 46 48

Quick view

Blouse BELLOVERA

1 190₽

1 820

35%

refund up to 360₽

new

Sizes: 46 Quick view

CHARUTTI T-shirt

1 300₽

refund up to 390 rubles

new

Sizes: 44 46 48 50 52 54

Quick view

90 004 D-Studio breeches

980₽

refund up to 290₽

new

Dimensions: 42 44 46 48 50

Quick view

D-Studio breeches

980₽

refund up to 290 rubles

new

Dimensions: 42 44 46 48 50

Quick view

D-Studio breeches

980₽

refund up to 290₽

new

Sizes: 42 44 46 48 50

Quick view

D-Studio breeches

RUR 980

refund to RUR 290

new

Sizes: 42 44 46 48 50

Quick view

D-Studio leggings

1,080₽

refund up to 320₽

new

Times Measures: 42 44 46 48 50

Quick view

D-Studio leggings

1 080 RUR

refund up to 320 RUR

new

Sizes: 42 44 46 48 50

Quick view

D-Studio leggings

1 080 RUR

refund to 320 RUR

new

Dimensions: 42 44 46 48 50

Quick view

D-Studio leggings

1 080₽

refund to 320₽

new

Dimensions: 42 44 46 50

Quick view

LookLikeCat jacket

4 980₽

refund to 1 490₽

new

Sizes: 42 46 50

Quick view

90 004 LookLikeCat jacket

4 980₽

refund to RUB 1,490

new

Sizes: 42 46 50

Quick view

DSTrend suit

3,680₽

refund to 1,100₽

new

Dimensions: 46 48 50 52 54

Quick view

Pelican kit

2 770 RUR

return to 350 RUR

new

Sizes: 52 54 56 58

Quick view

Pelican kit

2 770 rubles

refund to 350 rubles

new

Dimensions: 52 54 56 58

Quick view

Pelican kit

2 470 rubles

refund to 310 rubles

new

Dimensions: 42 44 900 59 46 48 50

Quick view

Pelican kit

2 470 rubles

refund to 310 rubles

new

Dimensions: 42 44 46 48 50

Quick view

Pelican dress

1 780₽

refund up to 220₽

new

Sizes: 54 56 58

Quick view

Pelican dress

1 780₽

220 rubles

new

Sizes: 52 54 56 58

Quick view

Pelican dress

1 780₽

return to 220 rubles

new

Sizes: 56 58

Quick view

Dress Pelican

1 090₽

refund to 140₽

new

Sizes: 9 0058 42 44 46 48 50

Quick view

Pelican dress

990 rubles

refund to 120 rubles

new

Sizes: 44 46 48 50

Quick view

Pelican dress

990₽

refund to 120₽

new

Sizes: 42 44 46 48 50

Quick view

Dress Pelican 42 44 46 48 50

Quick view

Pelican dress

990₽

refund up to 120₽

New

Dimensions: 42 44 46 48 50

Quick View

Pelican set

1 780 rubles

refund up to 220 rubles

new

Dimensions: 44 46 48

Quick view

Pelican jumper

1 190₽

refund up to 150 rubles

new

Dimensions: 44 46 48 50

Quick view

Pelican kit

2 270₽

refund up to 280₽

new

Dimensions: 44 46 48 50

Quick view

Pelican kit

2 270₽

refund to 280₽

new

Dimensions: 44 46 48 50

Quick view

Pelican kit

1 290 rubles

refund up to 160 rubles

new

Dimensions: 40 42 44 46 48

Quick view

Pelican kit

1 290 rubles

refund to 160 rubles

new

Dimensions: 40 42 44 46 48

Quick View

Pelican kit

1 290₽

refund up to 160₽

new

Dimensions: 40 42 44 46 48

Quick view

Pelican kit

1 190₽

refund up to 150 rubles

new

Dimensions: 40 42 44 46 48

Quick view

Pelican kit

1 190 rub

refund up to 150 rub

new

Sizes: 40 42 44 46 48

Quick View

T-shirt and Pelican

1 190₽

refund up to 150₽

new

Dimensions: 54 56

Quick view

Pelican T-shirt

1 090₽

refund up to 140₽

new

9005 : 52 54 56 58

Quick view

Pelican T-shirt

990₽

refund to 120₽

new

Sizes: 52 54 56 58

Quick view

Pelican jumper

990₽

return to 120₽

new

Sizes: 46

Quick view

Pelican T-shirt

990₽

new to 120₽ 9000 Dimensions: 48

Quick view

Pelican jumper

990₽

refund to 120₽

new

900 04 Sizes: 52 54 56 58

Quick view

Pelican T-shirt

990₽

refund to 120₽

new

Dimensions: 46

Quick view

Pelican T-shirt

890₽

refund up to 110₽

new

Dimensions: 44 46 48 50

Quick view

Pelican T-shirt

890₽

refund to 110₽

new

Sizes: 48

Quick view

Pelican T-shirt

890₽

refund to 110₽

new

Sizes: 44 46 48 50

view

Pelican jumper

890₽

refund to 110₽

new

Sizes: 44 46 48 50

Quick view

Pelican jumper

890₽

refund to 110₽

new

Dimensions: 44 46 48 50

Quick view

CHARUTTI tunic

2 180₽

refund to 650₽

new

Sizes: 44 46 48 50 52 54

Quick view

Dress 2 CHARUTTI

780₽

will return to 830₽

new

Sizes: 44 46 48 50 52 54

Quick view

Dress BELLOVERA

2 380₽

return to 710 ₽

new

Dimensions: 46 48 50 52 54

motr

Dress BELLOVERA

3,080₽

will return to 920₽

new

Sizes: 46 48 50 52

Quick view

Blouse BELLOVERA

1 820 return to RUR 540

new

Sizes: 46 48 50 52

Quick view

Beach shorts Lika Dress

700 RUR

refund to 210 RUR

new

Sizes: 48 50 52 54 56 58

Quick view

Lika Dress

900₽

refund to 270₽

new

Sizes: 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58

Quick view

Lika Dress

900₽ 900 04 refund to 270 rubles

new

Dimensions: 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58

Quick view

Lika Dress T-shirt

860₽

will refund up to 250 rubles

new

Sizes: 48 50 52 54 56 58

Quick view

Pants set blouse

990₽

will refund up to 290₽

new

Dimensions: 24 (80/12 months) 26 (86/18 months) 28 (92/2 years) 74

Quick view

Pants set blouse

1 010 ₽

refund to 310 ₽

new

Dimensions: 24 (80/12 months) 26 (86/18 months) 28 (92/2 years) 74

Quick view

Set of pants blouse

1 010₽

refund up to 310 rubles

new

Sizes: 24 (80/12 months) 26 (86/18 months) 28 (92/2 years) 74

Quick view

Pants set blouse

1 010₽

refund to 310₽

new

Sizes: 24 (80/12 months) 26 (86/18 months) 28 ( 92/2 years) 74

Quick view

Set of pants blouse

990₽

refund to 290₽

new

Sizes: 24 (80/12 months) 26 (86/18 months) 28 (92/2 years) 74

Quick view

Pencil skirt 1001 DRESS

3 300₽

refund to 990₽

new

Sizes: 42 44 46 48

Quick view

9000 4 Set T-shirt shorts

1 020 RUR

refund up to 310 RUR

new

Sizes: 26 (86/18 months) 28 (98/3 years) 30 (110/5 years)

Quick view

Skirt 1001 DRESS

3 300₽

refund to 990₽

new

Sizes: 42 44 46 48

Quick view

Dress LADY TA30IGA

2 ₽

refund to 720₽

new

Dimensions: 46 48 50 52 54 56

Quick view

LADY TAIGA suit

3 680₽

back to 1 100₽

new

Sizes: 46 48 50 52 54 56

Quick view

Dress LADY TAIGA

2 510₽

refund to 750₽

new

Dimensions: 46 48 50 52 54 56

Quick view

SPARADA T-shirt

1,500₽

return to 450₽

new

Sizes: 50 54 58 62 66

Quick view

Shirt dress LADY TAIGA

2 860₽

refund to 850₽

new

Sizes: 46 48 50 52 54 56

Quick view

Blouse LADY TAIGA

2 430 rubles

refund to 720 rubles

new

Sizes: 46 48 50 52 54 56

Quick view

Suit WHOLESALE FASHION

1 980₽

refund up to 600 rubles

new

90 004 Sizes: 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58

Quick view

Dress WHOLESALE FASHION

1,570₽ ​​

refund to 470₽

new

Sizes: 44 46 48 50 52 54

Quick view

Suit WHOLESALE FASHION

1 980₽

will return to 600 rubles

new

Sizes: 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58

Quick view

CHARUTTI suit

3 100₽

return to 930₽

new

Dimensions: 44 46 48 50 52 54

Quick view

Modellos blouse

1,440₽

vern up to 430 rubles

new

Dimensions: 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 60 62 64

Quick view

Cardigan DSTrend

3 040₽

refund to 910₽

new

Sizes: 44 46 48 50 52 54 56

Quick view

CHARUTTI dress

3 180 rubles

refund up to 950 rubles

new

Sizes: 44 46 48 50 52 54

Quick view

CHARUTTI dress

1 900 rub

refund to 570 ₽

new

Sizes: 44 46 48 50

Quick View

Lady Ag Dress ata

3 180₽

refund up to 950₽

new

Dimensions: 50 52 54 56

Quick view

Mitts Nota Bene

620₽

refund up to 190₽

new

Sizes: 6 (140-146)

Quick view

Shorts, cropped M&D

460 rubles

refund to 140 rubles

new

Sizes: 30 (110/5 years)

Quick view

Short cut M&D

460₽

refund to 140₽

new

Sizes: 28 (98/3 years) 30 (110/5 years old) 34 (122/7 years) 36 (134/9 years) 38 (140/10 years)

Quick view

Short cut M&D

460₽

refund up to 140₽

new

Sizes: 28 ( 98/3 years) 30 (110/5 l no) 34 (122/7 years) 36 (134/9 years) 38 (140/10 years)

Quick view

M&D sliders

250 rubles

refund to 70 rubles

new

Sizes: 24 (80/12 months) 62 68 74

Quick view

M&D jacket

RUB 370

refund up to RUB 110

new

Sizes: 18 (56 / 0-2 months) 20 (62/4 months) 20 (68/6 months) 22 (74/9 months)

Quick view

M&D sliders

250₽

return to 70 rubles

new

Dimensions: 24 (80/12 months) 62 68 74

Quick view

M&D blouse

370₽

return to 110 rubles

new

Sizes: 20 (62/4 months) 20 (68/6 months) 22 (74/9 months ) 62

Quick view

Set T-shirt shorts

1 020 RUR

refund to 310 RUR

new

Sizes: 26 (86/18 months) 28 (98/3 years) 30 (110/5 years)

Quick view

M&D jacket

370₽

refund to 110₽

new

Sizes: 24 (80/12 months) 74 Single

Quick view

DSTrend dress

3 770₽

refund to 1 130₽

new

Sizes: 44 46 48 50 52 54

Quick view

DSTrend dress

3,080₽

refund up to 920₽

new

Sizes: 44 46 48 50 52 54 56

Quick pro watch

Blouse DSTrend

2,460₽

refund to 730₽

new

Sizes: 44 46 48 50 52 54

Quick view

DSTrend dress 3 180 rubles

will return to 950 rubles

new

Sizes: 44 46 48 50 52 54

Quick view

Skirt 1001 DRESS

4 180 rubles

return up to 1 250 rubles

new

Sizes: 42 44 46

Quick view

Dress LADY TAIGA

3 160 rubles

refund to 940 rubles

new

Sizes: 48 50 52 54

Quick view

Blouse LADY TAIGA

2 160₽

refund up to 640₽

new

Sizes: 46 48 50 52 54 56

Quick view

Dress LADY TAIGA

3 110₽

return to 930₽

new

Sizes: 46 48 50 52 54 56

Quick view

D-Studio T-shirt

800₽

refund to 240₽

new

Dimensions: 42 44 46 48 50

Quick view

Banana trousers LADY TAIGA

2 380₽

refund to 710₽

new

Sizes: 46 48 50 52 54 56

Labeling of clothing and textiles in 2021

Mandatory labeling of clothes and textiles will begin on 1 January 2021.Manufacturers, suppliers and importers of clothing should work in the labeling system for light industry goods. We will tell you how to prepare for changes and work further.

Leave an application

Federal Law No. 488 of December 19, 2018 obliges to label clothes and textiles, and turnover participants – to report to the labeling system.

Order of the Government of the Russian Federation No. 792-r dated April 28, 2018 determined the labeling rules and the list of textile products subject to labeling.

  • from January 1, 2021 – the circulation of unmarked light industry goods will be prohibited.
  • before February 1, 2021 – all participants in the turnover are required to mark the remains of goods not sold before January 1, 2021

1. The manufacturer receives codes in the marking system and puts them on the packaging or label.

2. Upon shipment, the manufacturer sends a universal transfer document (UPD) to the distributor via EDM, indicating all codes from the boxes.

3. Upon acceptance, the distributor verifies the codes specified in the document and on the product, approves the FRT and transfers the data to the marking system through the EDM operator.

4. Registration of shipment by the distributor and acceptance in retail are similar.

5. During the sale, the cashier scans the marking code from the packaging or label of light industry goods, the fiscal data operator adds it to the receipt and sends it to the marking system. The code is out of circulation.

According to the decree of the Government of the Russian Federation of 31.12.2019 N 1956, the following light industry goods need to be marked:

1 13.92.14 6305209

Type of product OKPD 2 TN VED
Linen, 16.92.12
13.92.13
, made of natural or composition leather, including work clothes 11/14/10 4203 10,000
knitted or crocheted, for women or girls 14.14.13 6106
Coats, short coats, capes, raincoats, jackets (including ski), windbreakers, windbreakers and womens or girls, mens or boys 14.30.31
14.30.21
6202
6201

Textiles:

  • blankets and travel blankets,
  • curtains for interiors,
  • curtains (including upholstery) and bed valances.

Clothing made of textile materials (for women, for girls, for men for boys):

  • any T-shirts, T-shirts and other undershirts,
  • dresses, skirts and skirt-trousers,
  • trousers, overalls with bibs and straps, breeches and shorts,
  • suits and sets,
  • jackets, jackets and blazers.

Garment marking is carried out by a unique two-dimensional Data Matrix code, it is applied to consumer packaging, a label or a label in accordance with GOST.

Data Matrix code includes:

  • product code – 14 digital characters;
  • individual serial number of a unit of goods – 13 characters;
  • verification key – 4 characters;
  • verification code – 44 characters.

1.

Register in the marking system.

2.

Mark the remaining goods.

3.

Learn to label products (for production and import): connect to labeling, purchase equipment for printing labels.

4.

Learn to accept labeled clothing and textiles: connect to EDM and labeling, purchase equipment for scanning stamps.

5.

Learn to sell labeled clothing and textiles:

  • for production, import and wholesale: connect EDF to send documents;
  • for retail: update the cash register firmware, connect to the OFD, put a 2D scanner in the cashier’s place.

For registration you need an enhanced qualified electronic signature on the Rutoken carrier.

Get an electronic signature

1.

Install the required software:

2.

Follow the link and click “Check”. Make sure you set everything up correctly and click “Continue”.

3.

Select an electronic signature, specify a contact phone number and e-mail and click “Send a request”. Within 24 hours you will receive an email with a confirmation link.

4.

Follow the link from the letter and specify:

  • whether you are a manufacturer or importer of goods
  • EDF operator and EDM participant ID
  • groups of goods that you work with
  • are you a member of the GS1 Rus association “. If yes, enter the GSP and GLN identifiers

5.

Fill in the details in the profile, read the agreements with the operator and sign the agreement with the terms.

You will need a label printer.Choose a suitable one in our catalog or order turnkey label printing from us.

Leave a request

1.

Log in to the personal account of the Honest Sign using the digital signature

2.

Describe the goods. For each type of clothing and linen, we indicate:

  • Product name on the label
  • 4 characters of the product nomenclature code
  • Product code (if any)
  • Trademark (if any)

After the description you will receive a general code – GTIN …

3.

Order codes.

Next, you need to calculate how many clothes or underwear of each type you have in stock, and indicate this number in your personal account on the Honest Sign – as many codes the operator will generate for you. You will receive the final file with Data Matrix codes.

4.

Print and apply code labels.

Download the final file and print the codes to the label printer. The ordered, but not uploaded / printed codes are stored in the system for 60 working days.

5.

Enter the code into circulation.

In the personal account of the Honest mark in the documents section, click “Put into circulation”.

Leave a request

Manufacturer Importer
  1. Orders marking codes in the Honest mark.
  2. Prints code labels and applies them to products.
  3. Reports to the Honest mark about putting into circulation.
  1. Orders marking codes in the Honest mark.
  2. Sends to the exporter a file for printing labels or ready-made labels – the exporter applies labels to the goods and ships them.
  3. After passing through customs, the importer reports to the Honest Mark on the entry into circulation.

If necessary, the manufacturer / importer creates codes for transport packages and prints labels for them, forms aggregates and reports to the Honest mark about codes inside the packages.

Connect EDF to exchange documents with counterparties.

If incoming FRTTs are free, then in order to send invoices, you need to buy a package of documents.

The wholesaler needs to generate an electronic UPD and indicate in it the marking codes for the goods being shipped. Sign it with an electronic signature and send it to the counterparty through the EDM operator. The operator himself will send the FRT to the Honest Sign, after signing by the recipient, and the codes inside the document will be transferred to the property of the buyer.

VLSI will check the UPD for errors before sending and upon receipt, warn and help fix it.

1.

Connection to EDM. All incoming documents in VLSI are free of charge.

2.

Connection to the marking system to send codes there.

3.

Equipment for scanning stamps at the checkout and warehouse.

You will receive an electronic FRT with EDF codes from your supplier. To verify the stamps from the invoice with the ones received in fact, scan all the codes from the packages. If all is well, confirm the UPD, if there is a discrepancy, reject it or wait for the corrected UPD.If you want, you can immediately confirm receipt without verification.

1.

Update the firmware of the online cash register to add the marking code to the receipt. Check your checkout according to the instructions. You can update the software from manufacturers and authorized service centers.

“Tensor” has the status of ASC – please contact.

2.

Connect the cash register to the OFD, which can transfer codes in the check to the marking.

3.

2D scanner for reading stamps.

You need to sell marked goods through an online cashier with an OFD: the cashier scans the code, the goods are added to the receipt, and the fiscal data operator sends it to the marking system.

Marking from VLSI will not affect the speed of sales – the cashier scans only the Data Matrix code, and VLSI will add the product to the check itself. The data will be transferred to the marking automatically.

If the goods are transferred at the warehouse, then at the checkout you can generate a prepayment receipt without codes, and upon delivery, the storekeeper scans the codes and draws up the final receipt – they will be sent to Honest Sign. In this case, the storekeeper can use a smartphone with the VLSI application in the Warehouse, a Bluetooth scanner or a data collection terminal.

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Choosing equipment for the cash register and warehouse? Our video contains sets of VLSI for marking. Watch

  • Does the atelier need to label textiles?

    Ateliers that sew clothes under a service agreement with customers should not mark their products.

  • What should a thrift store do?

    If the store sells used goods, then all of them will need to be marked before selling to the end user.Also, when the buyer returns the goods back to the store, the clothing must be re-labeled.

  • What belongs to toilet linen?

    The explanations to the TNVED indicate that these are hand or face towels (including toilet towels fixed on rollers), bath and beach towels, face napkins and toilet gloves.

  • Is it possible to sell clothes on UTII and PSN?

    So far, yes. 325-FZ introduces a ban on the use of “special regimes” for sellers of medicines, footwear, fur clothes.

  • Does the retailer need to register with the GS1 system?

    No, it is not necessary. GS1 issues the GTIN that manufacturers or importers need for labeling.

  • Do I need to get separate GTIN (unique product code) if the product line has different colors or different designs?

    According to the marking rules, there is no need to create a separate card for each drawing, since all products are the same according to the “Color” attribute.But practice shows that creating a separate card for each drawing is the best solution, since the drawing is a distinctive characteristic of the product. You can specify the picture in the consumer properties in the optional “Design” attribute.

  • Is marking required when sewing outerwear under a contract?

    If the subject of the contract with the consumer is a service, and not a product, then there is no reason to put a marking code.

  • Is it necessary to register in the labeling system for a manufacturer-contractor who sews textiles under a contract (work contract)?

    In contract manufacturing (production under a contract), both the manufacturer and the customer can report to the marking system: depending on who is indicated as the Applicant in the mandatory certification documents (Certificate of Conformity / Declaration of Conformity), he orders the marking codes and enters goods into circulation.

  • Will the ownership of the goods transfer during the wholesale sale by cash, if the check contains (customer’s INN and name)?

    No. To become the owner of the codes in GIS MT, it is necessary to issue an UPD and sign it on both sides.

  • Is it necessary to register in the labeling system for a manufacturer-contractor who sews textiles under a contract (work contract)?

    In contract manufacturing (under a contract), the manufacturer or the customer can order and enter marking codes, depending on who is indicated by the applicant in the certificate / declaration of conformity.

Labeling of clothing and textiles from 1 January 2021

Participants in the labeling of clothing and textile products

Manufacturer – registers in “Honest ZNAK”, receives marking codes in it and places them on finished products – on labels / tags / tags or on packages. Then, when sending products to a distributor, the manufacturer creates an electronic universal transfer document, UPD. It contains all the codes from the packages / labels.UPD is sent through the EDF operator to the distributor and to “Honest ZNAK”.

Importer – orders marking codes in “Honest ZNAK”. Sends the file for printing labels or finished labels to the exporter. The exporter, on the other hand, sticks labels on goods and ships them. When the goods go through customs, the importer must report to the “Honest ZNAK” on the introduction of products into circulation.

Distributor – verifies the codes on the product with those indicated in the UPD received from the manufacturer or importer.Then, through the EDF operator, he registers the receipt of the goods in the “Honest Sign”.

When shipping clothes and textiles to retail stores, the distributor accompanies each batch of goods with an electronic FRT.

Retail store – marks the acceptance of clothes and textiles from the distributor through the EDF operator and the sale to the buyer using the online checkout. Data on the disposal of each unit of goods from circulation is transferred to “Honest ZNAK”.

Retail employees are required to label garments themselves in special circumstances: the customer has returned the product, the code is damaged or lost.

The reason for this is that when a product is sold, its code is dropped from the Honest ZNAK database. Clothing returned by the customer cannot be sold again without a legal code.

In such cases, the retail store requests a new code from Honest ZNAK, prints it and applies it to the package / label. After which the goods are allowed to be sold again.

Thrift store – must label the new product himself. For example, a person brought new clothes that did not fit him, but without a code.Then the commission should ask for the code in “Honest Sign” and stick it on the packaging / label.

The agent does not put codes himself when he accepts new goods from legal entities and individual entrepreneurs. The goods must have already been marked by the previous owner-consignor, and the transaction is accompanied by a UPD with codes.

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